Pinkbike Product Picks

May 10, 2013
by Mike Kazimer  
TSG Staten Carbon helmet

Carbon fiber is permeating nearly every section of the bike market, and full face helmets are no exception. TSG's Staten Carbon full face helmet uses a carbon fiber outer shell attached to an EPS liner to keep the weight down, and features removable cheek pads that can easily be snapped out for washing and de-funkifying. Instead of the more common D-ring chin strap, TSG went with a plastic buckle, similar to what is found on an XC helmet. There are three points of attachment for the visor, which can be adjusted up or down by loosening the screw in the center and setting it to the desired position. In the ventilation department, the Staten has a total of 11 vents, (counting the three closely spaced ones in the mouth guard), with a wire mesh covering to keep errant bits of loam from finding their way into the interior of the helmet. CE EN 1078 Certified. Weigh: 980 grams (actual). Available in S, M, L, XL. MSRP: $249.99 USD. www.ridetsg.com

TSG's Staten Carbon helmet is one of the lighter full face helmets available, a potential selling point for enduro racers looking for a helmet that won't weigh them down.

Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesThe Staten Carbon's weight, or lack of it, is the helmet's most immediately apparent feature. Anyone who has ever spent time grinding up a logging road with a full face helmet strapped to their pack knows how heavy it can feel after after an hour or two of sustained climbing. Hauling less weight up the hill helps conserve energy for when it really matters - the descent. Given its light weight, we could see this helmet being popular with enduro racers at events that require full face helmets to be worn. When it was time to go down, the Staten felt balanced, with good peripheral vision and enough visor adjustment to get it out of the line of sight. We didn't spend any time testing the Staten with a neck brace on, but there was plenty of room between the back of the helmet and a fully loaded pack, even when looking straight up. The helmet's fit around the top and back of the head was snug and secure, but there was more room on each side of the jaw than we would have liked - the thickness of the cheek padding could stand to be increased. It would be best to try the helmet on before buying it, as some riders may find there to be too much room around the cheek area to achieve the proper fit.

As far as ventilation goes, the Staten has four vent holes at the top of the helmet, and four smaller vents towards the rear, but it lacks any vents directly above the brow, or any type of inner channeling to direct airflow to the rear of the helmet, features that are becoming the norm on high-end full face helmets. The majority of our rides with the Staten Carbon took place in relatively mild temperatures, so we weren't able to see how it handles a sweltering summer day, but the venting was adequate for the conditions it was tested in. It would have been nice to see a D-ring closure instead of a plastic buckle - it's a little easier to fine tune a chin strap's tightness with a D-ring, and they are much less prone to breakage. As far as pricing goes, the Staten falls into a sort of middle ground - it's nearly $100 more than many non-carbon shelled helmets, but at the same time is $200 less than the latest batch of more full-featured, high-end helmets. It may also be difficult for riders in North America to get their hands on TSG's Staten Carbon, as it has only been tested to the European EN 1078 standard, and is not currently ASTM or CPSC certified. - Mike Kazimer



Club Ride Go Long jersey

Based out of Sun Valley, Idaho, Club Ride has a full line of apparel with a different take on what cycling clothing should look like. The Go Long is styled after a cowboy shirt, with a collar, pearl snaps, and a swath of plaid fabric running over the shoulders. Despite its casual appearance, the jersey has plenty of subtle technical features. The shirt uses Club Ride's RideDryWear fabric, a lightweight, polyester/spandex blend designed to be moisture wicking and quick drying. Mesh venting runs the whole length of the underarm and side of the shirt, and a ¾ length zipper, part of what Club Ride calls their Air2Flow system, is hidden behind the snaps. There is a front pocket with a snap closure, and two separate zippered pockets are located on the back left and right sides of the shirt. Colors: Ale, Indigo, Raven. Sizes: S, M, L, XL. MSRP: $99.99 USD. www.clubrideapparel.com

Technical performance with a stylish look, the Go Long jersey has extensive venting as well as a hidden zipper behind the classy pearl snaps.

Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesCycling fashion is a funny thing. There aren't too many sports where there's such a wide take on what 'proper' riding attire is. Some riders forgo any type of technical apparel, going out for rides clad in cotton t-shirts and cut off jean shorts, while others have no trouble parading around dressed head to toe in shiny spandex. Luckily, there's a middle ground, which is where Club Ride comes in. Photos of the Go Long don't do it justice - the fabric is lighter than it looks, and we found the shirt to be very compressible, perfect for tossing it into a hydration pack as an extra layer. Even though it is a long sleeve shirt, the side panel venting helps prevent overheating, and makes the shirt usable in a wider range of temperatures. The fit was relaxed without being overly baggy, and there was enough room to layer underneath for cooler temperatures. The slight amount of stretch in the fabric meant that when we rolled up the sleeves they stayed put without digging into our arms. Club Ride's Air2Flow system, the zipper behind the snaps, is supposed to allow for more or less ventilation depending on if the zipper is used, but the difference in air flow was minimal. Granted, our rides all took place with a hydration pack on - the difference might have been more noticeable if there weren't sternum and waist straps blocking the front of the shirt. While the styling of the Go Long might not be for everyone, riders searching for a technical riding shirt that doesn't take itself too seriously are in luck. Plus, if a ride happens to end up close to a honky tonk bar, you'll be able to two-step right on in without getting odd looks from the patrons. - Mike Kazimer



iXS Dagger knee guard

The Dagger knee guard uses a hard plastic shell to protect the knees, and features an extension that covers the upper portion of the shin. Foam padding extends around the sides of the pads, and is also in place above the plastic knee cap, a design intended to protect as much of the knee as possible during a crash. A stretchy mesh backing works in conjunction with two hook-and-loop straps to secure the pads, and a silicone band at the top keeps them from slipping down. iXS uses AeroMesh, an anti-bacterial, moisture wicking fabric to keep the pads odor free. Sizes: S, M, L, XL. MSRP: $85.00 USD. www.ixs-sportsdivision.com

The Dagger knee guards extend part way down the shin, providing a little extra protection from pedal strikes.

Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesThe overall fit of the Dagger knee guards is excellent - there is a cutout inside for the top of the knee that helps lock the pads into place and prevents them from sliding around when pedaling (or crashing). We took a couple of spills while wearing the Dagger, and they stayed securely in place without sliding down at all, an important trait for any knee protection. There's nothing worse than having pads that only work for the first part of a crash before sliding down and revealing your skin to the sharp rocks and sticks that eagerly await. However, we did run into one issue - at the spot where the front padding is sewn to the back panel, located on the bottom portion of the pad on the outside of the leg, there is a thick seam. This seam wasn't initially noticeable, but on extended pedaling sections it soon made its presence known, digging in and chafing with each pedal stroke. If the seam was flatter, or perhaps sewn in a slightly different manner, it wouldn't be a problem at all. Of course, pad fit will vary depending on a rider's leg / calf shape, but we'd recommend trying on the Dagger knee guard and pedaling around if possible to determine whether the seam will be bothersome. - Mike Kazimer






62 Comments

  • + 84
 The Club Ride Go Long jersey is stylish...where ?
Inside ?
  • + 28
 I think it's cool. The upper part is a little weird though. I think it's more of a North American style than a European. I'm not particularly fond of Puma shoes I'll have you know.
  • + 11
 In the USSR.
  • + 70
 Brokeback Mountain
  • - 6
flag bj4x4 (May 10, 2013 at 2:46) (Below Threshold)
 put a bag over your head than it becomes stylish
  • - 10
flag cheeselord (May 10, 2013 at 2:50) (Below Threshold)
 bj4x4, that's funny because...? You can't see the guys face, or anyone else's. Also, I think you mean 'then' it becomes stylish.
  • + 12
 That plaid bit at the top is lopsided, obviously deliberately but makes it look like it's been badly made, when actually it hasn't.
  • + 15
 That is one ugly shirt. I recommend a mercy killing..
  • + 14
 I'm with redhook, that is horrible, is that some sort of new hipster meets "MTB" look. Looks like an 80 year old grandma with glaucoma had a hard time making an old shirt cool. Also one pocket does not help the look either. I will stick with my Flannel in the winter.
  • + 4
 Club Ride makes awesome short sleeve jerseys, and they look good. I rarely pull out my other jerseys, unless I need long sleeves. That said, I don't "get" the styling of the long sleeves. Where the short sleeves look like you are riding in a mechanic's shirt, the long sleeves look like Canadian dress shirts.
  • + 1
 Ian Massey is such a trend setter, we all know he inspired that shirt,
  • + 19
 I am ready for the flaming. But stylish comments from a German. Come on we pick out the German tourist here by the black socks and sandals on the bottom matched with the mullet hair cut on top
  • + 7
 ^spewed my coffee on my keyboard.
  • + 25
 Looks a helluva lot cooler than the unicorn-puke pajamas I see a lot of at the trailhead. I think the Club Ride stuff is dope, but I do live in the west - I feel perfectly comfortable picking up a can of Copenhagen and a six-pack of CL-smooth tallboys at the liquor store before the ride.
  • + 6
 Well put, Noah! Takes a little maturity to appreciate the look.
  • + 7
 Canadians need their long sleeve plaid shirts...unavoidable fact
  • - 1
 Guessing this jersey will be marked down quickly
  • + 7
 Noah, can we be friends?
  • + 4
 ^^ That's my line!

But seriously -- who doesn't love an adorably ugly plaid shirt or the character that can actually pull it off? Personally, I like my ugly plaid cut off and paired with lots of denim, an equally ugly moustache and some sort of cheap beer. Yum. Shit.... Double yum.
  • + 2
 Nothing ugly about plaid shirts! I wear them all the time! But this one only has a weird, lopsided patch of plaid at the top. It just looks weird, like it's made out of random bits of other shirts.
  • + 1
 @ mtb4matt: Not all of us are wearing white Tennis socks with sandals Wink
  • + 0
 Or has it......
  • + 0
 I thought it was the type of shirt that you went to church in and then riding in after church
  • + 4
 You would have a real hard time finding a shirt uglier than this one.
  • + 3
 the shirt re-minds me of the Texas version or star wars
  • - 9
flag llamaman110 (May 11, 2013 at 17:48) (Below Threshold)
 it is soooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo uuuuuuuuuuuuuggggggggggggglllllllllllllllllllllllllyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! worst product picks eeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeevvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvveeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeerrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 0
 That helmet is noob 101 and theres some knee guards to go withit, might block couple mosquitis with them. Put this whole outfit together and go crash off the side of any mountain lookig terrible doh doh doh doh doh!!!!!
  • + 19
 Brb, gonna pick a dress shirt, I mean jersey, from the closet and hit the trails
  • + 20
 dress shirt? you must be canadian
  • + 1
 ^^look at the icon
  • + 4
 Of all the funky, fresh, new & technical gear that must be available to Pinkbike we get a helmet (admittedly rather nice) a shirt and some knee pads. What next a chainstay protector?!
  • + 2
 How about a chainsaw protector?
  • + 5
 I appreciate the effort put into the writing on the TSG, but how in the hell can those paragraphs be so huge with out once mentioning the D2.
  • - 1
 because the article IS about the TSG? and besides that, the D2 is around 350g heavier for the same price. i would rather compare it to the sixsixone camber carbon: around the same prize, same features, same weight and more or less an equally "not too good looking" design...
  • + 7
 It would make sense to compare it to other market leaders in the same price range (i.e. the D2!). As for the "not too good looking" category, I'm afraid you've made that up. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and I'm sure there are people out there who would put the D2 under that heading.
  • + 2
 that helmet is too short
  • + 4
 That shirt looks like someone only had 20$ in his pocket and decided to pop some tags at the thrift store with Macklemore
  • + 1
 the fluffy coat is better. and it wasnt $100
  • + 3
 Thanks, I've been waiting to see a review of the IXS Dagger pads for a while now. Now if only I could find a store that stocks them.
  • + 4
 Keep on looking for a store that has them. They are a lot better than anything else i have been riding with. Had a couple of POC's which i didn't feel comfortable in, so on my latest trip to Winterberg i bought a set of IXS Daggers. I crashed once and my leg got caught between a couple of rocks and my flying bike, but the pads took the entire hit, and i was able to pick up my bike and ride down the track without feeling any pain from my knees. On top of that, i have not owned any pads as comfortable as the Daggers.
  • + 3
 Seams...take note of wetsuit manufacturing and tape those seams knee pad designers!
  • + 4
 100$ for a shirt!?where this world is going...
  • + 1
 No country for old men.
Maybe they add a bolo tie to each shirt?
  • + 4
 View of the helmet from the front would be nice!
  • - 1
 Never the less, it looks pretty darn nice!
  • + 2
 I guess, except the peak is too small, looks a bit like a kids helmet.
  • + 2
 got-to-go ride shirts... blahhh
  • + 1
 it is exactly the same design as the D2, even where the vents are at the back.......
  • + 1
 That TSG looks almost identical to a THE T2. But cheaper.
  • + 1
 That helmet is a D2 with a melted visor
  • + 2
 RAD shirt! WANT!!!
  • + 1
 mast for ride
  • - 1
 I noticed that the guy in the shirt pic is not showing his face....... I understand!
  • + 0
 look a D2
  • - 2
 Inn Zoviet Rusha vee all where shearts wiz bootons.
  • + 10
 Have you had a stroke?
  • + 1
 just recently- nothing serious tho!
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