Pinkbike Product Picks

Oct 7, 2011
by Mike Levy  
Bontrager Rhythm glove

Bontrager claims that their Rhythm glove offers "lightweight full coverage for cross country riders", but they fit the bill for anyone looking for a pair of gloves for riding in warm weather, or those who prefer a minimalist option. To that end they use a lycra mesh top to let the air pass through easily, along with a Clarino palm that forgoes any padding, but does make use of reinforced areas where you'd be likely to damage them in the event of a crash. Both braking fingers feature wraparound tips that should lessen the chance of blowing them out in the long run, often the death knell for many gloves, and they sport an interesting Kelvar crash pad at the base of the palm to prevent tearing when you do your best scorpion imitation into the rocks. Like most gloves, the Rhythm's also sport silicone on the finger tips to keep your digits on the brake levers while riding in the rain. They retail for $29.99 USD. www.bontrager.com


Product Picks
There isn't a lot to the Rhythm glove, but that's a good thing.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesBontrager may not be the first name that comes to mind when considering a new pair of gloves, but it should be judging by how much we've come to like the Rhythms. While not quite as minimal as some, the Rhythm is still very svelte when compared to most options, something that we really appreciated on warm days. Its lycra mesh is quite breathable, something that is apparent by simply blowing on the top of your hand - you can easily feel the air pass though - making them much more comfortable when the temps near triple digits. The Kevlar crash pad on the palm is a tough material that feels as if you might notice it when are gloves on, but it's invisible in use. The cuff is one place where many gloves fall short, often ripping from pulling them on or off, or just being plain uncomfortable, but the Rhythm's wide and stretchy cuff is soft to the touch and has stood up well. Fit, the most important factor, is also spot on for our hands, with the fingers being just the right length and no excess material found at the palm. The Rhythm glove is a winner in our books, and they'll likely be in yours as well if you're looking for a minimalist glove that doesn't make you feel like you're wearing oven mitts while riding. - Mike Levy



Schwalbe Airmax Pro pressure gauge

Schwalbe may be well known for their all encompassing tire lineup, but, quite fittingly, they also offer the Airmax Pro digital pressure gauge so that you can be sure that you have your tires set to the ideal pressure. The blue gauge is compatible with both presta and schrader valves, and measures tire pressure to within a tenth of a psi - more than accurate for even the biggest tech nerds out there. A single button turns the gauge on, as well as lets you scroll between psi, bar and kg/cm². The last reading is saved even when the Airmax Pro is turned off, making it easy to keep track of your last change, but holding the button down for two seconds resets it. It also makes use of an auto shutoff feature to extend battery life. The Airmax Pro gauge retails for $32.55 USD. www.schwalbetires.com


Product Picks
Don't think you'd benefit from a gauge? Think again, because it could be the most effective money that you've ever spent.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesIt doesn't take a rocket scientist to figure out how important tire pressure is to the performance of your bike. Too much or too little air will have your bike doing things that just aren't right, and we're talking as little as a few psi, so it makes sense to figure out what works best for your terrain and tire choice. Sure, most riders are happy to get by using the notoriously imprecise dial gauge on their floor pump, but that just seems silly when those same people are often riding bikes in excess of $3,000, shod with tires that likely go for over $60 each. And no, your ''calibrated thumb'' doesn't cut it. Schwalbe's Airmax Pro pressure gauge, on the other hand, certainly does. Press the button once to turn it on, then push it firmly down onto the valve for the blue digital gauge to quickly tell you your tire pressure, letting you know that it's read it with an audible beep, to within a tenth of a psi. Its auto shutoff feature keeps it from going through batteries quickly as well, with ours still on its first battery after a busy season of riding different test bikes. The Airmax Pro is a clever bit of kit that we always have stashed in our bag, but we do have a few gripes with it. First, we'd love to see an air bleed valve button (like those used on shock pumps) so that we're not forced to remove the gauge to let air out with our fingers and then recheck it. Secondly, while at about 70mm long it isn't huge, we're betting that more riders would use the Airmax Pro if it was even more compact and pocket worthy. A backlight screen would also make it easier to read in the bush. Despite those grumbles we still don't leave home without the Airmax Pro, often stopping mid ride to see if we can blame an "off day" on an over inflated tire. While a lot of riders will scoff at the $32.55 USD asking price, the Airmax Pro is a great tool if you are looking to get the most out of your rubber choice. - Mike Levy



Nokon shift housing

Nokon's cable housing consists of modular aluminum pieces that are fitted over a full length Teflon liner, completely sealing the system from the elements. Each aluminum section of the German made housing features a ball shape on one end and a socket on the opposite, allowing it to be routed around tight bends without the kinking that can occur with standard housing. Nokon housing is purchased in kits, either shift or brake, that come with enough pieces to allow you to run full length housing on most bikes. It can be had in silver or black for $104.99 USD, or white, blue, red, green and gold for $113.99. www.nokon.com


Product Picks
Nokon's housing uses aluminum pieces that fit into each other via a ball and socket design, allowing it to snake around tight bends easily. We're suggesting giving Nokon housing a pass, unless you have a bike with shifting issues caused by questionable routing.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesNokon housing is relatively expensive when compared to a standard setup, but it does offer some advantages beyond simply looking cool. Bikes that make use of questionable cable routing, especially tight bends or full suspension designs that bend and tug on shift lines, are ideal candidates to be updated with the trick aluminum housing. The ball and socket design of each section allows the housing to go around the tightest of bends without damaging the cable or the Teflon liner within, and the system is also claimed to be free of any compression, helping to make shifting more precise. Gram counters should also take note, Nokon housing is also about 30% lighter than a standard housing section of the same length. Unfortunately, the advantages don't outweigh the disadvantages of the design. While Nokon claims shifting benefits from the "compressionless" nature of the aluminum housing, we couldn't feel the difference, and this is after installing a number of Nokon systems on different bikes. And while they are right in saying that it won't rust, it does mar quite easily. But the final straw that made us actually remove it from our bikes was the noise and wear. It didn't take long for the ball and socket housing design to begin creaking loud enough when turning the handlebar that we had to remove it for our own sanity, but it also has a tendency to quickly wear a gouge where it rubs against the frame, necessitating a healthy application of 3M tape to prevent damage - not something that we want to deal with on an expensive aluminum or carbon frame. At $104.99 USD we don't recommend giving Nokon housing a try. - Mike Levy



Pro Atherton grips

Pro's Atherton grips have a thin 30mm profile that makes them ideal for riders who prefer thin grips, and the soft rubber compound is embossed with the Atherton logo to provide traction, but it's their clamping design that sets them apart from standard lock-on grips. How so? Their inboard external clamping collar works in tandem with an internal expanding wedge at the outer end, making them more forgiving on the outside edge of your palms during use. While they certainly aren't the first grips to use this system, it is executed cleanly. The Atherton grips measure out at 135mm and come in one color, the grey and red combo pictured below. They retail for $26.99 USD www.pro-bikegear.com


Product Picks
The Atherton grips are a thin option that will please those who tend to ride with their hands pushed out to the very end of their bar.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe Atherton grips take a bit more care to install due to the internal clamping wedge used at their outboard ends - the screws need to be neither too tight or too loose for the rubber plugs to grab ahold of the bar's inner wall to prevent them from spinning - but it shouldn't take more than one or two tries. We're big fans of thin grips here at Pinkbike and the Atherton's don't disappoint with their 30mm diameter and comfortable rubber compound. Their 135mm length makes them longer than some, although we can't say that we really noticed, but their lack of an outboard locking collar certainly made a difference. If you had asked us if standard lock-on grips, those that make use of both an inboard and outboard collar, caused any issues we would have said no. But we quickly found the Atherton grip's smooth collarless end much more comfortable after the first ride. The difference was night and day when riding a bike with regular lock-on grips back to back with one equipped with the Atherton grips, although it has been pointed out to us that we tend to ride with our hands at the very end of the handlebar, meaning that our palms are resting on the very end of the grip. Give the Atherton grips a try if that sounds like you as well. Complaints? It doesn't take long for the light grey rubber to turn brown... wouldn't it make more sense for them to be done in black? As with most thin grips, they show wear rather quickly. - Mike Levy



Have you used any of the products featured in Pinkbike's Picks? Share your impressions below.


95 Comments

  • + 60
 F**K! An entirely negative Pinkbike review! Granted, Nokon cables are biblically sh*t, but it's really refreshing to see PB slate a product on the front page.

Kudos to you, Mike.
  • + 23
 Yeah but this is finally what MTBers need, not some article thats bullshits because theyre being payed. Because thats pretty much all you find in mags now. Keep it up pinkbike
  • + 16
 agree with this. I can always respect someone who doesn't sit on the fence! many props to you, Mr. Levy!!
  • + 27
 "At $104.99 USD we don't recommend giving Nokon housing a try." - Mike Levy

Awesome...totally awesome. We need and deserve more of this.
  • + 5
 Definitely refreshing to find that someone gave those cables an honest, PUBLIC, negative review. I've experienced all the gripes he had with the Nokon cables.
  • + 1
 Well, you probably did not read the frist and the Schwalbe review properly, because the Schwalbe thingamajic receives also some positive props. Let me also add that I have been running Nokons for more than 5 years now and that I am mainly in line with Mike Levy's review, though there is an exception to the rule (as always): I use them solely for routing my Rohloff grip shifter cables, because I have quite the impossible angle there. They work perfectly in that situation and no other cable guide could achieve that. Still, wear and tear is ugly on them, but if you keep 'em oiled or siliconed than all is fine.
  • + 3
 great my cable is sealed..so now i have to oil & silicon my housing? the review just got more accurate and honest.
  • - 6
flag jbrckmn (Oct 7, 2011 at 12:15) (Below Threshold)
 Maybe nokon didn't pay PB enough for a review... Schwalbe clearly did.
  • + 1
 i've tried a similar product, alligator's i-link. sucks the same as nokon's.
  • + 1
 The nokon cables are really great on high end xc race bikes, and they do add a real bling factor when they get maintained, and it isn't like cleaning them takes any more times then doing your chain, and to be honest re-lubing is probably a good idea regardless of the system... it's just a really good idea if your system costs 100 times more then the regular one.
  • + 1
 Nokon cables are expensive but if you don't mind the sound they are very good. I like mine.
  • + 1
 nokon is screwed now though haha
  • + 7
 the atherton grips look pretty good
  • + 1
 I know, we have some sitting in the shop and i've always wondered how they go. But i'm keen to give them a try!
  • + 1
 for me best grips so far
  • + 5
 Yeah these are cool articles, love the vote thing
  • + 1
 I've got them on mine, really grippy in the dry but can get slippery in the wet especially without gloves. Also because they're thin they have hardly any bump absorption...
  • + 1
 Great grips - so nice not to have the outer collar digging into one's palm. Very grippy and last pretty well for their thinness. I got about 50 days (6-8 hours on the bike) out of my first set. Only complaint is that the internal wedge does not have enough room in it to use them on Easton Haven or Havoc carbon bars as the wall thickness of the bar is thicker than aluminium despite being a lighter bar overall.
  • + 3
 The grips are great for anyone who runs there hands on the edge of there bars, I found it so much nicer than having my hand sitting on a metal clamp. Cant recommend them enough if your like me and hold on at the edge, there cheap too.
  • + 3
 The grips are good for me as i ride on the end of my bars how ever it would be better if they had a bit of waffle design or something abit more prominent as they are not so good in the wet/mud
  • + 3
 I don't like this type of grip although i do hang my hands off the edge of the bars. The first time you stack it, the end of the grip rips up. I run mine with the metal ring on the outside.
  • + 2
 Same happened to mine not like they are cheap either
  • + 2
 I love these grips. One of the best sets Ive tried. Its really true that you don't have an issue with an outer lock-ring untill its gone....and its so nice. Do wish they came in black, with a black lock ring. Or maybe gold to match my Saint parts....hmmmm.
  • + 5
 P.S. Pinkbike, I love these product pick articles, keep them coming!!
  • + 2
 I'm using the Schwalbe Airmax Pro since one year and a bit. Simple, effective, tough. Great tool. It's astonishing how imprecise the gauges of most floor pumps are. Airmax solves that problem. So you're able to ride with the best tyre pressure every time. Highly recommended. I'm a bit suprised about the US-SRP. In Germany that tool costs 14,95 EUR SRP which would make around 20 USD.
  • + 2
 I've been running the Nokon housing for a few months and while yes they make some noise, the biggest benefit is that they are sealed! I race in ride in conditions that can vary from wet and mucky to dry and dusty, and after a 24 hour race this summer ended up having to replace my cables and housing because they got gummed up. I decided to give the Nokon housings a try and although the initial setup was a PITA, I am very happy with them. And as far as the rubbing goes, they came with clear plastick sleeves to put over the housing in rub areas or I actually had some cable housing guards that slip over the housings to protect the frame. Then again, my frame has a beautiful blue anodized finish so I wanted to be sure to protect it right off the bat. When any bike that you'd want to use such a product though you would probably want to take the effort to make sure that you're not going to mar the frame. That's my take on it anyhow.
  • + 1
 thats cool that you like them but i don't understand how they are more sealed than regular cables. i mean i understand that the inner lining is a solid tube that is sealed but that is also the case with regular cables and usually the part that is not sealed is the end, which i pressume would still be the problem with the nokon, right?
  • + 1
 On a lot of older frames there are interruptions in the cable routing. Most modern bikes are designed to run uninterrupted housing from the shifter to the derailleur, so the whole "sealed" thing doesn't matter. But for frames that have braze-on fittings with interruptions in the continuity of the housing (sections where only cable exists), then the Nokon lining surrounds the cable keeping it protected so that crap doesn't get in at the breakpoints in the housing. Yeah, for a lot of us the whole "sealed" thing doesn't matter. I have a Nokon setup... it's in a box somewhere....
  • + 2
 A very easy way to improve the noise from Nokon cables is to use a few drops of your favorite synthetic chain lube.... rub on cable, move cable around, and no more noise. I have had the best luck with ProGold lube for this. This solves the ONLY problem with Nokon cables. Also note they did not test the brake cable kit, only the shift cable kit. The brake cable makes much more noticeable difference and improvement on existing standard cables.
  • + 2
 @freeriderjazza - I actually did this very fix multiple times. I'd rather not have to lube the outside of my shift housing though...
  • + 1
 Use progold. Worked for me. They made noises last year before I used it but even after a super hot and dusty (my bike changed color to brown, you could not see the orginal paint in many places!!) summer in france I had no noise problems.


Not that I think 104$ for cable housing makes sense.
  • + 2
 really? 32USD for a pressure gage? ive seen some from michelin for cars, that are much much smaller and lighter than that. But my point isnt the size. Its the fact why?! you say foot pump isnt accurate, but can you really tell the difference in riding down to .1 of a PSI? waste of 32USD. Id rather run my tires a bit too low and destroy them as 32USD would cover a new set of Highrollers which will give more grip than a old set thats over accurately inflated.
  • + 30
 $32 for a new set of high rollers? where are u shopping?
  • + 28
 I like the new voting feature.
  • + 2
 32$ dollars... ur talking of paper roller... and car pressure gauges goes up to 40 psi wich is low for bikes when you are not always downhilling. its worth the 32$ in my opinion
  • + 4
 @josh you can get a set of highrollers for 30$ in poland if you know where to look Wink
  • + 2
 I've got this pressure gauge, great for nerds like me that really wanna get precise with their tyre set-up in different conditions. Plus I got mine for free! Also run the atherton grips shown here, awesome grips.
  • + 11
 32USD is £20.50, that would barely get you one High Roller, let alone a pair...
  • + 0
 Don't get sucked in to the idea of needing an "accurate" air pressure gauge. If you always use the same gauge, then you will know what pressure works for you according to that gauge. Yes, this gauge would be a waste of $32 dollars.
  • + 3
 Slime makes a electronic pressure gauge for 9USD that I have been using really accurate and cheap
  • + 0
 Oh no my tires .5 psi under inflated this ride is going to be terrible... Honestly,if your blaming your tire pressure for shitty riding just quit. Waste of money.
  • + 8
 @c-bernier - I guess you took that statement literally. But it isn't uncommon to feel a difference between just a few psi, especially in small volume tires or those that use thin sidewalls. You may not care/notice, but myself and others certainly do. I want my tires inflated to the pressure that will have them working at their best. There are less expensive gauges, but I like how the Airmax Pro functions, and at roughly the same price as a pair of grips it is money well spent in my books. There are a lot of things, both for mountain bikes and not, that cost $30 and make a lot less sense.
  • + 8
 why wouldn't one want their tires to perform at their very best? It makes no sense not to have a reliable and accurate pressure gauge. Especially when tires can reach $100 CDN , it only makes sense to get the most out of your tires and at the same time improve your experience on the bike, especially if you're running tubeless, single wall, or thin lightweight tubes.

I'm liking the poll at the end of the reviews! It's a great way for companies to get some instant feedback from the biggest and best MTB site in the World.
  • + 2
 yea that pressure gauge is terribly overpriced and pb didn't even mention it being highly priced in their comprehensive review which implies that they think 32 bucks for a pressure gauge is totally normal, weird
  • + 8
 I'm curious how some of you feel the need to complain about buying a tire gauge, but can't feel the difference between 1 or 2 psi on your tires? It's mind boggling. Yes, people can and do feel the difference of one or two PSI in a tire. Yes, one or two PSI can make a very big difference to the handling of your bike.

Also, another great use for this gauge is boxxer WC forks. World Cup mechanics who work on bikes with boxxers can be seen using this gauge all over the paddock area every morning. And yes, 1 PSI in a fork makes a huge difference when you need to know exactly what your fork is going to do on race day.
  • + 2
 $32 is not that much money. Especially for a pretty important tool that will hopefully last. You can spend close to $100 for a pair of tires, but complain when a pressure gauge is more than $10?
  • + 0
 32$ is a lot if you already have a shock pump (i always use my shock pump to check the pressure). also a presta adapter is less than 1$.
  • + 1
 Most shock pumps are wildly inaccurate, and all are analog.
  • + 1
 Shock pumps are made for very low volume, but high pressure, and tires are high volume and low pressure. Not ideal.
  • + 1
 @joshbb www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=5845 is around $32 amusingly enough.

hmm that or this £2 thing www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TIRE-TYRE-PRESSURE-GAUGE-DIGITAL-LCD-CAR-MOTORBIKE-NEW-/280749485898?pt=UK_Diagnostic_Tools_Equipment&hash=item415df92f4a#ht_2776wt_936 i think i may have saved you lot a lot of money. can i have a beer for my effort?
  • + 1
 Just fyi, most tire gauges are impossible to use with a presta adapter, or are wildly inaccurate with one.
  • + 1
 Is there no company out there that make a small or medium size tyre pump that has a pressure gauge? Like the shock pumps.
I've been looking for one, but not happening so far.

To all the manufacturers out there. I'd buy that sort of product tommorow if it were available.

I have a pressure gauge, but dont really want to check the pressure, find I need some, pump it up, recheck the pressure and so on. I need a pump with a gauge.

Anyone else fancy one of those? Can we vote, just to see? Green arrow up, Red arrow down. Someone might end up making one if they realised the interest. If there is any that is.
  • + 1
 Are you talking about a mini pump? If so, Bontrager makes one with a guage.
  • + 1
 Right. Good. I'll ave a look at those then. Thanks carpy!
  • + 1
 I run these grips and there the best grip I have tried. One thing is getting them off can be tricky if you loosen up the screw on the end to much it will come apart and it's a little tricky to get it all back together, but it's still a great set of grips. Black would be a great option as the gray gets dirty quick.
  • + 1
 Oil your Nokons and cover the squeaking spots in clear heat shrink tube. I use them on my road bike only though and I hated the noise too. Performance is top though.

The SKS Airchecker adds the missing features mentioned above. The question remains how calibrated are all these cheap toys?
  • + 1
 I had those grips. They are butt ugly once installed and the hardware is cheap. don't over tight them, you will strip the bolt. I switched for the black Shimano PRO grips. Same idea and design as the Atherton Grips, just better looking and better hardware. Love the Gauge
  • + 1
 Is there no company out there that make a small or medium size tyre pump that has a pressure gauge? Like the shock pumps.
I've been looking for one, but not happening so far.

To all the manufacturers out there. I'd buy that sort of product tommorow if it were available.

I have a pressure gauge, but dont really want to check the pressure, find I need some, pump it up, recheck the pressure and so on. I need a pump with a gauge.

Anyone else fancy one of those? Can we vote, just to see? Green arrow up, Red arrow down. Someone might end up making one if they realised the interest. If there is any that is. Big Grin
  • + 1
 Totally agree on the Nokon... nice but not a huge improvement and, for the price, you really can't suggest that anyone buy it. And I actually run it on 2 of my 3 bikes. If you wash your bikes often, you don't get the creaking in the links but even without that, the added wear on the frame of the alloy links and the cost just make it really unreasonable compared to competitors that perform as well for half the price.
  • + 1
 I have the pro atherton grips, and although I like the feel and grip etc, the ends are prone to crash damage.
After crashing (only a few times) my right grip is shredded at the end. I must always land on the right, but thats not the point, they could do with being a bit tougher.
  • + 1
 >I must always land on the right,
me too.. about 4 out of 5 times. Funny how that works out
  • + 1
 @Caliber38heavy - That's a very good point. They grip ends are certainly likely to get damaged when you lay it down.
  • + 1
 Nokon housing is crap!!!!!! it does not work nearly as good as standard good quality Shimano housing with sealed end caps and stainless steel cables. DON"T WASTE YOUR MONEY!!!!
  • + 1
 Schwalbe Airmax Pro pressure gauge = BBB pressure Gauge , basically IT IS the BBB gauge (identical) with a lighter blue color and the name schwalbe on it!

BBB is a German component and accesories brand...
  • + 2
 Pressure guages = waste of money. Grips look nice - first time in like 30 years pb have had mojority of their reviews negative in a single post
  • + 1
 $32.50 for the tire pressure gauge is a lot when a standard shraeder valve pressure gauge like is used with cars would work just fine, but I guess that's the point really, to go beyond things being "just fine".
  • + 4
 The sub-$10 Car pressure gauges are hit and miss when it comes to accuracy though. I've seen multiple gauges from the same manufacturer/model be off by 5psi. And many floor pump gauges are inaccurate as well. And while the psi to a tenth decimal reading is a little overkill, I do use my own digital gauge quite often to check my bike tire pressures. However the gauge I use (and sell) betters the schwalbe one in a few areas. For starters, the display has a backlight option for using it at night. Next up there's an external LED light so you can actually find your damn tire valve quickly in the dark. Third it costs less. Its made by Beto (who are one of the larger bike pump makers in the world, and do the production for a host of other brands - such as topeak) and the model with the twin-lock head is half this thing's retail price. The one with the single shraeder valve head which basically is identical in appearance to the schwalbe branded one, retails for $8.
  • + 1
 do they come in presta..?
  • + 1
 no, cause cars don't. but a presta to shraeder adapter is like $1.50
  • + 1
 My Beto gauge is my favorite tool. PricePoint sells them for $12. The only thing that makes the Schwalbe design better is that the head on the Beto is large: this is not a problem for bikes, but it is for car tires. The Beto has a backlight and a spotlight, it has a bleeder button, it has two different modes, and it gives readings in four different scales. My fingers probably can't discern a five psi difference, consistently, but with my Beto gauge, I've been able to accurately get and repeatedly set my pressures down to 23 and even 21 psi. You don't know how low you can actually go unless you have a digital gauge. Unfortunately, the Beto is not rebuildable, and the rubber seal in mine has ripped after 3 years of regular use. Time to buy a new one.
  • + 1
 ButtonPusher and swearmouth, the Beto gauge that PricePoint carries is double-headed with both a presta and a schrader side.
  • + 1
 I was referring to car pressure gauges, but thats good to know.
  • + 1
 as a rider who holds the dead end of the bars I tried the Atherton grips on my DH bike,. they are great. really comfortable and really sticky, however they do wear out quite quickly.
  • + 3
 i had no intention of giving the $105 shifter housing a try, and now i still don't.
  • + 2
 Ripoff of the Schwalbe gauge: www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=51403 It probably do the excactly same job, but much cheaper.
  • + 2
 Its not... the BBB branded one and the Schwalbe branded one of this model are both manufactured by Beto, who's own branded one retails for $8. A good number of things Schwalbe slaps their brand name onto are made by other manufacturers and marked up significantly. This doesn't make them better than sliced bread, no matter how much you tell yourself it does because of the price tag.
  • + 2
 Was that last sentence aimed at me? Razz I already bought the BBB one, I don't give a shit what brand it is. Pretty much all my tools are BBB and they have never failed me, works just as good as the Park Tools I used when I worked in a bikeshop.
  • + 1
 haha i don't think i would call it a rip off of the schwalbe, most likely there is some Chinese factory that makes the exact same tool with any logo on it the buyer wants
  • + 1
 renthal need to make there kevlar grip with the one lock system. there grips r amazing really thin last forever really comfy, but when u crash and dirt gets under the grip end the glue is useless.
  • + 2
 Spring 2012 by the looks of it Smile
  • + 1
 I'm gonna go ahead and say the Bontrager Rythm Gloves, simply because I've already tried the Atherton Pro grips (which are great btw) so I'll try something new Razz Look comfy too!
  • + 1
 You cant seriously try and tell me that i need that pressure gauge. I just change the PSI in my tires for the conditions. you're right though, its not rocket science.
  • + 1
 I still have a set of Nokon shift housing completely unused. Yeah, I'll sell it. Been sitting on it for years.
  • + 2
 FFFFUUUUU I hate it when customers bring in nokon housing to be installed
  • + 1
 Bontrager has had lock on grips with no clamp on the outside for years now.
  • + 1
 ODI's patent is twin external removable clamps with a center tube which supports the grip. The common way to not need to license the ODI patent is to do the clamping method differently. Single external clamp (as the Pro grips use) is common, as are ones employing non-removeable clamps, and ones with clamps with set screws which use a pinch plate against the bar.
  • + 1
 Ok. All I was saying is that the Pro Atherton grips aren't special because of their single clamp. The only thing that potentially sets them apart is their grip comfort level.
  • + 1
 Gee has huge calluses in his palms from the external clamps so......
  • + 1
 I always use atherton grips on all my bikes, great feel and no more stupid locks rubbing through your gloves
  • + 1
 I have the Pro Atherton grips on my xc bike and I love it! and them!
  • + 1
 I'll be having one of those pressure gauges!
  • + 1
 I'm now riding my 4th pait of the atherton grips, the best ones!
  • + 1
 Way to go Mike! It can't all possibly be good all the time. Well done
  • + 0
 The Atherton grip's look so nice! I want some Smile
  • + 1
 They say they're made from "soft" rubber, but I just can't agree... I wouldnt use those grips Because fo that, I find the rubber hard... But yeah, they're even thinner than Ruffians.

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