Pinkbike Product Picks

Jan 27, 2012
by Mike Levy  
Outward Hound Excursion dog pack

It's great to see a well trained trail dog running singletrack, but if you're going to bring your hound out you may as well get them to do some work. Outward Hound's Excursion bag is designed to carry a small amount of gear (it's not recommended to make your dog carry more than 10% of its body weight), with two large zippered pockets on each side and two smaller outer pockets. There is enough room to have your pooch carry a multi-tool, tubes, energy bars, and even a small pump or tightly rolled jacket. A small pocket on the side can be filled with poop pick-up bags that are dispensed through a rubber gasket on the side of the bag, and reflective highlights make the your dog easier to spot in the dark. Three padded straps are used to keep the Excursion in place, with two under the belly and one larger strap that wraps around the front of the dog. It is available in three different sizes that can be sized to fit dogs ranging from a 19" to 48" girth. The Excursion bag retails for $34.99 USD. www.myoutwardhound.com


Product Picks photos
Pinkbike's Sherpa wasn't a big fan of the Excursion - it rotated when she ran and the zipper quickly failed.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesIt goes without saying that care has to be taken when having your dog carry trail supplies for you, mainly being conscious of not overloading the pack (never exceed 10% of your dogs body weight), and it must be adjusted correctly. But a dog with a pack can be a very happy hound, not just because they are out on the trail, but because it can make them feel like they are doing a task. Be smart and aware, keeping your dog properly hydrated and not weighed down too much, and you should have no issues. Fitting the Excursion bag will vary from dog breed to dog breed, but it's worth the few minutes it takes to measure your dog to be sure that you get the best fit. All of the adjustable straps feature mesh padding to keep them from chafing, and the top section of fabric connecting the two sides is made from the same material. The small sized bag is large enough to fit multiple tubes, a folding tool, energy bar and gel, and even a small pump, but all of that put it far overweight for Sherpa's 23lb frame. I settled on just the bare minimum, leaving enough room and weight margin to even stuff in my folded up Dakine windbreaker. Unfortunately the bag doesn't function quite as well as I was hoping once I got her running on the trail. It constantly wanted to roll to one side after only a few minutes of use, even when both sides were as balanced as possible, likely making for a very uncomfortable train run for Sherpa. The belly straps continually came loose as well, not helping matters. In the end a zipper failure put the Excursion bag out of commission after less then twenty rides. While the idea is great, the Excursion bag doesn't cut it for use on my dog's back. - Mike Levy



Frame Defender protection

Frame Defender's stick-on pads have been designed to protect your bike frame from noise or damage caused by chain slap, cable rub, or anything else that foam padding could prevent. The nearly weightless foam material features a raised surface with reliefs that allow it to be wrapped around curved surfaces easier than if it was smooth, and a super sticky 3M adhesive backing is used to hold it in place. The Frame Defender kit includes seven differently shaped pieces: one large piece that can protect a downtube, two smaller segments that are likely enough for two different chainstays, and four smaller sections that are ideal for cable rub trouble spots. It can be had in either an all black or in a blue/white camo option. MSRP $19.95 USD. www.framedefender.com


Product Picks photos
While an old inner tube can do the same job, your bike deserves the lightweight and inexpensive Frame Defender padding instead.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe Frame Defender package comes with instructions that suggest to both clean the frame application surface with alcohol, and to use a heat gun (or your girlfriend's blowdryer) to warm the padding up before installation. We didn't think that most riders will take those steps, so we didn't either. Instead, we simply gave the frame a quick wipe with a clean rag, slapped down the Frame Defender padding and hoped for the best while expecting the worst. Much to our surprise, the padding has stayed put for months, with not even a single edge lifting up. And that includes countless inconsiderate jet washer cleanings - whatever sticky 3M concoction they have used to keep the padding in place is amazing stuff. We trimmed ours so that it fit nicely around the bike's chainstay mounted cable stops but the kit's six differently shaped pieces can be employed anywhere on the bike where some extra protection is needed, including one long segment that can cover most of the length of a downtube (although some might call that a fashion faux pas). The difference between a bare chainstay and one with a layer of Frame Defender applied is obviously night and day, but its foam construction also makes it much quieter than any inner tube wrap job could ever hope for. Longevity looks to be quite good as well, with very little wear showing after three months of use. Downsides? The foam padding is thick enough that it may get in the way of some chainstay routed shift cables or hinder tire clearance, but some careful trimming should take care of it. At just $19.95 USD the Frame Defender kit receives full marks from PB; it's light, relatively inexpensive and infinitely more pro looking than wrapping an old tube around your chainstay. - Mike Levy



Bontrager XR4 Team tire

Bontrager's past tire lineup never received much praise, but a renewed effort by the Trek house brand, including the hiring of renowned tire designer Frank Stacy, has resulted in a number of new offerings that show promise. Intended for aggressive trail/all-mountain riding, the 2.35'' XR4 tested here features an all around tread design that Bontrager claims will work well in both wet and dry conditions. Ramped center knobs should help to preserve rolling speed despite the aggressive lugs, and siping is used throughout to improve knob adhesion and create more biting edges. The prominent cornering lugs use a laterally cupped design for the same reason. Our 2.35" Team Issue version weighs in at 742 grams (730g claimed) and the calipers tell us that it is exactly bang on the advertised width when mounted to the Bontrager Rhythm rims. It is also available in a 2.2" wide model, with both widths also having a TLR tubeless ready casing option. The Team Issue XR4 retails for $64.99 USD. www.bontrager.com


Product Picks photos
Bonty's XR4 surprised us with a super consistent ride that is likely to change people's minds about their tire lineup.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWe rode the XR4 tires in everything from the driest of dry conditions to the wettest that South Western B.C. has to offer (that means that it was really, really muddy) and have come away from it all with a good understanding of how the XR4's behave. Consistent would be the key word, with them offering up a feeling that isn't likely to surprise you with a sudden falling away of traction. Their round profile surely plays a large role in this sensation, but the aggressive knobs also seem to simply work, regardless of what's under them. After a short get-to-know-you period we were quickly throwing them into corners with the confidence that we have in some of our other favorite tires. Braking traction is on par with other aggressive designs, no better and no worse, but they do seem to roll better than rubber of similar weight and intentions - the ramped crown lugs at work. With 28psi front and back we've had zero flats, punctures or otherwise, and the casing shows no signs of damage. The rubber compound feels harder to the touch than we had expected, especially given the tire's performance, so it also comes as no surprise that the wear rate looks to be quite good. While Bontrager hasn't been known for their tires in the past, the XR4 will likely change that. - Mike Levy







107 Comments

  • + 27
 id way rather the lizard skin velcro frame guard. i truly don't feel that some foam with stick adhesive merits $20 bucks...people are getting to lax with pricing, were in a recession and opposite to how it should be things are getting more expensive. $20 bucks = the new $fiver
  • + 3
 Mountain biking is inherently expensive. Almost all mainstream products can be mimic'd by a DIY. You pay for the convenience of having something prefabricated for you with a dependable brand name. C'est La Vie. I'd almost be more concerned about it collecting moss up here in the pacific northwest than anything else ha.
  • + 4
 I'll stick with the tubes. best thing I ever used for chain protection and it lasts for years if it's covered in duct tape(the black kind)!
  • + 1
 used a raceface one for 2 years, has held up well. and scott includes velcroguards on there bikes, just seems smart
  • + 1
 I just got what looks like black insulation tape wrapped around the chainstay of my scott, my mate with gambler got this also lol
  • + 1
 Yes, 3M carbon fiber decal is affordable and better.
  • + 3
 As PatMan69 said black insulation tape works amazingly well! Inner tube thats beyond repair? I don't see why you should go buy a frame protector when you can make recycle something for free!!
  • + 0
 My method of choice for frame protection and many other thicngs is the thick number plate background covers for dirt bikes. $20 gets you three large sheets in a variety of colors, even faux carbon fiber if you choose it. THe foam doesn't look as good, but will probably dampen the noise alot.
  • + 7
 Innertube is ghetto and I love it!
  • + 1
 Ty-wraps cable ties Wink Light, cheap and durable.
  • + 2
 i use handle bar tapes for road bikes as chain stay protectors. cheap and light (1 set can do 4 bikes), does the job.
  • + 2
 Keep in mind that the Frame Defender kit comes with a lot more items than the Lizards Skins products do. Take a look at whats included. This is just the black kit, but you get the idea.
shop.framedefender.com/Frame-Defender-Kit-Black-0001.htm
  • + 1
 I ordered one, being as I'm about to receive a brand new Ragley Troof here in the US of A, and I'm trying some new ideas with this build I haven't before... I usually use UGlu Cloth Tape on my chainstay area, as well as fork stanchions for protection, but this is a new, innovative product, and I am gonna field test it!
  • + 1
 I use a construction/builders flashing tape as frame protection, its weatherproof and can be cut to fit any frame and is cheap for a few meters of the stuff, its saved my tin session many times.
  • + 3
 they come in rasta colors
  • + 1
 Electrical tape, anyone?
  • + 1
 I don't use elec-tape because it's so gummy... Cloth tape, both white (baseball grip dape, basically) and Uglu's stuff, a cement based tape, tend to remove less stickily.
Just depends on the person I guess!
  • - 2
 You are all a bunch of tech sissies. I use nothing. Steel on Aluminum makes a good sound IMHO. When I get a new bike, first thing I do is peel or take off the chainstay protector, even before I take off the warning stickers. Never had any problems cause of it, and people can hear me coming. I would have had a collision with a horse one time in a blind corner without this safety feature, word.
  • + 9
 Meanwhile, in Sanityville, people like to not grind away at their chainstays.
  • + 0
 $20 dollar for that is massively overpriced imo! If it were $10 I think they'd sell 100x more of these and you'd see them everywhere.
How do you ever get the stickystuff off tho..
Oh and I can imagine you can get the same stuff (maybe without the relief) way cheaper from them in the form of some other application.
  • + 1
 PLUS THE 23 BUX DELIVERY CHARGE ON LINE
  • + 1
 Really... my shipping was just $5 and change...
Still, I'll post up when I've used it for a while.
  • + 1
 shipping to Toronto is 3 bux more than the rasta stick ons
  • + 18
 Need recommendation on fast and heavy dog.
  • + 1
 german shepperd!
  • + 12
 if you are serious, look for a dog that has good stamina and can run for a long time. like a border collie
  • + 3
 Hushy's are more than happy to run all day and pull a sled so that seems like a sensible choice, I read on article once where a Husky was recommended as a trail dog.
  • + 6
 Laugh as you may but I have yet to see a better trail dog then my Labradoodle.. She is fast enough to do faster DH rides, agile enough for Freeride stuff and has done 20+ mile XC rides with me. Plus she is Hypoallergenic so I dont have dog hair everywhere like I did from my Golden.. Not that the shedding is a big deal when she is always muddy from rides/runs, lastly she keeps my feet damn warm at night.. But I'll throw up a vid for you to see how rad she is.
My labradoodle being Kick ass..

Edit: Yeah! I remember my HTML skills and embedded the link correctly..
  • + 10
 sick!! i have a chocolate lab that is fast enough and has the stamina but he is too dumb to ride with. One time i was out riding with him and he cut the trail off in a set of switchbacks and got ahead of me, then all of a sudden i hit a jump with a blind landing and he's on the backside of the landing laying down... I nearly landed on him. I still love him though.
  • + 4
 I would not reccomened a German shepard if you are gonna run it hard all day long , they have extreme problems with arthritis in later life and this will bring it on sooner.
  • + 0
 German Shepherd - not shepperd or shepard :oD
  • + 3
 @Swan3609 There is a marshmallow chasing you down the trail!
  • + 1
 Akita Inu
  • + 3
 are you looking for a dog just so you can get the dog pack Razz
  • + 3
 AFAIK, Husky might a potential mistake. Once they're running off the leash, they are incredibly difficult to stop. Say a deer, squirrel, fox or whatever crossed your path whilst riding, your husky will bolt and run FOREVER, far faster than you could hope to catch it.

Surely a boarder collie is the obvious choice?
  • + 2
 My kelpie is more than happy to follow along. He comes along on moto rides so mtb is a piece of cake for him. Border collies can get fat though but that might be another reason to ride
  • + 1
 Pretty much. A border collie is the ultimate prefect trail dog. They will run all day and it pleases them to obey commands.
  • + 2
 I had an Australian shepard that would stay right on my back tire all day if I could ride that long. She had amazing stamina. Energy forever. Super smart and I swear she understood English. Also super loyal. Any sheep herding breed would be my choice.
  • + 2
 I have an Australian Shepherd/Husky/German Shepherd cross. She is now 14 years old and can still do a 2-3k run with the bikes. when she was 2 years old, she would do 30 mile runs when we were motorcycling in the mountains. Be careful as these are working dogs, have extremely high energy, and are high strung. They get bored very easily and develop behaviour problems easily. If you can't exercise them at least 2h per day, don't get one. Having owned a few working dogs, and now Great Danes (the perfect pet dog in my opinion), do not rely on traditional obedience training. they need firm leadership as described by Cesar Millan, the dog whisperer. I have tried both methods and for working dogs and large breeds, the pack leader model is vastly superior.
  • + 3
 A rescued dog would be best.
  • + 4
 Australian Cattle Dogs are thes best (aka Blue Heelers)
  • + 1
 I wish my dog would take trail rides with me, but honestley, he is too dumb to. Cant even let him out the front door without a leash. He just runs away for a few hours. Considering that, a trails probably not the best idea. Hes a German Shepherd/Husky/Norwegian Elkhound cross, which means, extremely high energy

@phobospwns- My neighbours have one of those dogs, best behaved dog Ive seen
  • + 12
 Get like, 5 Pugs and tape them together.
  • + 1
 I would not recommend a herding dog just for biking, a lot of other dogs will happily join you for biking, but BC, Aussies, German Shepherds etc need to work with other stuff like herding, obedience and agility. Otherwise you will have a frustrated dog with to much energy, a couple of sit, stay, roll over and a few Ks on the trail doesn't cut it. Wooff Wooff Woooooff, If you going to load up the dogs packback, atleast let be the dogs stuff in it. Like leash, dog shoes, water, treats, bandage or whatever your dog may need.
  • + 2
 German shepards usually blow out their hips as if it were a Sram X7 derailleur, but a Husky can easily carry 15% of it's weight on it's back, keep up with you, and love every bit of it!
  • + 1
 Aren't labradors very prone to hip dysplasia?
  • + 1
 Rhodesian Ridgebacks are said to be able to keep with a galloping horse for 30 like miles. And theyre bred to hunt lions. I think ya got a winner. That being said, my german shepherd/blue heeler mix keeps up with me on 10-15 mile rides pretty routinely. Whatever the case, make sure you ease them into it or youre gonna have a lot of health issues, and a joint supplement probably wouldnt hurt either.
  • + 2
 Yesterday I bought my dog: www.pinkbike.com/photo/7652880
  • + 1
 I second the cattle dog vote! I steal my housemates red heelers for trail rides and these dogs SHRED. They rail berms, send jumps, are super fast, and can happily run for miles. They're quick enough you can send them out front every once in a while and enjoy the show. Sickest trail dogs I've ever seen, and really smart.
  • + 1
 My friend has a collie/black lab mix that we have been riding with. I have to say, it has been really impressive. Usually does 2 lengths for every one of ours just because it is off running in the woods at full steam doing its thing. Has to be the collie in it...
  • + 3
 I've used bontrager tyres before and have to say they are some of my favourite tyres ever, they last forever and grip amazingly. i now only run the g1 dirt jump tyres but I've had them longer then any other tyre and used them on everything, granted they look slick but they grip like nothing else taking into consideration the low profile design. prefere them to any maxxis option, and maybe even more then schwalbe's
  • - 1
 Bontrager anything sucks, including Keith himself. Ultimate sellout!
  • + 1
 well that's your opinion im just stating the fact that they are some of the best tyres i have used, and i will keep on using them. wouldn't use any other of their components but the tyres are good.
  • + 2
 That dog pack look good but could offer more protection from cold temps. Plus you really need some bright orange or yellow so these trigger happy fools dont mistake your dog for game. Frame padding always good, less zip ties the better. The bont team can sit on those tires and rotate but nobody going to run them.
  • + 2
 The Hungarian Vizsla is THE best trail hound IMO. I have never owned one but have a friend who does and we have been on some epic rides with Boris. He is usually right by your side all the way down the gnarliest descents, never, well almost never getting in your way. Super hound that can run and run but is tough enough to take the odd cased jump!!
  • + 2
 I have one of those Outward Hound packs for my dog, Kira, a Pit/Beagle mix. She is 35lbs and carries 10 beers no problems. I got her the pack to slow her down when building. She is super fit and high energy from chasing DH bikes all the time, so when you are hiking and digging, she is just going bonkers. When cutting an a super steep trail that I had had to hike up a long ways to get to work, I got the brilliant idea to get the beer weight off my back, and onto hers. Mellows her out a bit, and makes it so she doesn't piss off other people digging. No more "dammit dog, get that stick out of my hole", instead "Hey ya Doggie, yeah I could go for a cold one, come here."
DOG PARTY!
  • + 2
 I had this pack for our Dog a while back, and it really is not a very high quality item. We found another one shortly after me moved to Victoria (at Capital Iron), that is amazing compared to the one reviewed. The pack fits much better than this one, and is a much higher quality material, far more durable. I can't remember the brand name right now, but will post it once I get home and see it. If you have the right pack, it works amazing, and I certainly know my dog absolutely loves it.
  • + 1
 Would love to hear what kind of pack it is. The model tested didn't fare well..
  • + 1
 I totally forgot when I got home from work, I will get this to you tonight when I get home Smile
  • + 2
 www.granitegearstore.com/Alpha-Dog-Pack-P220C4.aspx
We got the green one (because you know, colour makes a difference Wink

We use this pack every day with our dog, if it's a walk around the neighborhood, or a hike in the bushes. Even after daily use, this pack is in the same shape we got it from the store (even the zippers work as well as day 1). It was $60 at Capital Iron, and easily worth every penny. Hopefully you can give it a go Mike, and I hope it works out as well for you as it has for us!
  • + 2
 If you haven't ridden the tires don't knock em. I've put the XR4s through all kinds of conditions in Colorado and even used them for some downhill at Sol Vista and Winter Park. They're a great high volume tire with loads of grip. They hold up well in the rockiest of trails and they don't wear fast at all. If you know the Front Range, you know we have trails that can absolutely destroy tires (lots of jagged rocks). I have to say I'm a fan. They're perfect for hard pack and lose over hard pack. In these conditions they grip like mad. They do alright in the mud/wet, but we don't have a lot of that here. I have them setup tubeless and with a few changes of sealant now and again they have given me no issues. They're easy to get on a rim yet seal up tubeless so easy. Never had to use more than a floor pump. They also are incredibly predictable at any lean angle, just like the review said. They have no weird dead zone like Maxxis tires where you feel you're about to wash out completely before the side knobs bite. Great tire. Hopefully if none of the brand whores buy them because they're Bontrager I can get a bunch heavily discounted. Smile
  • + 3
 Hensley and Buzz are the trail dogs and challenge any mutt out there. Hensley likes the dirt jumps as well, even jump the first four down the main line at Helesowen right behind me!
  • + 2
 I'm all for trail dogs, but please make sure your dog is well mannered, trained, and obedient. I can't tell you how many off-leash dogs I've been chased and nearly bitten by while on a ride. It is a privilege, not a right, to let your dog run off leash in the woods.
  • + 5
 DO I GET THE DOG?
PLEASE PINKBIKE?
CAN I KEEP IT , CAN I , CAN I??
  • + 1
 I like Bontrager for steping into "environmentaly friendly" tyres. I hope they made more of these. This tyre looks more or less like Rocket Ron, they had some minion looking like something as well. WHy not make "eco" versions of most popular tyres, since they nearly "copy" all of them?
  • + 2
 "Green" is a myth. It is a political thing that is printed in people's minds to make them think they save the planet by buying "eco" products. If "green" was really the way to go, only green products would be found. Also, often, "green" costs more energy, more material and more people to produce, so it is worse to earth than traditional products.
  • + 1
 Well it depends how "green"? Organic food is "greener" and more effective than industrial. Eating good food is more efficient economicaly than eating sht, because of health costs.

Mountain biking is not green at all in current form so it is hipocrysy to talk about it at all here. On the contrary actually. It would be "green" only if mountain bikers created local communities that would contribute to protection of nature by fighting for its rights. However at the moment it is hard enough to get people to work to maintain the trails so they give back what they took. In general "energy" is not the only thing. Global Warming is a fact, however even if we raise the temperature faster than nature can, temperature alone wouldn't probably hurt life on earth that much, as volcanoes and metheors have been doing it more violently in the past. What we are pioneers at is that we put toxins into environment at scale that even a super volcano can't. So it dos make a difference HOW you manufacture stuff. The biggest part of the story is probably WHERE. That is because in western countries it is much harder to put aside externalities like waste handling. If you empty a tank of chemicals into someones backyard in China, there will be calmer reaction than in Belgium or Sweden isn't it? It's all about handling externalities: who takes their consequences and when. We all do, question is when - when you see egzem on your grand child? or when your children loose fertility due to exposure to toxins that floated in in air and water from Asia? So you won't get grand children at all.

So you can always make something "greener", when I athink about it it should be "a bit less filthy" rather than "green" Smile
  • + 1
 how on earth can you argue than mountain biking is not green? I appreciate that making and transporting the bikes probably isn't particularly environmentally friendly but after that it's fantastic. encourages people not to use cars, keep people fitter, uses land for trails that might otherwise be used for something else that could be polluting... etc... so many other things have the exact same problems that you mentioned, such as being made in china (so they have to be transported, exactly the same as bikes) and then also contribute negatively to the environment, for example with toys having loads of plastic packaging, things being made with a poor quality so they don't last and have to be thrown away etc. Bikes are always reused and sold on.

i'm all for being environmentally friendly, but if you want to go green i really don't see any point at all in tackling the mountain biking industry, try something which will actually make a big difference. such as encouraging people to ride bikes rather than drive.
  • + 3
 I want everything to be a little more environmentally friendly aswell, but it isn't possible. It costs companies way too much to make things "greener" (new machines, new products, research, etc...). Money is evil.

Cycling is a very good thing for nature. But cutting trees, building trails, digging soils open, using super tacky tyres and riding a trail are not really eco friendly. I do not compare trailbuilding and riding with driving a car, because if you do so, it will seem eco friendly. A bicycle instead of a car or the bus is eco friendly. Trailbuilding and riding a trail with no purpose other than pleasure and fitness is not eco friendly. Especially not if you have a carbon frame.

I won't go into detail. Let's just keep in mind that cycling is better for everyone. It won't save planet Earth though.
  • + 1
 who cares about being green? why dont we all ride the bus if we want to be green? but I dont care enough to ride buses so I won't complain and feel guilty everytime I grab a tear-off
  • + 3
 Relax a bit guys, there are other things that make mountain biking "green" besides the direct impact of manufacturing.

Getting people off their arses, outside in the woods/hills/canyons, and connecting those places to positive experiences IS environmentally friendly. We've got a whole generation of kids who are largely unfamiliar with nature, and when they get to voting age, do you think environmental protection will be high on their agenda?

Whatever small impact there is from trail building (arguable if this is even an negative impact, if done correctly) or parts manufacturing, this is far outweighed by having one kid show his 10 friends how awesome wilderness is.
  • + 2
 Wilderness is awesome, but try to find natural trails that nobody rides. Bring 10 friends there and it's not even wilderness anymore. A path, a trail, that has been built to attract people will attract tourists and that involves cars, planes, littering etc..

And while we ride our bikes, we might not pollute directly, but it costs more food, clothing (needing 11000 liters of water for just 1KG of cotton, and when you rip your shirt and shorts it goes in the bin), rubber for the tyres, oil etc. just to ride. So even if your 10 friends would ride bikes, it's still not green for nature. A good walk on the other hand is green.

Perhaps I'm wrong, I don't know. I don't live in Canada. Everywhere I turn here in Belgium it's pure urban life. Rural people are considered being marginal. It sucks, I need to get out of here.
  • + 2
 All with you Robby. I'm really not waiting for the kind of rider that rides because he wants to be green.
  • + 1
 My plummer terrier is fast agile with good stamina, shame she loves to bite tires while theyre rotating!!! Lol ud b after a working dog in the uk to be able to cope. And in pets at home (uk pet store) they have much better fitting better looking. Cheaper and durable versions theyve bin selling for yonks!!
  • + 5
 Yes.... 'Girlfriends' hairdryer....
  • + 1
 LISTEN UP ! 3M makes an Electricians water proof rubbery tape that comes in two workable widths and it is super light but thick and durable, stretches and molds to any curve perfectly AND unlike Hockey Tape or Velcro comes off without lifting your bikes finish and NO residue to clean...
  • + 1
 Yep. This is the stuff to use. Cheap ($4 a roll), effective, and durable.
  • + 1
 I loved my XR4 tires until I had one tear its sidewall fibers. Ballooned up on one side and wouldn't roll without hitting the chain/seatstay. Other than that I really liked the tread pattern
  • + 1
 lil off topic but a FYI.... i try to stay with maxxis tires and they are coming out with a new CAR tire.....its a race tire for track/ autocross its really cool and i like to see any good company progress
  • + 2
 Would this fit something like a san bernard dog? This way i can also utilise him as a uplift service on trails to?
  • + 1
 i have the g4 on my rhythm elites and at just under 30 psi they work SOOOOOO good
  • + 2
 what kind of dog is that?
  • + 3
 I think it's a Shiba Inu. Could be wrong though.
  • + 2
 Yup, she is a Shiba.
  • + 0
 Why is it other manufacturers can produce kevlar-foldable bead 29 x 2.35 tires for 750g but Bontrager can barely manage to keep a 26" tire in that range ?
  • + 2
 Is it just me, or does pinkbike seem to be advertising dogs this week?
  • + 1
 Dog packs became famous after "Lilly shreds Trailside video" where she wears a ruffwear pack..
JRT all the way.. Smile
  • + 1
 they all look good but i think my dog will like the dog pack
  • + 1
 I wish there was an option to 'try' riding with a trail dog Wink
  • + 1
 Oh, Ok, i don't have a dog, so actully, i can't say anything about itSmile
  • + 1
 Doggy camelback for keeping him/her hydrated would be a cool idea
  • + 1
 just get a pack and put a water bottle in it! Smile Can't imagine how much a "doggy pack bladder" would go for haha.
  • + 1
 mike, please do a review on catcus repellant/ointment
  • + 1
 That frame defender looks the same as traction pads for surfing
  • + 1
 It probably IS... cut an existing product into smaller portions, market it to another industry and raise the price tag. Phil's tenacious oil is winter grade chainsaw bar oil. The difference is the little green/white bottle of Phil's costs 10 times what the generic chainsaw oil does. But it comes in a cute little bottle so the masses snatch it up. I got suckered into two bottles of phil's before I learned what it really was. Now I just mix my own oil blends and refill my old Phil's bottles.
  • + 1
 anyone try hockey tape!!! it works and removes good too.
  • + 1
 Y is pinkbike recommending a product they didn't care for?
  • + 1
 These are items that we have/are riding currently and we are offering our take on them.
  • + 0
 Who needs something like that for the dog?
  • + 1
 I don't "need" it, but it's a neat thing to have. As mentioned, dogs like to feel like they have a job to do. And it is certainly nice to have them carry a few essentials for those shorter rides when you don't feel like wearing a pack.
  • + 1
 BonTRAGER!
  • - 1
 this tire can blow me...
  • + 2
 Have you tried the model tested, or just making random negative comments? If you've tried them why can they "blow" you?
  • + 1
 because the only other rider i know that speaks highly of them is a whack job...and a gun fanatic...
  • + 1
 So two people recommend them and therefore they're bad?! I was dubious too, but gave 'em a go as got another good review in Dirt magazine in the UK, and pretty impressed. Plus they're cheap in my local bike shop!

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