Pinkbike Product Picks

Jun 15, 2012
by Brad Walton  
Easton Havoc UST 150 wheelset

Easton's Havoc UST 150 wheelset consists of the already existing Havoc UST front wheel teamed up with their recently developed Havoc UST 150 rear. The new rear wheel features dedicated 150/157mm spacing (it's convertible by changing the endcaps), along with 28 spokes instead of the older model's 24. Total weight for the pair is 1870 grams, making them one of the lightest off the shelf downhill wheelsets on the market. Despite that relative light weight, Easton is confident enough in the their strength that they have been named as the official wheel of Whistler Bike Park, a destination full of rim eating holes and fast, rough terrain. The Havoc UST 150mm employs a UST tubeless certified rim (23mm inner width, 28mm outer) that denotes its special bead hook shape designed to hold tubeless tires on securely when used with low pressures, as well as a sealed inner rim wall that makes for painless tubeless conversions. The front rim is laced up with 24 straight pull spokes, while the rear uses 28, with the nipples featuring external threading that sees them thread directly into the rim. The large diameter hubs are home to sealed bearings, with the front employing an adjustable bearing preload system (the rear hub uses a different, non-adjustable layout). The Havocs are available with either bold orange anodized hubs and matching water-transfer graphics, or a stealthy gray version that won't attract as much attention. A complete Havoc UST 150 wheelset (12x150mm rear, 20mm front) carries an MSRP of $1000 USD, or the new rear wheel can be bought for $555 USD on its own. www.eastoncycling.com


Easton Havoc UST 150 Wheelset
The Havoc's look great, but what's under the hood? A 28mm outer rim width with a deep 'V' profile for strength, as well as a sealed inner rim wall that doesn't require a rim strip. Proprietary alloy nipples screw into the rim, and 28 straight-pull spokes can be found front and rear. The wheel's hub bearing tension can be adjusted via spanner.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThere proved to be a lot to like about the Easton Havoc UST 150 wheelset. Stiff, light, relatively affordable, and they look great on the bike as well. Add in their tubeless-friendly UST compatibility that won't leave you worrying about pulling a tire off mid-run and you have a winner of a wheelset for the competitive DH racer. In fact, we handed them over to an elite lever downhiller who took two wins with the Havocs under him, all while attesting to the wheelset's stiffness and extra traction provided by the low tire pressures that a standard tubed setup can only dream of. Unfortunately, we experienced repeated loosening of the front hub bearings during our time with them. We wouldn't consider them to be ''trailside adjustable'' either, given that the job requires a spanner tool. This means that we had to ride out with loose hubs, likely causing the expedited bearing wear that we encountered. We also managed to break a spoke directly at the threads where it turns into the nipple, highlighting the fact that the nipples themselves are proprietary items that have to be sourced from Easton or a local shop. We should mention, though, that the offending wheel managed to hold completely true, sans one spoke, until another broke at the threads once again. Yes, we should have stopped riding the wheels after the first broken spoke, but with Easton recommending that users return the damaged wheels to their repair depot (even for a broken spoke), we can see riders continuing to put time on them before boxing them up. Easton does step up in a big way if repairs are needed, though, with them often rebuilding the entire wheel with new spokes even if you've only broken one, and reactivating the warranty from that point on as well. We have to dock the Havoc UST 150 wheelset points for a lack of reliability and convenience when considering overall use, but competitive downhillers who want an extremely stiff wheel that is also relatively light may be able to look past this.
- Brad Walton



RaceFace Atlas FR handlebar

Rising from the freeride dead comes a new take on an old school favorite - the 1 1/4'' rise Atlas FR riser handlebar. Manufactured from cold drawn, seamless Air Alloy material with an internal taper to keep material where it is needed the most, the Atlas FR measures in at a full 785mm/31'' wide. As their name suggests, this bar is intended for heavy use and therefore it isn't exactly light at 340 grams. But then again, your handlebar is the last thing that you want to be thinking about before sending it off something large. Proven angles are used, with an 8° rearward sweep and 4° upward sweep combination, and the bar can be had in black, red, blue, stealth, orange, and gold. MSRP $89 USD. www.raceface.com

RaceFace Atlas FR Riser Handlebar
For slow techgnar riding and control on the steepest of steeps, a riser bar is the hot setup. The Atlas FR riser has all the right sweep with a boost in vert. High is the new low, didn't you know?

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesLow bars for fast corners, high bars for technical terrain. That's the simple way of looking at it anyways. The 1 1/4" rise Atlas FR bar is a compromise between old school tall bars for slow shore skinnies, and the limbo flat bars trended at the racers out there. They could also benefit those with a short fork steer tube who want to get a little more upright postion. Whatever the case, aside from the added rise the Atlas FRs have all of the same dimensions as the regular Atlas bar, including the 31" width that can be trimmed down if one desired. The bar is one of the stiffest that we've ever used, and it also shrugged off a massive amount of abuse in the shape of some huge airs gone awry, as well as inspiring confidence in the steepest of downhill terrain thanks to its extra height that moves weight bias towards the rear of the bike. Not the lightest out there, but certainly a good option if weight isn't high on your priority list.
- Brad Walton



Deity Decoy 2.5 pedals

Deity's Decoy pedal offers a minimalistic, lightweight design with thin 17mm profile and concave shape. The extruded and CNC machined 6061 T6 aluminum pedal body rides on a stepped, black polished Cr-Mo axle, with DU bushing and Double Micro Sealed Bearing system. Eight allen pins per side provide traction, and the pedals are fully serviceable without requiring removal from the bike. Rebuild kits available. Uses an 8mm allen for installation. Available in bead blast black, red, green, purple anodized with laser logos, and in white powdercoat. Weight: 425 grams (pair). MSRP: $85 USD. www.deitycomponents.com
Deity Decoy 2.5 Pedal
The Decoy pedal offers a slim profile and bomber construction with a well-sealed bearing/bushing system.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesEvery now and then we have to mention a trusty standby. If we had a nickel for every pedal pin lost to the trails over the years, well, we'd have significanly more than five dollars. Which is only one of the reasons why we love the Deity Decoy pedal. Despite rock crunching and log grinding, we have yet to lose a pin on multiple sets of these pedals. But the main reason we love the Decoys is they are tough and reliable. The double micro sealed bearing system works, which strangely ins't the case on some other pedals out there. Our Decoys spin as freely as the day they were new, even after complete duluges such as the super soaker the trails experienced this past winter. They aren't the largest platform in the world, but they are sufficiently comfortable for size 13's. The only beef we have is the use of a 8mm hex for installation. Wrench flats would offer greater leverage to keep these really tight. Over time we notice a faint click in our drivetrain that eventually is pinpointed to the pedals loosening up on the cranks. A dab of grease and snugging them up again and we're back in business. For product longevity, we slap the Decoys a high five.
- Brad Walton






155 Comments

  • + 47
 Dear Pinkbike can you please do a Product Pick that your average biker can afford not $1000 for a wheels set i mean you can buy a full bike for that!
  • + 22
 if it's not in your budget, wait until the next product pick. everybody's budget is different. generally lower to mid-level components don't do anything that is worth mentioning or writing a review about,
  • + 15
 I'd bet there are many more riders with a low budget than high. I understand, the product pick has to promote the cool stuff, and it gives people stuff to drool for, but really - an "average biker" Product Pick should could be a regular feature - or at least they could do on out of three Product Picks geared towards lower budget builds...
  • + 16
 They test what manufacturers send them to test.... don't blame PB (or any other magazine) for testing expensive stuff when manufacturers fail to send them anything cheap to test. As to buying a full bike for $1000, sure you can... but would you ride DH on it ?
  • + 16
 A used Kona Stinky.... $1000. Easily DH-able
  • + 7
 i paid under 1000 for my flatline :p (yes the full bike only used twice) i got insane lucky tho
  • + 6
 At the lower price points products can be excellent value or utter rubbish. Yeah they might not do anything worth mentioning but if they're junk then I'd rather read about it than waste my own money finding out.
  • + 14
 If your budget is $1000 and you can find a bike you're happy with, that's great. It means you're riding on OEM wheels, and you don't have any money left to upgrade your wheels. That's fine too. But if you're looking to UPGRADE your wheels, then $1000 is not a ridiculous price for a top-of-the-line wheelset. If you're looking for $300 wheels, those are called replacements - don't expect them to be anything fancy. There are plenty of cheap wheelsets out there. I, for one, am not interested in reading about them.
  • + 1
 Whistler bike park was selling park Kona stinky's with these Easton havoc wheels all for $800.
  • + 5
 Are you sure they weren't the old Havocs?
  • + 1
 No its not that i dont have the money its just i would like to see products that look nice and are cheep to replace if they are damaged because im allways going there parts on my bike.
  • + 8
 Welcome to mountain biking. its not cheap. if you want cheep, go play soccer.
  • + 6
 we are talking about a sport where the entry level bike is $3,000 brand new. $1,000 for a wheel set (one of the more important parts of a bike) seems pretty reasonable. are we going to bitch when PB reviews a DH fork? "$1500 for a fork?! i can get a whole bike for $1000 DERP!" do you want them to bolt up a Rock Shox TORA to a V10? F@cking lame
  • + 2
 While your point is valid, and $1000 for wheels may be reasonable to some.... I think that there is some demand for reviews of mid to low priced products. The original post is valid too. In all honesty - and Im not shy about spending money on my bike, $1000 is high end. I would not be opposed to reviews of wheelsets in the $500-$750 range. I have about $550 into the wheels currently residing on my DH rig. Because they get trashed, and I don't have a wheel sponsor throwing hoops at me.
  • + 4
 @Deeeight , i baught a kona stab for £500 when i first got into dh.. looking back on it it rode well and served its purpose
  • + 3
 What i trying too say is your avarage biker doesnt have £645 to spend on a new wheels set round £300 for a good one seems better.
  • + 0
 the other 2 products this week were under $100. I'm not a $1000 wheel set guy here either, but... would you want to see the Rock Shox Domain triple review? or how 'bout the Fox Van RC review? I'm not trying to be an elitist, but the comment that started this thread is asinine.

I dont want to read the PB product review with the line up of: Fox Van R. Shimano M530 pedals, and the Sram X5 derailure/shifter combo.
  • + 3
 I know what you mean man but if they could find somthing that looks nice but doesnt blow a budget.
  • + 13
 do you want to see Adele in playboy?
  • + 0
 $1000 is alot for wheels.
  • + 4
 No way haha its just i would like to see somthing cool and be able to go and buy if with out breaking the bank.
  • + 0
 thats what they did. they put one ultra sex appeal item. and 2 cool parts that you can bolt up for under $100. sure a $1000 wheel set isn't for everyone, but everyone will look. If you lead off the product picks with a nice part that doesn't have the sex appeal, you won't get nearly the number of readers. it would be like putting a chubby girl on the cover of Playboy. sure she may be a really nice girl, who would be really really fun to hang out with and may even have a cute face and be great in bed. no one is lining up to buy that mag no matter how awesome she is.
  • + 2
 I understand about puting a big fancy product as the main product to pull people in but smaller things like the bars and pedals in bigger quantitys would be nicer aswell as the more expensive thing.
  • + 2
 There are plenty of people who can afford $1000 wheels. The pics people post of their bikes on this site confirms that. No not everyone, but enough that would be interested in such a review. Put up a pair of ENVE rims on Kings and you exclude a whole lot more people. PB puts up enough budget items to make everyone happy, I think. Remember, you're on a FREE website. I'm sure there's plenty of other sites on our massive interweb that has info on cheap wheels. Azonic Outlaws. Mavic DeeTrax. Sun-Ringle ADD Expert. Sun-Ringle Equalizer. Fulcrum Red Heat. There's a few to start off with... take a look.
  • + 3
 I don't think that he was accusing PB of being elitist. And the site does review mid range products aplenty. This review is useful to me and any avid mountain biker on this site whether or not they can afford them. I think he was just pointing out that maybe these are not the "affordable" wheelset that they are refered to as in the review. I would have to agree.
  • + 2
 Thank you ^^^^^^^^
  • + 3
 If your in the UK and want decent budget wheels have a look at Superstar
  • + 2
 Yeah they look nice they are cheep and they are strong
  • + 3
 I have a lot of bikes, they all have handbuilt wheels... right now I'm replacing the Easton XC One 29er wheelset on my girlfriend's Air9 with a handbuilt set. Aftermarket wheelsets might be ok for some folks, but for me, I can do two better wheelsets for the price that easton wants for just this one set.
  • + 1
 I'll save PBike the time...get Azonic Outlaws if you can't afford much. I run em and they are GOOD ENOUGH. HOWEVER if you are looking to upgrade it wouldn't be worth changing your setup unless you did step into something $750+ if you are going to spend more you might as well get more VALUE. Or if you hate spending unnecessary money stay on cheap, that way when stuff breaks your bank account doesn't. Wait...that was all common sense I think.
  • + 1
 i dunno in england you could get hope pro2s built to nice mavic rims for like £350-400 pounds a set? they would easily cope with intermediate downhill and are easy to service.
  • + 2
 even though there is no way I could currently spend 1000 dollars on a wheelset, nor do I have a dh bike to put them on, yet I still enjoy reading about them. What I love are the captions after the product "Pinkbikes Take" because it is a reliable source for a review since we know these guys really beat on their stuff and they know what is crap and whats good. The day I buy my 1000$ wheelset though, I'd really like to have read this article to know that I would not be buying these.
  • + 1
 The pinkbike take for the havocs say they're relatively affordable. I wish $1000 was relatively affordable Frown
  • + 2
 These are relatively affordable compared to the $3,000 Enve/King wheels of the same high-end DH genre that we are currently testing. Big money doesn't guarantee the best of everything, only the best of one or two characteristics. Generally speaking, if it's durability you're after, go with the heaviest wheels you can find. They'll also be the cheapest. Smile
  • + 1
 not a fan of pedals that have allen key pins that thread in from the top
  • + 1
 How much are carbon wheels? I'm sure "affordable" is all relative!!
  • + 3
 if your spending $3000 on an entry level bike you've got issues.
  • + 1
 how do you figure? A brand new entry level dh bike isn't going to be much less than that.
  • + 1
 Even after i upgraded from my kona my scott was £2400, i have spent around £300 buying top spec parts to put on it
  • + 1
 I think his comment more had to do with most don't consider $3000 as entry level, as you can buy good used cars or motorcycles for that much. That DH bikes start around there really doesn't count to what $3000 buys because DH bikes represent such a ridiculously tiny percentage of bicycle sales (we're talking, worldwide maybe 20,000 bikes a year...which is chump change out of the millions of other bikes sold).
  • + 0
 thats in GBP, not canadian dollars. huge difference
  • + 3
 but we are talking about a downhill part. i realize that few if any riders wake up and say "i want to try this DH thing, let me go drop $3,000 on a bike". but if you are going to spend that money, and all the other costs that DH racing comes with. odds are you can probably buy a nice wheel set if you feel you need to.
  • - 1
 @C4films there were two items on there that cost less than $100, sooo get over it?
  • + 2
 I would like to see product reviews with side by side tests. i like all the technical info pinkbike already provides but it would b nice to have something to compare against. i.e a few bars thrashed and rated out of 10.
  • + 1
 i think their tubeless design rim could be better than mavics looks lighter
  • + 0
 well, after last friday all i can say is "point made". a whole X5 review... what a great read *rolls eyes*
  • + 1
 looking back, this is the best product pick to date. everything on here is stuff the average free rider is likely to buy.
  • + 35
 Sadly mirrors my experience of the Havocs.

I had a set of them on my AM bike, due to the relative light weight, and supposed durability.

To cut a long story short over a 6 month period, I had 2 wheelsets both of which fell apart, some serious build quality issues & over half that time fighting with the distributor/Easton with no wheels for my bike. I experienced a level of service and quality of product I would expect from the budget end of the market, if at all.

I struggle to see the benefit of any proprietory wheelset with unique components, especially considering the nature of the wheelsets use, broken spokes at some point are almost a given, to have to send a wheel back for that? Seriously? You should be able to shoot to you local shop, buy a couple of spokes off the shelf and chuck them in.

Resounding fail from me.
  • + 11
 Yeah should be better in a year or two, Personally I'm more of a RIDE AND FORGET especially at that price
  • + 5
 I bought a set of easton flatboy pedals from new. Fantastic pedals but they developed play quickly and became unusable. No reply from easton to my multiple emails, I'll avoid them in the future
  • + 0
 Yeah, proprietory spokes suck. If they are selling a DH wheelset with only 28 spokes for $1000, why not provide a few extra spokes and allow customers to work on them without voiding the warranty.

The other picks seem solid, though I haven't always had the best luck with DU bushings in pedals.
  • + 1
 I own a set of Haven carbon wheels. They hold up pretty fine for the abuse they take from time to time. I've had busted rear bearings, but they sent me a new axle kit and bearings when I contacted them. all for free of course.

Was I lucky to be helped that fast? I dunno Smile

Didn't have any negative experience so far aside the bearing thing. New axle kit seems to hold.
  • - 1
 Or just buy industry nine wheels. they will last forever and are easily worth the price.
  • + 4
 @Hobnob

this has also been my experience of numerous proprietary wheel systems from Mavic, Easton, etc.

all very nice and fancy until a problem occurs, and sourcing replacement parts and tooling to rebuild the hubs or respoke the wheel is problematic



often very overpriced, and not actually any lighter or more functional than quality hand-built wheels from your local wheel builder

personally? I will always prefer regular ("J Bend") DT Swiss or Sapim double-butted spokes and brass nipples combined with quality, fully-supported and rebuildable hubs from Hope, and quality rims from Stan's, Mavic, Sun

have runs Stan's tubeless conversion systems on all of the mentioned rims for many years, with Specialized Control and Maxxis tires, without any issues
  • + 1
 I've ridden other Easton products in the past without issue but wheels...that's another story. I had a similar bearing problem with my old Havoc DH wheels. The freehub kept coming loose as well as the rear hub bearing. The rubber dust seal between the freehub and the axle nut was soo tight that I think that was the cause of the problem. I removed the seal and the problem went away...one week later the bearing was shot from not having a dust seal. The rims held up extremely well and I never had any problems with broken spokes but the hubs...worst ever IMO. I guess in the end I got 1.5 race seasons out of them so I shouldn't be too upset but for the new set close to a grand I would expect more. I could have bought 2.5 sets of the old ones for the cost of the new ones.
  • + 1
 Currently have the Havocs on my Nomad and I've had the same result with the spokes. One broke about 2-3 inches below the nipple, while the other broke right in the nipple. Both times under hard cornering. Thankfully I had spares. I will be trying out their 150s though.
  • + 0
 i wish they made 24" wheels as sexy as that.
  • + 1
 Ive had good experiences with replacement for my hubs which are WTB and the rims which are Mavic so im gonna stick to them and they are as strong as can be but not light, which i dont care about weight on my dh. Easton isnt the most trusted company for me.
  • + 1
 after reading all this I cannot understand why anyone would buy these. On my AM bike ive run alienation blacksheeps (45$) with dmr hubs (70$) laced with some straight 14 gauge spokes (20$) that I handbuilt over a year ago, and after constant beating they are still true for a grand total of 270$ and peace of mind
  • + 0
 tlong... it takes time for problems to see daylight. even when people have problems, they dont always share them. when people don't know, they buy Smile
  • + 1
 i bet those alienation/dmr wheels are a good 2lbs heavier. this is consistent with price and durability. for those who don't want a 3-4lb wheelset, $1000 is reasonable.
  • + 1
 @saturnnine

good point raised.

however, the very popular Stans ZTR Flow / Hope Pro II hub combo on d/b spokes and brass nipples is very competitive in terms of weight, and typically 1/3rd-1/4 the price of the proprietary wheelsets

as issue I have seem time and time again with a number of proprietary wheelsets is specific durability issues with hub internals(I am thinking Mavic and Easton), where the manufacturer has had to revise their hubs for the following seasons

the reason a lot of people like Hope is you can pull them apart by hand, get all spares easily from Hope dealers or on-line and Hope are based in Yorkshire here in the UK where riding in muddy, cold weather all year round is the normal scenario (I've been riding today mid June and its cold, wet and muddy!), and their products are designed for that environment
  • + 23
 I would hardly say $1000/ £645 is reasonably affordable! I think if I were spending that it would be Dee Max's
  • + 2
 For a pro-level DH wheelset it is appropriately priced. Similar offerings from DT, Fulcrum, and Mavic have similar price tags.
  • + 15
 interesting that you can take a wheel like this with proprietary parts, strict repair constraints, thats pushing the limits of weight and lasting strength and has somewhat known product gremlins (bearings) but whack on a hefty price tag and call it ‘pro-level’ and that makes it alright
  • + 4
 and this is where the old DH kit used to kick ass compared to todays kit. in the old days you just went and bought something like a DHR, it weighed a fair old amount but you could abuse the crap out of it and repair it a piece of cake. Todays weight weeny DH is getting rather boring. I hate to hear my self say this as its one of my biggest gripes about F1 at times but how about some restrictions on the number of rims etc a team can use in WC racing and see how long some of these products last compared to the older gear?
  • + 2
 well the point of downhill racing is to get down the hil as fast as you can lighter components help this and the teams have the budgets to use more friagile wheels. you can still buy/ build a set of bombproof wheels for far less than that. a set of mavic ex729s on superstar hubs with double butted spoke will cost you 230 odd quid and last forever or you could get the hope hoops wheel set which are only a bit more and last even longer. also dh racing these days is fa mre intersting to watch than watching people manhandle 50+ pound bikes down fairly tame tracks like it used to be.
  • + 1
 I would be inclined to agree if it weren't for the fact that in professional racing a rim only has to last a single run. Potentially which kinda doesn't really prove its strength and in the normal persons dh world I'm still riding the same tracks with the same kit doing the same speed and so are the people who had demo 9s years ago nd they're no faster now on their super light weight lapierres or v10s or whatever only they seem to need to change components more often :s
  • + 12
 It sounds as though you had a quite a few reliability issues with the eastons, for $1000 the aforementioned kinks shouldn't exist.
  • + 8
 and props to PB and Brad Walton for calling out the reliability issues as opposed to treating them as a sidebar
  • + 9
 For the price tag of the Havoc's a wheelbuilder can build you a set with Chris King Hubs and serviceable peripherals including tubeless options.
  • + 9
 shame about the havocs. i was considering getting some but reliability issues are no good for me. i'll stick to hope pro 2s i think
  • + 14
 Hope hubs, DT spokes and Mavic rims will always be my reference frame...for this kind of cash I'd go Deemax...
  • + 6
 Same here mate. I settled for Hope hubs with ZTR Flow rims instead. No problems finding spares
  • + 5
 great choice...Hope hubs matched to ZTR Flow rims are actually lighter than this Easton wheelset and after seeing some pics of Flows being used at Fort William, I'm all sold on them...
  • + 6
 Hope pro 2 Evo, DT Swiss Competition spokes & Mavic EX721 for me. You can actually service a pro 2 evo hub rather than stand there scratching your head when a bearing goes... 5 stainless cartridge bearings in the rear as standard too
  • - 1
 Deemax for me..if you gonna pay 1000$ for a wheel-set just make sure you buy something good Smile
  • + 3
 I run Hope pro 2 Evo, DT Comp black & Syncros DS28. About 80 grams heavier for the set and half the price. I have about 70 rides on them and had to touch them up once, no broken spokes. Sold on Hope hubs 100%.
  • + 2
 Hope Pro 2 Evos on something rims and something spokes... really the hub quality matters the most in expensive wheels...and Hope's sound nice, work nice, and are convertible for different dropouts. My first 650B wheelset was built around Pro2s specifically because of the ease at which you can change them to a different dropout configuration.
  • + 2
 @FastDHR - The Flows are a pretty disposable DH rim. 1 Week in Whistler is all my rear flow lasted, my front Flow held up fine, however. But hey, at least you can get this rim in stock ready to buy in most bike shops, unlike proprietary Easton garbage.
  • + 3
 Yeah im on pro 2's on my Dh bike as well, pro 2s on spank spike rims and dt spokes Smile and the sound of a pro 2 when your going fast sound like a machine gun Big Grin
  • + 5
 hello PB, thanks for including the Havoc USTs here. We're sorry about the issues, but we want to know more: Did anything cause the first spoke to break (i.e. a rock/tree branch/crash)? How long was that front wheel used with a spoke missing? Did your tester finish out the run, ride the rest of the day or spend a couple weeks without that spoke?

We just want to emphasize that these wheels use standard, straight-pull spokes (that are the same length for drive/non-drive) and standard sized bearings. They can be trued with a standard spoke wrench. The only small parts that are proprietary here are the spoke nipples. Without these spoke nipples, we couldn't make a UST wheel. Any competent mechanic can service these wheels (and replace spokes) and working on these yourself will NOT void the warranty. However we encourage users to send them back to Easton for service because we will re-activate the warranty and you'll get a wheel back that's good as new.
  • + 2
 A great COMMON SENSE answer from Easton. I'm running this wheelset right now and loving them - smooth, quiet, feels really strong and deflects well. So good to have a reliable UST product that works with Maxxis UST tires (no hassle). Fingers crossed that they hold up to ogre-testing. Almost as light as the ENVE DH wheelset - so we'll see if they can take a thrashing over the long term.
  • + 1
 My son has run these wheels for two months, and while that is only a short while, he has certainly put them through some abuse. As we were driving home from yesterday's training (Neuchatel - ahhh, found the "secret" DH trail), I mentioned to him how well I thought the Havocs were built and how durable they seemed for the light weight.

To add to this: I build all of my own wheels. I have done this for twenty years, and was trained by a top wheel builder. This is the first set of prebuilt wheels I have ever purchased. This is, by far, the best tensioned and built set of wheels I have seen. We will have to see how the hubs hold up, but In any case, this is a very good wheel set which I sense will be with us a long time.
  • + 2
 @ Easton - surely something caused the spoke to break, but as far as we can tell it happened while just riding along. Without easy access to proprietary nipples, we were forced to continue to race on the spokeless wheel.
  • + 1
 Nice one Easton ! You can have any combination of rim / spoke / hub and someone, somewhere is going to have a bad experience with it and whinge about it. You can have the most bullet proof wheels on the planet, someone will wreck them after one ride
  • + 0
 Well, shortly after I wrote this post my son's rear Havoc fell apart. It got a hit to the rear wheel, but the rim cracked and cratered to the point of being unrideable. He is only 100 lbs, and the rear tire did not pinch flat at all, so it seems the wheel was over tensioned. I am not sure how this will all pan out. Lets see how Easton handles this.
  • + 4
 With you guys, I really rate some Easton parts - But that price range is Dee Max territory! The Decoys seems great but doubt I'd ever buy another set of pedals after getting Mag V12's wi Ti axles.. and they wiegh less... personal preference I guess!
  • + 2
 The Mag V12s are also 3 times the price - hardly a fair comparison.
  • + 1
 Chain Rection cycles have the Mags for £53.00 now - fair point they dont come with Ti axles though.
  • + 2
 theyre also about three inches thick, cant ride on old dmr pedals, the paltforms tiny and makes my feet hurt, whever they're actually on the pedals that is.
  • + 4
 So high bars are the new low bars. Didnt low bars replace high ones? Not wanting to sound cynical, but the bar manufacturers must be running out of ways to make us buy new bars, when most are light enough and strong enough already Smile
  • + 4
 Ahh wheels they look nice but as the comments before , why spend loads on wheels that your local wheel builder or yourself rebuild if needed . Hope pro II 's and rim of choice pretty much all you need
  • + 2
 yeah, throw some 521's on a Hope hub and yer good.
  • + 1
 There exactly the rims I have too
  • + 2
 Spending 1000$ on a set of wheels with proprietary spokes and underengineered weight to strenght ratio. Not clever. Strong stuff is usually on the heavier side. 3rd or 4th generation products tend to last better.
It takes years to get the bugs out of designs.
  • + 1
 I see this all the time "appropriately priced", and "Mountain biking isn't a cheap sport". That in itself is ridiculous. So someone who can't afford a decent DH bike can't go riding. That's what's wrong with this industry, people accept that as the "way it is". It's screwing people who may not have the funds, but have the desire to ride.
  • + 1
 Something I recently noticed while working at Dick's Sporting Goods was how expensive the sport of baseball is, and how many kids play it. The bats they use now have as much materials engineering as our bikes and are like 400 dollars, then a glove for another 100, and then team fees and clothing for maybe another 100. So saying mountain biking isn't a cheap sport is entirely asinine to me. Its only because you look at the big initial purchase. For 600-800$ you can get a pretty nice bike new and even a better one used, and sure it may not be Whistler BP quality, but its gotten me up and down fun hills.
  • + 1
 When I first started riding I had to buy all my own stuff. I was a kid with very little money, a product pic of some middle grade stuff would be great for the groms or regular budget people. $1000 for a wheel set is steep and I was considering it untill I read pinkbikes take. A similar review of something a kid can afford would be great. I'm old now and spend way too much on bikes.
  • + 2
 Pedals should not be wrenched super tight into the cracks...just over finger tight will do the trick...with the added bonus of not stripping your cranks. I don't remember the last time my cranks came loose.
  • + 1
 Err...pedals...I meant pedals...lol.
  • + 1
 from the photo on the home page i was like YES FINALY they are reviewing saint brakes (even tho we all know they are dope) but the atlas bars were good too. and im glad they put out those pedals to, they look great, they are durable and they wont force you to mortgage your house either! very good choice this week PB Smile
  • + 1
 Currently running a set of Havoc 150 with no issues yet. I had a previous Havoc set snap spokes. When I talked with them they did mention there was a small issue with a bad batch of spokes. But I had a few sent to me and I was good.
  • + 1
 How are these Easton Havoc wheels different from Mavic Crossmax? Same width, same general spoke nipple design, and same profile. Regarding the profile, Stan's products have shown that tubeless works better with a shallow rim rather a deep rim profile because there is less air in the rim and more in the tire. You could fill the space with foam I guess (much like the rim strips do).
  • + 2
 yes to the RaceFace, been running the first gen atlas fr and still love em. But i prefer Mavics on my bikes, never had a problem and the build quality is amazing, plus the crome deemax just look so good
  • + 2
 Atlas for the pimp win
  • + 1
 Why do these kids worry so much about the price of parts? They just get their mommy and dadddy to buy them anyways... Anyone else see that a lot these days? Kids that are no more than 16 years old walking around with 2012 V10 Carbons and M9s done up to the nuts. Sorry someone had to say it! Smile
  • + 1
 For the guys who work at shops this is an awesome product review. All of those would make for a sick bike. They were probably all tested on the same bike lol. I have a friend who has those same wheels, and he says they are freakin' awesome. I have had the Mag version of the Deity pedals and they kicked ass. I bet those bars are epic as well.
  • + 1
 I've been running Deity Decoys for over a year now, and I think they're brilliant. No reliability issues, especially since I'm running them on a low bike (Lapierre DH-720) - they get a fair bit of smashing. And at about £55 they are well cheaper than most pedals around at the moment; but they still seem a bit of rarity, at least over here in Blighty.
  • + 1
 They look a lot like the Superstar nano jobbies
  • + 1
 man id like to see PB'S take on our (billygoatbikes.com) teams sponsor gear...i love the stuff but im always looking for a review/test from PB...loaded components, POC, ZERODE etc.
  • + 3
 Perfect timing on the pedal review. After reading this article I've placed an order for the Deity Decoy 2.5 pedals.
  • + 2
 Screw $1000 wheelsets that fall apart, Hope pro 2 and Mavic ex721 for life.
  • + 1
 what is the frame of the bike that those raceface bars are on? thanks! also if you know also what are the lock on grips and bar ends? thanks heaps!
  • + 2
 Cove STD. ODI Ruffians with ODI clamps.
  • + 1
 oh awesome, thanks heaps brad! Smile
  • + 1
 I'm loving those eastons! I've always wanted to see a light weight ust wheel with a wide rim. Finaly a product pick that I liked.
  • + 1
 Price aside...what about Chris King hubs, Mavic 721 and dt Swiss for a wheel set ? Or are you guys feeling Hope hubs, ZTRs and DT Swiss ?
  • + 1
 $1000 dollar wheels with water transfer decals....really, you can't throw on some lasered logos? or would that make them cost-prohibitive hahahah
  • + 1
 i have mavic wheels on all of my bikes only company that has done me right great strength ya you spend a bit more but there reliable as for pedals spank spikes all the way
  • + 2
 Decoy Pedals are where it's at. Best pedal out there IMO. Seriously consider these. I have them on all my bikes.
  • + 4
 i second that, and i like that you can tighten them with and Allen wrench and not a pedal wrench, who keeps a pedal wrench in their hydration pack? I dont know anyone that does, but everyone i ride with has allens in their pack everytime.
  • + 3
 I agree, I have the decoy lt pedals and I will never buy any other, they are deff the best pedal on the market!
  • + 3
 Also my pedals have never once come loose on me so idk how theirs did, iv had 2 pairs too..
  • + 3
 also love mine. tried a pair of spank spikes and loved the size and profile but developed creaking in less than 10hrs of use and continued to be noisy after 2 rebuilds and a new axle. Deitys have had zero problems in 2yrs of use.
  • + 3
 Deity release an amazing new pedal about a year ago. The Compounds. Plastic composite material, super light (in the weight territory of pedals that cost 4x more), very damn thin, replaceable everything, and best of all, only $50. I've bashed the hell out of mine with weeks of park days (they slide off rocks unlike any other pedal I've felt) and they've held up amazingly, I bent the spindle on one of em, and replaced the spindle for $8. I'm very sold on these pedals and do all I can to rep em because not a lot of people know about em lol
  • + 2
 I've been on the Deity Decoys since the originals hit the market. It's gotta be going on 3 years now with no mechanical issues. Sure you may lose pins but outside of that they have been bombproof.
  • + 1
 joebmx88 50$ you have to pay for Deity Compounds sounds like a lot! All Deity pedals are made by HT ( www.hti-pedals.com ) and Deity Compound = HT P12A, which you can buy for around 30$... Well, without fancy "Deity" logo of course Wink
  • + 1
 @miki-ck heh, well, today I learned, but, on the HT website, it says MSRP on the Nylon pedals is $50 USD, so same price as the Deitys and it seems like the compounds are a little easier to get here in the states Wink
  • + 2
 Oh, they are much cheaper in Poland...
But anyway, you can often buy exactly the same components under many brands and sometimes the difference in prices are surprisingly big Smile
  • + 2
 Deity Compounds use a different nylon composite than the HT P12A, so they are stronger. I have both the Compound and the Nukeproof Electrons, which is also made by HTI pedals, and the Deitys are way stronger.
  • + 1
 again..........................duh...................i will stickto my x-mass sx's thanx
  • + 1
 got the atlas fr low rise bars in stealth and i love them Would love to get a set of those easton wheels...
  • + 1
 not to stoked with all the rise on the atlas bars! ill keeep my nice flat ones thank you
  • + 1
 They have different rises - these were just the ones that were old-school high
  • + 2
 Where is the all of the above button?
  • + 2
 riser bars are coming back!
  • + 1
 flat bars are dead and were a trend. cracks me up people being obsessive about lowering their bars. steep DH needs riser bars.
  • + 2
 Great picks this week, thank you!
  • + 1
 Is it always pedals that have to be product picks? As most of us only need one set at a time......
  • + 0
 Had set of Mavic Crossmax's for 4 years now with no problems, really like those Eastons. Shame about reliability issues though as they look the Dogs Danglies!!!!
  • + 1
 wtf race face i just went a bought some blue atlas 1/2 inch riser why did i not wait a bit for the big risers just my luck
  • + 0
 It doesn't matter how expensive your wheels or bike is. Yal sound like a bunch of pricks
  • + 1
 What bike is the atlases on? it looks sexy!
  • + 1
 loosening front hub????? thats disappointing from easton
  • + 2
 techgnar? Facepalm
  • + 1
 Very nice old school high-rise bars
  • + 1
 i want thoes peddles so bad it hurts !
  • + 1
 I just got those atlas bars, they're so sick. I love them
  • + 1
 PSH! $1000 for wheels? What do they take me for?! A bum??
  • + 1
 nah Gordon Gecko
  • + 1
 I rocked out the Decoys for almost a year and loved them.
  • + 1
 I want to test all
  • - 1
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