Pinkbike Product Picks

Feb 3, 2012
by Richard Cunningham  
SixSixOne Raji Glove

Raji gloves are designed for hard-charging riders who want a glove that feels as soft as women's underwear and can survive some beating out on the trail. Raji gloves feel impossibly lightweight and ventilate so well that my hands feel cold when the temps are in the low 70s. The Raji is well made, with stretchable mesh fabric covers most of the uppers, including the fingers, and the synthetic leather palms are perforated. The two nose-picker fingertips on each hand are reinforced with a rubberized coating on the outer part and with tacky gripper strips on the inside for braking and for secure in-flight adjustments. There is no padding in the palm area except for synthetic leather panels, which are sewn into the inside of the thumb and forefinger and across the sensitive pads where the palm meets the fingers. Silicone gripper material is printed in key areas and a terrycloth 'sweat-wiper' panel is discreetly sewn into the back of the thumb. The elastic pull-on glove has no cuff or closure. Raji gloves come in white blue or black with garish graphics in six sizes from XS to XXL. MSRP is $24 USD. SixSixOne

SixSixOne Raji Gloves
SixSixOne Raji Gloves are not going to keep you warm, nor will they mute contact with snow-fences and trees, but if you want maximum comfort with a minimum level of protection, this is the glove you seek.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesWhen I slipped on the Raji gloves, I thought, 'no way are these things going to last more than a day.' Well, they did a lot better than that, and they feel a lot more substantial in action than their minimal construction and invisible feel suggest. I used to wear Mechanix gloves during hot Summer months for maximum comfort, but the palms wore out too quickly. I always wished for a similar fit in a more capable cycling-specific glove and this is exactly what the Raji is - dexterous enough to manipulate my camera and just tough enough to keep my hands from tearing up when I crash. Do I expect them to last a season? HA! I'd have better luck finding a pro bass fisherman without a pot belly - but at 24 bucks a pair, I won't shed tears if my Raji's self-destruct in a few months and I have to buy a new pair. - RC




DT Swiss AM 10 wheelset

You probably won't find DT Swiss AM 10 wheels at your local bike shop. It's an OEM wheelset that will be appearing on select Scott all-mountain models this season. The AM 10 is roughly a cross between DT Swiss' EX 2000 and the EX 1750 wheelsets. The AM 10 has the star-ratchet rear hub, alloy nipples and stainless steel bearings of the EX 1750 with round triple-butted Supercomp stainless steel spokes instead of bladed ones. Both are 32-spoke, three-cross laced and both use a 21-millimeter ID rim profile with stainless steel reinforced eyelets. The AM 10 uses the sleeve-joint rim like the less expensive EX 2000 wheel instead of the 1750's welded joint. DT Swiss is proud of that welded joint, although even they will admit that the sleeved version is probably its equal. We put the AM 10 in Product Picks because it has been pounding downhills all winter without a wiggle or serious dent and it rides beautifully. So, if you like what you read, consider upgrading to its closest sibling in the DT Swiss lineup, the EX 1750 wheelset. Weights for the 1750 in the 20mm front and 142/12mm rear hub configurations are 832 grams and 930 grams respectively. Hub options are: 110 x 20mm or 100mm x 15QR through-axle up front and rear hubs in 10mm x 135 QR, or 12mm through-axle rear in 135, 142 or 150mm axle widths (hubs are convertible to each axle option). A set of 1750s will cost you about $1100 USD. DT Swiss
.
DT Swiss AM wheels
The DT Swiss AM 10 wheelset is an OEM option featured on Scott all-mountain bikes based around their EX 1750/2000 All-mountain/Enduro wheels. The 21-millimeter ID medium-width rim is a winner, but its 'Tubeless Ready' designation is a bit of a stretch - it refers to a molded rim strip that fortunately, seals quite well when used with truly tubeless tires.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesDT Swiss has the history and breadth of knowledge to make the hub, spoke and rim designs of a wheel work in perfect harmony. This is the magic of the AM 10 wheelset - a wheel that feels lightweight, laterally stable and stays in tune month after month. What we most liked about the AM 10 hoops was that they accomplish such excellent performance with a straight-forward - we'd even go as far as to say 'old school' - build. Anyone can work on a wheel like this, and replacement spokes can be found in bike shops around the world. Molded rim strips are usually hell to mount tires to, but in this case, we never had to struggle. Every tire went on with a hand pump. The negative of the DT Swiss rim strip, however, was that it can be displaced with a misplaced tire tool or a shoddy tire mount. One must inspect and adjust the rim strip each time the tire is mounted. If you liked the AM 10 review, consider a set of DT Swiss EX 1750 wheels in the future. They are pretty pricey, but top-performing wheels that you can maintain with standard tools and parts? Sweet. - RC




Specialized Purgatory Control 2.2-inch Tire

My riding friends had been prodding me to try Specialized's tubeless-ready Purgatory tire for six months. I procured a few and was a little worried to discover that I received the 2.2-inch size. The smallest tire on my bikes up to that point was a 2.35. A dry spell, flanked by a couple of rainy weekends gave me the perfect opportunity to put the All-Mountain-rated Purgatory tires to test. More about that later. The Purgatory comes in a number of widths and a casing types. The Purgatory Control is the mid-priced version (You can buy the S-Works model for about 10 bucks more), with all the good features like a folding bead, two-compound tread and a tougher-than-wussy-S-Works casing that is reportedly 15-percent more resistant to cuts. The inside buzz is that the Purgatory Control tire is the choice of the top trail riders who work at Specialized. Cornering is this tire's forte' and the magic of the Purgatory tread is that its cornering blocks are elongated and aggressively placed, then backed up by a firm row of transition blocks. The center tread is sparse, but with enough rubber, properly placed, to afford strong braking. Purgatory Control tires come in 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4 inch casing for 26-inch wheels and 2.2 or 2.4 inch casings for 29ers. Weights range from 610 grams to 800 with our 2.2-inch test tires at 670 grams. MSRP is $50 USD. Specialized

Specialized Purgatory 2.2 tire
Widely spaced tread blocks with an emphasis on cornering is the key to the Purgatory Control's success. The Softer 55a-hardness edging blocks wear quickly, but they stick like a baby monkey to its mother. The center tread is a slightly tougher, 65a rubber compound.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesTwo words describe the Specialized Purgatory Control tire: 'Way Fun.' We set the tires up tubeless and let them fly. The casing is wider than its 2.2 designation would suggest and the oddly-shaped and spaced tread blocks can find grip almost anywhere. When the Purgatory breaks loose, it scrubs rather than drifts, still searching for bits of traction here and there where most tires would have given up. The sweetest surprise though, was while the 2.2 Purgatory had the grip of a larger, more aggressive looking tire, it still rolled like a narrow XC-based design. It's a fast moving tire that is easy to love. As far as durability goes, with slightly less than a hundred miles on the Purgatory tires, the tread is showing a lot of wear. Note that we run in the rocks and gravel a lot in the Southern US, and braking takes its toll on rubber. In any case, the Purgatory will not set any records for durability. We were asked about running it front or rear and the consensus was that it didn't matter. I'm running the same tire on the front and rear and having a blast. - RC



Hungry for anything in Product Picks this week?






44 Comments

  • + 12
 I happen to like these tires as well.First ran them front and back, now have them as a rear on 2 bikes with Fat Alberts up front for a little more bite.They are big for a 2.2 tire and roll pretty fast too. Me likey
  • + 1
 the fat albert you went with for up front, 2.2 or 2.4 (or did you got for 2.4 purely for a larger gripper front)?
what usage are the two bikes (once it dries up i'll be looking for F & R for my XC bike which i use more for AM. currently MudX F&R)
the purgatory / alberts, both less rolling reistance than say HighRollers?
Ta
  • + 1
 on my bike (6" Moment) I have 2.4 Fat alberts and 2.2 purg on the back.and wifes bike has 2.2 Fat ablberts and 2.0 on rear as her bike will not allow the bigger 2.2 tire.And I think that is the Captain 2.0. She has an Epiphany 5'' travel.I used to put winter tires on before but this combo works well when it gets sloppy.They stick to everything and roll quite fast. And I see some had knobbs tearing off,but so far they look great with over a year on them with heavy use.I even rode bootleg canyon DH 2 days, and Fruita and Moab for a trip out west and tires held up.They are run tubeless also
  • + 11
 Been using the purgatory for a while now on my AM bike and have converted a few to try them.
Such a good AM/XC tyre it's unreal.
  • + 1
 How is it with knobbs tearing out on this tyre?

I love Nobby nics for grip and mud shedding, but hate for how easy it is to tear the knobbies out. This purgatory tyre looks like it has a nice uphill wet root "hooker" and sheds mud great. Should roll fast as well.
  • + 1
 Yea I was wondering about that as well. I'v ridden nobby nics and fat alberts in the past. Their knobs rip off very easy, you can find plenty of threads on that on forums.

WAKI, I agree the nn's and fa's have good grip, even when you'r at the point where the side knobs are smearing grip is not an on/off switch but it 'scrubs' as RC said. But the point at which this occurs is just way too soon!

When you start tearing the knobs off your nn's they are holding you back. Switch to a harder compound and you'll see how much further you can go.
  • + 1
 I mean, I started loosing knobbs out of NNs after I begun using them for a bit more aggressive riding. I loved them in "mellower" XC and thought to try them in all kinds of stuff. It's fine as long as you try to rail them, but as soon as wheels start drifting, especially on dry rocky stuff... nope. Now I have Minions EXO for allround use. Changed from HRs which suck in Trail/XC where I live - too wet, too much roots. I will keep NNs on the hardtail though.
  • + 1
 Hi Chaps, well - I've not yet torn knobbies off, but I wouldnt take that as gospel as we all ride different types of terrain. To be honest, these tyres cost a hell of a lot less than the competition, so you can afford to experiment.
  • + 1
 Ok thx, have a good one!
  • + 7
 Always keep a pair of Raji's around...you can get them super cheap on sales. Got 3 pairs for 9$ each from crc 2 years ago and they are still usable.
  • + 3
 Sorry, but the dt swiss wheels seem way too average to come anywhere near that price point. The tires have piqued my interest...although if I gave them a try, I'd likely (as always) end up back on minions. I'd consider the gloves if I were to notice them on sale like Yeti85 was talking about. Thanks for the reviews, that was always one of my favorite parts of the old MBA rag.
  • + 4
 The price listed is for the EX1750's, not the AM10's, which are OEM only.
  • + 1
 this wheelset has nothing to do with EX1750 wheelset....NOTHING !!!...¸not the same hubs, not the same rims and the spokes are not even close ...the EX1750 wheelset is built around the DT240 hubs which are probably worth as much as this whole wheelset !!!
  • + 1
 I know. But it is being compared to it in the review since you can't buy them without buying a new bike. And the price in the article is for the 1750's.
  • + 1
 I understand but it's pretty ridiculous to compare an OEM wheelset with DT340 or DT350 and sleeved rims to the wheelset that Sam, Danny and Troy are rocking on their sleds ?!?
  • + 0
 Well, they do outline the differences, and say it's somewhere between the EX2000's and the EX1750's.
  • + 0
 EX1750 and EX2000 have nothing in common either.
  • + 2
 "The AM 10 is roughly a cross between DT Swiss' EX 2000 and the EX 1750 wheelsets. The AM 10 has the star-ratchet rear hub, alloy nipples and stainless steel bearings of the EX 1750 with round triple-butted Supercomp stainless steel spokes instead of bladed ones. Both are 32-spoke, three-cross laced and both use a 21-millimeter ID rim profile with stainless steel reinforced eyelets. The AM 10 uses the sleeve-joint rim like the less expensive EX 2000 wheel instead of the 1750's welded joint."

I didn't write the goddamn article. The original comment was about the price listed. That's all.
  • + 1
 and both those wheelsets have DT Swiss stickers on them...
  • + 1
 Very expensive the EX 1750...
I made myself an almost identical wheelset, with hope pro hubs, DT 5.1 rims, Sapim CX Ray spokes and sapim self-securing nipples, which cost me, two years ago, 350€ and weights 1775gr...
Strong, stiff, light and true!
  • + 2
 The 661 Raji's were great up until a few of years ago when they introduced the model with the transparent mesh that went round the edge and the tip of all the fingers. Up until then the fore and middle fingers had a piece of protective material that reinforced under the tip to over the top which was great. The new mesh just fell apart around the fore and middle finger tips after a couple of months meaning that i had to stitch them back together or buy a new pair.

I see RC's point about them being cheap and replaceable but personally i think its a bit of stupidity (or coporate cycnical savvy) that made them reverse engineer them and personally i don't think companies should be allowed to build non-disposable products that are only designed to last a couple of months - they aren't latex gloves afterall.

I previously went through three pairs of these in consecutive years because i was happy with the cost to longevity ratio, but haven't been back since they made them worse, and won't be back again until they re-reinforce the middle and forefinger tips again like they used to!

just sayin, yer.
  • + 1
 oh that and they look really good!
  • + 1
 right before last season I got a set of Purgatories...I still have the front, avan after a HARD season of riding em. The rear blew out on me after I riped a chunk about the size of a quarter out of the sidewall. But other than that Ive had no complaints. Good write-up
  • + 1
 I used 661 Raji gloves for BMX where I want a super thin glove, and for that they are perfect!

also great for hot weather MTN trail riding

have found its actually the stitching that tends to fail, as the fabric is very very thin and the stitching tears through, starting with a small split and quickly enlarging until your finger tips find their way out - this has happened with all 4 pairs of Raji's I bought and I ran last season

still a great glove, and much more durable than a similar super thin glove I had in multiple pairs from a previous sponsor


Purgatory is one of the best tires Specialized have made, and that is saying something as Specialized have some GREAT tires in their lineup

I've only used Specialized tires the past few seasons all with Stan's No-Tubes on ZTR Flow rims, ranging from Clutch and Eskar, to Storm, Purgatory and Captain (2" and 2.2") to Fast Trak - with great results in each instance

found the "Control" series better as a rear tire as it will take more abuse, and the "S Works" for the front works out better

something to note with SBC tires: they always come up LARGER than the given size, for example the Eskar is rated at 2.3" but has the same width and volume inflated as Maxxis High Roller 2.5"

currently running Purgatory 29" S-Works on front, and Ground Control 29" Control on rear with Stan's No-Tubes on Roval Traversee 29" wheels and thoroughly enjoying the ride in muddy / frozen conditions

lp1.pinkbike.org/p4pb7671928/p4pb7671928.jpg
  • + 1
 this wheelset has nothing to do with EX1750 wheelset....NOTHING !!!...¸not the same hubs, not the same rims and the spokes are not even close ...the EX1750 wheelset is built around the DT240 hubs which are probably worth as much as this whole wheelset !!!
  • + 1
 Run a 2.4 purgatory grid (grid is the thicker casing) on the front of my AM bike and it kills it. I run the specialized Eskar, which is also a sick AM tire in the back. Winning tire combo there in any conditions.
  • + 0
 Purgatories are honestly the best trail/am tire with the exception of conti's. If you want a more durable tire than the thin casing of the control than go for the armadillo elite option. And the last option on the poll was pretty useless "no smaller tires than 2.35" hello, the exact same tire that was tested here comes it a 2.4 which actually is closer to a 2.5
  • + 3
 Aww.Those options are suppose to bring humor.
  • + 3
 Thanks RC but I'll stick with my DAKINE gloves, Hope hubs/MTX rims, and Minion tires.
  • + 0
 What he said. Flow rims though.
  • + 3
 21mm rims are way too skinny bitches for me.
RC said it himself: www.pinkbike.com/news/Tech-Tuesday--Wider-Rims-Are-Better-and-Why-Tubeless-Tires-Burp-.html
  • + 1
 Hmm... I'll have to give the Purgatories a go though I've not found anything better than Fat Alberts for AM in UK. Had some Chunder tyres on a Spesh I had and they were pretty grippy but different discipline.
  • + 3
 " as soft as women's women's underwear" there's a good chuckle.
  • + 1
 I dunno, I've felt some undergarmets that were anything but soft and comfortable.
  • + 1
 @nothingbetter: you know... that's why you shouldn't wear women's underwear as a man.. :p
  • + 1
 got a set of Purgatories getting in today in 2.4 for my Remedy. Should be fun.
  • + 2
 i think they meant 2.5 inches in the opinion poll....
  • + 2
 Um, yup.
  • + 1
 inspiral purple...been rockin em for 1 month.....killer 9.7
  • + 1
 Neck brace review would be nice!!!
  • + 3
 A neck brace review is a long-time coming, but it could only be about comfort and features. The real information we want is about protection. Hard to find test riders willing to dive into empty swimming pools to compare three different products. RC.
  • + 1
 Lol! You would use crash test dummies for that, wouldn't you? Braces must undergo certification somewhere and there they got to have the equipment. Team up and get results maybe? Thats how the german test dudes get like rolling resistance values. They aint got the test machines they make a deal with schwalbe who own them - maybe the reason schwalbe rule the test results ; ) thats another story.
  • + 1
 Yeah i was thinking about comfort and stuff!! Cuz they dont fit with every helmet well, body armor etc... Some dont have adjustement features. Thx for your time!
  • + 1
 661 gloves are sweet in general. wheels are meh, custom is so much nicer.

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.063328
Mobile Version of Website