Pivot Cycles Launches Carbon Mach 5.7 – Interbike 2011

Sep 13, 2011
by Richard Cunningham  
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Pivot Cycles has been tight lipped about when it was going to join the carbon revolution. Designer-founder Chris Cocalis is no stranger to the stuff, having designed a few carbon mountain bikes and most recently, line of breakthrough road bikes under the BH name – so the question has always been ‘When,’ not ‘if.’ The Mach 5.7 Carbon appears to be well worth the wait.

Mach 5.7 Carbon
While the Carbon version of the Mach 5.7 shares the same geometry and dw-link suspension, it cuts a different profile when standing beside its welded-aluminum sibling. The carbon frame’s top and down tubes flare significantly where they join its tapered head tube, and especially so at the seat tube/top tube junction. The frame members are significantly larger in cross-section as well. Pivot optimized the bottom bracket area for carbon construction as well, with a huge 'Hollow Box' profile that spans the full width of its 92-millimeter-wide PressFit bottom bracket shell. Unlike the aluminum 5.7, the lower dw-link wraps outside the composite frame where it is supported by double-row bearings.


The carbon layup and molding technique of the 5.7 is said to employ a close-tolerance-molded internal bladder and a special high-pressure curing technique which ensure that the inner walls of the carbon frame are of consistent thickness and nearly as smooth as its sleek outer complexion. Precise compaction of the carbon layers during the molding process helps shave 6 ounces off of the original aluminum 5.7 with a ten-percent boost in stiffness.

Mach 5.7 Carbon Frame Details:
• DW-link suspension with position-sensitive anti-squat provides the cornering benefits of a lower bottom bracket.
• Fox RP23 Kashima shock with custom rebound and ProPedal settings for better tunability and small-bump sensitivity.
• 142/12mm through- axle and 160mm post-mount dropouts.
• Under top tube cable guide includes routing for dropper seat post.
• Rubberized leather chainstay, seat stay, and down tube protectors.
• Direct-mount front derailleur design accepts Shimano and SRAM systems.
• 145mm (5.7 inches) of rear-wheel travel
• 140mm or 150mm fork compatibility (150mm standard).
• PressFit 92mm-wide bottom bracket shell allows for wider pivots and better bearing support, and increased stiffness.
• 1.5” tapered head tube.
• Frame weight: 5.25 pounds (2.381g)
• Sizes: XS, S, Med, Lg, XL.
• MSRP: $2599 usd



With a 150-millimeter-stroke fork, the 5.7's head angle is 67.1 degree, which is is slack enough to enjoy gassing it down technical descents without giving up the 5.7's climbing ability. Position-sensitive dw-link anti-squat suspension allows Pivot to drop the bottom bracket to 13.7 inches without giving cause to bang the pedals on every sizable rock. The original 5.7 was spec'ed with a 24-millimeter-stroke fork and while the 'Carbon can roll nicely with that choice, Pivot will ship the Mach 5.7 Carbon with a 150-millimeter fork as standard fare. Rear suspension is a specially tuned Fox RP23 Kashima shock which is fitted with Pivot's sag gauge to make it easy to set up.

Multi detail shot
Mach 5.7 Features: (clockwise) Pivot's sag meter is shipped with every one of its dw-link bikes. The suspension is position-sensitive to ensure that there is no conflict between its firm 'anti-squat' pedaling action and the need for plush, long-travel suspension performance • Double-row bearings in each link keep side-play and premature wear out of the Mach 5.7's suspension equation, while a markedly different frame configuration that employs a central spine, better optimizes the qualities of carbon fiber at the bottom bracket • Integrated bash protector keeps the carbon happy on the down tube.

The Mach 5.7 carbon's swingarm is configured differently than the aluminum version as well. Taking advantage of carbon's better stiffness-to-weight ratio, the new swingarm eliminates the double-triangulated C-section bracing up front and adopts a single, left-side strut, with a small right-side strut near the dropout. The new configuration follows the lines of the well-proven Santa Cruz Blur series. Pivot further sweetens the stiffness of the '5.7 with a 142/12-millimeter through-axle arrangement and direct, post-mount caliper fittings for 160-millimeter rotors.

Chain Guide Mount Option
While the Mach series frames lacks dedicated ISCG chain guide tabs, Pivot offers a machined-aluminum ISCG chain-guide mount that bolts to the frame and clamps securely around the bottom bracket. The metrics of the new carbon frame are slightly different, however, so Pivot had to design a new adapter which will be shipping in winter of this year.

Will There Be Complete Bikes?
Yes, Pivot's website is already populated with specifications for seven different models of the mach 5.7 Carbon featuring both Shimano or SRAM components. The Shimano Deore XT/XTR model shown in this feature is pegged at $5599 usd. The first bikes will arrive at dealers this Fall.

Visit Pivot's website for exact arrival dates and check out their DH and AM models while you're at it.

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69 Comments

  • 9 0
 My hand has been hovering over the phone, about to order the alloy version of this frame. Think I'll hold off until this carbon is available now! This, or a Yeti SB66-C. Man, this is an awful choice to have to make!
  • 8 7
 Pivot all the way Wink
  • 4 0
 i would love an 2x9 sb66 with an air shock or a spesh enduro. sure, the pivot looks like a great bike, it just seems to be a bit too trail oriented for my tastes.
  • 2 1
 Buy the Yeti Joe.. buy the Yeti!
  • 2 0
 The system is basically an Ibis mojo, only without the price
  • 5 1
 Ric @ MBUK/BikeRadar used an alloy Mach 5.7 for the MegaAvalanche this year, and has been singing it's praises all year, as a trail/light AM rig. I try not to fall for reviews/media hype, but the way he writes about that frame, it sounds really tempting.

Also, the Pivot appeals to me more as a 'riders bike'. Doesn't the Yeti SB66 have a whiff of mid-life crisis, golf club, all the gear no idea, 'look how expensive my bike is'...? Odd to think of Yeti as having an image problem, but it kinda feels that way to me.
  • 1 0
 MBUK reviews are amongst the most biased around dude
  • 1 0
 Sorry how are MBUK reviews bias?
  • 1 0
 they are trust me
  • 1 0
 ^^^Go for the YETI!
  • 3 0
 Definitely the yeti, it'll be able to handle much gnarlier terrain.. however that pivot is one sexy trail bike haha.
  • 4 0
 No ISCG tabs? I know they have some sort of mount, but why not just add them to the frame since alot of people use guides now?
  • 3 0
 Probably for weight. At least they offer a mount... (Intense, Giant, I'm looking at you...)
  • 1 2
 why would you need a guide on this bike?
  • 1 0
 so that chain doesn't come off and chew the hell outta that nice new frame! Rolleyes
  • 1 0
 I always run a chain guide! Here in the rocky Arizona desert, it's gets very bouncy at times. I prefer the piece of mind and less noise over the weight savings!
  • 1 0
 Banshee - the the chain stays on this bike come with a protective cover. The lack of ISCG tabs wouldn't be a deal killer for me.
  • 1 0
 when your chain falls off it's not only the stays the get it, but the BB shell too...
  • 1 0
 I've been running 1X10 on my Trance X this season and I love it. Front derailleurs aren't always needed where I ride, so I went with a chainguide. I have a BB mount guide on my Advanced SL frame, but all other new giants don't easily take anything unless you're O.K. with just a top guide... This bike qualifies as long travel trail, and that's why it has mounts. ALL bikes in this category should have them. M2C.
  • 1 0
 It looks like they are including an iscg adapter that fits around the bottom bracket ala Spec Enduro/Yeti SB-66/probably others. They just refer to it as "USCG," which has to be a typo.
  • 2 0
 92mm BB?.. is this a new thing i haven't heard of?.. same measurement vs. 83mm BB on typical DH bikes... assume this results in a wider stance? What those pedals around the corners through town!
  • 3 0
 The BB cups are simply press-fit in the frame. This setup wont give you a wider stance.
  • 1 0
 I understand that it's press-fit.. but what about the 92mm... how does this compare with 68/73/83.. is the whole bearing assembly flush inside the frame to use the same spindle length as an 83? Anyways, nice looking bike.
  • 3 0
 Can someone please explain to me what the who-ha is with Pivot bikes? They don't do anything for me?!
  • 2 0
 The DW link suspension design is efficient and feels plush at the same time. If you ever get a chance you should demo one.
  • 1 0
 I have a Phoenix, and I can tell you the build and finish quality is second to none; but the most important part is the design. DW knows how to properly engineer suspension on a multitude of levels, whereas most other brands just work based on feel and look. So Pivot have taken a great design (custom engineered for each of their models) and combined it with really strong, reliable bearings so that the bike feels and performs super tight , and stays that way. I have been through a lot of bikes (Santa Cruz, IH Sunday, Specialized, etc) and I think the Phoenix is the best overall build (with due credit to my Ibis Mojo HD) ; I expect that the rest of their line will perform as well.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the replies! I must admit I've ridden a few DW bikes and wasn't that impressed, although admitadely I haven't ridden a Pivot. I guess a lot of it comes down to personal preference. Bolini - I am jealous of your bike ownership!!!
  • 2 0
 A half lb lighter costs how much more? I guess it just depends on what you care about. I see it is stiffer too, but I bet next year's alu frame will be too.
  • 1 0
 $400 more
  • 1 0
 I saw this bike on Saturday at the bike expo in MTL... if it weren't for tuition I would have placed an order on the spot. As for the BB sizing, it's a new system being developed with BH.
  • 1 0
 I agree with with Sharonb, 67 degrees is perfect for a light duty all mountain bike. Also when sag is set between 25-30 percent it would make the HT angle around 66.5, which is great for going up or down.
  • 3 0
 Perfect in every detail. Damn ...
  • 3 0
 I'd like a slightly lower BB...
  • 4 1
 low BB in xc/trail/am bike is about location location location - if you ride smooth trails then you can have a 4X like super low BB, and rail corners like a boss. But when it gets rough, it's not the best idea because it just gets hard to pedal without hitting stuff with pedals. If you add the fact that some people prefer longer crank arms and not too fat tyres, then things get a bit sketchy. I think it's abit too much of "slack & low uber-alles!" indoctrination lately
  • 1 0
 I agree. Very happy with 13.9"/68deg for AM/ trail use on my current 160mm bike.
  • 3 0
 The dw-link tends to keep the bike's suspension more stable, so it can track well with a low BB and not pound the rocks much (personal experience).
RC
  • 3 0
 Not sure Richard if suspension play so much role, have an old Xc racing hardtail with really low BB and 175 cranks and I hit the stones and rocks a lot. Then I also ride a 1st gen Nomad which is said to have super wobbly suspension and even with lyrik down to 115mm I hit the stones rarely.

But well I guess it really depends. Few years ago people had a bike and if they wanted a different geo they were buying a different fork, that was it. These days we have these completely unified fork/schock/frame theories with bikes coming out in nearly half inch of travel increments from XC to Dh, things like Spec Evo versions. Everything just gets super complicated and confusing and on top of that we get anglesets, offset bushings and Manitou pushes own shim stack tuning sets...
  • 1 0
 That's technological progression. People want adjustability.
  • 8 0
 As well as many psychologists and sociologists progress in their research, pointing out facts like: too much choice = bad decisions or paralysis, common discomfort of wondering whether you made the right choice - in result being less happy - no matter how smart you are.

I already saw a couple of situations, like a guy super stoked on having CC DBarrel, yet complaining he hasn't figured out how to set it so it feels right. He knows only one thing: because he knows that he can adjust it perfectly to his riding style and track conditions, he doesn't want to run it on default settings, no matter what...
  • 1 1
 Good thing psychologists don't run bike companies then, or they'd be out of business.
  • 7 0
 yup, I totaly agree with al you are saying. But it doesn't change the 100% true fact that this 4yr old mentality of MOAR of MOAR fks it up for everybody... industry only provides the drugs with more and more sideffects

Danny Harts WChamp shim stack for your Boxxer - comes with 500ml of 5wt shock oil, rainbow stripes stickers and chamois cream - will make you go faster on steep DH tracks, up to 0.002s/1m - warning! may cause anal leakage and rectal ventriliquism
  • 4 0
 Yep. Malcolm Gladwell in Blink:

“[Researchers] wanted to see whether the number of jam choices made any difference in the number of jams sold. Conventional economic wisdom, of course, says that the more choices consumers have, the more likely they are to buy, because it is easier for consumers to find the jam that perfectly fits their needs. But [the researchers] found the opposite to be true. 30% of those who stopped by the 6 choice booth ended up buying some jam, while only 3% of those who stopped by the bigger [24 choice] booth bought anything… If you are given too many choices… than your unconscious is comfortable with, you get paralyzed.”p142

I can't tell you how many times I've walked away from buying products (including bike ones) because there were so many options that I got annoyed.
  • 2 0
 I never go 'browsing' nowdays for that very reason. If I want to buy something for a specific need, I do research and make damn sure I know what I want.
  • 6 1
 I have worked in Mental Health for 19 years now. There is a lot of science in psychology. Drugs should be used only after a careful assessment/lifelong history. Over 90% of "mental Illness" can be "cured" with healthy lifestyle choices. The right medications for the correct problem will work very well when properly assessed.

Here's an interesting stat for everyone: only 15% of people are capable of independent thought. 85% of people fall into the herd mentality. They need someone to tell them what they need or want. Read the posts here and tally the percentages yourself and the numbers will match closely.
  • 2 0
 If you do research then you do "browse" a lot

I must say that last time ai needed o tbuy new grips for my HT as the old ones worn out. Last time I bought grips was like 4 years ago. It took me forever to choose... and I haven't got what I wanted, got red ones, I always hated colourful grips, just went on impulse as nothing I thought I liked was in stock... fk! Next time I go to the LBS and take the best they have.
  • 1 0
 heh Willie I guess at least 80% of remainnig 15% has a mentality of "I won't follow the crowd, I want to be different!" and then another 80% of them changes to herd followers when being different becomes a trend (imagine how frustrated must be the first generation of XXX buahahah - I tattoed all my arms to make a statement, and after LA Ink it all went to sht buahahahah)
  • 3 0
 holy...that's a different line you guys got on. researcher brian fontana says 60% of the time it works every time.
  • 1 0
 Bike companies do hire psychologists. It is called industrial psychology and it is responsible for what we know about business today.
  • 2 0
 virtual sheperds with virtual leashes for the herd to send 'em all over the cliff, eh? I always go with the wolves or at least a honey badger!

wonder how the 5.7 would be with a Monarch or a CCDB Air?
  • 1 0
 As a psych student I can't deny the virtual shepherds statement. (that is why I'll stick with trying to fix marriages) But the only thing worse than a cut throat business that exploits its employees and robs its customers is one that does it badly.
  • 1 0
 I think the "paradox of choice" is not taken into account by most bike companies, simply because they are shittin their pants that they will stay behind, it's easier to do so rather than arranging and following proper risk assessments. "Innovate or die" by Spec sums it all, but it doesn't say anything what does "to innovate" mean in the bicycle design. So as soon as someone pushes something, whatever it is - they want to keep up. Because bigger guys can afford many R&D projects at once, then lots of semi finished products just wait to be put as a reaction if someone came up with something similar earlier.

Like most businesses in the world they see their future and strength only in growth and growth, it's never enough - greed mixed with fear of being smaller and bullied. To best and easiest way to grow is to produce MOAR and MOAR stuff. Even small companies are becoming those "wedding bands" playing Madonna, Phil Collins, Sting, RKelly and if there's demand for Slayer - we do it as well, would be lovely! I think growth by buying up smaller companies is yet to come (and that will be a total fk up! everything will be beige)

It's about loosing any character at all really... I would have nothing against that if thye would just replace old stuff that would just go out of production, i.e 3x chainsets, 26" XC racing Hts etc...
  • 2 0
 thats a beautiful bike, pivot is such an under rated company that makes some pretty dialed bikes IMO
  • 1 0
 I don't usually right posts but this bike looks right to me! Used to develop suspension on off road Motorbikes this linkage looks right to me. and yes I want one!
  • 1 0
 Mach 5.7,Yeti SB-66. Both sweet bikes in carbon, which one is better is a tough question. I think it would come down to the rider on either bike.
  • 2 0
 I have one on order! Can't wait til October!
  • 2 0
 that's one sexy bike.
  • 2 0
 Phwoooar...NSFW...
  • 1 0
 What is the chainstay length?
  • 1 0
 same geo as aluminum. check the website.
  • 1 0
 Coming to a xc race near you.
  • 1 0
 how does the ICSG adapter mount to the frame since its a PF92?
  • 1 0
 looks awesome!
  • 1 0
 super sick!
  • 1 0
 wicked looking bike
  • 1 1
 Waaay to steeeep.
  • 3 0
 67 degrees for a 5.7inch bike is steep?
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