Race Face - Made in Canada

Jan 23, 2014
by Danielle Baker  
Race Face has a long history with carbon technology. They released their original Next LP cranks - an aluminum exoskeleton with a carbon charge inside of it - 15 years ago in 1998. Ten years later they re-released Next as a fully carbon crankset complete with hollow arms, implementing a proprietary process closely guarded by the brand. Minor evolutionary steps followed until the Next SL with a titanium spindle was released in 2011. This year, Race Face released not only the lightest production carbon crank set in the world (eclipsing the record set by their original full carbon design), but arguably the most versatile. The complete redesign, the new Next SL, which we recently reviewed, is not only modular, but also lighter, stiffer and stronger than previous designs. To learn more about what goes into the production of a full carbon crank, we ventured to Burnaby, BC, where Race Face's design innovation and carbon manufacturing takes place. Manufacturing domestically is a point of pride for the brand and something they have gone to great lengths to preserve.

Jonathan Staples telling us where we can t look at Raceface Oct 2013.
  The carbon room at Race Face is literally a secret chamber where access restrictions are strictly enforced. Beyond the door a group of passionate engineers and mountain bikers are making your cranks by hand.

While it is more cost effective to move manufacturing overseas to Taiwan, where Race Face produces components like chain rings, aluminum cranks, and bars, they are committed to maintaining and expanding their carbon crank manufacturing program in Canada. In the early years, the company took advantage of a government grant program designed to promote Canadian innovation. The program subsidized partial wages and supply costs to offset the risk associated with such an undertaking. The grant provided support for the brand to explore, and eventually prove, design concepts and manufacturing processes in carbon. Driven both by production efficiency and protection of their trade secrets, they have since invested a quarter of a million dollars in new machines and increased their carbon specific manufacturing team. “The pressure to transfer local production overseas is a daily reality of our business. We've had to make concessions in other areas to ensure the carbon crank program remains in Canada for the long term, but when you experience the innovation in the building right now and consider the early success of the Next SL crank, it's proof enough for me that we're headed in the right direction,” says Dave Murray, Operations Manager.

at Raceface Oct 2013.
  Each crank starts with multiple layers of one ply carbon.

at Raceface Oct 2013.
  The carbon is laminated together to build torsional strength before being cut into specific patterns.

at Raceface Oct 2013.
  A CNC machine is used to cut the laminated carbon into pieces which are then hand assembled, weighed for quality and moulded using custom tooling.

at Raceface Oct 2013.
  Each crank is finished by hand before being sent out for painting to prevent UV degradation.

at Raceface Oct 2013.
  Their unique process allows Race Face to use less carbon while creating stronger cranks.

One of the benefits of producing locally is a streamlined R&D cycle; faster turnaround on prototypes and, ideally, a quicker time to market. In some cases the proximity of the carbon room to the engineers has cut the development process by up to six months. With these kinds of results it has been a ‘no brainer’ for Race Face to keep the production local. Additionally, when you have a new and truly unique process, sending your designs off to Taiwan, the melting pot of bike production, can be unnerving. Rather than risk dissemination of their intellectual property or compromise the quality of their product, they instead built a dedicated carbon room in their new facility and began running two shifts daily to produce their handmade Next SL cranks.

Colin Worobetz Manufacturing Engineer at Raceface Oct 2013.
  Even the products that are manufactured in Taiwan are still designed and tested in their Burnaby location, including the new 35mm diameter SIXC bar.

at Raceface Oct 2013.
  The staff takes a very hands on approach to product development, testing gear themselves, and taking pride when a product is successful.

at Raceface Oct 2013.
  Cranks are tested to international standards that range from 50,000 to 100,000 cycles.

at Raceface Oct 2013.
  Carbon will run up to ten times past international standards, so often the tests are stopped before the carbon has fatigued.

at Raceface Oct 2013.
  Race Face subjects their cranks to their own testing with standard loads, but over longer periods of time, holding their products to higher expectations than what is required.

When it comes to carbon cranks, Jonathan Staples, Senior Design Engineer, says, “I don’t think there is any argument, they are better.” With six years of carbon technology development under his belt, Jonathan’s ingenuity is driven by his passion for riding and carbon technology development. Currently, the Next SL cranks are 120 grams lighter than their closest mainstream competitor, and according to Race Face their stiffness to weight ratio, when compared to aluminum cranks, is off the chart. While aluminum cranks have been made that approach a similar weight, the end product is too flexible, lacking the desired stiffness. In previous crank designs the spider arms were built-in, creating a challenging and expensive manufacturing process. Additionally, this design did not allow for the adaptation to new standards. In an effort to accommodate riders’ needs, this newest arm set up has a removable spider slot that will remain compatible with the changing standards. The new Cinch System, as it is referred to, has interchangeable parts that can be customized right from the manufacturing facility, at your local bike shop, or in your very own garage. Riders can now transfer their Next SL cranks from their summer bike over to their winter purposed fat bike with the addition of a wider spindle. Jonathan's team have produced a rider driven product that they have crafted from start to finish in in their office. Race Face employs a strong team of riders and engineers who have a unique chance to oversee every step of the product that not only you, but they as well, will be riding.

at Raceface Oct 2013.
  Next SL cranks, made in Canada.

At the end of the day, costs and efficiency aside, it is a much better conversation for a company to have when they can say their product is made in Canada. There is a lot of pride that comes with producing something locally and selling it to the rest of the world.

www.raceface.com


109 Comments

  • + 109
 I'm glad to see Race Face up on the top again. There were some rumors in 2011 that Race Face would stop producing their products and im sure im not the only one who is glad that they didn't. Amazing Products and (for today) fair prices. I'm sure a couple of my bikes in the future will get a hang of some Race Face products.
  • + 41
 If cost were no object, all my bikes would be decked out with full Race Face components.
  • + 32
 the issue at that point was bankruptcy, then the brand was bought by former employees who brought the pride, innovation, and standards back to the brand.
  • + 6
 I think a video would have been awesome of how things are made at Race Face.
  • - 23
flag freeride-forever (Jan 23, 2014 at 15:27) (Below Threshold)
 Beat me to it Zillah, I want a video, not pictures & I doubt that there's anything all that special about their process. It's just some bullshit to make the weenies think they all exclusive 'n' shit. Gimme a carbon crank that can handle street & trials riding instead of just dirt roads in & outta the woods & then you got my vote for a better material.

Canadic*nt, great name, stupid post. LOL PB censors my post but not your name!!!!!! ROFLMAO ha ha ha f*ck you PB.
  • + 28
 Who cars about carbon...narrow wide chain rings is why i love race face, if you don't have one, you're wrong...
  • + 12
 Dude spits the truth. Those rings are amazing, and they're very reasonably priced.
  • + 12
 I may be wrong but I'm perfectly happy with my existing chain guide. If i need to buy a new ring at some stage, ill maybe get a narrow wide one if its the same price, but why change just for that?
  • + 37
 change so you have a lighter bike, then you can have that extra beer, or upgrade to large fries
  • + 6
 @simooo I totally understand where you're coming from. It's the reason I haven't swapped out my rear derailleur for a clutch derailleur. When I first went to 1x, I simply removed a ring and my front mech to do it. Of course, that's far from ideal. I didn't add a guide or a ring meant for use as part of a single ring setup. I could have added a guide if I picked one up, but instead opted to try out their new chainring. People were ranting and raving about it, and it seemed like a good idea. I tried it out, and I haven't felt the need to pick up a chainguide since.

That being said, if you're not having troubles keeping your chain on with what you've got, keep it that way. It's not like a chain guide is that heavy or noisy that it warrants you swapping it out just to get the new ring. It's definitely worth a look though if you're swapping out parts.
  • + 6
 The narrow/wide rings are more expensive than a normal ring, yea, but they're a helluva lot cheaper than a standard chainring+guide. They're considerably lighter, too!
  • + 2
 Plus anodized aluminum always looks good. I don't think it's the end of the chain guide. Not by a long shot. It is, however, a nicely made product. Props to Race Face on it.
  • + 3
 if your building a bike from the ground up, it is cheaper than buying a regular ring and guide system...also running a chain guide can also mean more moving parts which sometimes means more shit that can break. plus they come in 30t for us "social" climbers. pretty much an all around win
  • + 2
 Their N/W rings are the best for sure. Accidentally ran my N/W ring with my SLX clutch off for a good week and my chain still didn't drop.
  • + 0
 I believe it...I've used a narrowide on my last 2 DH bikes and never dropped a chain. race face sixc cranks with a narrowide chainring and bashing....golden
  • - 5
flag ctd07 (Jan 23, 2014 at 2:38) (Below Threshold)
 Blackspires narrow/wide rings have even better tooth profiles and are made in Canada too, just without racefaces premium prices
  • + 4
 blackspires narrow wide is only 1 or 2 £ cheaper! what are you on about?!
  • + 1
 NArrow wides are great, but a narrow wide paired to a carbon crank is even better.
  • + 4
 Why the hell don't I have an RF narrow wide chainring on all my bikes? oh wait, I'm a college student -____-
  • + 1
 Different is wrong, Adamusaf? You must lead a thrilling life.
  • + 2
 absolutely
  • + 1
 You must lead a thrilling life sngltrkmnd. Living in the PNW and all. I have to make 4 hour drives to get to the mountains.
  • + 1
 Guys, NW is nice, but what about rock impacts?
I like running taco bashguard because it is lateraly closer to the center of the bike, and taco almost always equals to chain tensioner, so that is some extra chain security. I do not currently have NW ring, but that is something I would like to own.
I think that any type of bashguard is a must have on a bike that is ridden on rough terrain. Therefore, I will always run an extra tensioner because 20 grams more than just a taco is nothing, especially when you have 500+gram dropper post under your buttocks. Smile
  • + 1
 You can still run a bash with a NW ring ^_^
  • + 1
 SithBike - proximity to the mountains is definitely the reason I am here!
  • + 9
 So, the title is a bit deceptive. "Race Face - Made in Canada" Well sort of. It seems some stuff is made there, some (most) stuff is not.

At first I felt like they were gonna say RF is 100% Canadian made. Ok cool. Then they mention alloy bits are made off shore (no problem) and it seems the carbon is made in house. Then they mention that even some of the carbon (e.g. the SIXC bars) are made off shore. Alright now, what gives? Should this have been titled "Race Face Next SL cranks - Made in Canada"? Those are they only parts they confirmed ARE made there, but what else? If the alloy bits and a lot of other carbon is made overseas (I have no problem with this - not a rant against production in Asia) then why craft a title that makes it seem like all production is in N. America? Is it all carbon cranks?

Love my RF stuff and I have some Next SL cranks on the way. Nice story about their production, but it's pretty damn deceptive the way they position this as "Made in Canada" then slowly reveal that a lot is made overseas. I don't really care where my bits are made as all my RF has been quality. I have high quality bits made in the US, UK, Canada, Germany, Japan and Taiwan that I literally trust my life to. Folks here are happy to rally round Merica. I care more about the quality than I do about where it's made. If all else is equal (and it's often not) I'll get local.
  • + 1
 Corvus, it's not deceptive; it's a headline in PB. You're just taking it literally and then assuming the same it stands for every product they make. Have a look at Intense, right on their webpage "made in the USA", look closer and they clarify it's for their Al frames (intensecycles.com/weld) (and VPP linkages: www.bikerumor.com/2014/01/22/factory-tour-intense-cycles-impressive-american-production-line

Everything a company says is part of their marketing program and is designed to cash in national patriotism to some degree.
  • + 1
 if you are in the bike industry, you are going to be very hard pressed to not build parts in Taiwan due to cost. However, it isn't like Taiwan bike part production is a step below American or Canadian. We like to think so because we love domestic production (jobs, etc.) but layed up there or here, machined there or here, you get the same part (yes there are exceptions as always). Everyone makes a big deal about it, and if you are concerned about domestic labor, then yes, it is an issue, but from a quality standpoint, Taiwan, with the right direction, is spot on. Most of the people keeping stuff in the US or Canada are doing it for marketing.
  • + 2
 I read it similarly as Corvus. Gives you an impression of what they do up there in their Canadian HQ, which is making Next SL cranks and testing Taiwanese-made (RF designed) carbon. Up to your imagination to interpret the rest of the non-detailed marketing stuff, such as how stiff their carbon cranks are to alloy, but if they're comparing to their own alloy cranks, I wouldn't be surprised about significant stiffness gains, according to this source:

www.mountainbike-magazin.de/test/parts/acht-mtb-kurbeln-im-test-fuenf-3-fach-und-zwei-2-fach-modelle.911866.2.htm#7
  • + 1
 Last time I checked Atlas cranks are still made in Canada. I know their top end chainrings used to be, not sure if this is still true.
  • + 5
 Corvus1: I like to know where stuff is made. And if it looks good and functions right I'll even pay a little extra for something made in a country with strong environmental regulations, fair pay and working conditions.
  • + 1
 the only product being made in canada now is the next Sl components no other components are and i am speaking as being someone who has delt with the raceface reps directly the chainrings are bad ass dont get me wrong but none of it is made on shore anymore sadly
  • + 10
 I love their Atlas handlebars, I have them on all my bikes, from my XC bike to my AM rig
  • + 7
 I'm gonna try to start supporting these guys. I remember seeing in add for Sram, and it showed all machines making the parts. I like that these guys hand make stuff. Good work guys!
  • + 2
 SRAMs carbon cranks are constructed by hand as well, as are the carbon steerers/crowns, shifter and derailleur parts and many others. Mechanizing carbon layup would be tough.

Some parts are made by machine (CNC) and trust me, you want those parts shaped by a machine.
  • + 0
 I saw 2 different XO cranks snap last summer so i don't really trust them anymore
  • + 1
 i had the same problem with my sixc cranks
  • + 6
 It's great to see most of their stuff is made in Taiwan. I'd love some of the cranks though, even if they aren't supporting my local economy. I just hope the quality control is up to Taiwanese standards. Do they come with a time stamp? I'd hate to spend all that cheese on a Friday afternoon product...
  • + 1
 That's right. ... They think the same thing over their way! Not so different - national/community pride, love of quality bike parts and a bargain.
  • + 3
 SRAM's X-Sync or Race Face's Narrow Wide chain rings have transformed my bikes. Chain devices are heavy and expensive. Why bother when a simple variable thickness ring nulls the need for a device? 10 months on both a full bounce 160mm bike and a 29er hardtail and I've not dropped my chain. That includes XC, DH, 30ft hucks, crashes et al.

My new Cove Hummer 650bj Ti is decked with the latest Next SL cranks and 35mm Atlas Bars/Stem. Totally pimp!
  • + 1
 Sick bike and set up man. Would be especially nice to have that imported souped up Cove in the U.K.
  • + 1
 The weight of tha chain guide is equivalent to less than a bottle of water. Come off the weight train. Hahaha
  • + 1
 You could say that about literally any lightweight component. The cool thing about nw rings is that for bikes that don't need a bashguard there is no compromise in strength or performance.
  • + 7
 i love rf product. good article.
  • + 6
 Race Face whats not to like??
  • + 1
 not enough rise on theyr sixc bar hahahaha
  • + 1
 Carbon chainring tabs on the SIXC cranks, limkilde. Mine all failed simultaneously.
  • + 2
 Math-05stp: Ahhh just go for the 35mm version.

sngltrkmnd: Not to like :-)
  • + 1
 long story short, i can't change the stem on my bike so can't go for the 35mm version
  • + 3
 When Raceface went under, my boss had a quarter million dollar bid in place to buy Raceface's carbon fiber division, but was outbid at the last second by someone who bought the entire company. So close!
  • + 18
 cool story bro
  • + 0
 Easton Bell Sports.
  • + 3
 Glad to see RaceFace back from the brink and making decent kit.... Have they stopped making bb's now? As they were on a par with crank brothers for worst mountain bike product ever made!
  • + 1
 Had a 98 Raceface crank - 8 years of dh-racing. Still fine. CNC-binge look - looked very dated. Binned it. Qualitywise very good.
  • + 2
 I had a raceface headset, crankset, and titanium bb from 1998. All of them were hated by riders and supposedly had reliability issues. I guess i got lucky because all of mine are still working great.
  • + 2
 They still make them, yes. They had a pretty bad reputation, but I think the current BBs are considered pretty decent, at least in my neck of the woods. It a tough life for a BB though; my XT just shit the bed this week after about 12 months. Seems neither ideal or unreasonable to me.
  • + 1
 Yeah the stems, bars, cranks were all great... just for some reason the bbs were shocking, maybe they didn't have uk winters in mind when they were designed.
  • + 1
 Yup, the old BBs had troubles here on the north shore too. Not so much these days.
  • + 1
 You guys talk way too much! Eat this...1998 Turbine cranks, Isis ti. BB on a 2007 Foes Fly. After 7 years of 10 to 15 foot drops, racing, freeriding at Northstar, Mammouth, and Red Bull Rampage (original site), these cranks still work. They don't break! My 1998 XY post and 2007 Diabolus stem are still perfect as well. I don't have a single Taiwan part on any of my bikes! RACE FACE, CANADA, AND USA FOR LIFE!
  • + 1
 RaceFace has really nice stuff , i have several products of theirs , wish the did a Atlas stem with a 10deg rise Wink and their narrow wide rings work great with a clutch derailleur had mine now for several months and no dropped chains and i have no guide or bash ring .
  • + 4
 Wish RaceFace would make a 11-42 10spd cassette to go with the narrow/wide. That would put an end to the expensive Sram 1x11
  • + 3
 See torture machines testing parts? Race Face builds strong parts and backs up every product.
Still churning out parts from a building that used to be an old still.
  • + 1
 I get bit annoyed with all this carbon stuff with them saying its "stronger" and "exceeds the required strength by 10 times" etc etc! If that is true why do Raceface only warrant their SIxC carbon cranks for 3 years yet their Atlas cranks are warranted for a lifetime????
  • + 8
 Most likely because of the nature of crank use/abuse. While properly made carbon is way stronger than aluminum will ever be, cranks take impact abuse against rocks that could cause eventual failure. A sharp rock impact on carbon may damage the layup (if hit just right), causing eventual failure. A sharp rock impact on aluminum most likely would not. Stronger doesn't always mean stronger upon impact to rocks and other blunt objects. I applaud Raceface for not only making the best cranks on the market, but they also have crank arm boots to help relieve those sharp impacts that I spoke of.
  • + 4
 That's fair enough it does make sense. For a rider like me who has been know to clatter his cranks on the odd rock here and there I will stick with aluminium as it seems to be able to stand up to abuse more than carbon.
  • + 0
 even a scratch can become terminal damage after a long enough time
  • + 3
 Strength and durability are two different things. In the MTB world AL is typically more durable because it is softer and will not be damaged by a dent or scratch. Carbon is stiffer, but not able to withstand the same damage AL can - say from a impact with a sharp rock. Doesn't mean carbon is bad - you just need to understand the pros and cons and want the ones that come with a carbon frame or component.
  • + 3
 I'm not anti-carbon but it doesn't make sense to me that you build mountain bike crank arms out of it since the crank arms are the second most common component that is repetitively bashed against rocks (pedals being #1).
  • + 0
 I agree. If I had carbon cranks on my bike I would be scared shitless every time I rode it. I think it's a very brave person who puts their trust into them. Good luck to them.....they may need it!!
  • + 1
 Never had an issue, nor have I seen an issue with any of my friends carbon cranks. I will never go back to aluminum after feeling the performance gains of carbon. It's that good. Doesn't even make sense why someone would question carbon cranks. Carbon rims and handlebars if anything. Would doubt that one would be injured from a broken crank.
  • + 0
 See I'm the opposite. I have seen carbon bars snap easily and are also aware of a certain manufacturers carbon DH cranks failing at our national DH series last year.
  • + 4
 I'm still rocking my first RF Turbine LP crank arms I bought 15 yrs ago. Thank you RaceFace!
  • + 3
 Same!
  • + 1
 My Heckler has turbine crank set & BB, my Cove STD has NW, Atlas cranks and BB. No repairs, no problems, no maintenance = peace of mind and all day riding. Who says RF is expensive compared to cost of ownership and a smile on my face after every ride.
  • + 4
 sixc carbon dh bars...awesome bit of kit....
  • - 3
 Doubt those are "DH" technically.
  • + 2
 "built for AM/DH" - and on a DH bike. so yeah, they're DH bars
  • + 0
 "lightest production carbon crank set in the world"

Lighter than THM and Lightning? These two aren't as versatile granted but I don't think they can claim to be the lightest production carbon cranks. I believe Cannondale Hollowgrams are also lighter despite being Alu and super versatile.
  • + 0
 www.facebook.com/hashtag/weighitwednesday

Cannondale's reported system weight: 580g
Raceface's system weight, 30mmBSA, 175 arm, 28tooth direct mount: 512g. 68 grams lighter, 11.7%
  • + 0
 Let's ignore the BB because this will differ from frame to frame and the same BB will be required to fit each option in the same frame.

Raceface Next SL:
Raceface claim 425g on their website (arms, direct mount 28T ring) But with a 32T direct mount ring it is a fair bit heavier (446g).
See here: forums.mtbr.com/drivetrain-shifters-derailleurs-cranks/raceface-next-sl-1x-crankset-888126.html
So: Raceface Next SL is 446g (for arms and 32T direct mount ring).

Cannondale Hollowgram SISL2:
533g here: r2-bike.com/Cannondale-Hollowgram-Kurbel-Set-SiSL2-Sram-XX1
However, this includes the BB30 bearings (-47g) and is not apple to apples as is not a direct mount ring. Take off the heavy SRAM ring (-51g), heavy XX1 spider (-29g) and chainring bolts (-10g) and add a direct mount ring (+55g).
So: Cannondale Hollowgram SISL2 is 451g (for arms and 32T direct mount ring) (533-47-51-29-10+55)

The Cannondale is only 5g heavier despite being Alu.

However RF's claim is "lightest production carbon crank".

THM Carbones Clavicula M3 is 395g for arms, heavy XX1 spider and heavy stock XX1 ring. More than 50g lighter than RF.

Lightning claim 450g for arms, heavy XX1 spider, stock 34T XX1 ring and BB90 bottom bracket. Even with the BB it is 4g heavier than RF. Take away the BB and it is significantly lighter.

I don't see how RF can claim the lightest carbon crank???? Perhaps they argue THM and Lightning are not "production" cranks despite being available from dozens of places. As I said before, the intended use differs slightly to RF Next SL but that is not the claim. Furthermore, if you want a super durable crank you can have aluminium within 5g (Cannondale Hollowgram SISL2)
  • + 0
 Define "durable".
  • + 0
 Durable? Material generally more resistant to rock strikes than CF, able to repeatedly withstand 1000 Watts plus from top sprinters, Original Equipment on Cannondale Jekyll All Mountain/ Enduro bikes.... certainly no useless lightweight and strong and durable enough for most people.

Anyway, the claim by RF is "lightest production carbon crank" and THM and Lightning are both lighter. How can they make this claim? As an insider to RF perhaps you can explain the "lightest production carbon crank" marketing claim Colin?
  • + 1
 Not my department.
  • + 0
 Have a word with the marketing guys at lunch Wink No doubt it is good marketing as few people question it and have gotten suckered in by the "lightest carbon crank" claim....
  • + 2
 iv never had any problems with raceface kit on my xc or dh!!! bigup the raceface crew
  • + 2
 1st thing i did after buying my Slayer was get rid of the f-ing "made in china" sticker.
  • + 1
 I have only used the cheaper Ride XC series products by Race Face and they are great. I imagine their high end products will be awesome. This company has a really good vibe.
  • + 2
 Damn, who's that sexy guy setting up that handlebar test?
  • + 2
 Me.
  • + 1
 You wish.
  • + 2
 Race face narrow wide goodness!
  • + 1
 i got the opportunity to interview and tour the factory too for my school paper and they were awesome as hosts.
  • + 2
 Canadian..Eh ??!! GOOD FRIGGIN WORK !!
  • + 1
 Nice crankset. I know why they upgraded it. www.pinkbike.com/photo/10593409
  • + 1
 Had a set of SixC cranks on the DH bike and loved them. Can't wait for the Next SL's to show up for the trail bike.
  • + 3
 I want that chain.
  • + 3
 haha good spot, never break that bad boy..
  • + 3
 Heavy as sh*t though no thanks just buy a kmc!
  • + 1
 Although I obviously agree Jeff, there is a distinct lack of seriousness in our comments
  • + 1
 Ohh sh*t, I fell for it. I ended up buying a gold KMC. But it's still a no thanks for putting it on my bike. Looks better around my neck and I'll ride with the old chain.
  • + 1
 Got some next SLs in my bike and they really are good!
  • + 0
 Worth every penny! Too bad it takes many pennies to buy their stuff!
  • + 0
 My new build will have these cranks paired with a chis king bb.
  • - 3
 yet they still use aluminium crank extraction bolts.... i instantly mistrust any company that thinks that's a good idea.
  • + 3
 I'm glad that they use aluminum crank bolts and not aluminium here in Canada because mine have been fine for years! Shimano uses aluminum also.
  • + 1
 shimano dont use self extracting crank bolts...aluminium, fine yeah sorry whatever. I had some turbines two months, came to take the chain guide off and the self extracting bolt threaded, £12 for a new one, cheers rf
  • + 1
 I have 2 sets of XTR M970 cranks that would argue with you. Those and my RF cranks have been installed and removed numerous times with no problems at all. Of course this doesn't mean that you didn't have a problem with yours but in general they seem to work OK.

Just teasing about aluminium vs aluminum. Even though we use the word aluminum here I believe that aluminium is actually correct (it is the English language after all).
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