Race Face Next SL Cranks - Review

Nov 13, 2013
by Mike Kazimer  
2014 Race Face Next SL cranks review test

Race Face Next SL Cranks

Weighing less than one pound (with a 34t direct mount ring) the latest version of Race Face's Next SL crankset is light enough that even XC racers should approve. This light weight is accomplished by constructing the hollow crank arms completely from carbon fiber, and then attaching them to a 30mm aluminum spindle made from a new aluminum alloy. Despite their lack of heft, Race Face claims the cranks are strong enough to handle nearly every type of riding except full-on downhilling.


Details
• Intended use: XC / AM / Enduro
• Hollow carbon arms, aluminum 30mm spindle
• Removable spider
• Sizes: 170, 175mm
• BB options: BB92, 68/73 BSA, PF30, compatible with 190mm and 165/170mm fatbike standards
• Weight: 425g (175mm cranks with 34t direct mount ring)
• MSRP: $560 USD (as tested, includes BB and chainring)
Construction

Race Face manufactures the Next SL cranks at their own facility in Canada from carbon and aluminum imported from the United States, an increasingly uncommon practice in an industry dominated by products made in Asia. This tactic allows them to oversee the construction process from start to finish, making it easier to monitor the quality of the final product.

Part of the crank's light weight is achieved through the use of hollow carbon fiber arms. These hollow arms attach to an aluminum spindle that is 30mm in diameter, a change from the 24mm titanium spindle found on previous versions. According to Race Face, this change allowed them to achieve the same stiffness and strength of a steel spindle while still being lighter than the titanium version. Race Face also used a new aluminum alloy for the spindle that is claimed to be 20% stronger than the more common 7050 alloy. Compared to other cranksets that have the spindle permanently fixed to one of the crankarms, the Next SL's spindle can be completely removed, allowing users to swap it out for one with a different width (Race Face has spindles available to fit fat bike BB spacing). Since the Next SL cranks have a 30mm spindle, in order to make them compatible with bikes that use BB92 bottom brackets a bearing with an outer lip is pressed directly into the frame. Eliminating the retaining cups allowed Race Face to use the same size bearings as are found in a 24mm spindled set up.

Race Face Next SL review test

The Next SL cranks feature a 30mm diameter spindle that is completely removable, and Race Face has bottom brackets available that lets them work with every style currently on the market.


In addition to being able to swap out the spindle, the Next SL's Cinch interface means riders can run pretty much every imaginable chain ring combination, everything from a direct mount single ring all the way to a triple ring set up. An aluminum spider holds whichever gear combination is desired, and is then slid over the splines on the drive side arm (no spider is required for direct mount rings). The ring or rings are then cinched down using a lockring with the same pattern as a bottom bracket cup (Park Tool BB-22). We ran our review cranks with Race Face's 34 tooth direct mount Narrow Wide chain ring.

Installation

Installation was quick and easy – simply press in the bearings, the inner sleeve, and any necessary spacers using the correct tool, and then slide the spindle through the bearings. Next, tighten it all down with an 8mm hex wrench. The final step is to turn the preload ring found on the non-drive side to take up any play, and then secure it with a 2mm hex. Rubber boots are also included to protect the ends of the crankarms from rock damage.

Race Face Next SL

Once the cranks are installed, the preload adjuster on the non-drive side arm is used to remove any play. Race Face's BB92 bottom bracket does away with the plastic retaining cups to allow the 30mm spindle to work.


Ride Impressions

We rode the Next SL crankset like we would any other crank, running them through the full gamut of trail styles and conditions. Crank stiffness can be difficult to quantify, especially when riding a full suspension rig, but there wasn't any noticeable flex to speak of, even off of larger drops into harsh g-outs, or when mashing down hard to power through a tricky uphill section. The best cranksets and bottom brackets are the ones that don't call attention to themselves, remaining quiet and creak free, and we were pleased to find that the Next SL cranks fell into this category – they remained silent for the duration of our test. The wet fall weather allowed us to subject the bearings to some properly nasty Pacific Northwest mud and grit, but they took it in stride, and by the end of the test they were still spinning smoothly. The muddy conditions did accelerate the wear marks on the crankarms caused by shoe rub since our test cranks did not have protective tape on them, but Race Face has said that the cranks are currently being shipped with tape already in place.

We've had good luck with Race Face's four-bolt Narrow Wide chainrings, and the direct mount version installed on these cranks proved to work just as well. Set up with SRAM's X01 drivetrain and no chainguide, we never dropped a chain, even when plowing through steep, rooty terrain at race pace.

2014 Race Face Next SL cranks review test

Race Face's direct mount Narrow Wide chainring never let us down, keeping the chain on throughout the duration of our review period.



Issues

We haven't run into any performance issues with the Next SL cranks – they've taken everything we've dished out without complaint. The crank boots are a welcome addition to help protect the arms from rock damage, and the addition of protective tape should help prevent the shoe rub marks we experienced. There is one potential issue that is worth mentioning about the BB92 version regarding the pressing of steel cups into a frame every time the bearings need to be replaced. It's essentially the same way a headset functions, except that with headsets it is possible to replace the bearings without removing the cups. With careful installation this process should be trouble free, but careful is the key word – getting creative with a block of wood and a hammer is not the correct way to go about installing press fit items, no matter how tempting it is. Care needs to be taken during removal as well – if the bearing is punched out crooked, it could affect the frame. To help with this, Race Face will have a bearing removal tool available next spring.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThese babies are expensive, comparable in price to Shimano's aluminum XTR crankset, but bear in mind that the Next SL cranks are likely the lightest production crankset on the market. Plus, the large number of possible chainring and spindle options should help prevent them from becoming obsolete whenever the next chainring / bottom bracket "standard" arrives. We'd say the Next SL makes the grade, coming in at an incredibly light weight while still being able to handle the full gamut of riding styles, and the fact that they're made in Canada earns them bonus points as well. - Mike Kazimer


www.raceface.com


170 Comments

  • + 78
 I'm trying to barter my child for some Next stuff and carbon rims.
  • + 27
 In this case, only your first-born will be acceptable payment! Might need to throw an arm and a leg in there to sweeten the deal.
  • + 20
 Your baby better be 8 pound 6 ounce baby Jesus. Expensive bike stuff is expensive. AMIRITE?
  • + 14
 Someone get Rumpelstiltskin on the phone, lets get macross87 some new parts!
  • + 7
 Does the arm and leg have to be your own or can they be from an annoying neighbour? Not that I have my neighbours limbs laying around... I mean it not like I kil..er NOTHING!!
  • + 61
 Don't install a protective sticker! Every rub makes your cranks lighter...
  • + 6
 that's briliant idea patent it dude
  • + 18
 Things that tend to be light on my bike tend to not be so light on my wallet..
  • + 33
 As they all say:
Light, strong, cheap. Pick any two.
Except zee. Or maybe spank...
  • - 3
 Carefull with zee. The brakes use the exact same lever as the deore line. I bought them cause i was crashing into trees then come to find they are just rebranded bottem end ... i have a saint and its much more durable. .... also spank falls right in the middle of cheap and light.
  • + 1
 My father managed to split 3 zee freehubs in a year. I don't know exactly which cassete he uses, but I do know that he has 34 biggest cog (uses a 20 granny) and 6 of the biggest cogs on the same spyder. So yeah, carefull with zee.
  • + 8
 I would love/hate to see a "crash-into-tree-proof" brake lever Fuglio.
  • + 0
 doesn't fix lever durability, but teflon tape under the clamps helps a LOT.
  • + 4
 Maybe same lever. But nicer, stiffer hose and better caliper. Lever and mc just push the fluid. I can live with out all of the tool free crap
  • + 3
 finger tight only is my rule for brakes and controls
  • + 3
 @krsh: If the Zee hub is anything like the SLX freehub, then that is no surprise. Wouldn't doubt if they're one and the same. There have been known issues with the SLX freehubs for a while. Seen numerous exploded freehubs this season, all covered under warranty.
  • + 3
 I are a little trace of slx/xt in zee and xtr race in saint. I do see a similarity in lever, but calipers are somewhat hard to distinguish between the two group sets. Still nice brakes, anyways!
  • + 18
 I love that theyre made in North America....even if its CanadaWink
  • - 37
flag Drmagpie (Nov 13, 2013 at 6:18) (Below Threshold)
 Erm... North America is a continent. Canada is a country inside that continent as is the USA??
  • + 10
 No way!
  • + 11
 The only way you're getting 20% stiffer from an aluminium alloy is by using something that isn't considered a conventional aluminium alloy anymore (nothing that falls in the 1xxx thru 7xxx ranges), such as a metal matrix composite, or one of the Aluminum Berrylium or Aluminum Lithium family. All of which are going to be really pricey as they're primarily used for Aerospace and defence industries.
  • + 136
 That's what she said.
  • + 16
 ^^ The next Heisenberg?
  • - 12
flag Bullitproof (Nov 12, 2013 at 21:46) (Below Threshold)
 may i call out a fellow engineer? haha so many engineers that mountain bike. you have to be careful as to the classification: Re(engineer) or Im(engineer).
anyone who's seen any engineering mathematics class will get that.
  • - 12
flag Quesadilla34 (Nov 12, 2013 at 22:24) (Below Threshold)
 anyone else asociate the word " next" on a bike related object with those crappy little walmart things? Haha
  • + 0
 @deeeight, try riding the previous version of Next and then ride the new version, the power transfer increase due to the stiffer system is instantly noticeable.
  • + 2
 Could be 7068-T6511 aluminum. This stuff is surreal, look it up. 99,100 psi yield vs. 73,000 of 7075-T6511.
  • + 2
 @d8: Axlestiffness is not the limiting factor, modulus of carbon crank is.
  • - 19
flag Boris-Wolkow (Nov 13, 2013 at 1:43) (Below Threshold)
 Carbon as a brittle and fragile material is perhaps risky when using it for mountain bike cranks. The rigidity is definitely a plus but the chances to generate cracks because of impacts and to propagate these cracks by oscillating forces (pedaling) is still something we shouldn't forget. Maybe the other way around would give me a better feeling; outer aluminum and inner carbon.
  • + 4
 If its really up 20% its probably an Aluminium Alloy with a great percentage of Silicon or Magnesium. They go up to 90-95 GPA.
@bjorntsc: 7068 has a high strength not a high stiffness, stiffness indicator is the tensile modulus.
  • + 67
 Armchair engineers ASSEMBLE!
  • + 5
 @ deeeight. Its stiffer because its bigger. 25Mm to 30mm
  • + 5
 many poeple ride xo for many year without any problem me included , 3.5 years with the same carnk and i ride a lot ! carbon cranks is very solid trust me !
  • + 1
 Whut matrix ..
  • + 2
 The f*****g reb pill dude
  • + 1
 Completely agree. My SRAM XX crankset is four seasons old and has been on 3 different frames soon to be transferred to another frame in the spring.
  • + 4
 @Fugilo.... wrong... read what was written again.

" Race Face also used a new aluminum alloy for the spindle that is claimed to be 20% stiffer than the more common 7050 alloy."

That's a comparison of alloys... and has nothing to do with the diameter increase which they already mentioned was done to compare to the stiffness of a steel spindle while being lighter than the titanium axle they previously used.

As I said, to get 20% stiffness increase you need to leave the Aluminium alloys as most consider them (where its a majority of Al - 85% or more - and then usually a dozen other elements in small percentages) and move into the realm of metal matrix composites which have previously been used for bicycle (more than 20 years ago by Specialized for example). I have a couple Specialized M2 series threadless stems for example, which are made from the same weldable MMC that they made the M2 stumpjumper frames from and those came from Duralcan which is a division of alcan aluminum.
  • + 7
 wait, wait, wait. are you trying to say the spindle is made of some kind of metal?
  • + 14
 @deeeight - You are correct. This is typo. The material we use is 20% stronger, not 20% stiffer. This allows us to make a lighter spindle than if we used 7050 but at the same stiffness as a 24mm steel spindle. Sorry for the confusion.
  • + 10
 come on guys it's just some cranks
  • + 5
 @ridethree: Just a typical PB knowledge/pis5ing contest.
  • + 1
 @estate- I never said anything about the stiffness or young's modulus when referring to 6068.
  • + 1
 No you didn't, but the discussion was about stiffness claims in the review, not strength, so why you decided to chime in at all is a mystery.
  • + 1
 I misread and thought we were talking about yield strengths of materials.
I do agree that it would have been weird to have an alloy mostly consisting of the same base element to have a young's modulus that is 20% different; this doesn't happen unless you change a large percentage of the alloy.
  • + 9
 Have a 1993 Specialized M2 that has 30,000 miles on it. The frame and 1" steerer Marz Bomber Atombomb 2, with a whopping 75mm of travel is now hanging on my wall. Uncleaned!!! It's the original frame, 3rd fork. Not ridden anymore, I parked it last May. It's not cracked, just didn't know if it would last another 20 years or not. This bike was used for Downhill racing, dual slalom, dirt jumping, riding at the BMX track, Cross Country racing and road riding with 26" slicks. Went from 7 speed, to 8 speed, to 9 speed and almost 10 speed. I cased it, jumped it, dropped on it. During that 19 year run, I broke 2 of my "second" bike frames riding the same trails, the very same way and those were supposed to be "the newest and best" frames available. Every part on that frame was replaced at least once because it bent, broke, wore out or failed.

Add to all of that, I've never weighed less than 200lbs!! There is a lot to be said about those metal matrix composites.
  • + 11
 Relevant username ^
  • + 1
 @deeeight easy. easy there. Now now. Moscow. Good call. Moscow.
  • + 11
 wow, if I had the money, I would no doubt throw down the money for a set of those. Nicely written and from what I can read, one hell of a product.
  • + 3
 I wanted to see a pic of them on the scales.
Certainly come out as the lightest compared to others on ww.
weightweenies.starbike.com/listings/components.php?type=cranksets&sortby=real
  • + 1
 They only had Next cranks from 2001 and 2003 on that website, I suppose they would be heavier than these new ones?
  • + 2
 To put that in comparison, 21 years ago the xtr m900 cranks were 500 grams for arms alone (no rings, bolts or bottom bracket) and even the original raceface turbine ibeams were about 450g for a pair of 175mm length arms.
  • + 2
 I wish I had the money to try them out. I've been running THE SAME Race Face Next LP crank since 1998 (I think). I love it and it's still going strong! It's always been swapped to whatever bike I was racing on, so it's seen abuse.
  • + 3
 My teenage daughters have a set of my LP's and Shores from the 90's. Real components sealed BB's (and a spare!) and a Race Face BB that still spins smooth. Put a lot of hard miles on them before they got them. I was never sure if the Next LP's would last, guess I was wrong.
  • + 3
 I want to Raceface make all their cranks this way. Turbine direct drive single ring set-up would be a great more affordable 1x option.
  • + 1
 Had the first gen next cranks - 3 years then this summer the tabs which held the rings together separated from the crank. No longer covered under warranty Frown . Sticking to aluminum cranks and rather spend money on a good set of wheels.
  • + 5
 Even if you're outside of your warranty period, RF has a crash replacement policy to get you new Next SLs at around 50% off MSRP. If you purchase new cranks through the CR policy, they'll come with a new warranty (3 years on Next SL). We can still sort you out with an aluminum crank under the same CR deal if you'd really rather stick with aluminum. Email components@raceface.com for more info.
  • + 1
 I have a buddy in the same boat, was riding along - not under climbing load - and all but one of the chain ring tabs sheared off the rings. It's unfortunate RF isn't offering an extended warranty when clearly the materials or design are at fault here, especially when there are many stories out there of this happening (and the few Ive heard of seem to happen shortly after the 3yr warranty is up). The very fact that the design has changed implies RF recognition that it wasn't ideal. I love RF, have never had issues with their products and hope they'll offer more to my buddy than just CR
  • + 1
 Sorry that happened to your buddy, but RF does have a longer warranty period than anyone else (x0 and xx are only 2 years) so they try to help as much as possible. The amount of tabs that have failed (excluding the ones that failed from people bolting directly to the tabs w/o use of outer ring or tab shims) is extremely low compared to the amount we've sold. RF went away from the full carbon tab to allow a more modular setup. Sorry again that your buddy isn't pleased with our CR policy.
  • + 1
 $560, for the crank. $270, for an XO derailleur or $305, for an XX derailleur $400, for an XO cassette, or $425 for an XX cassette. Another $60 for a chain. Shifter will be $139 for the XO, or $175 for the XX
That's $1429 for the XO and $1525 for the XX. If I'm spending that kind of money. I'm not going to worry about $100 bucks extra, to get the XX. Minus 15% = $1300

With a 28 tooth chain-ring and 42 tooth cog and a 26" wheel,,,,,, you get a 17.2 gear inches per revolution.
A 22 tooth chain-ring and a 34 tooth cog and a twenty-six inch wheel,,,,, you get 16.8 gear inches per crank revolution. Nearly the same.
I'd like to try it. As soon as I get some money.
  • - 8
flag greendarthtater (Nov 13, 2013 at 0:47) (Below Threshold)
 But a bigger chain ring allows you to go faster on downhills, it's not all about climbing ability. They also don't make 22 tooth chain rings.
  • + 1
 And what about the heavier gears with that 28t front? Wouldn't they suffer from the relatively small front ring?
  • + 1
 ^^^ hahaha they do on triples....
  • + 1
 We're talking 1 x "something" drivetrains here! Razz
28t is the lowest they are doing, but this is simply not enough for going fast on a downhill (not meaning a DH downhill, just at a higher speed). Smile
  • + 0
 Herd about a 27 chairing
  • + 4
 In my mind, there's no reason to get the XX cranks. If you do some research, you'll see that they're actually heavier than the XO's and they have that silly spiderless arm that doesn't let you put on a 1X setup like the MRP bling ring or this RaceFace narrow-wide setup. Also, there's no way to make a 27 tooth ring in this format. Narrow wide means they have to have an even number of teeth.
  • + 1
 The 985 crank with wolf tooth is only 500gr, and the shimano attachment system with independent bearing tension and clamping screws is superior. You could probably even shed a few more grams by using ti instead go steel for clamping screws
  • + 3
 but these are still 75g lighter and CARBON
  • + 6
 Did you say they're CARBON...take my money, please.
  • + 1
 Yes! This spacer nonsense is... nonesense.
  • + 0
 75 grams of no-play-developing, no-bearing-crushing, secure attachment.
  • + 1
 It's also funny how they always say they never dropped a chain using a narrow wide ring. A bike shop that I know tested one on their local trails and dropped the chain 3 times on one ride! I just can't see how it's supposed to work when your chain is flying up and down. If it was that good then I would like to see the top DH racers using one with no chain guide, now that would be interesting.
  • + 2
 Many of the Sram Blackbox riders at Rampage were running the narrow/wide with no chainguide..
  • + 1
 I have run a narrow wide ring with no guide for a about a year now, have never dropped a chain. Maybe your shop needs to look at their setup better.
  • + 1
 Well things have changed slightly since. I have a blackspire narrow wide and its been amazing. I tend to hear its a certain other manufacturers one that's not quite as good due to its teeth not been as long as other narrow wide chainrings.
  • + 1
 i've never dropped a chain in a year of using the RF narrow wide ring either. i'm also using a clutch derailleur, i think that combo is perfect
  • + 1
 Love these cranks, won't ever be able to afford them.

Do any other RaceFace cranks use this Direct Mount system? Could you buy a spider that direct mounts so that then you could have the versatility of having a single crank that could run single 26t or swap out for a 24/38 mounted on double spider. An Alum Turbine which can mount these DM chainrings would be on my short list of cranks i would actually consider/could afford.
  • + 3
 Answered my own question with a google search.
www.bikerumor.com/2013/08/27/next-gen-race-face-next-sl-crankset-unveiled-495-grams-all-in-plus-pedals-wheels

So apparently, Yes you can direct mount spiders. No this isn't available on any system other than the NEXT cranks. I'll be waiting for the trickle down to Turbine. Love the versatility of this system though. +1 for RF
  • + 1
 I think the spindle is made by the magic mtb pixies if its that strong forget all the technical stuff you all sound like m3 owners. Lets agree that they are a true piece of bike porn and we all would want a set if raceface accepted kidneys as payment (yes I want a set that badly so one kidney on offer)
  • + 1
 I got in a biding war over a yellow RaceFace Turbine crank old school 110BCD square taper and ended up paying $170! Stupidest purchase ever as I see them go for $50 now. I had to have then though because they were the shit back then and the bike I was building was a beauty abandoned in a lobby. A 1992 Rocky Mountain "Team Comp", Porshe silver hand made in BC from Tange Prestige Ultimate Ultralite tubing. Too bad she's a bit small at 17" but with a 400mm seatpost and long old school Syncros stem, it fits and needed more Canadian parts. Deeight would likey.
These certainly are sweet cranks but pricey. Reminds me of 1990s high end pricing when a friggin hub could cost $350! Parts now seem much more reasonable...except this. Besides, why would I want this when I have FSA Afterburner bitches?! That's right, Afterburner, it makes me go fast!
  • + 1
 30 mm spindle on the BSA 68/73 version? (1.37 inches is ~35 mm). Press-fit bearings in a threaded shell? The article glosses over this, but BSA is still the most common BB on frames, or so I believe. Is it really the same crank?
  • + 5
 @Snfoilhat - We do make a BSA30 BB (Threaded cups that fit a 30mm spindle). We are not the only company to do this. E-13, Rotor, Zipp, Enduro all do the same).
  • + 1
 That's cool, thank you for explaining RF.
  • + 1
 Do they allow you to run a PF30 or BB30 crank in a BSA bb frame?
  • + 1
 No they do not. BB30/PF30 specific cranks have a short spindle that can not be used on a BSA frame (or BB92). Our spindle is long enough to work with BSA but will still work with PF30/BB30 (also BB92, BBright and BB386EVO).
  • + 1
 I have two of these with 26t single ring
Picking up a third set today
they are really stiff and light
running one 1x10 with xtr rd986
running the other two with xo1
Also have S-Works Fact with XX1 28t
RF Next Sl are nicer(more options, less proprietary)
  • + 1
 That's a full pound lighter than my $125 crank ($75 used). 464 grams to be exact. So, should I be broke now or after I lose the 20 pounds of extra out-of-shape I am carrying around? Hmmm... Wait, I'll lose 20 pounds and then buy $400 worth of beer instead...
  • + 3
 I bought my first turbines around 94 for $350ish. 19 years of inflation the cost of r&d and the materials makes anything under $700 with bb and rings is a retail price.
  • + 4
 The first turbines used good old (and after having been around decades, the alloy was) 7075-T6 and were simply CNC machined from billet, and the spiders were pressed on seperately and held in place with a bolt. They retailed for $199US in 1993 (when the US dollar was trading at around $1.60 cdn) and they weren't very reliable. In fact, of Raceface's entire first year product lineup, the only parts that were actually reliable were the ones not actually made by them in Canada (the Ti stems and bar ends were made by litespeed, the saddle was a relabled Vetta model with the rocky mountain shoulder saver pad under the nose as Rocky used on their Velo made saddles). Fortunetly that isn't the case anymore with the brand.
  • - 4
flag beeone72 (Nov 12, 2013 at 23:50) (Below Threshold)
 Deeeight once again says blah blah blah blah blah and blah blah. And will do the same on the next article you read.
  • + 18
 Who the f*ck are you @Deeeight? Are you RC's throw away account?
  • + 8
 Keep it coming deeeight, I love all that old school stuff!
  • + 4
 Ten minutes to Wapner!
  • + 2
 Yeah definitely .... definitely 6 fish sticks ...... definitely...... Yeah......
  • + 2
 I will stick to my turbines for now but as soon as i find $560.00 dollars laying around i will buy em! My wallet will still be pissed though I'm afraid
  • + 1
 Haha! Thats my new set set and hot dam I can't wait!
  • + 3
 Carbon cranks.. something I really want on my bike... but REALLY can't afford
  • + 1
 Anything "Next" reminds me of my crappy bmx bike as a kid.
  • + 5
 But their Next lineup is far from crappy
  • + 1
 I have a set of XO carbon cranks i'll sell you for $60 USD.
  • + 1
 I hate those preload adjusters. Why can't they do like current Shimano. And I will never, ever buy an MTB frame with pressfit BB. The only good place for pressfit is Spanish BB on BMX.
  • + 3
 worth every penny, quality is king.
  • + 1
 Some people weigh 50kg and don't go in for big jumps and such. Plus these look a lot better than sixc (more important to some people. Er, like me).
  • + 3
 I think I know what's going on the Christmas list!!
  • + 3
 Crankly... These look amazing.
  • + 0
 Another crappy post about over priced crankset right up there with SRAM over priced xx1 at least you can buy the SRAM xx1 crank set on Ebay for under $300 change out the spider and run 104 chainrings.
  • + 1
 I like how it looks... Simple.. But its super expensive. Hope this sort of crank and chainring system goes standard
  • + 2
 ...I need some new cranks for my fatbike...
  • + 1
 Having seen the abuse my SLX cranks have had.........hollow carbon........no thanks.
  • + 1
 These cranks are wicked. I'll be grabbing a set for sure. Gotta love Race Face stuff.
  • + 3
 425gr!!! wow
  • - 1
 '...but we'd also like to see some protective tape come with the cranks to shield them from foot rub..' Cut a small section of old innertube out and slide it over each crank arm. Job done.
  • + 9
 Is that easy? Old inner tubes will look great on this 500dolarplus piece of art
  • + 1
 I think they're prettier than the old SLX cranks. I would draw these like one of my french girls.
  • - 1
 Had me until press bearings directly into frame. Damage/wear on frame not worth the risk to me. Plus probably a pain in the arse, Shame I was well chuffed at the bb92 compatability and utter pimpness
  • + 3
 its a bearing cup mate, just like a headset, no damage or wear to the frame unless your hammering them in and out every other week and even then it would probably take a while to do any proper damage. plus, if the bb is anything like the pressfit one i use, you can tap the bearing out of the cup whilst its still mounted to the frame, but whether thats the case with this one i dont know
  • + 2
 The way I understood the article, in order to get a 30mm spindle to fit, there is no seperate cup and bearing, the bearing is pressed into the frame directly without a cup. Which is what markg1150 is concerned about.
  • + 1
 Theres a photo of the bb in the article which shows the bearings in a housing, and then there is a statement regarding the fitting of the stainless steel cups, my bad if im wrong though
  • + 1
 "in order to make them compatible with bikes that use Press Fit 92 brackets a bearing with an outer lip is pressed directly into the frame"
My understanding is its a bearing with a lip on the outside edge to correctly locate and stop it going all the way in. That's just for pf92 I believe.
  • + 1
 that's what I understand as well.
  • + 1
 Can anyone comment on the durability of these? I don't want to be worrying about my crank breaking if I jam it into a rock.
  • + 1
 Shame they keep snapping eh!
  • + 1
 Ahahaha so expensive! wtf??? might as well put a down payment on a car
  • + 1
 Cheap. Light. Strong. Choose any two.
  • + 1
 someone gets it...
  • + 1
 pwn 1 ..............Yep. Cheap , light ,strong. Pick two. Kieth Bontragers words I believe. So true.
  • + 2
 I think people were saying that long before he was born, although in MTB circles he always seems to get the credit. Still true.
  • + 1
 My Middleburns are still better.
  • + 1
 I luv race face stuff but these are ugly!
  • + 0
 What's the difference between AM and Enduro? One is a mt. Biking decipline and the other is marketing!
  • + 3
 Nope. One is a type of bike/riding the other is a form of racing.
  • + 6
 True, AM is pure marketing. Enduro racing exists for more than 10 years over here, and it's a beautiful discipline Wink
  • + 0
 AM is dead. It's called "aggressive trail riding" now.
  • + 1
 Would they fit a 36 or even a 38 toothed ring?
  • + 3
 They're currently offered with up to a 36t DM ring. You can always get the 104bcd spider and mount the Narrow Wide Single Ring if you need bigger than a 36t.
  • + 1
 These look quite nifty
  • + 1
 Next comment
  • - 3
 nice, the old model was already super light, but suffered from fragile carbon spider. looks like they've taken care of that issue. hopefully there will also be a steel version for am riding.
  • + 1
 Steel isn't needed for AM
  • + 3
 You want AM version you buy the SIXC cranks.
  • + 2
 Except for the spider-less design. 28t is perfect for my setup and I can't get there with my SIXC.
  • + 0
 My Turbines work fine.
  • - 3
 Why no 83mm bb for the ligytweight DHers?
  • + 11
 That's what SIXC cranks are for.
  • + 10
 Because they aren't a DH crank, and I'm sure RF doesn't want you using them as such.
  • + 4
 unlike SRAM who just added an 83mm spindle to their X0 cranks.
  • + 15
 SRAM will sell you your grandma to ride her downhill. If you pay.
  • + 1
 Some people weigh 50kg and don't go in for big jumps and such. Plus these look a lot better than sixc (more important to some people. Er, like me).
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