Randoms Part 1 - Eurobike Media Days 2019

Jul 4, 2019
by Ralf Hauser  
Nicolai blends two models into one

Gone are the 27.5” G16 with 160mm of travel and 29” G15 with 150mm of travel, leading to the creation of the G1 with either 162 or 175mm of travel (adjustable by a flip chip at the shock mount). With a super slack head angle of 62.5 degrees, super steep seat angle (78.5 degrees) and long reach, the G1 is another example of Nicolai’s longer is better approach.

By implementing so-called mutators at the chainstays and seatstays, the new G1 can be equipped with either 27.5” wheels (with external bottom headset cup) or 29” wheels (with zero-stack lower headset cup). The mutators at the chainstays are available in three lengths, making it possible to adjust the chainstay length between 445, 453 and 461mm.
Two mutator options at the seat stays (plus the option of eliminating them completely) can modify bottom bracket height and angles.

Conway’s revamped WME series

Conway is breathing new life into their WME (We Make Enduro) lineup with a complete redesign. Available as a 29er with 150mm of travel or 27.5er with 170mm, the full carbon frames utilize a full floating shock, mounted between the chainstays and a two-piece carbon link. Our scale showed a frame weight of 2,700 grams with cable housing and headset for a size M, so without those add-ons it should come down to about 2,500 grams without shock.

Clean cable routing from front to end. Liners on the inside eliminate rattling.
The PM 180 mounts are sitting on a separate aluminum mount for easy replacement, in case something gets damaged.

A small storage box is hidden underneath the down tube bash guard for essentials like a spare tube or mini tool.


170 mm of travel front and rear on the WME 627 with 27.5” wheels.

The Conway one-piece stem and bar combo is still in its late prototype stage but will be available in two lengths with a weight of about 270 grams.


Magura likes to hide things

Magura’s MCI (Magura Cockpit Integration) doesn’t only hide the cables but also the cylinders inside a specific SQlab handlebar.

The mechanical lever parts are actuating a long piston inside the bar through a hole in the handlebar. While the levers can be adjusted slightly in angle, its range of movement is very limited. SQlab grips can be pushed beyond the bar’s ends slightly for adjustment of the hand position.
The unit can be pulled out of the bar.

By turning the bike on its side, the brakes can be bled through a bleed hole on each outside of the bar.
Brake hoses are routed through the steer tube.

An easy link located inside the steer tube makes it simple to decouple the brake hose for disassembly and reassembly of the brakes.

Bored with the look of your brakes? Magura allows you to design your own brake lever stickers.


PRO goes bigger

With the Tharsis 3Five series, PRO is adding two 35mm handlebars and a stem to its lineup.

Available in a carbon or aluminum versions, the Tharsis 3Five carbon handlebar is benefitting from an improved carbon layup that is claimed to provide higher steering control than 31.8mm diameter models, but allows for vertical compliance that is comparable to the smaller clamping diameter. With nine degrees backsweep and 20 mm rise, the 800 mm wide bar weighs 200 grams.
The aluminum version of the Tharsis 3Five shares the same compliance characteristics thanks a variation in wall thickness. It comes in at a weight of 270 grams at 800mm width.

The Tharsis 3Five CNC stem is available in 35, 45 and 55mm lengths with a weight of 160 grams at 35mm length.


DT Swiss will spin your world

We’ve already looked at DT Swiss’ 180 hubs with Ratchet EXP technology in detail but now have news that the super light (185g rear and 92g front for Boost) and stiffer (15% more rigid compared to old design) hubs will be integrated into complete wheelsets with XC, all mountain and enduro specifications. Expect to see some first samples at Eurobike in September.
DT claims that real world racing situations with team riders have already shown that the new single ratchet design has increased durability considerably. The entire system is also incredibly simple to disassemble and reassemble.



84 Comments

  • + 74
 NO Magura, NO! #saynotointernal
  • + 37
 An answer to a question no one asked.
  • + 13
 I love having to lay the bike on its side to bleed the brakes! Genius!
Honestly who thinks of this stuff? Why not make the effort to have a smaller assembly on the outside of the bar, or have a more durable one? Or literally anything except internal
  • + 13
 We all want simpler cockpits. We don’t want ridiculously complicated cockpits that pretend to be simple on the outside. This is a classic example of an implementation idea being justified as a user need versus a user need leading to an implementation idea. Back to the drawing board Magura, and remember that simplicity will always outlast complexity.
  • + 11
 I give credit for the innovation mindset but that's a hard pass. The swiss hubs, on the other hand, have sex appeal.
  • + 15
 I....love it. Refine the idea a bit and making bleeding easier, but I like it. From a purely aesthetic point of view I really like getting rid of visible cables, but I can also see merit in protecting the cylinder within the bar. Anyway, off to go fix some teeth.
  • + 7
 @Lookinforit: how about no brakes? I mean they only slow you down.
  • + 7
 @Ktron: The obsession with hiding cables is pure vanity. I'm not completely opposed to it if the configuration is convenient to deal with, like internal chainstay routing, but anything that complicates cockpit service is a no go for me. You WILL have to deal with it, and then you're also locked into a single handlebar brand with probably limited dimensions. If Magura sold brake seals, I wouldn't be as hesitant either. Hope could do it right, but they never would bother.
  • + 3
 @rollchal: you ride chain less yeah? Well I ride brakeless foo!
  • + 6
 Integrated bar & stem and internal brakes are literally the 2 shittest ideas in mtb of late.
  • - 3
 @seitenryu: Yep - and less cables looks awesome. No more bird's nest.

Agree, they need to make the bleeding easier, but honestly it's a once every 6 month job. Even longer perhaps. Even if it's a bit finicky I can handle that (though turning the bike sideways it a bit over the top).

As for limited bar/stem combos - well if the idea takes off, others will get in on it.
  • + 3
 It's a daft idea. But... Mountain bikes would look a lot cleaner if brake hoses and gear cables exited down by the clamp, then you could have a groove under the bar to hide them, kinda like roadie cables under the grip tape. And less likely to get torn off in a crash.
  • + 1
 @mountainsofsussex: better routing of the brake lines from the brake levers, then routing it next to the bar, would definitely be muuuuuuch better than hiding it within the bar.
I agree something like what the roadies have, except no bar tape. Wokring in a shop, I never quite got the hang of puttin gon bar tape in less than 6 tries hahaha
  • + 1
 now I've seen how it works... I'm not as put off as the first look at it... Look how HUGE that reservoir is! BUT, I dont think I'd trust a bar with a big ol hole in a stress point
  • + 3
 personally i like the idea of a clean cockpit and when crashing no ripped off cables. But what about noise? And i like the oneupcomponents parts in my stem.
I guess no easy answer for all problems
  • + 1
 I had a Scott Spark RC with two brake lines, one shifter, two remote lockout cables, and a dropper cable. I never ever noticed the birds nest while riding. Looks good in photos, doesn't matter when it matters.
  • + 2
 @Ktron: I can't downvote you enough.
  • + 1
 Has the integrity of the handle bars with a hole in them been addressed?
  • + 1
 @zyoungson: Exactly how does on tune handle bar roll to account for people who are taller or shorter than their test mule? #dumbstideaever
  • + 2
 @Ktron: worst part imho, what happens in case you crash and hit the lever which is a very comon, and plunger gets mangled? It not a case of align it back and off you go, I keep my brakes and shifter tight enough to not move while riding but loose enough to twist when crash so they won't get foocked
  • + 17
 Oh my god! that Conway looks like an innocent cross-country bike compared to the Nicolai...
Curious to know the wheelbase numbers of that terrific beast...

PS: thanks Magura for making things more complicated when most people want them simpler.
  • + 14
 "Don't worry you'll like it" - said the G1 to the Conway
  • + 1
 @alexsin: just bite the root it'll all be over soon
  • + 2
 That Conway 170mm looks very interesting. Will investigate.
  • + 2
 Quick link hoses are awesome and way overdue but that internal hoses and exiting out of your steerer is trouble waiting to happen. No go on one piece bar and stems too(need sweep and stem lengthbootions to mix and match)
  • + 1
 Every time I see another Nicolai I know my next full suspension bike will be from them.
  • + 2
 1300mm+ on their size medium
  • + 18
 Holy the poor bushings in that Lyrik will be shot after 2 rides
  • + 2
 Exactly my thought. Poor fork...
  • + 4
 So a stupid but relevant question for anyone whose ever replaced bearings in a dt Swiss rear. How the &$@! Do I get the drive side star ratchet out on this new one... Magic, unicorn spit, the tears of a thousand broken knuckled mechanics?
  • + 7
 Would love to see someone do a switchback on that Nicolai.
  • + 2
 Forget what you think you know about bike geometry and ride one. Honestly, it just totally resets everything.
  • + 1
 Can you pump manual a deep roller with it?
  • + 3
 @acali: Totally. G1 is the best wheelie bike I've owned. It was as big a surprise to me as anyone
  • + 0
 Their build quality is absolutely amazing. I’ve always wanted one just a shame they have terrible geometry. 550mm reach with a 560mm chain stay. Haha ok nice one.
  • + 3
 @thenotoriousmic: ...on the XXL frames, designed for people who are 6'7" and over
  • + 2
 @IllestT: I’m 6,3 and I’d choose the smallest size they do and even still I’d have a bike with a retarded head angle and wheels that were in two different time zones and quite frankly offensive chain stay lengths. Other than that there frames are incredible. Even down to the grade of alloys they use. Absolutely second to non. Beautiful to look at especially in raw.
  • + 4
 @thenotoriousmic: well all I can say is try one before you make assumptions based on historical geometry of other bikes. I'm 6'3" and ride a Large, but could have gone bigger
  • + 2
 @IllestT: I have done when they first came out haven’t tried any of the newer ones but the handling was horrible actually one of the worst bikes I’ve tried. I have absolutely no idea what they’re trying to do but it doesn’t work.
  • + 1
 @IllestT:

Wheel base is physics, 1300 is not doing switchbacks without pulling trials moves like “stoppies.”

What will more likely happen is that the switchback won’t be ridden. It will be cut out with a trail “braid” .
  • + 1
 @Saidrick: I guess Mondraker, Transition, Pole, Nicolai, Whyte, Nukeproof, Bird and Commencal are wrong then. You should send them an email saying they need to go back to the drawing board - sorry guys, the longer, lower, slacker thing just isn't working
  • + 2
 @IllestT: look at the geo on a medium mega. That’s what Sam Hill won two overalls with. Most EWS riders are on smallish bikes compared to what’s out. They’re all going with smaller more responsive bikes on the whole. I’ve got a xl process which is pretty long as well. I’m going smaller next time. I’d definitely say it’s gone to far and that’s without getting silly with a 1.35m wheelbase and a 62 degree head angle but then again I’m glad it’s working for you they’re beautiful bikes and I really do want one if they made them in more manageable sizes for the stuff I ride.
  • + 1
 @IllestT:

The bike companies aren’t wrong, but I am not sure you understand what right means to them.

They are out to sell bikes. People don’t generally buy 2 of the exact same thing.

So, they make bikes different and tell you that they’re better than last year’s.

Remember when they got rid of 26” bikes, because 27.5” was the best of both worlds. Well now it seems, that 29” is supposedly better than 27.5”...
  • + 1
 just fyi, no hate on nicolai at all. I love what they are doing and would love to try one out. Switchbacks are the only thing I cant see it being good at, but i'd be happy to be wrong and its not a big deal either way. Im sure its a rocket, and fun as hell. I'm 6'1 and ride XL frames but with a shorter stem, I am a huge fan of longer wheelbases although they have their drawbacks, once you figure them out I don't think anything is as fast in the fast bits.
  • + 5
 The Conway is somehow really close to being good looking but somehow still manages to be fugly. The Nicolai on the other hand...
  • + 2
 I think my Vitus came out from the very same catalogue. They are almost identical
  • + 6
 1) That Nicolai may just be my new favourite bike.
2) Couldn't Shimano come up with a better name than just 'Pro'?
  • + 2
 Pro was a brand Shimano purchased a while back.
  • + 6
 That Conway is pretty sexy.
  • + 2
 Man, agreed. Especially the blue one.
  • + 1
 Looks very similar to the canyon spectral from 2015
  • + 3
 Anyone remember Magura Firmtech rim brake mounts? Anyone? Weird, because that was the future back in 2010. I wonder how this new system will fare. I really hope it dies a quick EU-market-only death.
  • + 3
 As a mechanic, if someone brought that Magura mess into my shop after snapping off their lever and losing their DOT, I’d tell them to get f*cked.
  • + 19
 As a mechanic you know that magura brakes run on mineral oil instead of DOT?
  • + 1
 @emptybox: Don't get captious Smile
  • + 1
 @Magura just go all in. A one-piece stem and bar with integrated brake levers and Vyron controller, interface for eLECT Coach (v2?). Put an interface for Di2 and AXS systems while at it.
  • + 5
 Those e-bikes look sick!
  • + 4
 The Conway is looks like a result of a Canyon/Mondraker collab
  • + 3
 I wonder how long it will be before someone stuffs an electric motor in the storage hatch on that Conway.
  • + 1
 Conway is next level looks. Magura looks cool but holes in the handlebar? Guaranteed stress riser unless there is some sort of reinforcement doubler around the hole
  • + 3
 The Conway stem/bar reminds me of a hammer head shark.
  • + 2
 Wow Conway really stepped up in the aesthetics department. What a looker. Now all we need is a review.
  • + 1
 I thought the nicolai travel options came via different shocks.. that bike looks mean
  • + 1
 That was the G16
  • + 1
 I like those grips on the pro bars,but I went to pro website and didn’t find them,what are they?
  • + 1
 Because that brittle-looking plastic on that internal Magura piston will never fail?
  • + 1
 Interesting how Conway is moving to a full floating shock as Trek is moving away from it.
  • + 3
 It's Astro Engineering's design. The same one behind KHS bikes an several other European brands. They have been using a floating shock since Mondraker choose them to manufacture their full suspension line.
  • + 1
 DUDES, Magura is on point, just wait. Nicolai needs to brand that the BENDER!
  • + 3
 Mehgura
  • + 0
 Already on a G1.
Expensive, but easily the most modern and capable mtb in 2019. Absolutely solid (and transferable) warranty too
  • + 2
 And how about that head angle on less than double black lines?
(I'm scared to even ask about climbing)
  • + 2
 @pakleni: don't join the pitch fork crew and look at single numbers in isolation - as a whole bike, it works well on all trails
  • + 1
 Conway's look like a improvement on the sunn enduro sleds.
  • + 1
 Eurobike ?
Maybe "OutDoor by ISPO".

Eurobike 2019 is in september.
  • + 1
 Love raw aluminum. So moto.
  • + 1
 G1 looks fast standing still.
  • + 1
 that nicolai looks absolutely ridiculous... i love it
  • + 0
 these are some of the worst looking bikes i have ever seen
  • + 1
 That G1 is on its way!Smile
  • - 2
 Climbing with a 62.5 head angle, laughable. Just put a dropper and big cassette on a dh bike already you nerds.
  • + 10
 head angle has no bearing on climbing at all, its all about the seat tube angle and body position
  • + 0
 @b45her: if you are only climbing a gravel road sure.. modern "enduro" bikes have just gone back to freeride roots. A dh bike with a climbing ring.

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