Riding Brendan Fairclough's Specialized Demo 8

Aug 4, 2011 at 0:08
Aug 4, 2011
by Mike Levy  
 
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during the SRAM XO experience Les Gets France.
Will riding a bike that is setup to go faster than you are capable of mean that you'll go quicker? Despite my hopes, riding Brendan Fairclough's bike didn't automatically mean that I had his speed or style. In a bit of an eye opening experience, the opposite turned out to be true.

Brendan's Demo 8 details:

- Production frame, size large
- 64 degree head angle, 343mm bottom bracket height
- 8'' of rear wheel travel
- BlackBox tuned RockShox BoXXer World Cup fork and Vivid R2C shock
- Code calipers and BlackBox levers brake combo
- Custom 6 speed cassette with 9 tooth small cog (uses 10speed spacing)
- Prototype Renthal direct mount stem
- 740mm wide Renthal bar


For a lot of us, mountain biking is very gear driven. Sure, we all love nothing more than riding trails, pushing our personal limits and being out on our bikes with good friends, but having the ideal equipment for the terrain is also important to many riders, myself included. And thus it can sometimes be easy to blame a bad day on what we are riding, or to have dreams of grandeur that usually go along the lines of "Yeah, well if I had his support..." or "But look at the bike he's on, of course he won!". But what if you did have his bike? In this case I am referring to Brendan Fairclough's Specialized Demo 8 and the full support of SRAM - can a World Cup race bike and factory support make a punter like myself any quicker? Will his pro-only BlackBox tuned suspension allow me to devour the roughest of tracks at a speed that will have Brendan worrying about his spot on the team? The obvious answer is no, Team Monster Energy - Specialized won't be calling Mike Levy up anytime soon with a multi-season offer, but the day I spent riding his race rig in Les Gets, France, did prove to be an enlightening experience as to the vastly different demands that a World Cup professional has of his equipment compared to an average Joe rider. The gulf is much larger than you may expect.

I rolled out of the SRAM pits in Les Gets with Brendan's bike setup exactly as he would have it on race day - I made no changes to his suspension, cockpit (besides swapping the brake levers to have the rear lever on the right) or tire pressure. I even left his saddle height where he would have it. I wanted to ride his bike as how he would experience it, albeit a touch slower. The plan was to do a few warm up laps at a gentle pace in order to familiarize myself with the green and black machine, followed by cracking the throttle open later in the day with an eye on discovering if you really can go faster on a "faster" bike. Les Gets' lift accessed trails consist of a mix of bermed runs, most full of rough braking bumps from a lot of early season traffic, and natural, rooty singletrack that weaved in and out of the forest. Much of the terrain is also off camber and less groomed than the typical North American bike park, which made it especially challenging considering just how slippery the mountain was after a few days of torrential rain.


Brendan Fairclough s Specialized Demo
Shown here first on Pinkbike at the last World Cup round, Team Monster Energy - Specialized has been rocking this prototype Renthal direct mount stem (left) that seems to look very polished and close to being a production item. Brendan uses a set of Renthal bars (right) cut down to 740mm on both his Specialized Demo race bike and his Enduro.
Brendan Fairclough s Specialized Demo
His bike his equipped with SDG's unique looking I-Fly Storm saddle (left) that uses injection molded lugs to keep him from sliding off the seat when conditions are nasty, although interestingly, he prefers to run it in both wet and dry conditions. Brendan runs a combination of Avid's Code calipers and BlackBox levers that put out a tremendous amount of power, and his rear caliper had this neat little mud guard made from a Monster can (right) that helps keep the mud and debris buildup, mostly from the front tire, to a minimum.


Production frame: Brendan rides a standard large sized production frame, meaning that the bike uses a stock 64° head angle and ground skimming 343mm bottom bracket height (when set to the slack and low position as his was), and while I was concerned that the 447mm long reach would make for a bit of a stretch for my 5'10" frame, my lanky arms and legs had me feeling right at home. There are certainly some wacky setups out there, but Brendan's cockpit isn't anything out of the ordinary; his bar is at a proper height - not stupid low, and wasn't a foolish width either, having been cut down to a reasonable 740mm. All of his controls are positioned near where most people would run them. He uses an SDG I-Fly Storm saddle, the very one that lit off a huge discussion over whether its molded lugs made any sense, but it felt just like any other saddle when sitting on it. Yes, it looks weird. No, the lugs don't make it uncomfortable. Besides a rather lofty seat height (he's got a few inches of height on me), there really isn't anything remarkable about his cockpit.


Brendan Fairclough s Specialized Demo
A lot of downhillers are asking for a smaller spread, six speed rear cluster like the one on the back of Brendan's Demo 8 (left), but his also has a smaller than usual, nine tooth cog. This lets him use a smaller chain ring, and therefore a smaller chain guide for more ground clearance, while still having a sufficiently high enough gear for racing at World Cup speeds. His custom six speed block still uses ten speed spacing and the shifting is done with a standard XX rear shifter, although the rear derailleur is equipped with a longer limit screw to keep it from moving the chain onto the custom aluminum spoke guard. Brendan's bike will no doubt be sporting the new Crank Brothers pedals at some point soon, but his rig still had the original versions while in France.


The BlackBox touch:If the bike's cockpit felt somewhat standard, his brakes are anything but. All it took was a few loops around the parking lot to realize that the green and black bike's stoppers had out of this world power. I'm not talking about just a bit more power than what you'd find on a stock brake set, but a gigantic leap over what I was used to. Of course, more speed requires more braking power, but the question is how? His Avid Code calipers are fitted with production pads and controlled via a set of BlackBox levers that, while light and trick looking, shouldn't raise the stopping power (they don't use a different leverage or port size). When I inquired as to where the power came from I was told that setup is key, that the powerful bite comes from simply taking the time to do a comprehensive bleed on the system. Regardless, I'm reasonably sure that I could bleed my brakes all day long and not have them turn out like Brendan's, but I guess that's why his mechanic looks after his bike and I don't!


during the SRAM XO experience Les Gets France.
A 450lb titanium spring and firmer compression tune inside his RockShox Vivid help to neutralize Brendan's very rearward riding style.


Despite Brendan being quite a bit taller than me we are of similar weight, but his suspension was setup drastically different than how I would run my own. Given how hard riders of his caliber hit sections, this isn't really too much of a surprise - the faster the rider, the stiffer the suspension needs to be to hold him up. This is especially true of Brendan due to his somewhat rearward riding style that sees him leaning off the back of the bike more than other riders. BlackBox technician Jon Cancellier explains:
bigquotesBrendan runs a pretty firm spring and compression tune on his Vivid. He uses a 450lb titanium spring and a heavier tune than his teammates to help offset his rearward biased riding style. When you watch Brendan ride he is always hanging off the back of the bike and we run his rear suspension stiffer to accommodate this. Up front, he runs 75 psi in his BoXXer. This is a pretty standard air pressure for our World Cup guys as they need higher air pressure to hold them up when they are hitting things at speed. We also make use of the volume adjuster on the fork, running it at one turn from full closed to help make the air spring even more progressive. - Jon Cancellier, BlackBox technician
Not exactly a setup made for piddling about on the trails, is it?


during the SRAM XO experience Les Gets France.
Trying to get the most out of myself was key to understanding Brendan's Demo. Mid corner and take note of how high the bike is in its travel. I hit this berm on other bikes during my stay in Les Gets and the results were very different than on the Demo race bike.


On the trail:So, with its extremely stiff suspension and brakes that felt as if they could bring a locomotive to a quick stop, how did the bike feel on the trail? Common sense prevented me from rolling into the most difficult trails that Les Gets has to offer straight off, instead spending the first two runs on tamer lines that would give me the opportunity to get a feel for the bike's handling before jumping into the deep end. Even though the early runs weren't challenging, it was clear that the stiff suspension would require me to really pick up my pace for it to perform at its best. It was obvious early on that the bike was simply going to get the best of me unless I rode it hard and well above my comfort zone - this didn't exactly come as a surprise to me. The bike was a handful at my initial guarded clip, wanting to deflect off of braking bumps instead of tracking over them, and it took a lot of effort to simply hold a line on the trail. The stiffly tuned suspension was not the only thing at fault here, although both it and my lack of aggression and speed played a large part in my floundering. The other factor was Brendan's tire pressure, no doubt higher than I require due to his much more aggressive cornering and attacking style. The high pressure, combined with the mixed conditions, had me reacting to how the bike was tracking instead of the other way around. I was in for it if I didn't get off the brakes and let the bike pick up speed.

A difficult start to the day then, no doubt. But I knew that things would be much smoother, literally, once I pushed past that line where the bike would begin to perform like it was intended to. I am never going to come close to approaching the speeds that Brendan would hit, but I was determined to at least open it up as much as I could in order to get a glimpse into his Demo's personality. I began to wrap my head around the bike once I got on more demanding ground and picked up my pace to a respectable speed. All of a sudden the bike set about to behave how I expected it to and it really felt as if my traction instantly doubled. I didn't need to work so hard to keep the bike on a line because the bike wanted to stay on the line, and the suspension went from feeling as if it was working against me to genuinely having my best interests in mind. There wasn't a lot of concession for early travel suppleness, but both the front and rear dampers seemed to do a surprisingly impressive job of erasing the small trail chatter, especially given their stiff nature. How it managed to accomplish this, I have no idea, but my guess is that Cancellier's BlackBox trickery has a lot to do with it. There is no doubt in my mind that mimicking Brandon's settings on your stock suspension wouldn't have the same results. The other upside to his firm race settings are that the bike does a wonderful job of preserving its geometry under braking or when on steep sections of the track. This makes for predictable handling and no surprises when pushing hard or when tired near the end of a taxing run. And as firm as the bike's suspension felt, I was also aware of it being supremely balanced - There were going to be no surprises, no sudden bucks or jolts, and it made me believe that I could charge into any lip no matter how awkward it looked.


during the SRAM XO experience Les Gets France.
The stiff suspension, and especially the rear end, encouraged a much more playful riding attitude instead of the usual ground hugging downhill bike that is so common these days. In this way, the bike very much suits Brendan's style.


The bike's Specialized Butcher tires also came to life when my speeds picked up, but I could feel that his higher pressures, required by his much faster cornering speeds, wouldn't ever be ideal for me at my slower pace. Regardless, it was easy to see how he could absolutely tear a corner a new a*shole given the bike's predictable handling and stiff, balanced nature, along with the powerful brakes that let him get on the binders as late as traction will allow.

Have you ever watched the Top Gear episode where Richard Hammond tries his luck at driving Fernando Alonso's Renault F1 car? It wasn't a pretty sight, and if the car wasn't equipped with Anti-stall he likely wouldn't have got out of the pits, but he also couldn't drive the car quick enough to make the aerodynamics produce the required down force or get enough heat into the tires or brakes to have them actually do their job. Luckily for me I can't stall Brendan's bike, but I felt much like Hammond must have. I simply couldn't ride the bike fast enough to have the suspension function ideally, to have the brakes not feel so powerful as to be overwhelming, or to get the tires to hook up. After spending a good part of the day on his bike, none of it doing it any justice, I handed it back to him so he could ride it like it was intended. Watching him ride, it was easy to see how the setup works for him. Without mincing words, Brendan rode the bike, while the bike rode me for most of the day. He looked at ease on it, lazily doubling over sections of trail where I was floundering on the ground, and picking up speed where I was on the brakes. The wet conditions seemed to trouble him little, and it looked like his was on rails through corners that had me dropping an anchor and sliding about. A rider of his caliber on a bike that is setup ideally for his style is an impressive sight to see, but it was also a lesson in how a bike has to evolve according to the rider on it.


during the SRAM XO experience Les Gets France.
Brendan taking a completely different line at at a much quicker pace than I could manage through this section. His Butcher tires looked to be glued to the ground here, despite the slop and wet roots.


Pinkbike's take:I'd like to think of myself as a fairly proficient rider, someone who can ride at an expert level and feel comfortable on any bike or trail, but it was clear to me pretty quickly that Fairclough's bike was literally too much for me to handle for long periods of time. I could push myself hard for a few runs to get a glimpse of what his World Cup Demo is capable of, but I didn't have the strength, aggressiveness, or confidence to get the most out of the bike. Of course, none of this is really too much of a surprise to me. You simply can't jump on a bike not setup for you and expect to be riding at your best, but Brendan's preferences show that what allows him to ride so fast can actually hinder a rider of lesser skill. Can the average rider throw a leg over a World Cup rider's bike and expect to suddenly take ten seconds out of their race run? Not a chance in hell.

It's not often that the chance comes up to spend some time on a full fledged World Cup race bike, so thanks to both Brendan for allowing it to happen and to SRAM for giving me the opportunity. The great photos are courtesy of Sven Martin.


Astonishing brakes and top drawer suspension that isn't made for the average rider, Brendan's Demo is certainly put together for speed. Let's hear what you think about Mike's time aboard Fairclough's race bike - put those thoughts down below!
Must Read This Week






84 Comments

  • + 76
 I think most people are intelligent enough to realize each rider has their bike set up to their own preference and you can't just get on a pro's bike an expect to go faster. I know reading some of the retarded comments on this forum would gave you a good enough reason to write an article aimed at the low IQ brigade, but there are people on this forum that do have a brain. The article was interesting though as it gave details about this awesome riders set up.
  • + 4
 i agree..i always try to explain to my friends the principle of tuning theyre susps..but it doesnt matter what i say..they all ride with the susps as soft as they can with the rebound as slow as possible..and only 20psi in the tires...i think Brandogs bike would suit my riding style (not that i go as fast as him, cuz i dont) but i use a similar setup on my demo aswell
  • + 12
 I like reading insightful stories like this. For some its an eye opener for others its a glimpse into another world. And without intentionally doing so shines the light on why the pro riders and mechanics have their jobs! A few years ago i read a similar article about roadracing motorcycles except the columnist was a pro racer himself racing the same make and model of bike. When he did get to ride the factory bike he didn't like the suspension setup and even with the use of the team mechanic and his personal settings couldn't turn the same lap times...
  • - 15
flag mooseman414 (Aug 4, 2011 at 7:46) (Below Threshold)
 robots....... just go ride your damn bike
  • + 10
 what r u doing here then?
  • - 4
flag trailjunkie12897 (Aug 4, 2011 at 9:32) (Below Threshold)
 Except why does he flip his brake levers?
  • + 4
 ^^ He does not
  • + 17
 Standard on british bikes:

Left = back
Right = front
  • + 1
 Did not realize you had a different standard in Uk.
  • + 9
 i bet alot of people wreck big time when they rent a bike overseas then.
  • + 1
 A lot of rental bikes run with Flip-Flop levers so you can just swap them round with a couple of Hex keys.
  • + 3
 a.k.a, avids
  • - 3
 Brendog runs his brakes so that the front is the same as on a motocross rig. Sam Hill also rides this way as do most Brits and Aussies. Guess that could explain why they're so god damned good at the sport.
  • + 35
 Very good article and nice to see on a pros bike setup from a non super hero riders perspective. 2 thumbs up
  • + 8
 EXCELLENT ARTICLE - one of the best, most insightful I've yet read on PB - good work Mike Levy!

setup is literally everything on bikes - you will notice this if you ride the same brand / model of bike as your riding buddy, but his bike feels completely different to yours!

this is why "borrowing" a friend's bike (or a shop demo / test bike) to experience what a future purchase may feel like, can be completely off-putting due to a setup that is simply not compatible with your needs Wink
  • + 22
 That's so weird, I was going to write a comment about how this was similar to that episode of top gear but Levy took the words right out of my mouth
  • + 8
 I was thinking the exact same about the Top Gear reference, yet another similarity between F1 and downhill I guess!
  • + 6
 Here's it is on the official BBC Youtube channel. Ignore the ad at the beginning.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=EGUZJVY-sHo
  • + 14
 what a brilliant article. something a lot of us riders want to experience: using a pro's bike. i know its gonna be different but how different it is would be the million dollar question and pinkbike just did that. props!
  • + 12
 This is one of the best articles I've ever seen on Pinkbike. Absolutely smashing. There's some people who really need to read it.
  • + 2
 I gotta agree with ya there dude , I found it to be really interesting to read , I kinda knew what the out come would be in my mind but seeing it written by some one who's probably faster and more talented then me means more Smile
  • + 8
 Great Article ! It reminded me of my first time coming from a Hardtail to a 140mm Full-suspension :-( I was all over the place. After 20 years of riding mountainbikes I went and did a MTB Technical trainings course .... for Beginners !
It took me a long time to find my set-up and it's definiety on the other side of the Planet from Brendens.
  • + 4
 Just want to chime in to say that I also really enjoyed this article. Def quite a bit of the general stuff is fairly common sense, but loved the more in depth comments, and found it to be insightful overall. Well done Mike!
  • + 9
 Extremely well written!
  • + 4
 well said, it goes to show you that making a huge ammount of changes at once isnt the way to optimize your bikes performance for YOU... small changes one at a time it the way to go. figure out a base setup that work for you under most conditions and fine tune as the day progresses!!!
  • + 3
 Nice write-up.
I don't think that 75psi/bottom out most of the way in is un-common with racers and Boxxer WC's, in the UK anyway.
His Hi/Lo compression and rebound settings would have been interesting also, to compare.
Our tracks over here, hence the way we ride is different to over the pond, which might account for some of the set-up differences.
Try hitting wet pine roots like you would wet cedar in Whistler.... Can we have Cedar please :o)
  • - 1
 I doubt Brendog uses his Uk setup for all of his worldcup runs or bikepark training abroad so I don't know why UK specific settings would be relevant in France.
  • + 3
 I really enjoy this type of article. I have read many of these articles on pro moto bikes for years. It reminds me of a comment made by Commencal on Gee's custom bike a few years back, which was slacker, longer and lower than production, and it was pointed out there was no plan to put those numbers into production as it would slow the average rider down, rather than speed them up. You have to go fast enough for the tradeoffs to be a benefit. The kids commenting on numbers saying they need XYZ head angle or BB height need to ride a setup to see how it works.
  • + 6
 wow, good read! if only you could favourite articles... hint hint, Razz
  • + 2
 EXCELLENT article and very interesting. I think one point that may have been missed is that WC Pro bike set up is hard for more than just the reason that they ride harder - the WC tracks these days are also MUCH harder on suspension than any holiday-run you'll find in Les Gets.
  • + 2
 The guys at motocross magazine have observed this phenomenon while testing the race bikes of James Stewart and Ricky Carmichael too. They'd often say that it took mind-bending amounts of speed to get Stewart's suspension to even move (and Stewart probably doesn't weigh much over 160 lbs.)

Excellent article.
  • + 2
 Good write up. Although it's pretty much common sense, it was a good read. I'm sure Mike reveled at the opportunity to ride Fairclough's bike. I go through the same thing every year and with every new bike. I set it up super stiff thinking I am faster than I actually am and as the year goes on, it gets softer according to how fast I actually am.
  • + 2
 reminds me of F1 cars. Normal people, even ones that are very good drivers, most of the time can't corner with them without spinning out just because there so difficult to drive. I guess when you get to the elite of the elite you have some crazy equipment
  • + 5
 cool story bro. nice to see an honest article and well written
  • + 1
 PS, @Mike, great article and very well written. None of us will ever get the chance to ride a bike, set up for a Pro rider, so it's great to hear some kind of feedback comparing their 'stock' bike to our 'stock' bikes.
I think the gist is, it's not all the bike, be prepared to alter your set-up as you progress with your riding. It'll change your life. Or your cornering at least!!!
  • + 1
 Most of us already know that personal set-up is 90% of bike satisfaction and performance, but I found it great to get a little insight to how the pros set-up their rigs. It is a bit tempting to try a bleed day, and see what I can get out of my brakes.
  • + 1
 Ohh man you are one hell of a lucky guy Big Grin Not just becouse this is a 2011 Demo8, but you managed to ride a bit one of the best pro downhiller bike, which isn't for nothing at all - you felt something from the magic of BlackBox and felt something you are on a pro bike, so maybe if you push harder, and harder you at your hardest you can feel something what they feel. Well done Smile .
  • + 1
 Is it possible to get Brendan's mech to give us mortals a tutorial on brake bleeds? I manage a bike shop, bleed my own and customers brakes, and have never been 100% satisfied with the information provided by the manufacturors or suppliers!
  • + 1
 I'm surprised no one commented on the "relatively" narrow 740MM bars for a guy running a large frame and almost 6ft tall. I guess this dispels the myth of wider = better? Especially blokes running 780MM or 800MM. Just picked up some OSX bars at 780MM. Think I'll chop it down a bit.
  • + 1
 1st. Demos are quite long in the TT area
2nd. Brendog tends to ride further back. Riders who do that tend to go with narrower bars (Brayton is the same)
  • + 4
 It just goes to show, its not the bike, its how you ride the bike.
  • + 2
 My buddy tearing it up on a dick's diamondback coil ex show'd me that, but how you tune it also can make it way better so more tunable stuff can make quite a difference. I know just being able to tune my mission's suspension more than my old kona dawg made a huge difference.
  • + 3
 Yes, thats true. But you can tune Your 2010 demo 8 all you like, but at the end of the day the kid with the drop offs on the 06 gt ruckus that they dont even make anymore is still goinh to put in a faster time if he is detirmined enough.
  • + 1
 But if you put gee on a Walmart bike and sent him down the hill the bike would give out before he hit the bottom. also that kid on he ruckus will be faster if he tuned his suspension
  • + 1
 Reminds me of pro SX and MX bike tests in the dirt bike mags. Seems like half the time the bikes are rideable and the other half the motor has too much go and the suspension is too stiff for a "normal" rider.
  • + 3
 That was great. It would be great to see more stories like this if possible.
  • + 1
 Great article, never really thought about what it would be like to try the pro setup, looks like it really is different from the way the average mortal sets their bike up!
  • + 6
 It's set up to have a good ride, not to be a fashion whore! Big Grin


" his bar is at a proper height - not stupid low, and wasn't a foolish width either, "
  • + 1
 What an amazing looking ride, the seat is definatly one of my favorite parts, just waiting for monster to colab to make a seat like that!
  • + 1
 I just noticed, that the fork does not have the black stanchions. I guess they didn't wan't to reveal too much Wink
  • + 1
 Anyone know how they got the Vivid to fit the Demo? I've heard it's not an easy task or something?
  • + 1
 Seems like most guys his height are riding mediums, wonder what was the draw to riding a large? Hmm Any ideas
  • + 1
 Anyone know for a fact what lenght cranks he runs on this machine most of the time? Thanks.
  • + 1
 Anyone know for a fact what lenght cranks he runs on this machine most of the time? Thanks.
  • + 1
 Anyone know for a fact what lenght cranks he runs on this machine most of the time? Thanks.
  • + 1
 i remember some years ago, riders would use cut up old tires on the seat for similar reasons.
  • + 1
 Anybody know for a fact what length cranks he runs on this machine most of the time? Thanks.
  • + 2
 really enjoyed this story!
  • + 2
 Great stuff! Love articles like this.
  • + 1
 Mike - bloody good article! I'm curious to know what the psi was in his tires?
  • + 3
 Hey Matt, I had planned on taking a number of measurements and notes at the end of the day but Brendan and his bike left La Bresse before I was finished up on the lifts. They'll hopefully be more of those types of articles in the future, but with more in depth numbers included.
  • + 2
 really interesting article
  • - 2
 Love the look and setup of the bike, i also agree with other comments, the bike is setup to your liking. i don't see how you could go faster if the only difference from his bike to the standard bike is a change in components?
  • + 1
 that would be very appreciated haha, i really would like to know some of the weights,
  • + 1
 The plan was to get some numbers on Brendan's bike, but he ended up leaving La Bresse before I could get to it. The bike certainly isn't heavy, I'm guessing sub 40. Next time!
  • + 2
 probably the nicest bike in the world
  • + 1
 Wish I could get my buddies to take some time tuning their crap to fit their style.
  • + 1
 is there any other articles like this ?
  • + 2
 OMG that stem! Drool
  • - 1
 I agree. Renthal have a reputation for making good quality parts - but I hate their stem design and the colour of the bars.
  • + 1
 id like to know the weight of it
  • + 1
 If you go do dirt mags website or Mpora Dirt TV done a WC riders bikes weights and measurements , was quite surprising really some of the bikes weights were more then you would expect , a fair few 40+ pounders on some of the top teams and of course some scary light 34 pound jobs.

I can find the link for you if you want ?
  • + 1
 pretty long article but really short considering If I got to ride Brendan's bike I would write a blog and talk about it every day, only it wouldn't be nearly as honest.
  • + 3
 Long? You should have seen the unedited length =) I could have written an essay about this one!
  • + 1
 i think im going to make me one of those mudgurads for my elixer cr Smile
  • + 1
 hes rear disc is bented or its just my mind?
  • + 1
 I think its your mind. Are you ok lol. Loving the caliper mudguard tho.
  • + 1
 looks like its just the shape, unless bending the rotor is the new way to get immense power
  • + 3
 Running bent rotors enables you to brake more effectively , kinda like ABS. Maybe.
  • + 1
 I think its because its not a circular outer edge on the rotor. Its one that is kinda wavy I think
  • + 1
 How talls brendan with this being a large frame?
  • - 1
 i find it hard to believe all that power comes from how they bleed the brakes
  • + 5
 It is not only about the bleeding, but doing that thoroughly is a big part of the game.
Positioning the caliper exactly according to the disc (speaking of +/- 1 tenth of a millimeter) is also VERY important.
One step also pretty often forgotten is to really adjust the left and right brake cylinders in such a way that the brake pads are exactly
the same distance from the disc.
A lot is about minimizing tolerances. Makes one hell of a difference.
  • + 1
 that still wont give you the "massive" power that he speaks of. and those "brake cylinders" you speak of are called pistons. the tolerances b/w pads/rotor will make a difference in lever throw consistency, but wont give you the big power that they are talking about.

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