Riding RockShox's New 2014 Pike - First Look

Apr 4, 2013
by Mike Levy  
 
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TRAIL HOUSE: SEDONA, ARIZONA
ROCKSHOX
PIKE
WORDS Mike Levy
PHOTOS Adrian Marcoux and Sebastian Schieck


A Different Approach

The third annual Trail House gathering isn't the usual press camp event. Our introduction to new gear is often a rushed affair that more closely resembles a hasty dine-and-dash than a fine dining experience, but RockShox wanted to take a different approach for the launch of their new Pike trail fork. The concept was to invite a very select group of journalists - representatives from only four North American media outlets got the nod - to get to know new products in a more relaxed environment. That means more one-on-one time with the engineers behind the technology, more time on the bike getting a feel for how it performs, and more time shit talking around the fire pit late into the night. Held in Santa Cruz, California, for the previous two years, RockShox chose to relocate this year's event to Sedona, Arizona, a riding mecca well known for its hectic terrain that doesn't forgive mistakes, be it straying off line into a hundred year old cactus or traversing a rocky pitch that looks like it could turn any exposed skin into something that reminds one of an open can of tuna should you make a bad decision. Don't be
fooled by that harsh description, though, as there is plenty of flow to be found in the countless miles of winding singletrack that spiderweb out from town, so long as you're good with at least a few sections that promise to have even the most confident of riders puckering up in hesitation. In other words, a great place to debut the new Pike, a mid-travel fork that is aimed squarely at the rider who looks forward to throwing themselves at such terrain for hours on end.

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  Our crew was looked after by the fine folks at Western Spirit Cycling, a guiding outfit based out of Moab, Utah, who run tours all over the United States. They not only lead out our rides, but also put together some amazing food and drink to keep us going strong, key points to maximizing the fun factor.


Same Name, New Fork

It was 2003 when RockShox rolled out the Pike, a fork that, with 140mm of travel, 32mm stanchion tubes, and a 20mm thru-axle, looked to answer the needs of riders who wanted to get rowdy on their trail bikes (I think we were just calling them mountain bikes back then, though) without having to worry about a spindly cross-country slider being up to the task. Both bike technology and rider skill have evolved leaps and bounds in the ten years since the original Pike, but the concept of a relatively light fork that can take the abuse of a downhiller on a trail ride carries on with the 2014 Pike. Don't get the wrong idea, though, because this is an entirely new fork from the ground up.

The new Pike's chassis reflects its intentions, with 35mm stanchions that receive a hard anodized black finish (no, this is not the BlackBox-only DLC or limited BlackGold treatment), and sturdy lowers that feature more material on the disc side where the forces are higher. Casting details also include slightly less magnesium on the damper side as it does not require the same volume as the spring leg, shaving further grams, as well as a redesigned and much simpler 15mm Maxle Lite thru-axle.

While the Pike's chassis is fresh, it's the new 'Charger' damper that has us most excited. The sealed but serviceable damper employs an expanding bladder in order to compensate for shaft discplacement, and while utilizing a bladder isn't new technology - FOX's FIT cartridges follow the same basic principle, and it has been in the motocross world for many years before that - it is a step forward from RockShox's current emulsion-style systems that allow air and oil to mix. All told, the finished product is a 140 - 160mm travel fork that enters the ring at a claimed weight of 4.05lb. If you're the type to factor that last point into your build, that's lighter than equivalent fork options from RockShox's direct competitors.

2014 RockShox Pike Details
• Intended use: trail/all-mountain
• Travel: 140 - 160mm (29'': 140 - 160mm, 27.5/26”: 150 - 160mm)
• Air sprung
• New 'Charger' damper (sealed, serviceable)
• External adjustments: rebound, low-speed compression, pedal assist (depending on model)
• Dual Position Air w/ 30mm travel adjustment (optional)
• 35mm stanchions w/ black hard anodizing
• Redesigned 15mm Maxle Lite axle (no 20mm option)
• Steerer: taper only
• Wheel sizes: 26'', 27.5'', 29''
• Weight: 1838g/4.05lb (claimed, 160mm)
• Availability: May, 2013
• MSRP: $980 - $1085 USD







RockShox's Jeremiah Boobar explains the 2014 Pike


Views: 24,714    Faves: 38    Comments: 7

Filmed and edited by Mind Spark Cinema


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  Pitting out of the SRAM race support truck has its benefits, including access to the technicians who work on SRAM's BlackBox suspension and components. We may never be able to come close to qualifying for a World Cup race but we got to pretend for a few days.


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  A 140mm travel 29er version of the Pike was fitted to the front of our Santa Cruz Tallboy LT Carbon for testing, a potent combination that suited Sedona's rocky terrain.


Charger Damper - BlackBox DNA

When one thinks of the BlackBox program, images of many of the top World Cup downhillers (as well as the cross-country contingent) likely pop into your mind, which makes sense since that is where we most often see the custom suspension and components that are reserved for only a select few SRAM/RockShox-sponsored racers. As it turns out, RockShox has also been hard at work developing suspension for the mid-travel world as well, with the Pike's new Charger damper being tested incognito within a standard Lyrik chassis over the last year - there is a chance that Mega Avalanche specialist and all around badass Rene Wildhaber had prototype versions fitted to the front of his Trek without anyone noticing. What is interesting is that RockShox denies that the new damper has been used in any of their BlackBox-equipped BoXXer forks during last season, despite the air-free cartridge making a lot of sense in a long-travel application where the speeds are high and the impacts are hard. Will we see a longer stroke Charger damper tucked into a BoXXer chassis at the first World Cup DH stop in Fort William, Scotland? RockShox wouldn't confirm the chance of that happening, but we would bet some serious coin that it will.

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How is the Charger Damper Different?

All of RockShox's current lineup, excluding the new Pike shown here, utilize some variation of an emulsion-type damper - this refers to a layout where the damping oil is free to mix with air in the system. Open bath dampers from Marzocchi would fit into this category, as would RockShox's Mission Control damper that they use in their BoXXer and Lyrik forks, as well as FOX's Open Cartridge found in their Evolution series. In an emulsion damper air is used to compensate for damper shaft displacement as the fork compresses and extends. Oil does does not compress, meaning that the fork would not be able to compress if the leg or cartridge body were only full of oil. This design is often simpler but can mean that the oil and air can mix enough to cause the resulting air bubbles to pass through the damping circuits, resulting in a loss of damping and control.

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  RockShox Engineer Damon Gilbert gives our group a run-through of the new Charger damper under the canopy of the SRAM race support trailer.

The opposite of the above, a closed and pressurized damper like the Charger system (does the name make sense now?) is completely full of oil and has essentially no air within it, meaning that there is far less opportunity for it to foam during hard use. But how does the damper compress if it is completely full of oil? In order for a closed damper to work, it must utilize some form of compensator that allows for expansion under compression - picture the internal floating piston (IFP) in the piggyback of a rear shock that pushes against the air trapped on the opposite side of the oil, thereby allowing for oil displacement. Rather than an IFP, the Charger damper uses an extruded rubber bladder to accomplish the exact same task, with the bladder expanding as the damper shaft travels into the cartridge as the fork compresses. Again, this isn't a new idea, but it is one that makes a lot of sense within a fork because a bladder does not present any of the friction and packaging issues of an IFP design.

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  The bladder is relaxed when the cartridge is at full extension (left), but expands out as the damper is compressed (right).


Extruded Bladder

RockShox isn't pretending that the concept behind the Charger damper is new - they know full well that bladders have been used in FOX's FIT cartridges for years, as well as tucked within the piggyback of many moto shocks - but they have gone to great lengths to improve on the design. Reliability was at the top of the list during development, we were told, and it is for this reason that they chose to go with an extrusion process rather than molding to manufacture the bladder. Their reasoning is that molding results in seams and geometry changes in the bladder that can lead to weak points, whereas an extrusion technique produces a long and seam-free section of rubber tubing that is then cut to the correct length. When asked how long a rider could expect the bladder to last, RockShox product manager Jeremiah Boobar answered with "years."

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  While a molded bladder resembles a condom, with an open and closed end, the Charger's bladder is essentially a tube that is open on both ends. RockShox seals the bladder by way of ramps machined into each end of the aluminum fittings that hold the bladder in place.

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  The damper's compression assembly (left) is housed in the upper end of the cartridge, with the pedal-assist feature sitting behind it. The rebound piston is found at the opposite end (right).


Simplified Air System

All versions of the Pike will be air sprung, with riders able to choose from either a Dual Position Air (DPA) system that allows for 30mm of travel adjustment via simplified internals compared to previous iterations, or a fixed-travel Solo Air option for those who don't feel the need to lower the front of their bike for climbs or less demanding terrain. The DPA system works by transferring air from one chamber to another via ports that are open and closed as the crown-mounted dial is turned. Suspension rate on all versions of the Pike can be tuned by way of RockShox's 'Bottomless Tokens', plastic spacers that are threaded by hand into the underside of the top cap. Multiple Bottomless Tokens can stacked up in order to increase the progressiveness of the fork through its travel.

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  The Pike's DPA system (right) allows riders to limit travel by 30mm, while RockShox's threaded Bottomless Tokens (right) should make tuning the forks spring rate easy.


New Chassis, New Maxle Lite

The Pike's Charger damper isn't the only thing to talk about, though, with it sitting within an entirely new fork chassis that features 35mm stanchions, a new crown and steerer assembly, and impressively detailed lowers that contribute to the fork's relatively light 4.05lb weight. A new and easier to use 15mm Maxle Lite ties the lowers together, with it forgoing the finned and sometimes fragile lever catch of the original design. While the previous version depended on expansion to tighten up, the revised version's simpler thread-in and clamp design uses compression to accomplish the same task. Clocking the quick release lever to the proper angle is done by removing the axle from the fork, pushing the lever-end into the axle, and turning until it sits in the proper place, a job that should only need to be done once.

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  The closed cartridge separates the damping oil from the lubrication oil, allowing RockShox to use simpler seals (left) that combine dust and oil duties into one unit. Sag gradients on the right leg make for quick setup (right).

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  Compression adjustments (right) are made at the top of the right fork leg, with the large dial offering full open, pedal, and lock settings. The smaller, inner dial adjusts the amount of low-speed compression damping when the fork is set to full-open. Low-speed rebound is tuned via the red aluminum knob at the bottom of the same leg. The dial is captured, meaning that it can't rattle out during a ride, and its detent ball bearing and spring are also trapped within the dial for the same reason.


Monarch Plus

The new Pike is going to garner the most attention, but let's not forget about the back of the bike. A new Monarch Plus shock was also shown to us during our time at the Sedona Trail House event, and it certainly deserves some time under the microscope as well. What's different about it compared to the previous Monarch? Oil flow as been upped thanks to a larger diameter damper shaft - 10mm versus the old 9mm shaft - a change that has made for a much larger tuning range that should make life easier for riders who spend time at the extreme ends of the spring rate, be it the featherweights or the Clydesdales. While packaging limitations keep RockShox from fitting their Counter Measure negative spring that is employed within the Vivid and Vivid Air, a system that has shown to greatly improve shock sensitivity, they have increased the amount of negative air volume to help improve the Monarch Plus' eagerness over smaller impacts. A lever on the side of the shock allows for three compression options: full open, mid-firm, and firm.

Monarch Plus





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First Impressions:
bigquotesCan two rides, regardless of length or terrain, be enough to qualify as a bona fide review? Hardly, especially as reliability doesn't even come close to being in play. But, given that we've been able to put solid amounts of saddle time on many of the 2013 versions of the Pike's competitors, we can certainly get a glimpse of its performance in comparison.

Our initial feeling is that RockShox has produced one hell of a mid-travel fork that, at this early stage of testing, appears to not present certain drawbacks that some of the competition struggle with. It is no secret that one of our major complaints with other offerings is their tendency to gobble up their travel on both hard hits and under heavy braking, issues that can be a real problem when riding serious terrain on a bike that doesn't have the travel of a downhill bike. The Pike, on the other hand, did well to stand up high in its travel, going a long way to keeping our Santa Cruz Tallboy LT Carbon test bike handling as it should. At the same time it didn't feel harsh on the smaller trail chatter, a feeling that is often the result of running too much air pressure or low-speed compression in an effort to have the fork not dive through its travel. In fact, we spent very little time on setup, simply running the air pressure recommended for our weight and starting with both the low-speed compression and rebound settings in the middle of their range. We are all the more impressed given the lack of setup effort on our end, and are confident that we could eke more performance out of the fork had we had more time on it.

What forks are in the Pike's sights? With 140 - 160mm of travel and 35mm stanchion tubes, it goes without saying that the Pike is aimed at FOX's 34 and 36 series, two options that have a very large following. Only more testing will reveal if the Pike can usurp FOX's offerings, but our early hunch is that the Pike is going to surprise a lot of riders.
- Mike Levy


www.rockshox.com
Must Read This Week

459 Comments

  • + 127
 When you buy a modern mid/high-level fork, the technology inside is on par with the dampner on sports cars and superbikes. It's wild to think how advanced this technology is...just for a bicycle!
  • + 131
 That's what people that don't ride don't get, they say £5000 is too much for a bike, but when your buying the equivalent of a Ferrari but in bike form, the price is understandable.
  • + 31
 Great way to put it.
  • + 74
 @Joey..

And on that same note, you get this attitude from mountain bikers (me included) that they NEED the "ferrari" of bikes/bike components despite only being a weekend warrior and not racing or anything.

People complain a LOT about how expensive everything is getting,.. but it's only expensive if you require the best of the best and really care about shaving a few grams here and there. It's very easy to build a pretty solid bike with full SLX/X7 and a mid-range fork/shock that will still outperform a huge chunk of a riders ability.
  • + 13
 That's what people tell themselves but we know deep down were not getting £5000 grand worth of bike.
  • - 10
flag baca262 (Apr 4, 2013 at 11:33) (Below Threshold)
 you get 5k worth a bike when you buy a mx bike. at least rs is finally catching up with dampers
  • + 34
 So many things in mountain biking are overpriced.
  • + 21
 Absolutely agree there's no way a Bike should be in the same price bracket as a mx bike but they are.
  • - 25
flag RyanWensley (Apr 4, 2013 at 12:27) (Below Threshold)
 I like to buy the best or second best components for my bike as I know that most of the time I'm never going to have to do maintenance on them. That's how I see it.
  • + 47
 Why shouldn't they be in the same bracket?

You have an alloy frame in MX. We have carbon.

Our bikes are taking huge abuse, and yet are tying their hardest to hit low weight targets. Moto's are cool, but they have the advantage of working with much more material as weight and stiffness aren't their two biggest concerns.

You are getting a low end moto for 5k, you are getting a pretty shit hot bike for 5k.

Many things are a bit pricey, but not overpriced. The market is a mere fraction of the global moto market, they are able to take advantage of their size. There is a huge network, huge manufacturers of every little part. In bikes, bikes are a production month for many manufacturers.

So again, I ask you to go buy a motorbike and ride it, and leave cycling alone it won't miss you.

But I suppose your of that mindset that "5k for a bike with no motor?". If that is the case, go buy your 5k moto and ride it, and leave bikes to the rest of us who actually enjoy what we are riding.
  • + 17
 can get a dacia sandero for under £6k rofl.. and that has 4 wheels just saying
  • + 3
 Then go buy one, no one is stopping you. You won't because that would mean actually having to spend some money on something. I can buy a bike for $100. It has two wheels and some gears, pretty much the same thing.
  • + 45
 Dacia sandero, Who are you James May!
  • + 10
 Moto come in one size, churned out by a few companies in thousands. Bikes come in a gazillion sizes and designs to fit your body size and riding exactly. Personalization, low volumes and advanced production techniques to hit those uber-light weights costs money.
  • + 8
 Mountain Bikes are over priced. The cost has got nothing to do with the technology, weight or anything else. It's all about how much you can get people to pay for it. Ever noticed how last years £3000 model drops to £2000 in a sale & the new model with all the new technology conveniently comes in at the same basic price + a little bit more to see if they can get away with it! We've brought this on ourselves though. We always want something a bit more special & spend that little bit more for it each time. I'm as guilty as the next guy but if we didn't buy the high end bikes as much the price would come down.
  • + 3
 These companies have overhead to pay, obviously some are profiting more than others, but the amount of R&D that goes into a lot of these bikes is a huge cost. And keep in mind most companies aren't selling thousands upon thousands of single models. If these companies sold the quantities that mx manufacturers did, then the prices would obviously come down.
  • + 3
 This fork looks so awesome! I want it! Wait its $1000? Aww...Too expensive.
  • + 9
 Hahaha on par with sports cars and superbikes?!?! Your f*cking delusional! The mtb industry is lightyears behind, they just use fancy names and hipe eveything up to make u think your getting something special when in fact your paying out the ass for internals that are a complete joke.
  • + 4
 i absolutely like this condom thing from SRAM ... LOL
  • + 9
 If this had proper adjustments I would be interested. I'm sick of these 3 position adjustments for dummies. Save that for the lower end stuff.
  • + 1
 I heard a rumour at the beginning of the year that Rockshox have some very impressive stuff due out in 2014, this looks great. Can't wait to see what they have in store for the boxxer!
  • + 2
 It is easy to fit a gazillion doodads when you do not need to worry about every frigging gram. It is really hard to design lightweight parts. Motorcycles and cars are NOT light years ahead. Not even close. Carbon layup, or even aluminum tubing are very sophisticated on bikes.

People comparing bikes to motos do not know what they are talking about. And if you do not like cost of a nice rig, go buy a Huffy in Walmart. $80.
  • + 8
 Comparing MTB with a sports cars really made my day. It shows probably where the brainwash come to its end. Or maybe what's next? Bicycle technologies on a par with rocket science?
Comparing bikes to motos!? Last time I checked, motos had an engines. They have transmissions, while we run cranks and looks on pinion as on a super high tech innovation.
Of course bikes are overpriced. And the reason is that they are super fun to ride, so it is not possible that we will not do it, no matter the price. That's why we have same problems going for snowboards or skies. They said it's so expensive because of special trees. What special does trees have? Being watered by holy water?
Let's not be that fooled. Bikes are progressing incredibly and they use good level of technologies, but they are still simple machines compared to cars or motos. They shouldn't price that much and we shouldn't spend our money on a bikes with such an ease.
  • + 4
 No, they are not simple at all. They are made by the same engineers, knowing the same technologies, and trying as hard. It is very difficult (and expensive) to produce a simple device that works this well and make money selling it in small quantities. Number of parts and lines of computer code do not tell the whole story.
  • + 1
 for instance... Konas' Magic link technology is VERY similar to the suspension linkages used in Formula 1 racing cars. Extra engineering, more machines to spit out the extra parts... at the very least, more templates for the existing machines.. now on a whole, I do believe that these engineers are likely being payed in spades.. which drives up the cost.

I worked in a plant... Undisclosed... where I would see the engineers that were getting 36 dollars an hour to BE THERE, sit for 6-8 hours a day and only move if something went down, or a line needed to be switched over, in which case he would either send people on errands to look for parts or get "labourers" to move and swap pieces.... oooh and then middle and upper management... I am outta this before the tangent begins, lol..
  • + 4
 That 15mm bullscat is another reason not to buy this fork. 20mm was way better on the original pike and still way light. Taper steerer ahh can make it work I guess. These companies just fall right into any fad that comes along like bunch of junior high dweebs. Add a real oil seal separate from the dust seal then we'll talk. Dont feel like servicing my fork 10 times a year. The price has also been upgraded what the hell??? For that price I just get a lyric, still very light and 20mm. The whole point of the pike was a mid level fork around $400-$700 depending on options. Now its being touted as top o the line enduro fork. Wankers!!!
  • + 6
 Talking absolute rubbish. If mountain bikes are so advanced and worth months of our wages with the worlds best engineers working round the clock how come nobody's effectively worked out how to change gear without pedalling? Imagine how much that would revolutionise mtb? To be able to select the correct gear under braking or hitting the apex of a corner ready to put the power down? SRAM has no problem selling you a £500 mech, shifter and cassette that realistically is fundamentally flawed by design and people still claim we are not getting ripped off? Hahaha ok guys believe what you want but the reality is your paying the amount company's think they can can get not how much something is actually worth.
  • + 1
 You live in Canada, how do you know about James May?
  • + 4
 BBC canada... We have been watching topgear for years.
  • + 2
 I dont want to sound boring but the ohlins shocks on that Ducati race bike are basically electronic cane creek shocks. Ohlins and cane creek use the same basic shocks.
  • + 3
 @thenotoriousmic You clearly do not understand how it all works. Chain drive systems are some of the most efficient way to transmit our puny human power. Try pedaling Rohloff, you will understand. There is nothing fundamentally flawed about a derailleur, it works brilliantly. It is light, efficient and cost effective. Making an internal gearshift system that is competitive in weight is much harder than you think it is. Look at Pinion drive for example. And by the way, you can just go an buy one from Nicolai if you are so inclined.
  • + 4
 i work for dacia and trust me 6k is waaaayyy too much. Stick with the bikes Wink
  • + 1
 Mark beaumont rode a fair way round the world on a rolhoff geared hub before it broke on his world record trip I'd consider on if they made them for downhill bikes.
  • + 2
 Forget about this smelly old fork what kind of seasoning did you put on those steaks Martha? I want to see detailed specs of each steaks size, weight, and fecal size afterwards.
  • + 1
 @thenotoriousmic: They do make them for downhill bikes. www.nicolai.net/176-1-ION+18+Pinion.html
  • + 1
 I JUST came back from sea otter, i easily saw over a thousand of these forks.
  • + 48
 I liked the old Pike, so I'm excited to see this one, but wasn't the original Pike much less expensive? $1000 is a lot for a fork. (At least for me) I'll be looking forward to them coming into the lightly used market one day.
  • + 31
 That's MSRP. Tell me if you can find anyone that has paid MSRP for a fork.
  • + 12
 can i change my old pike for new one ? Smile
  • + 72
 Only if you are in the top 3%
  • + 55
 missing the 20mm
  • + 0
 It is so much more expensive than the old pike because its just all around a better fork.
  • + 5
 And they replaced the pike with the sector as they're cheaper fork meaning the pike can move into the high end market with Rockshox still having a decent budget fork on the market.
  • - 12
flag Aibek (Apr 4, 2013 at 9:36) (Below Threshold)
 When all the industry is pushing the wagon wheel sizes , the need for 20mm axle is not present any more ,someday you will find yourselves on a 80mm 35" bikes.

Thank you, i'll stick to my 55's and 26" syncros wheels !.
  • + 13
 what i loved about my old pike was the U'turn 95-145mm travel in 5mm increments with same plushness throughout. Awesome compression adjust. pretty much the ultimate hardtail,short travel full suss fork,fully adjustable for any thing from DJ to 4X to trail and park riding i see none of that in this new pike an awesome new fork... but, in no way filling the gap in the market that was left when the original legendary Pike ceased production
  • + 6
 @summit800

It's called a Lyrik... Smile
  • + 1
 *Megavalanche......but maybe Mega Avalanche is more apt lol
  • + 1
 Ok, take a deep breath, get ready for my shit sandwich (neg props) here goes:

I really don't get what this adherence to 20mm is all about. Frankly, I'm sorry, but most 'weekend warriors' and EVEN enduro riders aren't "hardcore" enough to warrant a 20mm, and even IF they are the added stiffness AND weight saving from a tapered steerer and 35mm stanchions (sp?) will more than make up for it, not to mention a ridged arch and modern tough wide rims. I hate to be the one to break it you but most people are not Danny Hart, Josh Briceland etc and don't warrant the burlier kit and bearing in mind, that when most of these "hardcore" riders are doing their training Enduro/trail riding, they'll be rolling on the same kit with tapered steerers and 15mm axles and wide tough modern rims enjoying the weight benefits gained from these newer designs. Even Bearclaw said very emphatically in his bizarre interview with Dan Milner that he always hopes for a lighter bike - I think he's just come into a carbon demo as well and is 'super-stoked' about it. On a side note I'm really looking forward to seeing what Aaron Gwin is riding, boy has been underground! Or I've not been looking hard enough...?
  • + 9
 noone said 15mm was too weak, it's unnecessary.
  • + 13
 i like the ability to have backup wheels from my dh bike that fit(ie 20mm) and vice versa
  • + 6
 I was excited till I saw the no 20mm option. I am in the market for a new fork to match up with a new frame but I really do not want to have to buy a new hub and get wheel rebuild etc just to accommodate a lack of options in the 20mm axle selection. Oh well back to the shopping and research time. I guess the switch to Fox or another brand on the market will be complete soon. Thanks Rockshox.
  • + 5
 20mm is a decent standard. 15mm is unnecessary. Have the old Pike. Very decent kit. Plows through travel to easely even at my 135lb featherweight. So you tend to ride it with too much pressure and that hurts. Let`s see if the bladder can fix this and without starting to leak. Maybe the whole damping and spring assembly needs to be taken out of the stanchions and go somewhere on the frame so that decent diameter seals, pistons and reservoirs can be used.
  • + 1
 I guess they reckon if the Lyric's come in 20mm and most trail bike riders run 15mm .. I'm running 20mm so just waiting to see what 2014 lyric's look like .. but want new wheels anyway ..
  • + 6
 Not 20 mm, I not buy.
  • - 1
 I think that a lot of 20mm haters are missing the fact that it's not just a 5mm increase in axle diameter, it's also a wider hub (110mm vs 100mm) and therefore a stiffer, better-tracking front end.
  • + 1
 with convertible hubs (most hubs) the flanges don't move when you switch adapters.
  • + 2
 When you buy/build a front wheel you make sure it is adaptable to all 'standards'. Simple.

Ten years ago this lack of planning in future-proofing was understandable, but these days we all know there are many standards out there, so plan for it. Buying a cheap wheel that fits only one type of axle is a false economy.
  • + 3
 I'm running hope pro 2's ha ha no worries
  • + 2
 I totally agree with @nojzilla. The old Pike was one of the best forks ever made by Rockshox -or any brand-. This new Pike looks awesome, but I don't think it will get any closer to what the Old Pike did when it was born: evolution in mountain bike suspension. To be honest I still prefer the legendary coil sprung, totally adjustable & incredibly versatile old Pike rather than this one.
  • + 1
 The problem with this is when dho came out with boxxer hub years ago there was an advantage to 110mm spacing, but when discs came in they screwed it up by making the rotor sit so it was inboard of a 100/9 front hub. The boxxers were fine, and for years had the really thick brake adapter to compensate but later 20mm forks took the lowers closer in so you couldn't make a wide flange front hub, since all the hub makers were making adaptable hubs. The maverick forks had a different front hub to get around this, as did the terrible specialized forks of a couple years back.
  • + 45
 Hate to say it, but we're losing features as a result of having all these wheel sizes. Its just not economical to offer a 20mm option, a coil option, and an 1-1/8" option in 26", 29", and 650b sizes.
  • - 15
flag phatone17 (Apr 4, 2013 at 8:52) (Below Threshold)
 29ers are.........................
  • + 34
 ....something everyone has their own personal opinion on.
  • + 7
 I agree that missing the 20mm option is a bummer, but the other two I think are also greatly due to obsolescence. Coils are getting pushed out quickly as air forks improve and can be made to feel pretty darn supple and smooth. And 1-1/8 steerers are well on their way out, I think tapered steerers is one standard pretty much everyone can agree on. It is a bummer for people who have older frames they love and can't put new forks on, but within a few years that will be a pretty darn small group.

As for the 15mm thing... it does kind of seem like an unnecessary extra standard. Surely they could make a light duty 20mm option that comes within grams and allows for way more mixing and matching of components. All I know for sure is that I want a new Pike now... dammit.
  • + 9
 a pike is now automatically not even a choice for me due to the tapered steerer and 15mm axle. that's a shame because it would be lighter than my float 36. i guess i take my money somewhere else?
  • + 1
 It's all about the money these days, even in mountainbiking... Wink I get your point though, thank you for this statement!
  • + 1
 @phatone17 the answer you're looking for is fast.

Go ride one. Seriously.
  • + 3
 as long as the argyle doesnt become 15 mm and tapered im happy, such a big turn off for the new pike, was stoked until heard that
  • + 3
 Why? Tapered is stronger, and 15mm is lighter.
  • - 2
 tapered steerers might be a bit stiffer when it comes to single crown suspensions but definitely not stronger,,,the strength of the steerer tube comes from its wall thickness, MX bikes are using 1'' steerer standard on all double crown suspensions...and 15x100m is not any lighter than the 20x110mm hub standard...
  • + 32
 Seems like would be a better fit if offered w/ 20mm axle? Especially with 35mm stanchions and since its directed @ Fox 36s? Looks nice with the black though!
  • + 8
 I guess they tried to make a clear gap to Lyrik with the axle choice. Tapered only seems quite silly too, at least most dj guys can forget the Pike because of it.
  • + 4
 You can get the Lyrik in 160 though ...
  • + 2
 @DARKSTAR63 apparently the Lyrik will only be available in 170mm (probably using the RC2DH damper)
  • + 1
 Exactly, thus the need to make a clear difference in other features like the axle size.
  • + 4
 If thats's the case then I do have an issue with no 20mm axle option. In fact I have an issue with no 160 lyrik. I have one and I love it. Lot's of agressive 150 bikes that it suits, where 170 is a tad much.
  • + 2
 Well, it's a 15 min job to lower a solo air lyrik Wink
  • + 2
 Fair enough. Haha.
  • + 1
 One way would be to get a straight 1-1/8 20mm axle 170mm lyrik, and lower it to 150 or 160 depending your need...
  • - 8
flag Enduro27 (Apr 4, 2013 at 9:01) (Below Threshold)
 This pike is stupid, for less than a pound more and the same price you can get a lyrik mission control with any steerer, 80-170mm of travel (spacers), and a 20mm axle
  • + 14
 Why is it stupid to want a lighter fork, with a tapered steerer, 15mm axle and 150/160mm of travel?

If that's the spec you want, you buy the Pike. Otherwise, you buy something else. That doesn't make it 'stupid'.
  • + 4
 What are you guys going on about? This seems to be aimed at the 29 and 650b bikes. There is no other 29 fork like it, and the Lyrik is a whole different animal for 26 and 650b.
  • + 2
 Not at the fox 34?
  • + 4
 I'm thinking one of these on the front of the 2014 Spesh enduro 29er carbon I will never ever own. We can all have dreams though right?
  • + 2
 People, this isn't directed to compete with a Fox36. It's meant to compete with a Fox34.
35mm stanchions is a deceiving thing as it's on par with a Lyrik. I am saddened by the 15mm through option only; eliminates this as a choice for me, however, maybe Lyrik lowers will fit?

Nevertheless, hope to see what they're gonna do with the Lyrik next; looks like lots of tech to trickle up to it.
  • + 1
 I hate new unnecessary "standards" just as much as anyone else but in the end it's probably just like rear axles... Weekend warriors jumps on the "so much stiffer" 142x12 bandwagon for trailbikes when some DH pros ride 135x12 rear ends claiming that the stiffness difference isn't anywhere as troublesome as the increased width of the rear triangle.

Are the laughable weight savings worth dealing with a whole new standard though? I guess that's the bike industry for you.
  • + 1
 delete
  • + 1
 I still ride 9mil qr front and rear... hit mountains requiring chairlift, drops of up to 12 feet, all terrain types... and have also ridden friends bikes with 20 mil axles and 12 mil rear... I cannot feel a difference, though I know the stiffness is there b/c the axle is encompassed all the way around... but if ur wheel is on tight, then it's stiff period.

So I don't understand the commotion about usefulness vs. unnecessary... some like, some don't... in the end somebody will buy this fork.
  • + 1
 A bolt on 9mm axle is stiff. People think they ride harder than they actually do. They think they need what the pros do, which you prove is not the case.
  • + 3
 @ PLC07- you do realize the 142mmk rear IS just a 135x12 with a molded interface for easy axle alignment and QR12mm. They use the same hub shells, chainline etc.
  • - 2
 Pretty sure the hubs are wider for 142mm as Hope make an adapter for their 135mm hubs so that they will fit 142mm frames.
  • - 1
 What I meant is that for DH they'll sell you 150x12 axles for the increased stiffness. Meanwhile, some DH pros use 135x12 axles since they find that the laughable stiffness difference is not enough to compensate for the inconvenience of the rear triangle width increase. Today 142x12 is a must on trailbikes apparently because it's oh so stiffer, yet DH pros ride 135x12 and they find it plenty stiff. Go figure. If the difference is hardly perceptible, what's the point of having so many standards? Personally, I have a 135x10qr on my dh bike and 142x12ta on my AM bike and I don't really notice a difference so I'm kind of doubting there's a huge difference between a 15mm and a 20mm front axle when performance is concerned. Don't they have engineers to figure this out?

So many wheel/axles/steertube/stanchion sizes for just a fork... Options are always nice but when there are so many with so little difference, I don't feel like the consumer wins in the end.
  • + 1
 142 IS a 135mm hub with a fitted dropout to make lining the axle up easier in a wheelchange. Look it up if you don't believe me. 142 should FEEL the same as 135x12 but be simpler and tool free to use.
  • - 1
 I didn't believe you so I looked it up, 142 refers to the hub width, it has to be wider than a 135mm hub so that it can sit into the tabs that hold the wheel. The chainline and brake spacing is all the same, but you can't use a 135mm hub in a 142x12 frame.
  • + 1
 You get the 142 adapter kit for the 135 hub. Everything is the same except the endcaps.
  • + 1
 Hub width is measured at the end caps of the axle... that's it. It doesn't mean the hub flanges or bearing spacing or anything is automatically different. You can use the same hubs in multiple different frames by changing axles/end caps. In the case of cartridge bearing hubs (like Hope), this is a simple swap to make. In others, like shimano hubs which run sealed loose ball and cone assemblies, you physically have to respace/change the axle assemblies.
  • + 25
 Why no 20mm axle? Frown
  • + 21
 Seriously. I stopped reading there. No sale!
  • - 1
 Seriously. Go ride a 35 mm fork with a 15mm axle before you judge.
  • + 16
 who gives a fuck, i'm not buying another standard hub when i have a perfectly fine 20mm hub.
  • + 4
 Grr, no 20mm? I have other sets of tubeless wheels from other bikes. All these axle standards just ruin my ability to be able to switch out wheel-sets from one bike to another. OK with some manufacturers like Hope you can get adjustable hubs, but what if I'm perfectly happy with 20mm. It's a serious irritation because 15mm was sold as the replacement for XC 9mm QR. So now we have 9mm QR or cheaper bikes and still for some XC and trail bikes, 15mm for some XC, trail and even AM/Enduro bikes and 20mm for enduro/FR/DH and DJ. Switching to 20mm would have been fine for all other than the most weight-weeniest.

Now it getting hard to find any tapered 140-160mm fork with a 20mm axle.
  • + 1
 if you have a 20mm hub buy a fork that has a 20mm axle, it really is that simple. this is not the fork you looking for.
  • + 2
 What if the new Pike was exactly the fork I'm looking for other than that pesky 15mm axle?
Still, I'm not furious with RS, the whole industry has decided that the fork axle of choice for all XC, trail enduro and AM is 15mm, and all must have tapered head tubes. However many Pinkbikers think that 15mm should just replace 9mm QR for XC, and everything else should be 20mm. Weird that they don't listen to customers. Also weird that none of the manufacturers are really willing to break rank to make a 20mm axle and tapered head tube.
  • + 2
 The 20mm argument is silly. Once the wheel is clamped the forces go through the hub/bearings/spokes/etc, not the axle. This is a weight-optimized trail fork. Lyrik comes in in 160 travel in the DP Air and 170 in the Solo Air, but the SA comes with a spacer to shorten it to 160. So if you want 160 travel, 35mm stanchions and 20mm axle then you should buy a Lyrik. If you want even shorter travel I'll custom build one for you with the older Solo Air system that can be shortened as low as you want with spacers. You just have to be creative with your options. Personally I think this fork looks perfect and I will def be getting one.
  • + 1
 hey zmc888... I run 9mm for allmountain/enduro type riding on an abra cadabra frame with a 150 Soloair Sektor RL up front... does that make my 4 grand build a cheap bike?..... just pickin at ya, lol. I understand wut ur saying.

Seriously though, I may be a weekend warrior, but I ride effin hard!!! Should I upgrade even though I've NEVER had a failure with my qr?
  • + 1
 Daemongrad: the way I look at it is run what ya brung until it breaks or wears out. Then upgrade when you need to spend money.
  • + 1
 ZMC888: What people here don't realize is a group a f a few hundred kids on Pinkbike who complain about the price of everything and are against all changes from what they currently own are such a SMALL part of the market it doesn't register. Really, if a convertible hub is a deal breaker for someone, is this really a product you could afford to purchase. RS knows this. The 15mm isn't much of a big deal in the fork in terms of weight (every little bit counts in marketing though,) but a 15mm specific hub can be quite a bit lighter than a 20mm hub. We will likely see high end wheels with specific axles rather than convertible ones for specific applications in the next few years.
  • + 2
 If 20mm was SOOOO superior for this category of fork, over what could be done by changing other parts of the fork design (stanchion diameter, lowers, the crown for that matter) then Rockshox could have kept on pushing their Maxle Lite 20mm QR axles... instead of abandoning it for aftermarket versions of this new fork. But they didn't... so get over it already. They have money to spend on R&D and the lab equipment and computers to do all the stress analysing crappola and you do not... so chances are, they know what works more than anyone on here whining that they won't buy the fork because its not a 20mm axle.
  • + 18
 For those slamming Rockshock for limiting the Pike to 1 1/8 with 15mm axle, yes it's probably disappointing but look at it from Rockshock's perspective. The fork is designed for a category of bikes that continues to grow, but is still far from the majority of MTB's sold annually. I.e. it's a small market. They have to keep SKU's in check in order to maintain margins and keep costs in line which means they are going to produce something that serves the majority. Also consider that they really aren't targeting this as an upgrade fork for older bikes - it's clearly aimed at manufactures to spec on NEW AM/Enduro rigs. Currently Fox is getting most of those sales (all the sales when it comes to 650b) which can't be sitting well in Rockshock's offices.

The good news is there are lots of options in the market place. No need to get pissed off and spit vitriol online because a manufacturing doesn't meet your needs - it's just a product to be fitted to a toy for a leisure activity (albeit, an activity that's just behind my wife and kid on my importance list). Just buy a fork from someone else in the short term and reconsider it as an option down the road when you build up your next rig. Chill and remember why we all ride.
  • + 6
 finally, some common sense.
  • + 0
 don't toss me under the bus yet peeps. i commented directly above the guy who shed light on what i said, but read it right after i commented.
  • + 2
 That cost needs to be kept down, that's just because all the new standards, with new wheel sizes. The industry has now over-saturated the market with a new standard money-grab so badly that consumer choice has been damaged because manufacturers cannot offer all options any more and now pick and choose what to make.
  • + 19
 If someone says anything about "3%" then Team Hutchinson/Polygon will never ever show bikini footage of Tracey and Holly again hahaha!
  • + 4
 Oh we don't have to be on a pro list for this one? huh...
  • + 4
 My thoughts exactly! Big Grin Big Grin Big Grin
  • + 3
 Damn those steaks look righteous!
  • + 14
 Awesome hopefully this fork damper really is up to the task. So disappointed with my 34, I like the tuneable tokens option as well easy to do, props RS for making this tuneable and serviceable. As for tapered makes good business sense, tapered has been around long enough now for a new product to go this way. 15mm also, I am a 20mm fan but I have both don't notice any difference in stiffness up to 160 weight makes more difference to the feel of solidity, DH though still want 20mm. Also my last Pike probably still one of the best forks I have ever owned and Ive had plenty, Marz, Fox, RS, apart from my 12 Fox 40,Ive been disappointed time and time again by Fox dampers.
  • + 13
 Those black stanchions looks sick!!! But it seems like Rockshox is going for an almost non-existent intermediate step between the Revelation and Lyrik. And the RC3?? Comeon, that's pretty much CTD. And seriously??? 15mm axle only? Tapered steerer only? What's up with that? I just don't really get what they're trying to go for here...
  • + 12
 I think the lyrik now has gone to more of a 170mm fork, and the revs are pretty lightweight to be hammering. It does fit the gap... and looks incredible. Tapered steerer and 15mm is the next big thing remember? You've just forgotten about it all due to silly wheel sizes
  • + 8
 To me, no straight steerer and 15mm only is a mistake. Rest is fine, I'll wait for more underground testing of the charger damper.
  • + 5
 Edit: One cool thing though would be to be able to put a Pike CSU with damper and maybe solo air (although I'll probably stay with my modded solo air ...) with a set of Lyrik lowers ... Burly lowers, 20mm axle.
  • + 1
 @Ploutre, I was just thinking the same thing!
  • - 1
 @Ploutre, it's been so long since those standards are here, get on with it!

All new frames come with tapered steerers, there are plenty of options for headsets, then nearly every decent hub and wheelset comes with conversion kits. Sure, I myself would love everyone to make 20mm axles and frames with straight 1.5 head tubes, half of shit on ebay does not fit eah other, but what the hell can we do? It's time to move on, you are just deluding yourself that if we bitch enough here, something will change for the better. Nah-aaaaah!
  • + 3
 KT65, I can tell you from experience that the RockShox RC3 is NOTHING like the Fox CTD damper. They feel absolutely nothing alike, even though they are both approaches to solving the same problem. As for the non-existent gap between the Rev and the Lyrik, it certainly does exist. As bigbluebike said, the Lyrik is given as a 170mm fork quite often and feels more like a Boxxer than like a Revelation. The Revelation is more on the XC side of things. I'm stoked to see this option, hope it comes out to us mere mortals with black stanchions, and cannot wait to throw it on the Stumpy Expert Evo.
  • + 1
 @wcartman all my hubs/wheelsets (Crossmax SX x2, Deemax, Reverse Evo9 hubs) can't be adapted to 15mm ... I'm not against those "standards" I just think it's stupid to prevent people from buying one (most likely including me) just because they are limiting the offering in steerer and axle size. And tbh, it wouldn't be a problem for them to make a straight 1-1/8th steerer.
  • + 2
 Ploutre, are you seriously complaining about tapered steerers and 15mm axles being an odd, new 'standard'? That argument is literally 4 years out of date. RockShox, and other manufacturers have to at some point stop supporting older standards. Like it or not, tapered steerers and 15mm axles are now the default set up for mountain bikes (gravity bikes excepted).
  • + 3
 What non-tapered headtube bikes are out there? Haven't seen one that is not in at least a couple of years.
  • + 1
 so what about those of us with a regular headtube dualsuspensiondave? say what you will, but i have an almost new turner 5 spot that isn't tapered. do i have to upgrade it because the industry tells me i have to? yes, there are 1 1/8th options available but if they cease to exist than i have no choice.
  • + 3
 What is stupid is wanting to spend $1000.00 upgrading to a new fork on a 5 or more year old bike. Ride it the way it is, or use a 5 year old fork and rebuild it to be compatible.
  • - 1
 last i checked, 2010 was less than 3 years ago.
  • + 1
 You can still use a 5 year old fork and rebuild it. You will definitely have an easier time finding old standards on older products. Modern frames use tapered steerers almost universally now. Maybe you should have "accepted" the market trends when you bought your last frame, rather than supporting a dying standard. Why would you buy a turner 5 spot? So many similar options with about the same performance, with forward compatibility. Poor choice in frames. For what its worth, this fork won't fit on my Mojo SL either. I'm OK with that. My Mojo has 4 years of hard use, and I wouldn't spend a grand on a new fork. I have a DT Swiss carrbon on there now, and don't think this will be $1000.00 better. What is the point of changing to a new fork on an older bike? Ride it the way it is and save up for a new bike.
  • + 2
 @saturnine... wut? April 4th 2010 was exactly three years ago.
  • + 0
 damn, if i knew it was stupid to buy new stuff that is better than the old stuff i could've saved a bunch of money.
  • + 1
 2010 models were released in 2009 too. 4 year old frame.
  • + 3
 The biggest selling point for me is that the axle to crown length is 20mm less than the lyrik. So you can run this fork on a bike designed for a 545 a-c and not totally jack the geometry. The revelations just don't have the stiffness. I think this will replace the revelations on most 150-160 trail bikes.
  • + 1
 Rudeboybl - the MTB world was obsessed by slack geometry the last time I checked. So lowering axle to race seems counter-productive as it steepens the head angle
  • + 1
 rudeboybl, where did you see the info on A-C height. I totally agree on getting the A-C height down for a given wheels size is a good thing but I went through that info a bunch of times and didn't see it being 20mm less than a Lyric....or any mention at all of AC height. I'd also like to know the fork offset of the 650B model as that's what I'd be after.

Slack should be handled by the bikes HA or an aftermarket angle set not stupid long A/C forks.
  • + 1
 yes, april 4th 2010 was 3 years ago, but the last day of 2010 was 27 months ago
  • + 2
 OK, here it is, the new PIKE from Rock Shox, emmmmmm.... not for me, why, three reasons: 1- 15mm axle only, 2- black stanchions, 3- tapered steerer. C'mon guys, I had Pike solo air and was very happy with it, well everyone has their opinion, I like their new technology and their 160mm travel. Instead of Pike I will go for MARZOCCHI 55 CR 2013, which I have at the moment and I can say that it's sick fork, very very happy with it. Again guys that's my opinion
  • + 12
 20mm axle option, and 1 1/8 steerer, and I would absolutely replace my old pike with this. More options would mean more sales...
  • + 3
 The downside to this is that it also creates more cost, and to offer more options that means they will be making less money on their forks. Don't kid yourselves, Rockshox doesn't just make forks to keep you happy, they're a business.
  • - 1
 The lyric is still in the lineup and is available in your configuration. This is a new chassis to move forward with, not look back and hang old heavy parts off of.
  • + 1
 If there were less variables being introduced, such as the abundance of wheel sizes for mountain bikes, it would be possible to have the options that used to be provided such as actually being able to buy a fork with multiple steerer sizes, I mean even right now Rockshox's own totem rc currently comes with 4 steerer sizes, 1 1/8, 1.5, and two tapered options, but notably only for 26" wheels... *EDIT - Another thing Ive just noticed is that the new Pike is the only fork in RS' lineup that has no other variances of its self (ie. RC, RCT) with the exception of the more price conscious "30 Gold TK" which does come in three wheel sizes and two steerer options so it is possible for RS to provide these.

I apologize for the paragraph, but in my opinion the tapered steerer only lack of options significantly reduces the amount of riders who would purchase this fork. I could deal with the axle change, I mean I have already changed over from a 9mm axle years ago and could afford yet another new hub if needed, but I know that myself and many others wouldn't really want to change frames for a fork
  • + 1
 Its to optimize ONE crown and steerer for weight and stiffness. Making several options results in compromise. If that last 200g isnt important, there are other forks that have your needs met. This is the lightest option in the current market.
  • + 9
 Looks like RockShox isn't interested in selling products to us people who are still riding "outdated" 1-1/8"-frames and 20mm-hubs (Let alone that 3%-nonesense...).

Keep your (amazing-looking) forks then and sorry for not being able to buy a new frame or front wheel. I'll buy from someone who's willing to acknowledge me as a valuable customer then.
  • - 5
flag Willie1 (Apr 4, 2013 at 10:36) (Below Threshold)
 Where do you still get your v brakes from? I'm having a hard time fitting them on my bike. Manufacturers don't respect me any more. They expect me to have to upgrade my brakes when I get a new frame. That sucks.
  • + 8
 pretty sure RS is in complete agreement with your statement. although they would never admit that. fortunately this fork is PERFECT for me, and many, many thousands of other riders as well.
  • + 1
 V-Brakes are a different story (and RockShox still produces forks for V-Brakes, btw Wink ). On the other hand, there are still plenty of second hand 1-1/8"-frames that are still totally suitable for people who don't want to or can't afford the shiny new stuff. As long as this is the case, RockShox should keep producing compatible forks.
  • - 1
 This fork doesn't have v brake mounts. Why won't they support that standard too?

So you agree with me, there is a lot of second hand stuff for people who don't have modern equipment. Apply that logic to your first post. Your stuff isn't shiny and new. Its last generation equipment. The world moved on. My mojo is last generation too. The world moved on.
  • + 1
 I agree with darren, v brakes are obviously inferior, but a 20mm axle option is not, it's a choice between stiffness and weight. Tapered only is the killer for me here though, I'm riding a 140mm travel frame and want a 150mm fork, but it's a 2009 frame and has a straight steerer. I was getting really excited about this, but now I absolutely cannot give RS the money for a shiny new fork, because they can't be bothered making a straight steerer upper.
  • + 2
 @willie1: you have generally been lambasting people here. I wish to take issue with you. You have suggested that people have had "poor choice in frames" if they have not chosen a tapered head tube. Here is why you may be missing a point. I ride a Cotic BFe, one I bought in 2010. Only now it is called the Classic BFe by Cotic. The reason? Well, Cotic's line up all went through an update recently for a number of reasons including the CEN strength test standards and all their MTB lineup received tapered head tubes. I also bought a Bottlerocket frame in 2011 just weeks before an update to, you guessed it, tapered head tubes. Now the BFe is still in production, as was the BR for two years after its new HT, same geo, same bikes virtually, however the Industry has deemed it that I shall be left behind because I bought my frames just before a big change in standards. We, as users and consumers have every right to express our dissatisfaction with that without being told by people like you that it is our fault for making a wrong or poor choice. The timing of our choice of frame may have been unfortunate but the fact that many frames that are successful were upgraded by the companies with tapered HTs shows the FRAMES are a good choice. The company can upgrade the frame ...... We can't, we have to buy a new version of the bike we already have!! If you think my point not valid, please explain why.
  • + 1
 There are quite a few options out there. Not every model has to be available in YOUR configuration. Fox, Rock Shox and several other brands make forks with the options you need. This is one of the newer generation products made for the newer generation frames, and I have no interest in having the price increased to make this model a retrofit when I buy my next frame and would consider this fork. There are already last generation models to fit your older designed frame, and the performance difference isn't monumental..

The underlying issue is entitlement. It is just silly to listen to people complaining that extra expense wasn't added to a product so you can maintain numerous backward compatibilities. This model is a new platform to go forward with- to use with new frames, to use with frames designed around 650b wheels, rather than retrofits, for enduro frames that don't need the full 20mm axle/wheel combination. This fork wasn't designed for your old equipment. Stop being so full of yourself and stop seeing this a personal insult that your outdated, last generation components aren't the market this product is meant for.

Have you not considered that a 1 1/8 steerer version might require too much extra weight, or a significantly different design and could sacrifice the performance/weight balance like the Fox forks do to maintain those compatibility options? This fork is pushing the weight/strength boundaries and requires modern construction techniques. Go buy the shiny fox 34 pig to keep your old components in use. Hell I even have a 150mm Travis with 34mm stanchions, 1 1/8 steerer, and 650b compatibility. Its 20mm and not much heavier than a fox 34 (about a pound.)
  • + 1
 Thanks for the reply Willie. I understand what you say about the need for the industry to create new platforms to go forward with, however again I take issue with you about people who express dissatisfaction as being "full of themselves" and seeing it as a "personal insult". There is absolutely no justification for you saying that by someone expressing their disappointment about their being no option to upgrade their perfectly good frame with a product they are interested in that they are being "full of themselves".
Read that again too before you comment, if you choose to do so. We,as consumers have every right to feel insulted by people like yourself who tell us we have "poor frame choice" or are "full of ourselves" when it appears you yourself do not appear to give people the right to feel disappointed.
For my part I have a Pike on my BFe, a Domain on the Brocket and a Sektor on a Stanton Slackline. I choose RS to keep my tooling bills down and to enable me to service all my forks myself. I am disappointed that the new Pike will not be available to fit my frames. There, I have said it. What is so wrong with that that you feel you have to lambaste people for expressing their opinion??
  • + 1
 My response is to look up the definition of entitlement. I don't understand why everyone feels they have the "right" to express everything they feel. There is freedom of speech, I get that, but some of us, and apparently based on the market direction as seen with this product, the people with the buying power don't agree with the need for the extra weight of the 20mm, and even in road cycling, frames are using tapered steerers. If the enduro market settles in with 15mm axles, and tapered steerers (needed when using carbon steerers) then FUTURE models will be MORE COMPATIBLE and cheaper for about a 5 year cycle. Why do people feel the need to tell everyone the product won't fit their frame? I just don't get it. Why do they need to tell everyone how RS doesn't value them because this one product doesn't fit their frame? Do people REALLY feel their individual importance is that high? I ask all of the people who complained about this product confirm who buys a new fork every year or 2 for their bikes? A new fork is one of the least cost effective upgrades you can make. Wheels make much more sense, and if you are thinking ahead, get an easily compatible wheelset. I suspect most people complaining haven't bought a fork or would have bought a fork this year. If they were, there is Fox, X Fusion, Marzocchi, other RS models, and even Manitou has some new models in the pipeline plus the boutique brands such as Bos.
  • + 2
 That's a fair enough point Willie, so I see where you are coming from now. If people just complain and choose to do nothing about it but whinge, I am with you all the way. I don't get it either. I do have to say though that one should never fear from expressing one's opinion in the hope the industry takes note; if we feel the people making the decisions are not listening to us as consumers, consumers walk away: that is something I have learned as a business owner here, and something that I hope goes beyond the marketing hype we hear from companies telling us they are listening to us... For that reason I say, express your opinion, you never know, it may make a difference.

To renew your faith in people who do say "...I'd like one of those to fit my bike", may not just be whingers with poor frame choice, full of their own self-importance, I offer this alternative (which has been my decision) . I strongly recommend anyone who is peeved at their being no 20mm Pike option trying to save yourself future incompatibility issues (and thereby cost) by re-lacing your wheels to Novatec D881 and D882 hubs; 9mm, 15mm, 20mm front, 9mmQR, 10x135, 12x135, 12x142 rear all in the hubs (front and rear) with all the spare adapters and axles, cartridge bearings and, so far, great reliability for 99 Aussie dollars (search and ye shall find). And you get to learn how to lace up wheels if you do the research too people. Have a good day Willie mate.
  • + 2
 Thank you for the reasonable response. Also, don't forget many bikes have 44mm 1 1/8 head tubes. They can be converted to tapered Smile . I have been using the Novatec hubs on many bikes for about 4 years now. I have never seen one fail. I have built about 20 wheelsets for friends with them and they are the best bang for the buck out there. Pillar triple butted or bladed spokes are very strong and very light at 1/2 the price or less than the DT or Sapim varieties. THAT is an upgrade you will feel Smile .
  • + 1
 Pillar triple butted / bladed... must admit I have never used them. I am due to build up a set of Stan's Flow on Novatec hubs with a friend using DT Comp tomorrow actually to help him get a first foot on the wheelbuilding ladder... cheers for the heads up, I will check them out!
  • + 1
 The superstar trizoid hubs are really nice if you want to spend the extra on them.They have 120 engagement points like I9 hubs. superstar.tibolts.co.uk/product_info.php?cPath=31&products_id=366 Look up the PSR Xtra: www.pillarspoke.com
  • + 9
 I don't really get all the whinging about a lack of 20mm axle option. As far as i'm aware theres very little difference in terms of stiffness and by making them 15mm they have a bigger market than if it were just 20. Its easy to convert a 20mm hub down to 15mm but not always so easy to convert a 15mm hub to a 20mm axle.
  • + 4
 an adapter would add at least $30 to $40. maybe we'd like to save that cost? also, some hubs cannot be converted.
  • + 1
 i don't get it either. if i needed a 20mm axle i would prefer the lyrik anyways.
  • + 2
 I think the biggest issue is that how many of us have 20mm hubs and wheels that we want to use without having to convert (running on two bikes, less things to get loose and squeak, etc). I personally don't think it's a deal breaker, cause like you said you totally can convert 20mm's down usually, but it is just annoying.
  • - 1
 Just because you have old shit that isn't upgradeable isn't a reason to keep the old standards. Using a 15mm axle is fine. You can buy a convertible novatec hub for cheap. If your hub can't be converted, its probably one of the entry level formula hubs. If that is the reason you can't use this fork, you aren't in the market for this fork.
  • + 1
 true that there are many people running 20mm hubs on their trail bikes, but i bet there's just as many (or more?) people running 15mm on their trail bikes. more importantly, in the future, trail bikes w/ 15mm hubs will outnumber 20mm by a huuuge amount. but i guess RS made a poor decision by not catering to the minority.
  • + 1
 its too bad they don't offer these with the standard steerer sizes as well, would be pretty cool if they had a 1 and 1/8th.
  • + 8
 perfect fork for me, I currently have a fox float 150 with 15mm axles and was looking to up grade to a float 160 36 but didn't pull the trigger because i needed a new hub/wheel then, now I can just get this fork! Great!
  • + 0
 what has convinced you that this fork is an upgrade from your float? just out of curiosity.
  • + 3
 I am guessing the author is upgrading the travel(150-160mm)and the stiffness (32-35mm)
  • + 3
 how is it not an upgrade from a 32mm fork? it's certainly not going to be any worse.
  • + 2
 Yeah I just want the 10mm of travel and the stiffness... I was going to get a 160 float anyways now I just don't have to buy a new wheel or relace my current one with a new hub
  • + 11
 need more 20mm less 15mm crap.
  • - 2
 Seriously? You know it's 2013, not 2009, right?
  • + 8
 15mm shouldnt even exist except for xc.
  • + 1
 Why, what's the problem with it? I'm not having a big at you, I'm genuinely interested why you think 15mm axles are 'crap'.
  • + 3
 I have no problem with them for xc type forks as it fixes issues with std qr. The problem with 15mm here is that it is going into a market that is most likley saturated with people running 20mm wheels and no real reason to change to 15mm other than make money
  • + 2
 this fork is directly targeted people running a 15mm axle. the lyrik is targeted to those running a 20mm axle. makes sense to me.
  • + 5
 but why 15mm?
  • + 2
 15mm b/c, whether you believe it or not, the majority of trailbikes produced in the past two years have 15mm axles, and most if not all future trail bikes will have 15mm axles. that is, till they come out w/ the best of both worlds 17.5mm axles.
  • + 1
 lol!!!! too good kwymore!!!
  • + 7
 This reincarnation looks very promising! Loved my old pike, and am now contemplating the sale of my 2013 Fox 36 for one of these beasts. But no 20mm thru? Really? Bad move Rockshox.
  • + 2
 And no 1 1/8" steerer!
  • + 4
 No 1 1/8 steerer? Is this 2006? The Lyrik is the fork that one would want to replace a 36.
  • + 5
 What, no 1" threaded steerer? /s
  • + 2
 sounds like you'd be willing to spend a grand to save a little more than half a pound. you should just stick to the float.
  • + 6
 15mm axle instead of original 20mm? Change the name from Pike to pussy. I have the 2005 Pike and it's still very very good fork. The new version is much more complicated and expensive. At first I was thrilled to read about Pike's resurrection but it's nothing more than marketing bullshit.

PS: I almost forgot to mention that this black stanchions looks Suntour XCM cheap.
  • + 2
 Dude i feel your pain, justice has not been done to the pike name Frown
  • + 2
 Agreed. It's like the new VW Beetle. Original was rear wheel drive, rear engined, air-cooled, new one is just a regular front engined front wheel drive water cooled machine. Trading on the name.
  • + 8
 @mikelevy Is the travel internally adjustable to run it permanently at 140mm or would I have to buy the DP? (stiff 140mm fork for Blur trc?!?)
  • + 7
 I'm liking this. But I kind of miss the old Pike when it was just simple and overbuilt. Hopefully this is just as bad ass as my old Pike that lasted 4 years before I retired it.
  • + 7
 Well the newer lighter weight Lyriks kind of fit that bill. This fills the gap between it and a Revelation quite nicely ...And yes, the older Pike was badass. I have one that I bought used totally clapped out and it still runs mint... excellent fork.
  • + 1
 I think the travel is a little too long, it sits too closely to the lyrik. Where's my 130->150 dual position fork with bigger than 32mm stantions? I'd get a sektor or revelation, but they're too skinny!
  • + 1
 Like the old pike. Little bulldog of a fork.
  • + 8
 Sound like an almost perfect trail fork for me. If it only had a 20 mm axle. And a straight steerer so I wouldn't have to get a new headset... Close but no cigar...
  • + 3
 Was stoked until I read the 15mm axle and tapered steerer, guess I'll have to squeeze more life out of my 150mm Sektor, us guys with frames a few years old are so out of luck for all the new forks.
  • + 1
 If you've got a frame 'a few years old' and a Sektor, you need to upgrading your frame before the fork, surely?
  • + 3
 Uh no
  • + 3
 I have a Blur LT2, right b4 they moved to the tapered head tube. Perfectly good frame with lots of life left.
  • + 1
 have to back these guys up here, nowt wrong with a 2007/8 patriot, perfect candidate for such a fork too.
  • + 1
 My 2009 dawg is in need of a new fork, not sure on the sektor/revelation because I've heard it's flexy, would've loved this, can't fit it.
  • + 1
 Man... the Sektor is a kickass fork, I bought it when it was first released. I ran it on an 04 coiler frame for the last season the frame saw under me... on mountains, trails, swamps, road... EVERYWHERE!!! Have only changed oil and seals once in 2 years... requires NO other maintenance... Excellent fork man, serious. It now resides on my Abra Cadabra frame, and feels even nicer with the change in geometry.
  • + 1
 Thanks for the recommendation daemon, might reconsider then...
  • + 1
 Hey... I wouldn't say such things if I weren't dead serious about it. I will say, it is not for everyone obviously, but if you arent killing huge drops and are a smooth rider, you should check it out... I do love mine, Beer
  • + 1
 the sektor is a good fork without a shadow of a doubt but due to the changes between it and the original pike its just not as stiff, thats where something like this new pike really does make sense. IF you can actually fit one to your bike.
  • + 5
 I love the look of it, and knowing Rock Shox they're going to be super plush. My old Pikes are still my favourite- and I'm gonna stick with them so I don't have to buy a new skinny xc 15mm front hub. I personally prefer the 95-140 mm range of travel anyway.
  • + 7
 I've been waiting for this for months...the Pike will look pretty good on the front of my Stumpy Evo. So long flexy Revelation!
  • + 1
 Is there an adapter for the wheels on the Evo to take it from 20mm to 15mm?
  • + 1
 You really think it's going to be much stiffer? My revelation came with a 20mm axle and seems a tad stiffer than the fox 34s with the 15mm axle. Or maybe it's all in my head.
  • + 1
 It's all in your head.
  • + 1
 German mag tested them in a lab and the 15mm revs are torsionally (for steering) STIFFER than 34s and longitudinally (for braking) almost as stiff as 34s. Was amazed and been questioning fox engineering since...
  • + 1
 @Sontator: Have you ever ridden the 29" verson of the Revelation? They literally just extended the lower of the fork by 1 1/2".
  • + 1
 no haven't, actually not even the 26". If they did that they did not put much thought into it. just saying as i am in the market for a new fork, torn between a 2014 rev 140mm and a xfusion rl2 traveled to 140. sure xfusion with 34 stanchions must be stiffer but how much considering the rev at 140 26" is supposed to be one of the stiffer 32 forks (so much that is in one way stiffer than the fox 34? also damping performance and suppleness, wondering how they compare though only heard good about xfusion
  • + 1
 I read in a magazine once that people from the Netherlands have funny looking feet...I've never seen any feet from the Netherlands, but a magazine said it, so it must be true.
  • + 1
 Well, i see what you doin there Wink but they are supposed to be all german and objective and put the forks on a dyno and measured how much force would make which fork bend how much and the rev with 15mm was torsionally stiffer that the 34, just under braking a tad softer. but then maybe their setup was flawed or it does not hold up to real world. so you have ridden the revs and think they are flexy?
  • + 9
 $1000 is MSRP people. You won't pay nearly that much as a consumer.
  • + 2
 Try nabbing the Lyrik RC2DH.... MSRP is the norm, you MIGHT find one MAYBE 50 bux less or so...
  • + 1
 On par with a Fox 34 and Fox is certainly not discounting those.
  • + 2
 that would be because the 34 has fox written on it Razz
  • + 9
 Stop the 15mm shit already!
  • + 13
 There are lots of riders who do use 15mm. I don't see why they cant make a 20mm version though.
  • + 3
 It's all right when they put it instead of crappy 9mm open dropouts (in xc forks i.e.). But in 160mm fork? Stupidest idea since the rock shox's new vivid "3% bullshit".
  • + 2
 the only reason a lot of riders are riding 15mm is because they have to! not by choice
  • - 1
 ??????????????????? Where do you get that from?
  • + 0
 uh this new pike for example, or someone that buys a complete bike that has a 15mm axle and is then restricted to 15mm forks when 20mm is far superior in every way.
  • + 2
 holy crap, if you need a 20mm axle this is not the fork for you. your thousand dollars would be better spent on a real hard hitting fork like a lyrik, fox36, 55rc3 ti, or vengeance, not to buy a trail fork to save 1/2 a pound.
  • + 4
 Now let me be clear before i start Razz . i like rockshox, i think they make good quality affordable forks that the home mechanic can tinker with. and looking over what theyve done internally here they seem to have tried to keep it that way and props to them for that, the bladder system seems like its gonna be much easier to get into than the fox dampers.

Here's my gripe. The pike was built as the ultimate do it all fork back in the day, you could DJ on it, you could DH on it and you could rip on it round the trail centres, yes it was a bit weighty and yes the damping wasnt the best, but it ripped. Now i cant say what this new one is gonna be like as obviously i havent tried it but... (and this is a big but) ... RS seem to have completely missed the reason for having a pike.

put all your fancy damping nonsense in the Rev thats what it was bought out for in the first place after all was it not ? the chassis is looking bang on although why theyre offering it in 160 i have no idea (lyrik anybody???) i think 140mm is where it should be at......
  • + 3
 ......the air spring seems like a great idea as there never was an original solo air pike (personally i would have loved one) but if you ask me the pike should be taking back its spot where the sector is albeit at a slightly higher price with a rev RCT3 damper scaled up and 20mm axle, that with coil uturn and DPC/DPA and solo air. this seems to be an attempt at offering a poor mans lyrik with slightly better perfomance than a rev and a nod to foxs CTD system, seems too frankenstein for me.

If the performance is there and the price comes down a lil bit and they start offering all the steerer and axle options in the second / third year of production this would please me more and so far from the sound of it the RC is the better option. but lets see.

Right now if you want everything that the Pike was go buy an Argyll RCT and be done with it. Please RS give us a proper beefcake mid price do it all fork with the Pike name on it not a frankenstein opponent to the fox 34 thats muddying the water on why the lyrik exists.
  • + 1
 that should read rev RLT damper btw my apologies
  • + 1
 maybe RS screwed up naming it pike. b/c whether or not this is meant to recreate the original pike, its definitely meant to be an opponent to the fox 34.
  • + 5
 Glad the pike is coming back better than ever. Just wish it was a little cheaper and had a 20 mil thru option. not a deal breaker though. Probably in the running for a 650b build i want to do in the future Smile
  • + 4
 To get the stiffness and the weight they are looking for, tapered is the only way to achieve it. 1 1/8" is a flexier interface, that's why its been abandoned in big trail bikes. 15mm is a demand from Bike OE's, and wheel manufacturers who don't want to post higher weight wheelsets with larger bearings that a 20mm thru demands. Also you can then make a clear distinction between 'trail" and "big mountain" etc with the 15mm vs 20mm delineation .
  • + 3
 Well said! Throughout this whole thread, no-one has really mentioned the technical benefits of tapered/15mm forks. Maybe this fork just wouldn't be viable with a straight steerer?
  • + 1
 A 20mm axle would've increased stiffness, is tapered being a requirement only so because they won't produce a 20mm axle option?
  • + 2
 the 20mm axle/15mm axle difference is so small you would never feel it. The lighter axle, smaller bearings, smaller hub shell, and smaller dropouts on the fork add up to a fair bit of weight savings, probably 1/4 to 1/2 pound. A bike that weighs 26.9 pounds SOUNDS so much lighter to consumers than a bike that weighs 27.2lbs. Its dumb, but this type of marketing works.
  • + 8
 We love Rockshox here in Puerto Rico.
  • + 3
 this comment board crack's me up. cryin about this pike not using a 20mm axle is like crying your new sports car doesn't come w/ a tow package. well, that maybe a bit too sarcastic but seriously, there is no way in hell i'm spending $1000 to save less than a pound. and if I absolutely need a 20mm axle on my trail bike, I would prefer a lyrik or fox36 anyways b/c i'm probably doing a lot of shuttling and bike park riding along with trail. granted i would not care one bit if 15mm had never existed, but it does, and in the future the 15mm trail bike market is growing, the 20mm trail bike market is shrinking, rapidly. RS made the commen sense, logical, and obvious choice going w/ a 15mm on this fork. ( and ditto w/ the tapered issue as well) and no, i don't think they should make 15 AND 20 or tapered AND 11/8, those days are gone.
  • + 5
 So sram makes a cartoon advertisement making fun of the 3 position system that fox has here on pinkbike then they release a fork with 3 position compression system......
  • + 1
 I was wondering when I'd see this comment...lol.
  • + 3
 I do believe the Rockshox Sektor is the replacement for the old pike they have just renamed it. The New pike as it says it's totally new... If you want an old Pike at old Pike prices you have 2 choices, the old Pike or the Sektor, But if you want the new pike it will cost you more. If this fork had been given a new name, half of you wouldn't think to even compare it to a pike, stop complaining about the price! Fox Floats and Talas come in at similar prices anyway, yes we all want things to cost less but it's not always that easy.
  • + 4
 rockshox's answer to the fox 34 by the sounds of things..... on that note that damper looks suspiciously like a fox fit one
  • + 2
 If you guys want straight 1 1/8 steerers or 20mm axle lowers, pony up the money ahead of time to get rockshox to do the tooling of the design for it. Organize a kickstarter funding campaign and see what happens. Because otherwise, the only ones who'll be getting those options are OEM buyers who specifically want it, and will be ordering several thousand forks at once.
  • + 2
 For the people who think 15mm is somehow inferior to 20mm, I think you are missing an important point. The way through axles are implemented on XC, trail and AM forks, extra tube diameter would be pointless. For the through axle to actually have any structural benefit to the fork it would need to be pressed in very tightly to the lowers (like a headset), or clamped radially with bolts (like a stem). Only then would 15 vs 20mm matter. In their current form they only provide two advantages over a skewer: they will not let the wheel fall out and cause a crash if they are too loose, and they stretch far less than the old 5mm steel rods, thus holding the hubs axle in the fork more firmly. If you ever used a 200 mm rotor on a wheel secured with just a skewer, and heard the disc rubbing as you went around hard corners, then you know what through axles are for - holding the hub better, keeping it perpendicular to the fork legs by clamping stronger, period. It has NOTHING to do with the rigidity of the fork itself unless it is bolted into the lowers like a Fox 40 or Boxxer.
  • + 2
 Looks like the replacement for the 150 Revelation which with 32mm stanchions just isn't good, especially if you're a bit bigger and ride hard. 35 stanchions and 150 travel...yes! Hopefully as plush as the Lyrik, and black on black....love it!! Don't know why people are whining about the axle and steer tube...modern standard.
  • + 2
 The "extruded bladder" is not a new or cutting edge idea for mountain biking. I had (now on a friend's bike) a 2005 Marzocchi Marathon XC and the TST cartridge used exactly the same design with and external bladder that looks the same and it had multiple terrain settings just like the Fox CRT or whatever it is called...in 2005. That old Italian fork still works amazing and still has the original fork seals leak free.
  • + 2
 Rockshox, in my opinion you guys make the best performing forks out there, in almost every category. However, your 2013 and 2014 fork line up is ugly!!!! And a huge portion of why people buy certain components for the bike is based off looks. Even though i like your suspension more than fox, i would rather run a fox 36 float kashima over a lyrik solely because of looks. Please work on different decals and that black stanchion looks terrible!!!!! Whats wrong with the standard gold annodizing? Im just trying to give my point of view, but seriously a huge factor in a new purchase is based off of looks. Your 2010-2012 paint schemes were gorgeous, please bring it back!
  • + 1
 Bang on, I think lyrics with blackbox stanchions, with white lowers, and white crown would look great
  • + 1
 What a great looking fork from rock shox, seems perfect in my book. Stout at a great weight - been in the market for a 34 or an Xfusion Slant for a couple months and this one will get my money. 15mm is great, keeps the weight down and does the job...Can't wait to get on one...
  • + 1
 you'd have better luck finding bigfoot than finding the slant. they (xfusion) said the slant would be out late summer '12, then december, then february, then.......crickets.
if the slant isn't available by may, i'm buying this pike just out of principle.
  • + 3
 Hmmm. 15mm axle seems a little weaksauce for this type of fork. If I was a fork manufacturer I would do a little market research and see what people want.
  • + 1
 right, they didn't do any market research. also, if 15mm is weaksauce, the lyrik would be a better choice anyways. RS will sell plenty of these forks, they can't make everyone happy and that's ok. manufacturing business 101.
  • + 1
 PossiblePoser, don't you think it's a bit arrogant to assume they did no market research? RockShox/SRAM didn't get to where they are by blind luck and guesswork. Just because it's not what YOU want,you shouldn't assume no-one wants it.
  • + 2
 Yep arrogant. Look at all the comments. I am a hater and I hate bullsh$t. If I was a weight weeny I would be down for a 15 mil axle on an xc bike. My revelation even has a 20mm axle. Let's see theoretically tapered headtube = stiffer, 35mm = stiffer, 15mm = flexier. Just my 2 cents, don't take it to seriously. And yes I'm sure people will buy it, cool looking fork.
  • + 1
 Poser: there are a group od kids here complaining. Part of market research is to figure out how many have buying power as well. Notice almost all of the comments are related to "it doesn't fir my old frame/wheels." That by itself eliminates you from this product. It is geared to a NEW build with a weight conscious buyer. If you can't afford to convert your hub, or buy an adapter for your headset, you are more in the market for a Domain or a Sektor. Those products have compatibility as they are your market. If $1000.00 for a 200g weight savings over your existing product, then $1000.00 for a lightweight high tech wheelset isn't unreasonable either (and will likely be more noticeable.)
  • + 1
 First off I'm not a kid. 2nd I am pretty much the target market for this type of fork. I ride xc fairly aggressively. 3rd my wheels are only 6 months old and have a 20mm axle. Yes I could convert my hub but the only point of going to a 15mm axle is to save a little weight in the bearings, the convertion doesn't do that. The reason to buy a fork would be to upgrade. They are trying to sell this fork on the basis that stiffer is better, marketing is working on me. 15 mm is theoretically flexier, spacing being part of this. The reason for tapered headtubes and 35mm stancions is to increase stiffness. 15mm makes sense as an upgrade over qr but is a downgrade for a burly am fork.
  • + 0
 Sorry, your language sounded like a kid. RS doesn't think you are the market for this fork, even though you think you are. RS assumes you will be able to overcome the axle problem you have. Maybe you can, then this for will apply to you.
  • + 3
 What, no 1" threaded steerer? Or cantilever brake mounts? Sorry rockshox, lost sale here!

/s

No one seems to be mourning the loss of those standards.
  • + 1
 I complained about the 15mm axle standard at first. I mean we already had 20mm that's stiff and light so why bother, right? Well now I have one and I honestly can't say it's any less stiff. At 6'6", 220lbs riding in Vancouver I think if anyone can force a fork to flex, it's me. Times change and so do standards. Monster T's were once the norm then we switched to 888s then to 66s then to Fox 36 180s and now 34s (for AM, at least). We continue to get great performance out of lighter and lighter gear. At some point you either embrace the new standards or STFU and use what you have.
  • + 6
 20 mm axle needed Frown
  • + 2
 New hub $50.00. Problem solved.
  • + 1
 When are RS going to stop with this overpriced Apple-like crap! What's next, they're going to put batteries in my forks and a USB, SD slot, dual cameras and possible wi-fi??.....Wish Marzocchi comes back with the Z1,T's,66 with the black stanchions and super plush ride to show RS what butt seks looks and feels like. I'm out, can't stand this!
  • + 1
 @ willie1, i understand it cost more to make more option types of axle and steer tube, have you never heard of the term, 'spend more money to make more money' loads of people might want (20mm + 1.18th steerer) (20mm + taper) (quick release + taper) and so on. buy limiting to taper and 15mm their cutting their own noses off really. I bet a hell of alot of people wont change their prefered hub and frame/headset types ( starting at £70-£150 for mid range parts or even a different Frame at huge money ) just to have the new Pikes. Liked the old at 140mm, Love the new ones more at 160mm but i will never have them on my rig because they just cant supply them to fit !!!!!
  • + 0
 Buy a lyric. It has the options you need. The light weight and axle/frame limitations also prevent people from running these with FR or DH components and ramping up warranty repairs. For the heavier components there is the.... wait.... THE LYRIC that is still compatible with your older components!!!!
  • + 2
 i would bet my house that there aren't enough people wanting to run a 20mm axle and 11/8th steerer on a trail bike to justify producing them. what you consider "a hell of a lot" is actually a hell of a small amount relative to the current trail bike market and future trail bike market. and RS decision proves they know what they are doing.
plus, it doesn't make sense to need a 20mm axle AND need a fork as light as possible, the lyrik should be ideal for that. bladders don't equal better.
  • + 0
 @kwymore, Do you know how many bikes were sold with 1.125 headtubes that were supplied with, or people chose to fit 20mm forks to that fitted into the "trail" category say three or four years ago before tapered HTs became the norm? Unless you think these bikes just evaporated sometime over the last three years, they are still here, as are their owners who may be looking for that option. But don't just take my word for it, try this, from RS own sales blurb from the 2013 Recon Gold 20mm 29 inch 1.5 steerer fork.

"Let’s face it. You know what you want from your suspension, which is why we believe in giving our riders the options they desire. "

It would seem fair then, would it not, that some people may be surprised that RS has chosen to only offer one option. Yes, I know and understand all the very good reasons why RS will feel that only the tapered 15mm be offered. It's their prerogative so good luck to them. Some of us are disappointed though.
BTW I am sure if you asked some elite WC DH riders if a 20mm axle on a light fork made sense to them they may say yes.
I want a 20mm light fork please because I try to keep my wheels and hubs interchangeable. I have started using Novatec hubs because changing over is easy as pie, but most of the wheelsets I own are 20mm hub so I can swap them around if needed, it's nice to be able to do that.
  • + 2
 very true dave. i'm sure RS carefully considered the amount of 1.125 HT bikes still being ridden and the owners who might want to upgrade. then they realized the size of that market still pales in comparison to the amount of current and future trail bikes w/ tapered HT's. every company has to accept a percentage of potential customers will be disappointed w/ their product, that doesn't mean they made a bad decision.
  • + 1
 people complaining about the price of things also have to consider the chain of people the bike goes from, iv done business in the skate/bmx world but not mtb so my mark ups might be wrong but 100% mark ups are not unknown in the sports world.

Dealer sells bike for £5k buys it for £2.5k from distributor who buys it from manufacturer from £1.25k and when you think they are making a carbon frame paying for research and development, bills, equipment, endorsement deals and sticking a top notch set of 3rd party components(trade price) on the bike they aint making much money at all when you consider the amount they ship
  • + 1
 Why the hell is Boobar wearing a pyjama? Preparing the journalist to fall asleep telling them incredible stories? With wonderful charaters like Counter Measure (aka negative spring) and Rapid Recovery Damping (aka hydraulics).
RS makes good stuffs. They don't need stupid blabla.
  • + 1
 I get it, its the lighter platform and competitor to teh 34mm Fox line. I bet the weight was the biggest reason for the 15mm axle. And if you need that I'd say Lryik, I love mine and won't get this cuz its gonna be too spindly for me. But I seriously agree the straight steerer lets 44mm HT's use flush lower cups for more geo. adjustments w big travel on a smaller bike-5 Spot. Same-ish geo w flush cup at 160 to 140 ext cup! And hello, upgrade to older frames is sweet! I'd love to put one of these on an older frame, hello that's upgrading half ur bike! And a huge change.
  • + 1
 so fox goes smaller shaft and RS says bigger is better. hmmmm. nice weight and adjustments though.not alot of room for that bladder to expand. they should offer fork and shock packages. buy both and save some $'s. interested in the new lyric now......
  • + 1
 Taper only and 15mm only is pretty beat... It makes it almost impossible to retrofit to any bike more than 2 years old... 15QR and tapered head tubes aren't that old, it's disappointing that RS is alienating those customers.
  • + 1
 Tapered head tubes have been around since 2006, 1.5 head tubes that'll take a tapered steerer are even older than that. Even 2 years ago most 150-160mm frames were tapered. And TBH, most people with a frame older than 2010-ish aren't likely to be dropping a grand on a new fork.
  • + 3
 but they can say they are being screwed!! ;(
  • + 4
 modern consumerism, " i demand that a product that doesn't apply to me be catered to my needs!"
  • + 5
 What? No cantilever mounts and 9mm QR compatibility? RS is losing it.
  • + 2
 The promotional video was funny. All the slow-mo clips were of the rider manualing through stuff with the fork doing absolutely nothing. Well that's just great, except they're trying to advertise a fork. Hello?
  • + 5
 So, basically, "new and improved" Lyrik with girly axle?
  • + 10
 An entirely new fork chassis and damper, so not really a Lyrik at all. Not to mention the weight =)
  • + 2
 So the Lyrik's camp little brother then?
  • + 6
 More like the love child of a Lyrik and a Revelation.
  • + 3
 Rockshox, say bladders are not reliable in shocks when they tell us we can't get the new vivid, then release a new damper based around a bladder, go figure
  • + 4
 Are those...... BOMBERS!?
  • + 3
 why the 15mm Boobar? i'm sick of having a different set of wheels for every bike!
  • + 1
 20mm are all but dead, because mtb product managers at the big bike companies falsely believed fox and shimano's bs marketing stories that 15mm through axles were lighter and just as stiff.
  • + 0
 I hate it when people rag a new product, but being a big Pike fan I was really looking forward to the launch of the latest product, but seeing it's tapered only, and currently only available in a 15 mm axle option, I'm pretty disappointed. I'd be looking at headset changes and wheel purchasing if I wanted a set.
  • + 0
 Headset is about £50, front hub is about the same. Not a massive outlay when you're talking about a brand new £750+ fork.
  • + 4
 Wheel build on top of that buddy. If you're thinking of spending £750 on a fork you don't really want to have to factor in another £150. It'll make it 20% harder to get by the missus.
  • + 1
 Yeah, that's true. I know it's a bit tenuous, but maybe that's 1 more reason to buy from a shop rather than online? Any shop should offer to waive wheel build charges if you're buying a £750 fork from them.
  • + 3
 That's a very nice idea mate! Something that can easily be offered by a bike shop, that wouldn't be easy for an on-line store to emulate. It would definitely soften the financial blow a little.
  • + 1
 "Dual Position Air (DPA) system that allows for 30mm of travel adjustment via simplified internals compared to previous iterations"

I'm confused.. can you adjust the travel externally.. like a U-turn?
  • + 2
 Dual Position Air allows you to decrease the travel by turning a knob at the top of the left leg ninety degrees. It works by moving air from the positive to the negative chamber. It can also be found on the Lyrik actually.
  • + 1
 Ah thanks very much. It doesn't actually say how you would adjust the travel.. it just says that you can..
  • + 1
 To those who say things are not over priced.. please tell me why i was able to by last years model renthal protaper bars for $28AUD from local bikeshope.. whilst their "newer model" sells for $110AUD+
  • + 2
 The fork looks sick, dont know why everybody is bitching? at least rockshox, marzocchi or fox have not turned to cannondales 'amazing' lefty fork, so it could be a lot worse
  • + 0
 Was liking everything about the new Pikes until it was pointed out that there will only tapered steerer and 15mm axle compatibility. Way to piss off a lot of would be customers. So unless you have a 2010-onwards frame ( and even some new ones still use straight 1.1/8th ) and already run 15mm hubs RockShox dont want your money. WHAT CUSTOMERS VALUE IS OPTIONS TO SUIT THERE BIKE, NOT BUYING NEW BIKES TO SUIT THEIR NEW FORKS !
3 steerer options and 3 axle options would equal more sales wouldn't it ?
  • + 1
 It requires more tooling, more infrastructure, more SKUs and more inventory. There are already three versions of the fork and there is no need to multiply that. How about the people who want tapered 20mm, or 1 1/8 and 15mm? Should those be available too?
  • + 1
 Yes, scrap the huge list of dampers with minute incremental improvements and focus on the chassis, they can do it for rear shocks why not for forks ? the problem is that they have too many different lines, reduce the number of fork "models" and provide a smaller range with more options. do they really need sectors and revs and now this all in virtually the same market? why not scrap the rev 32 mm chassis and make it this with all the offerings? i suspect that will be the long term outcome is that one line will bite the dust and this line is expanded with more options to accomodate
  • + 2
 OF COURSE THEY WANT YOU TO BUY A NEW BIKE TO FIT YOUR NEW FORK. If you could fit a new fork to your existing bike they wouldn't make any money.! Next year I'm waiting for my 185mm Avid disk rotors to be discontinued & replaced with 191.77mm rotors that don't match my brakes, 11gear rear casette that wont work with my 10gear cranks & anything else they can fettle with to make me have to change everything on my bike again. All because it's meant to be stiffer, lighter, more money & better.!
  • + 1
 Lyric is 20mm axle, Pike is 15mm axle. Different intended uses. Why the complaining?
  • + 4
 It's because they can't offer extra axle and steerer options, as cost is too high. This money gas been eaten up by making the 650B and 29er fork versions. See where all these new standards get us? Less consumer choice, forced obsolescence and more cost all round.
  • + 1
 If you arenèt intereted in the weight savings this model offers (15mm, tapered steerer, lightweight chassis) then the lyric is available in all the other options with a slight weight penalty.
  • + 4
 Bummed out on the 15mm axle. This beauty should be rocking a 20mm.
  • + 0
 Nice fork. I've been waiting for this fork since i saw the 650b proto at Galbraith a few months back. It'll be a perfect fork for when SC releases their longer travel 29er soon!

Marketing / gimmick issues though:

1/ "The closed cartridge separates the damping oil from the lubrication oil, allowing RockShox to use simpler seals (left) that combine dust and oil duties into one unit." Hmm, their other forks also separate the damping oil from the lubrication oil. All of the higher end ones do anyways so the fact that they use new seals has nothing to do with the new damper.

2/ Those air volume reduction spacers are stupid also. People have been adding oil to the air spring to accomplish the same thing.
  • + 1
 All the dissent forks now cost $1000+ . Is this an agreement between the suspension companies or what? Ridicules. The steaks they ate should heve been very expensive!
The same happens with frames, wheels etc.
  • + 1
 i cant belive that they stopped with the pike for a short period. best fork i have ever had. just bought argyles will have them once they get back in stock. totaly gutted tho would rather have a pike
  • + 4
 looks like a fit bladder to me
  • + 5
 As the article states, it is based on the same principle but the bladder is very, very different from what is used in a FIT cartridge.
  • + 1
 Looks like a 2005 Marzocchi Marathon TST cartridge...
  • + 1
 I'm really interested in this fork. I like the idea of it, I think it'll work well on my Niner WFO that I'm currently building up. This fork I believe is designed really for the new longer travel 29ers like my bike.
  • + 1
 I thought RockShox bagged on Fox CTD with their Cartoon ads for the kids. Fox must be flattered RockShox copied the CTD and bladder!!!
  • + 0
 Looks great but hopefully they will offer it in a standard 1&1/8th as well.
With the Totem & Lyrik still in the lineup I don't see a "need" for a 20mm but it would have been a nice option.
  • + 3
 No 20mm axle?????????????
  • + 1
 Disapointing video, was expecting to be told at the end of it I'm too shit to own one. No point wanting it now if its available to everyone, they've taken the motivation away
  • + 1
 Rockshox, please just cancel the job of the responsible product manager due to not including a 20mm option... This guy does not understand the job.
  • + 0
 You should send them your CV, as you clearly know more than anyone at Rockshox, they'll really value your input! Or not...
  • + 3
 Will the 2014 Lyrik see updates as well?
  • + 4
 boobar
  • + 3
 exactly what i though
  • + 1
 r a boob
  • + 2
 same
  • + 2
 Better than Poobar- that's slang for Hash in the UK!!
  • + 1
 Don't truvativ aka rockshox aka SRAM make a handle bar called the boobar?
  • + 2
 dang, and to think im still riding my old pike air with 140mm and lockout haha. great fork, and this one looks even better!
  • + 1
 So, how would I find a 150 COIL 650b fork? Similar to a Lyrik but in true 650b configuration. Is there something that could be modified?
  • + 1
 "Lock for ultimate efficiency" - that one made me laugh! If I end up working in the bike world will I have to talk like that to sell my products?
  • + 2
 No 1 1/8 steerer option and a 15mm maxle = maybe you'll need to buy a new frame nor hub / weel
  • + 2
 Yup. I got super excited about this new Pike, then noticed that it won't work on my frame/wheelset. Maybe I will just send my old fork off to get PUSHed...
  • + 3
 don't get the no 20mm option at 160mm travel range.
  • - 2
 its an enduro fork, not a FR fork. Thats why the 15mm. If you need 20mm, buy the heavier duty Lyric.
  • + 1
 I thought most people are using the lyric as an enduro fork or most using 20mm thrus with 160mm travel. enduros been around longer than 15mm has. hasn't it? i had an old pike and it was 20mm...
  • + 1
 Lyrik is now only 170mm. Which is fine with me.
  • + 1
 ^ah-that's right. lookin at a new enduro and with 165mm out back the lyric sounds much better.
  • + 1
 They are pushing the weight/stiff boundary as far as possible. 20mm and 1 1/8 options means no weight advantage over the competition's current offerings. You are going to see more of this in the next 18 months.
  • + 3
 Can see this being the next big thing in dj forks
  • + 0
 apart from the tapered steerer only, and if you can lower them.
  • + 1
 Their ad is making fun of the whole CTD system by fox.. and now they are going to use 3 preset compression settings for the fork? lol
  • + 1
 This sounds like a really good fork, i have old pike aswell as on my big bike i have 36's but i dont think i can go back 36s are such a versitile fork
  • + 2
 Do the lower travel to 150 to fit 650b wheels? I would rather have more travel and fatter wheel.
  • + 2
 that test bike.... carbon santa cruz LTC tallboy with XX1, reverb stealth and these new forks/shock? WANT
  • + 2
 Right?!
  • + 3
 All this talk of bladder I'm off to empty mine weeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee :-)
  • + 1
 I have the new style seals on my 32mm Reba RLT TI. 0 stiction on that fork!
Who's going to be the first to try these 35 mm seals on a Boxxer?
  • + 4
 Rockshox ctd
  • + 2
 I wonder if they have HSC and LSC settings for the 160mm
  • + 1
 yeahhh
  • + 1
 I'll replace my old pike when it breaks... But I don't see that happening any time soon Lol
  • - 2
 Is it just me that thinks having black upper legs on this fork is a stupid idea? No1: Black upper legs look like they will scratch like crazy. I'm not sure but if you look at the photos above it looks like these brand new demo forks on brand new bikes are already getting scratches & marks on? No2: I'm sure black upper legs look great on some bike frame colours but if your upgrading these on to an existing bike there is a good change they wont work with your frame colour & make your £3000+ pride & joy look like a complete dogs dinner.!! maybe RockShox are only interested in the pre built market. A real shame as I own a set of Pike 454 Duel Air forks that I am looking to replace but I'm put off buying these because of the colour. Stupid I know but when your spending that much time & money on a bike getting something that doesn't scratch up & look rubbish matters.
  • + 1
 Why is it that they don't mention the fact that the fork has black stanchions?! I mean it's just slightly noticeable....
  • + 2
 Where's mine?? I want one for my Jabula...
  • + 2
 Yesterday Fox, today RockShoxs!
  • + 1
 I still have my old 2005 Pike on hardtail, superb fork. Hope the new one does the job just as well.
  • + 1
 Pike + Spitfire V2 + XX1 would be a nice setup, but with no 20mm option i'll stick to my old bike
  • + 0
 980 dollars for something looking like an old Nixon with 15mm axle?!
, i'm gonna rush on ebay and buy a proper pike with 20mm axle for 200 dollars.
  • + 1
 Mike! Props! Awesome coverage! Need to give you +1s, +Likes, +Favs, and such for a comprehensive article like this.
  • + 2
 Is it just me or has stantion colours gone full circle?
  • + 1
 At 42 years old, this is how it works. Notice a lot of wheels and cranks were available in silver last year.
  • + 1
 Bummed that I can't get a 140mm travel version for my 26" ride!
  • + 1
 That rebound cartridge looks like a FIT
  • + 1
 man,it's just a shock after all
  • + 1
 is it just me or does that dampening system look a lot like fox internals
  • + 1
 Riffle hanging out back during the presentation.
  • + 0
 Pure stupid don't make 20mm axle version. 15mm mostly for 29er these day. What are they thinking???
  • + 1
 is it possible to lower the fork? like to adjust from 120-150?
  • + 1
 You'd think they'd offer a 20mm thru axle as an option, too bad.
  • + 1
 was Ropelato riding the pike on his stumpi?
  • + 1
 great to see the larger stanction tubes
  • + 1
 I was like YES and then I saw 15mm Frown and mrsp is alot.
  • + 1
 Cool story. How about releasing the new Lyric DPA in black.
  • + 0
 Tapered steerer only? FFS just when when I wanted to upgrade the forks on my Intense 5.5, these would have looked sick
  • + 5
 You can't expect the older standards to be supported forever. It's also not available in 1" threaded steerer with a cantilever hanger.

I know it's harsh, but that's the nature of the industry.
  • + 2
 Its not even that old! Bikes are still being produced in 2013 with staight head tubes!
  • + 2
 High end 150/160mm travel trail/AM bikes (to suit this fork) are being produced in 2013 with straight headtubes?!?

Name one!
  • + 3
 On-one 456 steel Wink , stanton 853 slackline, NS bikes Surge 2. All perfectly good AM/Trail weapons here and if you fitted an original pike or a dropped lyrik you could hit some DH too.
  • + 1
 Hardly 'high end 150/160 travel trail/AM bikes'.

They're all low/mid-range steel hard tail frames. And do people really fit £1000-ish forks to £160 On One frames?!?

You've got to admit, that's an incredibly small niche for a fork manufacturer to be expect to cater for.
  • + 1
 Well all i can say to that is lets look at the original pike. i dont know about you but when people say pike to me first thing i think is DJ and DH hardtail, maybe thats just because when i got into MTB the pike was the one to get as you could do it all with it.

in regards to high end, £500 for a hardtail frame id say thats pretty high end without going carbon or ti both of which if your gonna splash that kinda cash your more than likely gonna stump up for a full sus. and yes i have met people with on-ones with 36s and the like on, just because its £200 frame means jack, if it rides sweet why not put good components on it ?

so what do RS offer for the hardtail lover ? sektors, revs and the argyll RCT which in my experience isnt tuned for trails really. i have a recon gold 120 and the stiffness compare to the pike it replaced is just not there, the sectors are the same. so what ive gotta go fettling about with an argyll then ? i know that the hardtail market isnt the biggest out there but its still a pretty big market especially here in the UK.

theyve done a lot of things right with this fork but limiting the target market by forcing 15mm and tapered on people is a bad move, the steerer options is a bigger deal than the axle but still.
  • + 2
 @jay,all of those straight head tube bikes can run a tapered fork. they use a 44mm ht so that you can run all steerer types. brit is corrrect, nobody is producing high-end 150-160 trail bikes w/ a 11/8th HT.
  • + 1
 dude, greatest of respect and all but theyre not 44mm HT.

NS Surge 2:

headset: standard press-fit 1.125” (1-1/8” A-head)

Stanton slackline 853:

Head tube 1 1/8"

and the 456 steel definatly has 1 1/8th as the guy i ride with regularly has one that i built.
  • + 1
 Last time I remember a fork if you're lucky lasts 3-5 years, but a frame 7 or so. Thus forks need to match frames, not visa-versa.
  • + 2
 dude, i was wrong. i've been drooling over that slackline ti too much. well, thats 3, and i'm sure there's a couple more out there. i guess RS just decided they could live w/o the budget steel is real market for the new pike. btw, that slack 853 looks awesome, and i don't think they made a mistake by making a frame that isn't compatible w/ a fork i already own.
  • + 1
 Frames have a service life of 5 years if aluminum. Steel is longer. The only reason steel frames are using the skinny head tubes is the lost sales to the weird look of using a 44mm head tube on a skinny steel tube frame. I use Paragon 44mm head tubes on the frames I build.
  • + 1
 Willie, I agree in reality frames have a general usable life of five years, but most manufacturers have a "lifetime warranty' of around 7 years.
  • + 1
 Jeramiah Boobar made up name ???????????????????????????????????????
  • + 1
 does somebody know the axle-crown-height of the 27.5 version?
  • + 2
 So why is it black?
  • + 3
 Racists.
  • + 0
 It's in black so your lovely expensive fork uppers can get scratched & look crap in no time at all.
  • - 1
 I like the new Pike, the black stanchions looks so good. It clearly look that RockShox develops better than for example Marzocchi.
  • + 1
 Tell us about those wheels.....
  • + 1
 Is this replacing the Lyrik..... that i just bought?
  • + 7
 There will only be a single 170mm travel Lyrik in the RockShox lineup.
  • + 2
 I'm betting we'll see a new Lyrik in the next two years. That chassis is getting a bit old.
  • + 1
 no, this does not replace the lyrik
  • + 1
 So can we hope for coated boxxers? Smile
  • + 1
 Really good article. Fork looks to be really good too.
  • + 2
 tapered steerer only?
  • + 0
 yes, you have that correct.
  • + 2
 What a good idea!
  • + 1
 sarcaism i hope joeee Smile
  • + 4
 Of course ! How stupid is that?!?!
  • + 1
 the posts are only as stoopid as the poster Smile
  • + 1
 so glad to see another one
  • + 1
 Atleast you dont have to be a pro rider to bike a rock shox product now
  • + 1
 those complaining about the axle: We have the lyrik.
  • + 1
 BRING BACK DUAL-AIR!!! WE'RE NOT IDIOTS!!!
  • + 1
 Way like, but wondering where the lyrik goes from here.
  • + 1
 So sick!!! Long live the PIKE!!! Thank you RockSHOX!!!
  • + 1
 i still happy with my 2007 coil 2500gramm PIKE
  • + 1
 Niiiiiiiiiiiiice Big Grin
  • + 1
 Get a 55
  • + 1
 Can anyone say fox FIT?
  • + 1
 I can, but why. Most of us can speak here. That is a silly question.
  • + 1
 Im gonna have me one
  • + 1
 Kashima wins.
  • + 0
 20mm thru-axle !!!!!!!!!!1 I'll stay with Fox...
  • + 1
 WOOHOO!!!!!!
  • + 0
 Taper only - thx for nothing SRAM
  • + 1
 100000000000000000000
  • + 0
 BOOBAR!!!
  • - 1
 was interested until I noticed the 15mm axel...stupid
  • - 1
 Do they still outsource production to Fisher Price?
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