Rotwild - Eurobike 2012

Sep 2, 2012
by Mike Levy  
Rottwild bikes.

R.E1 650B
German company Rotwild has seven new models for 2013, with the 27.5"-wheeled R.E1 being the most interesting to us. The addition of the mid-sized wheel to Rotwild's lineup allows the 26"-wheeled R.E1 to sit at a full 180mm, while the model shown here features a more all-around 160mm figure. The bike's rear suspension, dubbed 'XMS - Enduro', uses a four bar, Horst Link layout that should allow the design to remain neutral to rider input. Frame details include all of the usual points that you'd expect to see on a bike in this travel category; ISCG-05 tabs for a chain guide, a tapered head tube, and a 12 x 142mm rear end included. The R.E1's dropouts are particularly interesting, with a clever replaceable insert allowing for a number of different axle configurations, and the complete bike coming stock with a Shimano-compatible Direct Mount derailleur hanger.


• 160mm of rear wheel travel
• Aluminum frame
• Rotwild XMS - Enduro suspension
• 66.5° head angle
• ISCG-05 chain guide tabs
• FOX Float CTD shock w/ Kashima
• 12 x 142mm thru-axle
• Sizes: small, medium, large, x-large

Rottwild bikes.

Rottwild bikes.




Rottwild bikes.

R.E1
Going down in wheel size lets Rotwild move up in travel, with the 26"-wheeled R.E1 sitting at a full 180mm via a 2.5'' stroke FOX Float CTD shock with the gold Kashima touch. A heavy-hitting FOX 36 Talas matches the rear end in travel, but its Talas dial will allow the R.E1 rider to reign in the bike's 66° head angle when it comes to to earn those turns. A minimalist dual-ring guide comes as stock equipment as well, with the same thought in mind. Other component highlights include a colour-matching DT Swiss Tricon wheelset (a lightweight EXC1550 Carbon wheelset is also an option from Rotwild), and a Shimano XT drivetrain.


• 180mm of rear wheel travel
• Aluminum frame
• Rotwild XMS - Enduro suspension
• 66° head angle
• ISCG-05 chain guide tabs
• FOX Float CTD shock w/ Kashima
• 12 x 142mm thru-axle
• Sizes: small, medium, large, x-large



Rottwild bikes.

R.X2
Rotwild's 150mm travel bracket is split into two frame options: either the aluminum R.X1, or the carbon fiber R.X2 pictured above. The frame's 'XMS - All Mountain' rear suspension employs a re-worked rocker link compared to 2012 that Rotwild says has upped the frame's stiffness, thereby helping to limit the FOX CTD shock's side loading. Just as on the longer travel R.E1, a tapered head tube and inter-changeable 12 x 142mm dropouts are present, but the bike's ISCG-05 chain guide tabs are a bolt-on, replaceable piece. The top tier model shown here features a no-holds-barred build, with an XTR drivetrain and brake spec, as well as a 150mm travel FOX 32 Talas CTD fork with the Kashima treatment. Interestingly, the entire R.X range has been spec'd with triple crank sets.


• 150mm of rear wheel travel
• Carbon fiber frame
• Aluminum seat and chain stays
• 68.5° head angle
• Replaceable ISCG-05 tabs
• FOX Float CTD shock w/ Kashima
• 12 x 142 thru-axle
• Sizes: small, medium, large




Rottwild bikes.

R.R2 29
While the 26"-wheeled R.R2 platform has been very successful in the past, Rotwild found that the design's layout didn't translate over to the larger 29" wheels as well as they would like. The answer is the brand new, 115mm travel design shown above that allows Rotwild to postion the bike's pivots where there would otherwise not be able to with the older layout. The new bike is available in both carbon and aluminum flavours, with the upscale R.R2 29 featured here. Rotwild designed the new model as a pure race bike, and they say that it sports a firm feel with that in mind.


• 115mm of rear wheel travel
• Carbon fiber frame
• Firm, race-oriented travel
• 69.25° head angle
• FOX Float CTD shock w/ Kashima
• 135mm dropouts
• Sizes: small, medium, large

www.rotwild.de


72 Comments

  • 120 72
 650b needs to stop.
  • 127 28
 dont like it dont buy it.
  • 30 42
flag Conm (Sep 2, 2012 at 12:34) (Below Threshold)
 Full stop.
  • 86 10
 dont knock it till ya try it... I havent so im open minded on it
  • 51 10
 650b is awesome! Just like 29/26 or 1x/2x/3x drive trains, it depends on where you are and what/how you ride. Theres nothing wrong with have more options. If you dont like it dont ride it.
  • 40 4
 650b is an option, it isnt replacing your beloved 26" wheels.
  • 13 1
 as long as you get the option between 26, 27.5, 29 ...its only when the size your looking for hasnt been made an option that it starts to become annoying, but then 26' wheels arent going away anyway....
  • 28 4
 Are 650B and 29" a way for companies to make more money? Yes. But thats what EVERY product is made for. Is it a possibly unnecessary new standard? Unsure. Is it as unnecessary as 35mm handlebars? Nope. Is it as unnecessary as 1 1/4 steerer tubes? Nope. But I think everyone can agree wheel size dramatically affects the way a bike rides. Better? Worse? Depends who you talk to, which is okay. Lets face it wheel size hasn't been explored much historically and all it means is manufacturing changes and some awkward teenage years. Geometry still remains untested, it doesn't have 20+ years of trial and error like 26". But we will get there eventually. Till then, sit back, relax and enjoy the show. In my opinion we haven't really changed the way we ride bikes since 2005.
  • 11 0
 people should stop whining about new wheel sizes and hating on innovation, dont think it works? go demo one for yourself or ask a friend if you can try his bike and see for yourself.
  • 16 56
flag bat-fastard (Sep 2, 2012 at 13:25) (Below Threshold)
 29" is gay, 27.5" is bisexual.... 26" is just right...
  • 23 2
 two can play at this game... "29ers are like a same sex bj its all good till ya look down"
  • 9 1
 Actually 26 wheels are getting replaced (in the XC/Trail).

Look at Scott's Genius trail line up this year only with 29 inch wheels. And I'm sure there are many other companies following the same.

As for having more choices, yup it is great! Except more choices generally mean higher cost as well.
  • 4 2
 The options are only there if frame manufacturers still make them in 26". Some line up especially XC line ups (Scott) don't offer a 26".

So it's pushing people who want new frames to have 29". That means the options have gone. In other words if you want a new frame you have to buy wheels/forks too = more £££/$$$
  • 4 2
 So. Many. Wheel sizes to choose from. Would be nice to have the choice of a few bikes with a few different wheel sizes in my own garage, but until the day comes when good bikes become affordable for mere mortals or I win the lottery I think venturing away from 26" is a bold move for most
  • 5 3
 I really depends what you ride though. If you only race XC why would you still be on a 26" bike?
  • 5 1
 650b is just another option, making bikes more versatile and adaptable to ones needs. It's not like 29 and 26 are just gonna dissapear.
  • 3 1
 well put sir.
  • 4 4
 I might try 650 b when I'm too old to lift the front wheel in order to get over obstacles. Till then, I'm havin a blast pounding the 26 through the tech trails faster than ever. Maybe I'll try 24 inch wheels for more of a challenge!
  • 6 0
 So far, I haven't ridden a 29er I've liked. I'm sure there's one out there that might handle/turn the way I want, but I haven't ridden it yet.

650b? Tried an Intense Carbine and loved it instantly. Geo felt great, and it turned exactly how I wanted. If you're thinking of going to big wheels and you love 26ers, it's a viable option... 2 cents.
  • 5 5
 Can you honestly say you have been out riding your 26" and felt "I could really use bigger wheels" I'm not suggesting innovation is a bad thing, but this just screams money making ploy to me by an already obscenely over priced industry
  • 2 0
 No. I can't say that. Super happy with my 26. But, like lots of people I enjoy trying new tech to see if it makes riding more fun or not. When I had the chance to try a 650b bike, there was a noticeable difference in how it muted the high speed chatter. To add to that benefit, it still felt as playful as my 26". It jumped well, and cornered in a manner I felt comfortable with... I felt like I could go faster, without the 29er awkwardness.
  • 4 7
 hey everybody, lets make a 28" wheeled bike!
  • 5 2
 Don't get me wrong ill be buried with my 26' wheels, but its funny because 26' was just the size they decided on when they built the first mtb, and now everyone seems to think it is the 'right' wheel size instead of trying and testing different ones. Like they say don't knock it till you try it.
  • 3 0
 [quote]Look at Scott's Genius trail line up this year only with 29 inch wheels. And I'm sure there are many other companies following the same. [/quote]

And.. er... 27.5!
  • 1 0
 @NWray I race xc but I'm not on 29" or 27.5" (and neither are most people in my race catagory) just because I will never scrape enough money together to buy all the shit I would need to change wheel size.
  • 2 3
 @denham I prefer 26" wheels over 26 foot wheels, dont you?
  • 2 0
 My bad. You got the point tho.
  • 1 0
 im quite liking the look of these 27.5" bikes atleast they dont look like Bamby like the 29ers
  • 2 0
 and to be fair any one on a 15" frame or smaller shouldnt be on a 29er. they are just too big. (think 11 year old on his first full sized MTB, they look like 29'ers because the frame is so small)
  • 8 2
 If 650b sucked so much, companies wouldn't switch their whole lineup over to it. It's a lot cheaper for them to continue building 26" bikes, so obviously they feel this new size is worth the investment. The wheel hasn't been touched in years, so maybe it's time to take a look at new options. Yes, these "new" sizes have been tried in the past, but now its a full swing operation that has a number of reputable companies offering high-quality components for them. For example, a few years ago the wheel strength of a 29er just wouldn't have been there, but now it makes sense for a lot of people, and that's why some people love them.

I've ridden a couple of 650s (Norco Range Killer B, Sight Killer B, Jamis 650...) and have found them to handle just as nice as a 26er but with a smoother ride. In fact some of the 2013 Norco 650s have a shorter wheelbase than their 26" counterparts. I used them on the North Shore, used them in the East, and not once did I wish I had a 26" bike.

I've also ridden a number of 29ers and love them for my local trails. I find I just perform better on the trail with them compared to a 26er. Can I bunny hop them as high? No, and my cornering is a little slower too. But the number of times I need to bust a full out bunny hop or pull a u-turn on the trail are limited, and the pros outweigh the cons for me. This is not the case for everybody, and that's cool; ride what you like.
  • 1 1
 Not necessarily. Look back to the 80s. BMX market saturated, not enough new units being sold to please the bean counters. Mountain bikes invented, bean counters happy for 20 years. Roll on 2010... Mountain bike market saturated, not enough new units being sold to please the bean counters. Mountain bikes reinvented with bigger wheels, the sheeple are fooled into parting with more of their hard earned coin to buy the latest greatest wheel size they just can't do without... bean counters happy. I haven't tried one, I'm not against the tech, but I don't think it's worth all the hype. If I have the chance to try one I might try it. Marketing wise, I think it's a scam.
  • 1 0
 How do you explain road bikes then? Same wheel size for how many decades? And yet the bean counters have been happy all along...
  • 1 2
 I don't know. Maybe they sell more because it's a more mainstream sport.

They use 650c wheels for triathlon don't they? Why do they think that's better? I think they use them because they just always have, and actually the difference between wheel sizes doesn't matter that much.

I believe that 26, 27.5 and 29 inch wheels handle a bit differently. I don't believe that it matters that much for 99% of riders. I've been told by different people in the industry, at different times, and independently of each other, that the push for bigger wheels is a commercially driven scam to sell more bikes.

I am not saying I think big wheels are shit, but I am saying they aren't necessary. If everyone who can afford two bikes spent the money they used to buy one of them to actually learn to ride the bike they have, the sport would be better for it. Sadly the reason it doesn't happen is that old washed up guys with families, like myself, have more free money than free time and that, Smike, is why 29ers didn't die after six months like they should have done.
  • 4 1
 Tri-bikes still use 700c wheels. There used to be larger wheels on road bikes WAY back in the day (27"x1.25") but there was a switch to go mainly 700c. But a road is a road is a road, so there really isn't a need for different diameter wheels.
I feel like everybody is a conspiracy theorist when it comes to this stuff. They think everybody is just trying to rip them off and make money. Truth is, while it might make them more money, it gives the consumer more options to fine-tune their ride. I work at a shop and have yet to have a customer come in and buy a 29er because they think it will be an improvement over their 26er. They come in because they need a new bike, and then they try out the 29er and find it will suit them better. It doesn't make the company more money, they were gonna buy a bike whether or not it came with 26, 27, or 29" wheels. We simply have more options now.
  • 1 0
 Good point
  • 9 0
 that R.E1 is one nice looking bike!
  • 2 1
 its so slick looking for a 180mm travel bike, it looks like it would handle the decents well....but..i wonder how it climbs, if it does it well, its an enduro riders dream come true.
  • 3 2
 it looks capable on the climbs... it looks fairly light idk the weight
  • 1 0
 and it has a talas as well... help you out a bit
  • 5 1
 Just like going from rigid to suspension, Gripshift to SIS, 25.4 handlebars to 31.8, there is usually a good reason for the new technology. Money grab? Probably. Overhyped? Definitely. But that doesn't mean it isn't a better option for the majority of riders. Some will stay with the old stuff because that's what they like, and that's totally fine. But give this new stuff a try with an open mind, because you might just be surprised. And if you don't like it, go back to your old steed and enjoy the trails. Even if 650 completely takes over (which it likely won't), there will always be 26ers, just like there will always be singlespeeds and rigid bikes. So stop complaining and be happy for once that our industry is trying to improve our ride.
  • 4 0
 650b will push out 29" IMO. Accept for the super tall guys. 29" was all marketing I believe, and 650b should have been the first choice, accept new frames and forks weren't needed for that option. I wouldn't call it a conspiracy, but I still think there was some foul play.
  • 1 0
 Its crazy how now that anyone can use FSR style suspension, just how many brands are all over it for this year. Norco and Specialized must be a little bit nervous about RAM, Ghost and now Rotwild, especially if they can produce a better spec bike for a lower price.
  • 2 0
 there are probably half-dozen more euro brands that have been using horst link for a while. the rights specialized bought don't cross the atlantic.
  • 1 0
 Hey nwthumbs I'm 5'6" and own an ibis ripley SMALL frame, I have NO problem riding it, it's fits me well and I really like the ride. I've ridden 26" bikes for 10 years and yes it took me probably 3 good rides to get used to the ripley but I sure can tell the difference in my ripley to my Titus el Guapo . People say that 29 ers have heavy wheels, slow going , bad cornering and are heavier, and NOT made for shorter people......B.S. to that !!! Mine weighs 26.4 lbs. and moves very very well !!! I ride it really hard and It takes a beating, I ride 98% of the stuff I ride with my all mnt. Bike
  • 3 1
 I wanna try it befor i'm saying "Not good"
In matter affect i don't think that peoples develop things brfor them tring them-self...
  • 1 1
 They should have made the R.E1 650b frame out of carbon fiber so people who want all this trendy stuff can get it all on one bike and the R.X2 frame from aluminum with 26" so people who don't care about the trends can buy a bike from them as well.

typo edit
  • 3 0
 Remember, people once thought Aluminum was a trend too.
  • 3 0
 Rocky and Norco replaced 26 for 650b in trail. It must be good. I am keen to try the altitude.
  • 7 5
 thats probably the nicest looking and best performing stock build out there
  • 4 1
 looks a lot a fun,
want to try one,
Smile Smile Smile Smile
  • 1 1
 I don't usually say that bikes look like others, but this R.E.2 is so close to the Trek Remedy. Also that R.R.2 looks amazing
  • 2 0
 All nice looking bikes. Would love to try em all.
  • 1 0
 For once i like them all, nothing like Rotwild from many moons ago.
  • 2 2
 i should invent 28.5 inch wheels. anything in between anything is always "the best of both worlds" anyways.
  • 1 0
 Where can we find these bikes if we live in North America?
  • 1 0
 Yeah, I want to know that too!
  • 2 1
 thats it im getting a 650 Smile
  • 1 0
 Quite like the look of RE1 650b! Smile
  • 1 0
 Problem about Rotwild is: They are really really expensive...
  • 1 0
 Im feelin that R.E1! Both in the 26" and 650b.
  • 1 0
 27.5, Now i can have the worst of both worlds.
  • 1 1
 Ditto
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