Santa Cruz V-10 Carbon Review

Aug 18, 2011
by Reece Wallace  


Watch Reece Wallace aboard the V-10 Carbon at Whistler

Views: 52,313    Faves: 466    Comments: 77

filmed by Dylan Forbes



Low weight, high strength

The Santa Cruz V-10 Carbon is not only more adjustable, letting you tweak both the travel and head angle, but also sports new larger pivot bearings and hardware, a 1.5" headtube, and a longer stroke shock than what was used on its aluminum predecessor. Total weight of our test bike? An impressive 35.6 lbs. And this is a stock build straight from Santa Cruz - some extra coin spent will have you under the 34lb mark without getting too crazy. Not only is it impressively light, our carbon frame and Vivid Air shock weigh in at 8.6 lbs, but it's also said to be as strong - and even stronger in some regards - than its aluminum predecessor. A perfect example of this would be the head tube and down tube junction, where the carbon material is nearly half an inch thick. This really highlights carbon's ability to be used sparingly where not much material is needed, but layered on thick or in different layups in high stress areas. While the burly junction up front may not be able to be seen without looking at a cutaway, the frame's smaller than average diameter down tube is more obvious. While everyone seems to be going towards massive, but thin, tubes that can be susceptible to rock strikes, the engineers at Santa Cruz went the opposite direction. Not only does the smaller diameter present a smaller target for impacts, but thicker material has been used to resist any damage that could be caused by rocks being thrown up from the front wheel or in crashes.


Santa Cruz's carbon V-10 has been designed to not hold anyone back, that includes both yourself and Steve Peat.
Santa Cruz's carbon V-10 has been designed to not hold anyone back, that includes both yourself and Steve Peat.
The V-10 is all about adjustability. You can choose between 10 and 8.5 inches of travel out back, along with a head angle between 63 and 66 degrees, letting you tailor the bike to suit the track or your riding style.
The V-10 is all about adjustability. You can choose between 10 and 8.5 inches of travel out back, along with a head angle between 63 and 66 degrees, letting you tailor the bike to suit the track or your riding style.


Customized handling

Adjustability, whether you are changing the bike's handling from course to course or are wanting to set it up once to suit your style, is a large part of what the V-10 is all about. With its 10" of travel, the previous iterations of the V10 may have been pigeonholed by some as simply being "too much bike", even if they hadn't ever ridden it in anger. The 2011 V-10.4 goes a long way to appealing to more riders by featuring a simple and easy to use adjustable travel system on the lower link that lets you reign in the travel out back to 8.5", which also lowers the bottom bracket and slackens the steering angle. All one needs to do is remove the shock bolt and flip the aluminum inserts, quick and easy. This should completely change the character of the bike and allow you to decide how much feedback from the terrain you are looking for and whether you want a more playful steed or a bike that stays low and fast. While this may necessitate a spring change on frames equipped with a coil shock, the Vivid Air that is bolted to our carbon '10 will require only an air pressure adjustment.


Santa Cruz V10 Carbon
The lightweight carbon front triangle allowed Santa Cruz to beef up other aspects of the bike, including the pivots and associated hardware.


Updated hardware

While the carbon Santa Cruz is staggeringly light, there is more to the story than its lack of heft. Using carbon for the front triangle has allowed the bike's designers to actually beef up other aspects of the bike without being penalized for it. Larger pivot bearings have been utilized, along with expanding collet pivot axles to keep everything tight and quiet during a long season of racing and riding. The ISCG 05 chain guide tabs are made from carbon and are incredibly beefy - the frame is now taco approved (tab mounted chain guides voided the aluminum frame's warranty). While they certainly could have made the rear end of the bike out of carbon, Santa Cruz didn't see the advantages of it at this point in time. This aluminum swingarm, the very same as you can find on the Driver 8, is not only as light as they thought a carbon version could be, but it's also easier to produce. Carbon used where it makes sense - up front, and not where it isn't needed - out back.


Santa Cruz V-10 carbon rear ends
While our test V-10 is sporting the production aluminum rear end, Santa Cruz is working on a carbon swingarm for the Syndicate team riders to use at the upcoming World Champs in Champrey, Switzerland. The carbon rear ends are likely still a ways out when it comes to production for non-team riders, but it is interesting nonetheless.


Specifications
Release Date 2011
Price $6972
Travel 8.5" /10"
Rear Shock RockShox Vivid Air
Fork RockShox Boxxer World Cup
Headset Cane Creek Angleset
Cassette Shimano HG 80, 11-28
Crankarms Race Face Atlas
Chainguide e.13
Bottom Bracket Race Face
Pedals n/a
Chain KMC X9 SL
Rear Derailleur SRAM XO short cage
Front Derailleur n/a
Shifter Pods SRAM XO right trigger
Handlebar Easton Havoc Lo 31.8mm
Stem Thomson
Grips Lizard Skin Peaty lock on
Brakes Avid Elixir CR Mag w/ 203mm front 185mm rear rotors
Wheelset DT FR FR600 rims laced to DT 440 hubs w/ DT 14 guage spokes, brass nipples (20mm front hub)
Hubs DT 440
Spokes DT
Rim DT FR FR600
Tires Maxxis Minion DHF dual ply 2.5 wire
Seat WTB Silverado SLT
Seatpost Thomson Elite



Controlled ride

The V-10 is all about gnarly, technical, fast and aggressive downhill trails. In the ten-inch setting (where most riders will likely have it), plowing over rocks, roots, stumps, and drops doesn't do anything to faze the carbon rig. The suspension not only feels impressively supple on top, but also bottomless at the opposite end of the stroke, with the Vivid Air feeling as if it met its perfect match with the V-10. While some will always shy away from an air sprung damper, the Vivid Air is fit perfectly to the bike such that it produces incredibly smooth, plush, and progressive travel that is also consistent in how it responds to the terrain. It just happens to be incredibly light to boot, although there is probably a larger advantage to be had by its spring rate being infinitely tunable with a shock pump. Once setup is complete, which is simple due to the large adjustment window in which the bike performs great within, its suspension will eat everything from low speed hits to larger high-speed impacts, all with no surprise or unnecessary action.


The Whistler Bike Park is home to the Camp of Champions Mountain Bike Camp. With an amazing coach to rider ratio of 1 3 maximum you learn so much in such a short time it will amaze you. At camp you ride from 10AM to 4 30PM in the bike park and then from 6-10 in The Compound. Ride the best bikes in the world from 11 different brands and get coached by Mike Montgomery Greg Watts Fogel Brett Tippie Ryan Berreclaw Justin Wyper Casey Groves and many more. This is where you want to be riding this summer.
In the fog high up in Whistler's Garbonzo zone


But the bike isn't just about insanely high speeds: On B.C.'s burly North Shore terrain, in a zone full of the gnarliest rock rolls that you can imagine and absurdly tight corners, the V-10 was just as simple to ride. Getting the 'Cruz through these sections was as easy as looking at where you want to go, even with the speeds in the single digits when the bike is clearly designed to go as fast as possible. The V-10 is incredibly responsive in these conditions, a trait that I wasn't expecting given the bike's long legged and forgiving suspension. The V-10 has always had a "big bike" feel to it due to its ground hugging personality, and the carbon predecessor is no exception. But the black machine is implausibly playful and reacts well to rider input. Is this down to the bike's stiff and lightweight carbon front triangle, sorted geometry, or maybe the dialed suspension in the form of the RockShox Vivid Air R2C damper or World Cup fork? Surely a combination of all of the above. At a faster pace it's effortless to get low and scrape your back foot through the dirt while roosting this machine and it really encourages its pilot to dig deep and carry more speed than you really think is possible in the bends. This isn't really a surprise given the bike's pedigree, and you'll know that a slow race time can't be put onto the bike's shoulders, only its pilot, a sobering fact if it turns out that you're a bit slower than you thought.


Reece Wallace on the V10 Carbon
The V-10 loves to go fast, but just as much fun can be had on the bike by boosting jumps and taking the fun line instead of the fast line.


Most riders will no doubt simply run the bike in the 10 inch travel mode, which is great for big terrain, but they'd be missing out on a large part of the V-10's ability by not having a go in the shorter 8.5 inch setting. By simply removing the bolt and flipping the insert found at the lower shock mount the bike becomes an entirely different animal. Riding the V-10 in a 8.5" setting enables the bike to pump more efficiently, therefore jump faster and higher. This adjustability makes the bike not only a fantastic race machine on course where some pop may be required to clear parts of the track, but a great bike park bike as well. Furthermore, the bike is equipped with a head angle adjusting Cane Creek Angleset in its 1.5” head tube, that allows for zero, half, one and even one and a half degree changes. Riders can use the AngleSet to have the bike as slack as 63 degrees in the 8.5-inch setting or as steep as 66 degrees in the ten-inch setting. While it may be possible to end up with a configuration that isn't ideal, customization to your riding style or local terrain is a large part of the V-10. Somewhat surprisingly, we preferred riding the V-10 in a steeper 65 degree setting. This relatively steep steering angle, steeper than what we have preferred on past test bikes, allows me to move further over the front end of the bike, thus making my riding stance more aggressive and therefore putting more weight on my front wheel to improve cornering and control.


The Whistler Bike Park is home to the Camp of Champions Mountain Bike Camp. With an amazing coach to rider ratio of 1 3 maximum you learn so much in such a short time it will amaze you. At camp you ride from 10AM to 4 30PM in the bike park and then from 6-10 in The Compound. Ride the best bikes in the world from 11 different brands and get coached by Mike Montgomery Greg Watts Fogel Brett Tippie Ryan Berreclaw Justin Wyper Casey Groves and many more. This is where you want to be riding this summer


Reliable to boot

I'd be lying if I said that I wasn't concerned early on during my time on the bike about damage to the bike's down tube from rocks flying up from my front tire. However, after four months of riding the V-10 almost everyday in the Whistler Bike Park and the surrounding area, with countless rocks making contact with the down tube, there are zero dents, cracks, or even chips in the finish - and this is with no protection covering the carbon fiber down tube. In fact, the bike as a whole proved to be as reliable as a Swiss timepiece. The pivot bearings still rotate smoothly, and the rear end is wiggle free despite a few hundred Garbanzo runs. In addition, Santa Cruz has also reworked their ISCG tabs.

Pinkbike's take

Overall, the Santa Cruz Carbon V-10 is a fantastic bike. It isn't a stretch to call it the Lamborghini of downhill bikes, such that it out performs most riders’ abilities and can go faster than you would ever want to, not to mention that you might have to take a second job to finance this beautiful machine. There are a lot of less expensive bikes out there, some of them can be built up to a similar weight, offer the same adjustibility, or even approach the bike's suspension performance, but it truly is rare to combine all of those traits into a single package such as Santa Cruz has done with their V-10. For that reason we are confident in saying that the V-10 is truly in a class of its own.


Check out the entire Santa Cruz lineup on their website, or keep abreast of all things SC on their 104 Bronson blog.


-Reece Wallace
-Pinkbike.com
-SRAM
-Chromag Bikes


117 Comments

  • 105 0
 It's giving me a carb-on
  • 2 0
 Its so sick, hopefully my next bike will be one of these.
  • 13 0
 the new v10 which peaty and minnaar are on at VDS looks even better!..

dirt.mpora.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/IMG_8845.jpg
  • 1 0
 when do you mean if you call someone a "kiwi"?
  • 4 0
 someone that comes from New Zealand is usually a kiwi
  • 1 0
 That scrub was sick Reece ! Didn't know you shredded trails that hard, awesome
  • 12 0
 It's good to see it dirty in the product photos! A clean bike is a lonely bike.
  • 1 0
 @ duncanp thats a sick bike!!
  • 1 0
 Well if I had $6972 I would defintaly buy it too!
  • 1 0
 @duncap, matte black looks so much more stealthy then a gloss or mettalic
  • 1 0
 this bike is so sick i rode one at camp of champions it kinda sucks for jumping tho
  • 1 0
 0:28 is so sick!
  • 17 8
 I still think that the Evil Undead is the best looking carbon DH bike at the moment, the Demo looks no different, never personally been a fan of the V10 frame anyway, Undead is just plain hot . . .
  • 3 0
 Maybe, but we can't wait that long... Big Grin
  • 5 4
 but it keeps snapping after 2 runs Wink
  • 12 1
 yeh but what use is the evil looking good when it snaps.....

www.the-locs.com/2011/08/evil-undead-died-la-bresse.html
  • 6 20
flag anthonysjb (Aug 18, 2011 at 4:02) (Below Threshold)
 wow a carbon bike big deal
  • 9 7
 I've read so much here about carbon frames catastrophically failing. During my recent ride, I saw my friend falling off his cf bike in the rockgarden - not a second too soon, I jumped off the bike, rolled like Jean Micjeal Van Damme behind a closest rock to hide from the inevitable explosion. Fortunately his frame did not touch any stone, we looked straight into the eyes of carbon death - this close to death experience changed our lives forever!
  • 8 0
 when did jean claude van damme change his name?
  • 9 1
 So the 'inevitable' explosion wasn't inevitable then was it. I just spent 2 years on a carbon Scott Ransom and taken some massive hits on it. The only bit that failed was the aluminium swingarm, which funnily enough failed just like you say carbon does. Have just bought a carbon Nomad to replace it. Am looking forward to that proving 'catstrophic carbon failure' wrong too.
  • 11 0
 this is what happens when somebody tries to be more smart and funny than he really is.
  • 4 1
 I'm just gonna make Fun of the first comment cause the evil undead is prob the most sketch carbon bike money can buy the suspension design makes the frame want to rip it's self apart
  • 1 0
 Just to add, they say the blur carbon is the strongest bike they've ever made
  • 10 0
 $7209 for a complete bike I hope!
  • 2 0
 + hst?
  • 1 0
 so what happened with that tax thing? did they change it or did it stay the same? I am keen to know because my mates and i were utterly confused when we were over there in July.
  • 1 0
 HST is 12% in BC right now. A while ago, it was PST+GST.
  • 3 1
 I once had a 2008 pro carbon specialized enduro, after a solid summer of using it, the point where the rear shock mounted to the frame, which was also adjustable in 2 different settings.. kinda fel apart, the alloy bushes wore out, which then elongated the holes thru the carbon... looks like a similar system on the v10... no thanks.
  • 1 0
 I just got a Titus ftm carbon and I notice the same thing alloy shox mounts agents the carbon rocker. I am still getting parts and putting it together and I thought the samething. I was thinking of putting some plastic washers to separate the metal n carbon. Does anybody think that will help?
  • 3 0
 Eee... The lower link where the geo adjust plates are is made out of alumiNUM
  • 2 1
 Aluminum ! wow that sounds so much better then aluminium !!
  • 2 0
 Nucular aluminum
  • 2 0
 By the sounds of it the bushings just wore out. The bushings on the top linkage on my glory wear out in no time which sucks
  • 2 0
 I don't get it the alu vs carbon swingarm thing. On the one hand, it says the Alu is as light and stiff as a carbon one would be, and on the other, they're making carbon ones for the Syndicate riders. If the former is true, why the latter?
  • 2 1
 That has to be "one" of the SEXIEST frames out there, some will say it is the sexiest others will disagree.Now it has a full carbon rear it is so nice, It looks like it was made by Mother Nature with its organic like curves...
  • 1 0
 It doesn't have a carbon rear, that's just for the pros mate.
  • 1 0
 Its a typo error,i submitted my comment but was unable to edit due to my battery dying on my iphone. By the time i plugged charger in it was too late....
  • 1 0
 Fair do's Smile
  • 1 0
 ''An impressive 35.6 lbs. And this is a stock build straight from Santa Cruz - some extra coin spent will have you under the 34lb mark without getting too crazy''.... I'm wondering what they were thinking by not too crazy, evrything on this bike is top notch, you're going to be looking at an extra 2 grand to get it under 34 lbs
  • 1 0
 Enve rims, carbon bars, carbon post/Thomson Masterpiece, Tioga Spider saddle Razz
  • 13 0
 Like some would be unhappy with 35 lbs anyway ? Razz But yea some tool will probably blow 2K saving 1 pound in weight ! Probably the sorta guy whos laces match his goggles and underwear
  • 1 0
 Nah... Prolly goggle straps and laces. And gloves. Ok, and underwear. Haha.
  • 1 0
 I got mine under 35 without spending huge amount of $$$ . You don't have to buy enve rims - ztr flow are 470g and 1/8 enve price ..
  • 1 0
 I wonder if any of these companies have thought of using Nomex honeycomb in any of these carbon frames. Aircraft manufacturers use Nomex honeycomb all the time for super light and strong aircraft structures. could actually make a stronger but lighter bike frame than just thick hollow carbon fiber tubeing.
  • 1 0
 but surely the frame walls would be much thinner and therefore dent easier?
  • 1 0
 thats true, but you could thicken dent proned areas and even bond in thin strips of metal like titanium or magnesium. I'm and Aircraft Structures mechanic and repair and build composite structures all the time. you'd be very surprised at how light and strong some aircraft components are. Aircraft engineers have been playing the weight VS. strength game with composite materials since about the 1960's. The possibilities with composites is endless, there's a million ways to do things with them.
  • 1 0
 Nice review. The part about not being able to blame the bike for a slow time seems to sum it all up quite well...One point that appears to be in conflict with the SC site though is the Driver 8 swingarm comment. On the SC site FAQs for the V10 they address this and say it is a similar swingarm, but is different. As someone who appreciates good engineering, I've always been impressed with the SC build quality and technical advancements. One question for their new carbon offerings. Are they still made in the USA or are they coming from the east? Anyone know?
  • 1 0
 off-shore vendors Wink
  • 1 0
 super fast bike handles awesome except for the rearshock rock shox vivid coil it sucks my went right away shipped it for warranty and because they ve had so many issues with this shock their orders are backed till october so much for my new rig bullshit
  • 1 0
 i had the first carbon fiber production bike made.....the kestrel 4000...... It was sick bike in it's day and worked very well......and several years later when Kestrel came out with a mtb fame...... I was able to get one also....... Sexy black frame with green lettering....Very nice indeed......fast , light ,nimble, responsive, great flick ability .......but one wrong get off in the rocks......and i know because i wrecked one with a pretty average get off in the northeastern rock gardens........that carbon does not take well to impacts that it was not designed to compensate for......carbon Is a fiber and is laid in certain manners to give it strength or not in certain directions.....light weight and nimble.....for sure......capable of many impacts.......not really....... Also had many other carbon fiber bikes in the prime of the material..... Miyata....... Vitus........ Bonding to aluminum was their downfall....... kestrel was the first and best monocoque system for us ....... But that is all history......designs have changed......but the rocks that we hammer through......have NOT !!
  • 1 0
 "but if you follow bikes as much as I do, you will find this bike is being praised for simply being CF."

If you led as much as you followed, you would find that there are enough people that own these bikes along with many others in my kneck of the woods that you can have a subjective conversation about the merits of nuances found in a number of different bikes without it resorting to someone claiming they know a lot because they read about it a few times.

If you need someone to praise the benefits of a V10 that are not related to the material it's made of, read some reviews of every predecessor. Pay particular attention to how much better each generation was than the last. This one is no exception, and a small part if it had to do with what it is made of.

Of all the bikes you have owned, which do you think is underrated and worthy of the praise you are going to give it on a public forum?
  • 1 0
 I recently returned from an extended Whistler trip and met 2 people who ride hard and both had the same complaint:
The mounting bolt for the shock CREAKS like a bitch and is hard to keep tight (lots of torque needed)
Anyone else hear any negatives?? I tend to read reviews for the negatives, not the positives. Especially maintenance issues- I'll skip over a top bike contender if you always have to wrench on it!!
  • 2 0
 Santa Cruz team riders bikes are weighing in at 34.4lb with the carbon rear triangle and a front triangle that's 650g lighter than stock.
  • 1 0
 Sans Ratboy.
  • 1 0
 I heard rumour of the Syndicate's V10's weighing in around the 33Lb mark with certain specs....That's a bit fooking light really, not sure if I'd like a DH bike to be that light personally.
  • 2 0
 I don't think its about how light you would like the bike, you're thinking on a durability standpoint for everyday riding. These guys go through hoops every race or two, and get suspension rebuilds every race. They're not concerned with durability, just getting the shortest time possible.
  • 4 0
 Actually I'm thinking along the lines of how a light bike would feel to me as I ride it. For me there is an optimum weight for a DH bike. Durability comes from buying good parts and keeping your riding as smooth as possible. I can't comment on how pros like their bikes, I'm not a pro.
  • 2 0
 Personally I think 37lb's is an ideal weight for a dh bike but it's probably down to your style and we just have to look at who's riding them.
  • 1 0
 I like my dh/freeride bike to be 39 pounds, anything under 40 but over 36 is good for me, I'm a big heavy guy and I don't want something so light that it feels like it's going to fold under my weight
  • 1 0
 I reailsed how much flex I get on my forks under me, I'm only 12 stone but there's soooo much flex in the forks
  • 1 0
 I'm up over 16 stone so I need to know that I can trust my bike and if it feels to light, no matter how strong it really is, it just doesn't give me the trust in my bike that I need
  • 3 3
 For 7 grand I'd want a full carbon frame! Very nice, but bloody expensive comparing it to it's peers. I'd imagine the vast majority of riders are just fine on their choice of alu framed steeds without such a price tag. This one is for the affluent or credit monkeys I reckon.
  • 1 0
 7 grand will get you a similarly built alu bike. The price difference is not that drastic. Remember this is retail MSRP.
  • 1 0
 Approximately 5 grand RRP will get you a similarly built alu bike too. Over here I think the RRP of the V10 Carbon is around £7,500 give or take. Just depends how savvy you are really, but if you're happy forking out 7 grand for something you can get similar for less then go for it.
  • 1 0
 Glory 0, Session 88, Demo 8 all retail for over $6k. All i'm saying is it's not that huge a jump to go Carbon with SC.
  • 1 0
 Glory's are less than £6k, Demo 8's are £4200 and Session 88's are around the same as a Glory. A £7500 V10 means at least £1500 more for a carbon front end.
It all depends what value you put on money I guess. Even if I had the money, I wouldn't be inclined to waste it on something that will inevitably become cheaper in time just to be in fashion.
  • 1 0
 I am in total agreement with you about buying further in the future when prices will drop drastically. Where I am not in agreement is that the MSRP's I am talking about are in USD, not GBP. That's a 1.6x difference in exchange rate! MSRP of Demo 8 on specialized.com is $6400USD. And the MSRP of this V10c is $6972USD. That's not a huge difference!
  • 1 0
 Well British prices are the only prices directly applicable to me, therefore I reference them. And I'm sure you can appreciate from my breakdown of the price comparisons, that the V10 is exceptionally expensive over here. Notably the Demo 8 is dirt cheap compared to what you guys are paying over there, very interesting lack of correlation going on there.
  • 2 0
 Killer riding, Reece... you have more in your bag than dirt jumping! That scrub was the raddest thing that I've seen in ages!
  • 1 0
 Haha thanks Mike. Downhill is the best for sure, can't ride mountain bikes without shredding gnarly mountains!
  • 2 0
 i love dh bikes...i fully dont trust carbon...like crash over the bars bike bounce puts a hole in the frame and thats your money gone
  • 2 1
 That's actually not the case with carbon, it is incredibly durable and I found it to be much more resistant to dents and cracks than aluminum, if you read the article...
  • 1 0
 I've worked in shops that have taken warranty claims for simple carbon goods like seatposts, with relatively fewer forces being applied than a frame would have. Carbon technology is far from infallible. However it certainly seems to be progressing at an intriguing rate.
  • 2 0
 650 is for the total frame, so 300 lighter swingarm,, 350 lighter front end
  • 4 1
 about 7 grand.... i can buy me a future with that ....
  • 3 0
 I would literally sell my soul for one of these.
  • 3 1
 That frame it's for sure the best!
  • 25 34
flag Greenwood102 (Aug 18, 2011 at 0:23) (Below Threshold)
 It looks like a norco Wink
  • 17 0
 Please don't...
  • 8 7
 ...It was a joke.
  • 6 2
 I have a v10, i know what they look like...
  • 3 1
 Greenwood,don't bother,I allmost shit my pants from laughing...
Cheers mate! Smile
  • 8 2
 I think the number of negative props on Greenwood102's comment above demonstrates that there is a need for a lot of people to develop a sense of humour! Far too many users taking themselves too seriously :/
  • 5 3
 I prefer DEMO rather than V10.
  • 1 0
 I made the mistake of taking my buddies V10c out for a day at Whistler... absolute plow machine.
  • 2 0
 BEST BIKE EVER ! Salute love my santa cruz carbon Big Grin
  • 1 0
 its a nice looking bike bloody expensive though wonder how durable it would be in the real world
  • 3 0
 Seeing the Syndicate not destroying any the whole 2010 season; plus this year's almost over, pretty sure they're more than up to the task for us Joe Shmo's.
  • 2 0
 How do ppl afford these??!?!?!?!!
  • 3 2
 2 words... uhhh holy shit?
  • 31 1
 if my math skills are correct, i believe that is 3 words.
  • 15 1
 There are 3 kinds of people in this world: those who can count, and those who can't.
  • 5 1
 Uhh is not a word.
  • 11 0
 well its not a number
  • 1 0
 I just busted a lung!!!

2 letters, 3 words or simply 5 words? I'm all confused
  • 1 0
 probably gunna coast atleast 8000$ complete with taxes
  • 2 0
 EXCELENT
  • 1 0
 I'm in agreement with the writer 100%
  • 1 0
 Hoooooly shit that's awesome.
  • 1 0
 Mmmm I like carbon, carbon's gooood
  • 1 0
 forced to think about replacing
  • 1 0
 Frame looks like it could use a jelly doughnut.
  • 1 0
 if i was going to buy a DH bike this would be it. 100%
  • 1 0
 Anyone know what Pedals are on that Test bike?
  • 1 0
 Truvativ
  • 1 0
 Huhaaahuuuuhaaaa ..haaaaaa..hhuuuuuuuuaaaaaaaa
  • 1 0
 Sick bike but I still have my eye on the 951
  • 1 0
 So your saying its an ok bike then?
  • 1 0
 Niiiiiice!!!
  • 1 0
 its a dream... Smile
  • 1 0
 Lemme smang it girl
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