Schwalbe Magic Mary - Review

Feb 19, 2014
by Matt Wragg  
Schwalbe's Magic Mary is the new mainstay of their gravity range, replacing the Muddy Mary as their all-conditions tyre. Before it was even released it was clocking up downhill World Cup and World Championships wins. This year this tyre took Steve Smith most of the way to the series overall title. On the enduro race circuit they have taken Nico Lau to Trans-Provence and numerous national race wins. We have been putting in time on them since last May to find out what all the fuss is about.

The profile of the Magic Mary

The profile of the Magic Mary


Details:

• Purpose: All-mountain/trail/enduro/downhill (dependent on carcass)
• Sizes available: 26, 27.5 and 29 inch
• Carcass: Evolution-Snakeskin, Super Gravity and Downhill
• Compounds available: Trailstar (intermediate), Vertstar (soft)
• Tubeless ready: Evolution Snakeskin and Super Gravity carcasses
• Weight: 795g, 1045 or 1190g (dependent on carcass)
• MSRP: $93.25 (Super Gravity)

Construction

Schwalbe offer the Magic Mary in three carcass options: Evolution-Snakeskin, Super Gravity and Downhill. The Evolution-Snakeskin uses two layers on the sidewall and three under the tread, reinforced with a Snakeskin protection layer on the sidewall. For the downhill tyre there are four layers on the sidewall, reinforced with a Snakeskin layer on the outisde and Apex snakebite protection inside, under the tread there are six layers. On the Super Gravity tyres there four layers on the sidewall, reinforced with a Snakeskin layer and the Apex snakebike protection, unlike the other two options, the Snakeskin layer extends under the tread, supporting the two carcass layers there. In terms of weight, this means a 26 inch Magic Mary is 795g in the Evolution-Snakeskin option, 1045g in Super Gravity and 1190g in Downhill. All tyres with the Snakeskin and Super Gravity casings are tubeless ready, but they don't feel there is the same demand for the downhill tyres.

Carcass options

The three carcass options (from left to right): Evolution Snakeskin, Super Gravity and Downhill. The Snakeskin layer is red and the Apex protection is in blue.



Schwalbe offer two compound options on the tyre - the softer, downhill-orientated Vertstar and the harder and faster-rolling Trailstar. Both options are made up of several different compounds to try and maximise traction where it matters most and offer some additional longevity where they suffert the most abuse. They offer an extensive range of combinations of carcass, compound and wheelsize. In 26" and 27.5" wheels they offer every possible mix, but as there is no market for 29" downhill bikes right now, the 29" tyres are only available in the Trailstar compound with the Snakeskin and Super Gravity casings - there is no downhill or soft compound option.

Setup

Michael from Schwalbe offering some expert help with the mounting.

Michael from Schwalbe offering some expert help with the mounting.


We tested both the Super Gravity casing in, 26" and 27.5" in the Trailstar compound. Mounting the tyres tubelessly depended very much on the rim, with the DT Swiss EXC 1550 wheels they needed a compressor to seat. With the newer DT Swiss Spline ONE EX 1501 and Stans Flow EX wheels they were an utter joy to work with, more or less seating without even needing a pump. We chose to keep our pressures conservative, but many of their enduro racers like Nico Lau and Adam Craig drop the pressures down to around the 20psi mark for racing.

Out on the Trail

Climbing: The 290g weight saving in comparison to the downhill tyre makes a huge difference, saving that kind of weight from the rotational mass will completely change a bikes handling. What surprised us about these tyres was how well they rolled, considering the big, aggressive tread pattern and 1kg+ weight. While they didn't exactly dance up long transfers, they don't suck the life out of you, like a full set of downhill tyres. When you get to technical climbing, having a big sticky tyre means you have more traction, more of the time, which helps you tackle obstacles.

Cornering: One of the biggest innovations in the Magic Mary is the block size - having bigger, sturdier blocks means the tyre stands up better to aggressive riding. Combine that with healthy gaps in between them and they allow you to feel where on the tyre you are so well. You know exactly when you transition from the centre to the side and the shape and size of the blocks means that when you lean in they bite and you can hold it there. Unlike some other big block tyres, they encourage you to use the side, rather than push through it. It takes a little adjustment at first to get used to where you can push them to, but pretty soon it is very noticeable when you switch to another tyre with less side, you really miss the grip.

We put a lot of time in on these tyres on the rocky and rooty trails around Sospel in France.

We put a lot of time in on these tyres on the rocky and rooty trails around Sospel in France.


Braking: Under hard braking the square centre tread keeps them composed. They brake in a nice, straight line and don't squirm about too much.

All-weather performance: Maybe the most impressive thing about the Magic Mary is how much of the year they work for and the range of different surfaces they work well on. We first mounted them in May and are still on them now in January - we've used them from dusty summer conditions, through to wet, muddy winter. They are a true year-round tyre and we were continually impressed with how well they performed, no matter what we asked of them. Whether it was on slick, wet rocks where we just wanted to understand what traction was available, or throwing up the inviting loam of deep pine forests, they felt good.

Lifespan: This is the one area where Schwalbe tyres traditionally don't perform as strongly as some of their competitors, and unfortunately the Magic Mary is no exception. They have worked on their compounds and the drop-off isn't as dramatic as it was a couple of years ago, but they're not going to last forever. With the level of technology that goes into these tyres, both in terms of carcass and compound, they aren't cheap, which inevitably makes people more sensitive to lifespan. That technology offers great performance, but we suspect a good part of their target audience would prefer to be able to buy them in a single, harder compound, sacrificing outright performance for a simpler, cheaper tyre that lasts longer.

Pinkbike's Take:
There's a very good reason why the Magic Mary is quickly becoming the number one choice of privateer racers in both downhill and enduro. Today they have the dubious privilege of having their logos blacked out by more racers who are unhappy with the tyres they are supposed to be using than with any other tyre. Quite simply, they perform outstandingly in most conditions, offering impressive sensitivity and outright grip. Also, with the extensive range of sizes, carcasses and compounds the chances are they offer them in combination to suit your bike, your trails and your style of riding. Many other tyre companies are still playing catch-up on that front right now. We stand by what we said when we first looked at these tyres: These are the new benchmark for aggressive tyres. - Matt Wragg

www.schwalbetires.com


179 Comments

  • + 78
 Just waiting for waki's comments about this tire
  • + 35
 Waki should have his own talk show...
  • + 8
 Why you are thinking about waki??? Leave him at his home...
  • + 21
 14 hours and still no Waki comments?? Maybe someone should send out a search team. This isn't like him..
  • + 0
 good one Big Grin
  • + 3
 don't mean to sound like a noob but who is this " waki " guy you speak of
  • + 16
 You need to summon him, with the verse : 650b,650b,29er,29er,ENDURO, ENDUUUUUUUUUUUROOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!
  • + 1
 Beware. Spam is inevitable.
  • + 56
 Sorry we had an extremely long chat with Protour about capitalism and religion. I was kind of occupied with it. The I had quite focused and productive day at work. So I need to be quick: I think Magic Mary bla bla bla the other bla bla tubeless bla bla bla and bla bla bla, single ring bla bla bla I use tubeless bla bla, a friend of mine bla bla bla. If only bla bla bla Maxxis bla bla. Jedrzeja how's you head light?
  • - 10
flag Lew-xvtt (Feb 20, 2014 at 5:28) (Below Threshold)
 Awesome Waki is awesome ! Big Grin
  • - 9
flag bholton (Feb 22, 2014 at 8:03) (Below Threshold)
 That was awesome Waki!
  • + 8
 PinkBike, just get it over with and give Waki a job.....every Ying needs a Yang.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns seems like people are still waiting for you here...
  • + 1
 @Ozziefish: wow this is an old thread. Has Waki got his own talk show already?

for real, i would actually start visiting pinkbike as much as I used to if the Waki had a weekly article on the main page or something, the last couple years I've visited the webpage just to see race results and race pics.
  • + 61
 Tyre names are getting more and more cryptic, with maxxis you have a single wall 60a 2.35in high roller, you know how many walls it has, what the durometer is, width and what tread pattern it is... job done. No ill have a magic mary supergravity vert star.... excuse me while i refer back to the menu to find out what the hell that combo actually is, its like being in a pretentious coffee shop. Dont even get me started on michelin, that's just baffling and thats also before you have to take into account a 2.4in tyre is bigger than their 2.5s.
  • + 28
 Agreed..cant stand all the stupid names for sidewalls and compounds..
Keep it simple..durometer should be a # and sidewalls should be specified by how many plys it is..
  • + 6
 +1

I found it a total nightmare when I went from Maxxis to Schwalbe, I pretty much know where I'm at with them now though.
  • + 23
 i have no problem to remember 3 names Wink
  • + 2
 Haha, the thing about Michelin wheel widths! Its funny cos its true...
  • + 67
 Thanks for your feedback. The reason for our names is on the one side marketing, but even more important is to specify the technologies through the name. A durometer doesn`t indicate the grip or damping performance of a tire (and what durometer to take from a triple-compound?), a SuperGravity is a turning-up dual-ply tire construction, but with the tread of a single-ply with an additional layer of SnakeSkin material to protect the tires from getting cuts. This does not only sound weired, it simply does not really fit into the scheme of the "normal" bike-tire world this is why we create our own descriptions for our own technologies. Thanks anyway for your feedback and sorry for all the confusion. All technologies are by the way listed here: www.schwalbe.com/en/produkt-features.html
  • + 41
 I think thats good customer service. A company reading the "critical" comments and taking the time to answer. Keep it up!
  • + 1
 I couldn't agree more about the cryptic names, hence I started to "de-marketize" and normalize the tire data out there. Drove me just crazy to always read all the definitions about SuperGravity, Maxx Terra, BlackChili, ... Could need everyones help though. I started a database on bitingtires.com where I map vendor names to real information. Some vendors are supportive, others not so much, but if you have additional data points, that's always appreciated. Just leave a comment on the blog, or on facebook. Keep riding!
  • + 11
 These look super aggressive and have a pretty prestigious race pedigree to back it up. Nothing gives you confidence like a grippy tire. If I'm not mistaken, Stevie Smith took his first win in Norway on his first race on these tires, when they were still prototypes. How do they compare to the muddy mary?
  • - 58
flag mnorris122 (Feb 18, 2014 at 20:35) (Below Threshold)
 Well, the muddy mary's a mud spike, so you're not really comparing apples to apples...
  • + 14
 Muddy mary is not a mud spike, that's the dirty dan. The muddy part is quite misleading, it's their intermedate tire, and the magic mary is the evolution of it. I got one on the front and I like it a lot so far but I know people say they are not great on hardpack. I picked mine a short while ago, so no hardpack this time of year to see that for myself.
  • + 5
 So I have tried the performance model 2.35 and the high end models in the magic marys....both very insane grip!
  • + 6
 Ran muddy marys all season last year, they were amazing! the only downside was that a pair of minions would easily roll fast than me when it came to july/august weather, but I got a pair of magic marys in late august, and its all the grip of the muddy, with the rolling speed of a minion. Schwalbe is SICK!
  • + 1
 curtiso: how much better was the high end model than the performance line? When I spoke to Schwalbe, they mentioned that lack of protection (Snakeskin) and despite having a dual compound, it will still be harder than the pacestar compound. Some claim too slippery on roots in the wet compared to the premium compounds.
  • + 3
 So I tried the Performance model first be cause of the price....$39.99 MSRP tire!
hawleyusa.com/thcStore/Catalog/ItemDetail.aspx?id=TIRE67943
Grip was great in softer dirt, not very sticky on hard surfaces like rocks and roots. I found out that you MUST run downhill tube in these tires to prevent a lot of pinch flats.
Anyone riding hard will have to run the vertstar.
  • + 2
 I've been using performance Hans Dampf tyres, ghetto tubeless, for enduro and trail riding, and can say while they grip well on all sorts of dirt, they are very slippery on roots and rocks, especially when wet. Would not use them for racing but as a budget tyre for off season riding they're great.

On a sidenote I also managed to pinch flat the tyre, so that even Stan's sealant didn't manage to seal it back. Had to buy special patches to fix it. Wonder if the same thing would happen if I had the Evolution Snakeskin tyre on?
  • + 7
 "MSRP: $93.25 (Super Gravity)" Hells No!!!
  • + 3
 IThats the MSRP real world is a nother story.
Just bought Magic Mary, Hans Dampf, Rock Razor all supergravity version for 37€ = 51$ a piece. All to be used at this year Trans Savoie
  • + 4
 I used Hans Dampf pacestar, rear and trailstar front, snakeskin at last years TS and they performed brilliantly. I did however use a full rear over the week.
  • + 1
 Is UST gone now or something. I'm seeing fewer and fewer tyres offered for UST rims?
  • + 1
 @ krsh you can pinch flat the EVO tires as well. I pinch flatted a nobby nic on the north shore that stans would not plug either. Actually snake bit the tire. Just trashed the tire after that.
  • + 0
 The tubeless ready snakeskin is much better for tubeless than the performance line. Their beefed up so the stans can do its job, im running the hans damf with ss and its been awesome.. Also how do you pinchflat a tubeless setup? No tube to pinch.. You guys musta burped it
  • + 2
 I said something much different than my comment ^4-5 above!
WFT!?!? Are we being edited/censored now as well?!?!
And my comment was valid although I won't mention it as I hope this will reach you my fellow PBviewers.
"Psh……."
  • + 3
 @slipnjloc no burp, no tube. Literally 2 holes (snakebite) in the tire caused by pinching the tire to the rim. I have only done this with Nobby Nics. Currently running a Hans Dampf and Rock Razor with no issues.
  • + 2
 @road-n-dirt what casing was the nobby nic? I had a similar problem with a performance nobby nic, cept it was a puncture on the top that didn't seal
  • + 1
 evo snakeskin pacestar compound. 2 holes on the sidewalls (opposite ends) had to tube it to get off the mtn. But as I said my current setup has had no issues. However I'm going to Vancouver in June so we will see how they hold up in the same environment that I punctured that Nic.
  • + 8
 Actually theese tires arent so expensive.
Top of the line are like 35-40 eur. and the cheapest version with Performance dual compound (the longest lasting one) is 17 eur, and is pretty amazing for an entry tire.

I've running one as a front tire in the performance compound, and compared to my older DHF and Intense DH this is amazing. Best grip so far and really fast roll. The roll suprised me the most to be frank.
  • + 13
 Still no stock of these anywhere in the UK, the distributor is a total ass clown.
  • + 5
 Got mine off bike-components.

After I spend the current rear tire I might try the Hans Dampf/Magic Mary combo, or go Rubber queen in the rear.
  • + 26
 The rubber queen in the rear XD…giggle… sorry Wink
  • + 1
 I'm bit confused about those compound. What compound does performance line has? Any of those two listed above or something completely different?
  • + 1
 Vert I trail are triple compounds. Performace is 55/60 duro and trail is 45/55/60( I think)
  • + 2
 drakche: i have Muddy Mary trail on front and Minion DHF 60a on rear and i can say that if its wet, theoretically harder Minion slips on stone less, than MM. I was very surprised, when i noticed that(once i came back home from rainy day on bike and bike slips on stone floor, but softer MM slips much more than harder Minion, tried it few times). After some time of using, Maxxis compound looks like more "fresh" and grippy, dont know why.
  • + 3
 what i want to say is, that "duro" is not the proof of grip
  • + 2
 Yes I know, I'm talking about he longevity. There is also the thread pattern. Especially the side knobs. The thing I noticed with MagicM is that I run it ar fairly low pressure, and the carcass doesn't deform. But if I move my weight to the front and push I the rim alsmost touches the ground. So even with the weekest walls they are pretty stiff.
  • + 1
 OK, thats good info!
  • + 9
 Maxxis fanboys are gonna love this !
  • - 24
flag shredjekyll (Feb 18, 2014 at 20:32) (Below Threshold)
 Love what? The fact that HR2's, Minions, and Ardents are all better overall tires?
  • + 17
 ^ so you are one?
  • - 9
flag shredjekyll (Feb 18, 2014 at 20:34) (Below Threshold)
 I ride/own a plethora of brands
  • + 6
 If you are riding wet conditions, high rollers and ardents suck. Schwalbes and Contis also heads and shoulders above minions when it gets slick. Minions definitely the best tire in dry loose conditions.
  • + 1
 lay off the nug 2.3-2.4 3C HR2's are phenomenal in the wet.... Pinkbike agrees.... "cleared great in sloppy conditions and found tons of traction where I thought it may struggle" www.pinkbike.com/news/Maxxis-Minion-High-Roller-2-review-2011.html
  • + 6
 Pinkbike loves everything haha HR2s may be ok in damp conditions in a bike park but when things start to get wetter muddy marys are better then after that it's spikes you're needing.
  • + 5
 I put a hole in a Schwalbe Nobby Nic in about a week, had the knobs ripping off in two, I ride four times a week at least, just can't afford Schwalbes if my Maxxis give excellent grip and last for months and months. Maybe if I raced or only rode occasionally I might use 'em.
  • + 1
 It really depends what casing and compound you're using on each tyre. Also if you're riding particularly rocky terrain it isn't great for tyres.
  • + 1
 Euan, I also have some Table Tops, and even though they are not for mountain and are in fact DJ/urban tires they have stood up very well, so I agree it's the compounds that Schwalbe have chosen to use which make them weak, but really I think the gains from light carcasses and soft compounds are honestly not worth the trouble for most non-racers.Also actually I prefer Kenda K-Rad to the tough and strong Table Top as they roll faster and have bigger volume.
  • + 1
 I am a fan of Maxxis :-) . Just started MTBing last year with S Enduro, I replaced my Specialized Butcher 2.3, I combined a ST (Super Tacky) by Maxxis in front 2.35 and the stock Specialized Purgatory 2.2 for rear. But this snake-skin rubber is intriguing. Let me try this tire in Spring. If I remembered, I'll get back to this talk.
  • + 2
 Have to agree. High roller 2 is extremely good in the wet,had it on the front before I swapped for a magic mary. Magic mary just shades it slightly
  • + 4
 I wonder if the Supergravity will be good enough for DH?
Reason I ask, is because I've had FR cased (Schwalbe) tyres before on the DH bike, and it was the worst thing I've ever done to my DH bike. When I went back to dual ply, the stability was instantly improved (the best way I can describe the FR casings, were that they were "skittish)
  • + 28
 I don't want to give too much away, but they have a cunningly-titled "Downhill" casing for downhill riding. Subtle, I know, but that's Germans for you.
  • + 6
 Hilarious Matt (that was sarcasm)

I run a tubeless DH bike, and if you pay attention to your own article, the DH casing is not tubeless ready.
  • - 2
 Then don't run tubeless maybe? Why would you need to for downhill?
  • + 9
 finnrambo, lower rolling resistance, decreases rotational weight and no risk of pinch flats..
  • + 5
 Indeed, I wont go back to tubes ever again.
  • - 1
 I tried the magic mary in Spain in December tubeless.... after day 2 I went back to tubes and no issues. The dh ones just dont work well tubeless with ztr ex rims. The tube felt better out in spain as well as not burping on some of the hard hits. With enough gradient the extra weight made the bike feel more planted and better through some of the rougher fast and looser corners, where tubeless felt a little light and vacant. Might just be me though.
  • + 2
 Tubeless VS tubes aside - did you try the Supergavity VS the DH carcass?
  • + 1
 I could only get the dh ones when I got mine from starbike. Would like to try the supergravity tubeless though.
  • + 2
 I have it on the front of my process 153. I used it for an uplift day recently an it was amazing! Super gravity version tubeless. At one stage I hit a big rock really hard coming off a big drop. I heard a huge pop and thought it was gone but it survived. The impact would have taken out any other tire I have. Can't recommend enough
  • + 2
 I'll share my experience, I had single ply hans dampf, now I have super gravity hans dampf on my am bike and dual ply minions on the dh bike, I'm sure you could get away with super gravity on a dh bike but I wouldn't do it, it's always best to be sure and they feel incredibly fragile compared to the minions. They're a decent step up from single ply though... just go dh casing and put tubes in, if you're riding hard enough to flat a dual ply your pressure is probably low enough to burp a tubeless setup or you'd appreciate the sturdier feel of a dual ply tubed setup anyways. That's my opinion, take it or leave it.... hopefully that helped somewhat
  • + 1
 Well, I rode a set of michelin DH comp 16 and 32 on my dh bike for years, it always been my number 1 tire choice.

But now i own a slopestyle bike and i often go downhilling at the local mountain bike park (Bromont in Quebec) and to keep the weight as low as possible, i mounted a set of schwalbe rocket ron ... yeah those little cross country tires. And to be honest, (beside the fact that they have a lot less grip) these tires do not seem fragile at all, and with the right pressure, i dont have more pinch flats than i had with the michelins. What i am saying is that i am confident the supergravity one will do the trick for DH.

(so yeah i am comparing a 2.8 DH tyre to a 2.25 cross country one....)
  • - 1
 dont know why are you guys complaining about SuperGravity carcas on DH. SG is not for DH, its more for enduro, freeride, or lighter DH, so... Wink
  • + 5
 Christ, can a person not ask a straight question?
No one's complaining here.
  • + 1
 Just looking at the weight of the tire and the description, I would think it might be adequate for DH with sealant in it. 1045g in Super Gravity and 1190g in Downhill.
  • + 3
 @sup3rc0w The answer to your first question is "yes"! Super gravity tires are 2 ply on the sidewalls just like the DH tires and that is where you need it most. I bought a magic mary supergravity last autumn and ran a hans damf supergravity on the rear since September. Rode Champery World Cup track with no problems. And personally if it can handle that track it can handle anything. I don't see the point of having a 2 ply casing on the top. Supergravity is lighter than the DH version AND you can fold the tire (which make it easy to store off the bike and easier to put on the rim). I have since ridden in rocky and dry conditions as well as loam, snow, wet conditions and the magic mary just keeps gripping like mad! I have to vertstar compound by the way an I run thin tubes. This tire could only be better if they made a 2.5 version!
  • + 1
 sintra, thank you very much for the response.
Ordered the Vertstar SG Smile
  • + 1
 @ sintrafreeride I also had a hansdampf in sg casing which was fine until I was riding the Avoriaz side of the lindarets bowl 2nd or 3rd run in I slashed the tyre wide open across the top which doesn't have dual ply... Also I have been running dh versions of muddy marys tubeless on deemax ultimates for the last 2 years and found they work fine, could be the rim bead shape on flow ex rims that don't work well with those tyres.
  • + 2
 Well that is very unfortunate EuanBisset145. I dunno if that is very common occurrence though. When I used to live in Deux Alpes I did get occasional cuts on the knobs from the slate in the Venosc run but never cut the casing though of course I had full on DH tires back then 2.6 Michelins and 2.5 Muddy Marys. I will be doing a full season this year on them and then can do a full long term review. So far I have ridden 3 days at Champery at the end of the season (so every run was either the Worldcup track or the two secret tracks next to it), I rode several times in my secret track in Chatel (all loam) and then I did over a month of riding in Portugal in rocky and dry conditions. I'm pretty confident these tires can handle everything after all that. I run them at 20psi on 36mm rims with tubes
  • + 1
 @SintraFreeride: The same as EuanBisset145 here. I had an almost new Hans Dampf SG at the back which I cut at the top during the landing of a 1.1 meter jump, during my run at the national enduro championship in Gondramaz. A small 1cm cut but which enough to screw up my run and render the tire useless for tubeless, as no fluid can fix it. I really wasn't expecting that as the jump wasn't that big and there were only some little rocks on the ground.
  • + 6
 For enduro 650b weightweenies:
Schwalbe Magic Mary 2.35 650b SnakeSkin Trailstar: 931g

www.pinkbike.com/photo/10567503
  • + 7
 How much do the rubber bands weigh?
  • + 14
 650B weight weenies should be aware that at that weight it carries approx 25% more angular momentum than on a 26. Someone more educated in physics may want to ponder the relationship between that and this comment from the article.
"The 290g weight saving in comparison to the downhill tyre makes a huge difference, saving that kind of weight from the rotational mass will completely change a bikes handling." Does a 25% reduction of angular momentum equate to a 25% equivalent reduction in tire weight? If so how come this never gets talked about? In a world where people sacrifice things like suspension and braking performance, not to mention spend mega bux on carbon rims to save weight, why are they so quick to pile on rotational mass and push it further from the centre if rotation that has a much greater effect on handling than saving weight elsewhere?
  • + 6
 @kramster: brilliant thoughts, pinkbike: how about a tech tuesday about this?
  • + 10
 because being fashionable is more important than anything
  • + 3
 It carries 25% more angular momentum at equivalent rotational speed. However, because the diameter is bigger for 650b, or even more for 29ers, at a given rider speed, the wheels are spinning slower. This largely negates the increased rotational momentum, which is probably why it isn't discussed much.
  • + 3
 DR, It's been a long time since I took physics, but I think that's not accurate. The RPM is lower, but the actual speed at tire is the same. The calculator I used to reach the 25% figure is concerned with speed at the extent, not the RPM, therefore I believe it is accurate.

Anyone else with fresher/greater physics knowledge than me want to pipe in?
  • + 8
 Angular momentum calculations aren't concerned with "speed at the tire". The equation is L = I*w, where I is moment of inertia around the rotation axis, and w is angular velocity (RPM). As you can imagine, a 29er travelling at the same speed as a 26er will have its wheels spinning slower, thus have less angular velocity.

Moment of inertia for a spinning wheel is approximately I = mr^2, if we ignore weight of the hub and spokes (these are much lower than the weight of the rim and tire). As you can see, moment of inertia for a 29er wheel is 24% greater than a 26er of same mass (I assume that's the 25% value you mentioned), due to the higher r value. But the angular speed will be 12% less due to the bigger diameter. The actual increased inertia of the bigger tire is partially counteracted, which I think is why people don't talk about it that much. The difference between a 650B and 26" is even smaller.
  • + 1
 ^ thank you for the tech thursday! #noirony
  • + 1
 I have not ridden the magic marys, but I have spent some time on the hans dampf evo snake skins with trail star rubber and have nothing but good to say. The trail star rubber hooks up and wears extremely well. I have several hundred miles of descending, a lot of it rocky stuff and the tires still look great, the rear has minimal wear on the braking nobs...knobs... I dont know. I imagine the magic marys are going to ride well, seeing as the rubber is top notch.
  • + 4
 Any experience on riding the supergravity tubeless on a dh bike? I am thinkin on tryin this out. As for my enduro bike i will probably go for a snake skin in the front and a supergravity in the back, both tubeless. In the past when i was riding a snake skin in the back i cut it open 2 to 3times per season, so i think ill switch to the super gravity.
  • + 3
 I raced downhill all last season on Hans Dampf SuperGravity's set up tubeless. No issues during racing, they held up great.
  • + 3
 I have been using a magic Mary as a front tyre through the winter, and I have to say it is has awesome grip. Even in the worst of a British winter it has traction. The thing I like most about schwalbe at the moment is you pair a magic Mary with a couple of Hans dampf and a rock razor and you have a tyre system for every condition, as far as trail/all mountain goes.
  • + 1
 Actually im thinking about Magic Marry Vert as front and Hans Dampf Pace as rear tire. Most of users here are raving about how well Magic-M rolls, so how is the rolling comparison between these tire and HD(on the rear)?
  • + 2
 The combination works great, the magic Mary rolls well but it still drags a little put a hd on the rear and it's perfect
  • + 1
 Been running a muddy mary with a HD rear for around a year, in all conditions, and it's the best combo i've ran. rolls ok, but the grip outweighs any negatives with the rolling since you can push so much harder. manages to keep good grip no matter how wet, so impressed.
  • + 1
 Haven't tried a Magic Mary on the read but can vouch for the Hans Damf as a rear tire! I run a Magic Mary vertstar front 650b and a 26in Hans Damf in trailstar. Works in rocky, dry conditions to loam and wet (have yet to try in proper mud but then I do have a Dirty Dan for that!).
  • + 3
 Just got a pair in for the DH bike. Am going to try running the SuperGravity version tubeless on some FR 600's with Gorilla Tape and goo. Vertstar for the front and Trailstar for the rear. Hope to get them mounted up this weekend with tubes to seat the bead and stretch them out.
  • + 4
 Schwalbe tires... Big Betty DH casing, trailstar, sideknobs tearing off on a front tire after 1 month, no warranty. Wont be buying this sh&% again.
  • + 1
 try the vertstar compound! Softer, more grip and even wear no tearing!
  • + 2
 Y the hell are they only offering a vertstar (soft) compound for the dh tire (www.schwalbe.com/de/offroad-reader/magic-mary.html)? if you put that one on the back it will only last like two days on a hard packed trail... maybe they are trying to force people to run the supergravity in the back?
  • + 0
 You don't need the DH casing the super gravity is 2 ply (just like the DH casing) on the sidewalls and just as anti-pinchflatable.
  • + 2
 These seem pretty close from what I can take from the review to my continental der baron black chillis, I absolutely love the performance from them but would like to try something new, anybody had experience with both these tyres?
  • + 1
 Comparison between Baron and Magic Mary will be very interesting.
...bcs Baron 2.3 have better > lower weight than MagicM
Gils1991, how are the side knobs on Der Baron, their support, grip and feeling? Im asking, bcs on the pictures every 2 knobs looks like so far from each other, so im afraid of losing grip in some conditions while cornering. Can you give me some info? Thx Wink
  • + 0
 You cannot compare the Baron and Magic Mary (or at least should not), there are very different tyres. The Baron is incredible, but in a very limited window for use. The Magic Mary is an incredible all-round tyre with a very different type of profile.
  • + 1
 possible, but the thread pattern looks "similar", thats why i asked for comparison.
  • + 2
 The Der Baron 2.5 black chilli is insanely good for most conditions I've been in, but when the mud or dust gets thick then I use Continentals Mud Kings. The side knobs on the baron are large and well spaced to aid mud shedding ability but have very good predictability and thanks to the super reinforced sidewalls the support from the Baron is immense and the grip is there all the time BUT once sliding as I said the predictability of the tyre really shines. Just a great all round tyre with a good rolling speed to.

Ideal tyre for the trails I ride most of the time (rock faces, roots and loam, DRY OR WET)
  • + 1
 THX Giles, sounds promising, maybe i will prefer Baron, bcs cant find Vertstar Magic-M. in SnakeSkin, so aroung 900grams/tire, which Baron can offer me in Black Chilli version
  • + 1
 I run the 2.5 DER Baron black chilli compound tyre, bear in mind they are pretty pricey but last a long time thanks to the black chilli compound trates!
  • + 3
 I'm running the magics on my demo, and I do love them! They are always super grippy, but I do agree with your point about lifespan. I went through a set of tire last weekend at the mob n Mojave bootleg canyon race.
  • + 2
 Coming from North Vancouver where it is sloppy wet loam half the year I'm going to say that the best tire I have found to transition through all types of conditions is dual maxxis 2.4 Hr2. I have mine set up tubeless with around 28 psi and it is simply the best tire I have ever found. And if you follow me I swap bikes and setups quite frequently lol. Not taking anything away from schwalbe because I'm sure it's a good tire but these comments always turn into personal battles and comparisons so I thought I'd share mine. Ride what you like not what you're told you like. And pros ride what they're given for free. Don't get it twisted stevie could win mounting road tires to his Wilson....LOL
  • + 2
 Thanks! That was the original concept in the design. The old HR was pretty good, but a few cuts and sharper angles would have improved it greatly. The result is a good all around tire, the HR2.
  • + 1
 the most impressive thing I found about the muddy mary was how well they cleared mud you could rip some soft loose dirt and they will just clear and not pack up if these are the same but work on hardpack as well I am fully sold on them.
  • + 1
 I got this MM 2015 evolution 27.5 snakeskin and its a good tire for almost all of the conditions. BUT i find it IMPOSSIBLE to make it tubeless so that makes it a piece of shit. The sides of the tire (snakeskin) are just to weak to fit on a ''normal'' (read not tubeless rim). Even with more take and extra tape on the sides it is impossible.
I tryed: 1 normal taping, Double taping, Double taping+extra tape on the sides, riding the tire with an inner tube (so it sets after the rim?)
Any one more tips i could try?
  • + 1
 It takes high pressure for the tire to set into the rim. Go to a car or truck workshop where they have a high pressure tire inflation system. That's what I used to do for the hardest to set tires, instead of going to a fuel station pump, but now I pressurize a 2l soda bottle to 70 or 80psi, and then release the air from there directly into the tire, which works perfectly. You should also spread soapy water on the tire beads before. And remember to remove the inner part of the valve before, so the air can flow better.
  • + 1
 I am very pleased with my muddy marys for dh/bike park, also use them for allmountain if i need a lot of grip and no puncture, would definetely try the magic marys next, i have tried der baron in 2.3 size and really didnt like it, it felt unpredictable and nervous
  • + 1
 In stock on StarBike:
www.starbike.com/en/schwalbe-magic-mary
I got mine before Christmas, shipped to the UK, no probs.

Rock Razors too, if you are planning ahead to slightly drier weather in the UK (which is due sometime in 2017 Wink )

www.starbike.com/en/schwalbe-rock-razor
  • + 1
 iv'e been running hans damf trailstar front with a pace star rear in most conditions, tbh I think a minion super tacky on the front gave the best reassuring grip, although I prefer the bigger size of the hd's,
do these magic marys grip as well as a super tacky minion on the front, if so I will get one, anybody know?
  • + 1
 The magic mary has just as much if not more grip than a super tacky minion. Definitely better in the wet
  • + 1
 thanks bud, I will order one when some are in the uk
  • + 1
 You should buy from Bike components.de Only 36 Euro and not much for delivery. Pure bargain
  • + 1
 Minion 2.5 is 62mm on my calipers, Hans Dampf 2.35 is 61mm, so "bigger size of the hd's" is an optical illusion.

The Hans Dampf also brakes like total ass compared to the Minion, up front anyway... haven't used either as a rear.
  • + 2
 Have a set of these on my Bronson and they are incredible. Best tire I have ever used. Looking forward to pairing it with the new Rock Razor on the rear and seeing if its much faster. Nice work Schwalbe!
  • + 2
 So you had no issue fitting a magic Mary on the rear wheel of your Bronson, due to the 2.4 maximum tyre size of the Bronson ? Seeing as muddy Marie's in 2.35 are as big as a maxxis 2.5. Interested as I have a Bronson and would like to get some Smile cheers.
  • + 3
 Maxxis aren't the benchmark for actual tyre sizes - all their tyres are undersize relative to what they claim. Schwalbe, Michelin, Hutchinson, Intense etc are much more accurate with their widths than Maxxis. If a bike is claimed to clear a true 2.4, it'll clear a Schwalbe 2.35 as well as a Maxxis 2.5 with no problems.
  • + 2
 Tire width just read the mm reading not the inches.
  • + 1
 No issue at all vetting them in there!
  • + 3
 How is the "side-knobs-problem" solved on these new tires?
Im asking, bcs side knobs and their durability and cornering support its weak point of all Schwalbe tires.
  • + 4
 Got a Magic up front, and a raggedy old minion in back. Bellingham Gnar approved.
  • + 1
 Running these tubeless on a set of ztr flow rims on my dh bike, awesome tyres can't complain, when they wear out I would replace them with the same again for sure! yes schwalbe's have always worn slightly faster then some other brands but the performance & quality of the tyres has always meant I don't begrudge replacing them sooner then if I ran another brand.
  • + 4
 Finally an affortable tire !....Super Cheap : MSRP: $93.25 (Super Gravity) ... LOL
  • + 1
 I think it is a fair price for the quality. The day you go Schwalbe vertstar is the day you stop riding all other tire brands...
  • + 2
 That last pix the fork was a F36, was that a 26 or 27.5 wheel being used? Im wondering as im making the jump to the tweener size using that fork.
  • + 1
 The bike is a Specialized, so probably not 27.5. doesn't look like too much extra clearance, either...
  • + 2
 @Carrot-Top Mount up a 2.35" Schwalbe and then re-evaluate your comment. Don't be misled by comparing to a 2.35 Maxxis or similar.
  • + 1
 Exactly, they feel much wider.
  • + 2
 I'm not mislead by comparing to Maxxis (See my reply to my original comment.) I simply find that 2.35" (or Maxxis 2.5) is too narrow for DH. Why is it that companies are no longer offering wider sizes when they make new "DH" tires?
  • + 2
 Because 2.35" is what pros are riding, 2.5" offers too much roling resistance which is obviously bad for racing. And everybody know that pros are setting the trend.
  • + 3
 Indeed, nobody makes non-race specific DH stuff anymore, it's like they think people only bring out their DH bikes on race day, otherwise we all have them locked up in hermetically sealed display case or something.
  • + 2
 Yeah it I agree that it is a shame that there are fewer and fewer +2.4in out there. I would love a 2.5 magic mary...
  • + 1
 I really like how simple these tires look. No odd shaped knobs, nothing asymmetrical. Just simple blocks, which works the best most of the time especially on the rear.
  • + 0
 HR2 or Minion Sticky, ride with confidence and forget about it for months. I'm not sure why Swabby thinks transition knobs are a good thing?? Hans Dampf was easily the worst, which lasted about 7 rides anyways.
  • + 1
 What combo of Magic Marys would you guys recommend for enduro riding, or MM front and rear?

Will be fitted tubeless to my Flow EXs
  • + 2
 Running these on my Demo 8. The best feeling tires I've ridden and the grip is amazing.
  • + 2
 Continental Der Kaiser FTW !
  • + 1
 A pair of these will go nicely on my new bike, Super Gravity version for the Mrs' bike. :-)
  • + 2
 Cool tire...but I think Ill stick with my Hans Dampfs for $40
  • + 1
 I'm on HansDampfs with my Jekyll right now. I am amazed how they hook up on all conditions. I may just get a set for the V10
  • - 2
 if by all conditions u mean dry :-) they are useless for wet conditions...
  • + 3
 I don't know man, I'm on Vancouver Island right now you can't get anymore west in Canada and it's really rainy here. I've had really good experiences with the Hans tires on sopping wet rock,root,terra out here. mind you rock is different all over the globe.
  • + 1
 it might work on wet rocks n stuff. but as soon as it gets muddy, they fill up super fast and you loose all the traction..
  • + 1
 I found HD's for trail cruising good, but pick up the pace and they just can't hold a line. The side knobs are just not enough. As well, I found them a little skittish with no hook. I have cut mine and they are much much better, nice hook but the side knobs are just a no go, you can fold them at will. They can be quick, but must be finessed. Same with the BigBetty, I got a DH rear for last season. I was able to undercut the side knobs quite easily carving on hardpack gravel berms. The betty would have been a much better tire with a good side knob. Seems Schwalbe messed up with the knob size and shape with the new softer compounds, as undercutting and ripping side knobs was quite common. The new models seem to have significantly beefed up the side knobs, hell they are now buttressed. This season will tell.
  • + 1
 These are like Hans Dampfs on steroids!
  • + 1
 This is one gnarly lookin' aggressive tire. Looks just like an MTB version of an MX tire.
  • + 1
 So how wide is this tire? I didn't see that anywhere in the article.
  • + 1
 it is 61mm on a 31mm rim or 2.35in
  • - 1
 When did we start referring to tires as "carcasses"? And then saying carcass every second sentance...
  • + 13
 Why do people feel the need to snakry about every mundane detail.
  • + 0
 Enduro approved carcasses to go with my Enduro rims for my Enduro bike!
  • + 1
 Sorry for mentioning "carcass".. Now let's all go back to the Pinkbike approved whining about "enduro"
  • + 0
 I don't care how well they perform, over $90 for a tire is ridiculous!
  • + 0
 It's got Enduro written all over it!
  • + 2
 Oh, well then ill take a dozen!
  • + 0
 Time to snap up loads of cut price muddy marys then !
  • - 1
 Been sold out most places for some time, and being discontinued, you;d be hard pressed to find some.
  • + 0
 93 dollars for one tire ill stick with my table tops.
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