Shimano Gives Us the First Taste of Its 2015 lineup

Feb 2, 2014
by Richard Cunningham  
Further expanding the capabilities of its E-tube wiring and electronics found in its latest Di2 electronic road bicycle shifting systems, Shimano today introduced the Di2 Wireless Unit (SM-EWW01) featuring the new Shimano D-Fly Data Management system. This new wireless component adds another dimension to the Di2 experience by wirelessly connecting riders to their Di2 data through a cycling computer. Di2 wireless unit is a compact wireless data transmitter compatible with Dura-Ace 9070, Ultegra 6870 Di2 and Ultegra 6770 E-tube road shifting systems.The wireless transmitter easily plugs into the E-tube wiring system and seamlessly connects Di2 equipped bikes to a compatible wireless cycle computer.

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Shimano's E-tube single-wire conduit system allows the Di2 wireless transmitter to be plugged into the same line that powers and commands the rear derailleur.


Shimano D-Fly transmits data through a proprietary private ANT wireless protocol and allows riders to monitor Di2 gear position, battery life, as well as some other common rider data functions. The new Di2 Wireless Unit is powered by the same Di2 battery that powers the Di2 shifting system. Upon its introduction, SM-EWW01 will be compatible with the Pro Scio ANT+ cycling computer, a new 2014 introduction in the PRO line. Future compatibility with MIO and other cycling computers are planned for the 1st quarter of 2014.The Di2 Wireless Unit maintains a svelte size at only 38mm long, 25mm wide,12.5mm in height, and weighs less than 5 grams. The SM-EWW01 will be available in March 2014 for $79.99. The Scio ANT+ cycling computer weighs 80 grams and will be available in white or black color options for $139 in February 2014.

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The wireless unit is said to weigh less than five grams. Presently, the unit syncs only with Shimano's Scio ANT+ cycling computers, but more applications will follow. Will Shimano offer a smart phone app? Only time will tell.

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129 Comments

  • 79 5
 Strava and a normal derailleur is all I need
  • 102 20
 is strava enduro specific bro?
  • 30 2
 I used to like hikers.
  • 36 10
 "Will Shimano offer a smart phone app?"
Nobody here gives a crap
  • 13 3
 I use enduro.
  • 5 3
 Great surprise after all the 11 speed, narrow-wide hype. ironically,no pun intended
  • 11 2
 how long does the battery actually last? imagine battery powered brakes haha
  • 45 5
 It's wireless right? What if there would be some bug in transmission frequency in the middle of the peloton? If one guys Di-2 transmitter suddenly controls derailleurs of 4 bikes? What if they make Di-2 brakes as well? I would not risk it myself, too much probability of sabotage... man I crashed on the 56th kilometer -what happened? - they hacked my Di2 again...
  • 6 0
 Nice food for thought but I'm sure they figured that out before releasing it.
  • 3 0
 Waki that would be amazing Wink
  • 13 3
 But have they figured out The EMP shockwave?
  • 20 1
 Waki, they are aware of this issue and will be implementing the AFA* system to combat the possible problems.




*Another f*cking Acronym
  • 9 0
 Big Grin Big Grin I was thinking the same Waki - roadies cheating on whole new level

But on the serious note:
Wireless seatpost & derailleurs, lockouts... that would clean up handlebars nicely!
  • 4 1
 Quebracho... such things are already designed they just haven't seen the light...YET!
  • 1 0
 imagine they make something like a SRAM to Shimano changer....
  • 5 0
 lol for sale shimano e-mech , unlocked....
  • 4 1
 Yeah some guy on the side of the course with an rf jammer mashing everybody's gears! lol
  • 1 1
 Not only EMP shock waves and frequency take overs but what if a solar flare simultaneously takes the whole Tour de France out. It seems obvious that it's built this way by design, somebody knows how to make that event better.
  • 4 1
 All i can think of now is the scene in scary movie 4 where the little girls bike stops working after emp
  • 1 0
 The hecklers hacking the signals and change gear during the rock gardens yes!
  • 1 0
 Gotta love how all this going Smile
  • 4 1
 If I'm reading all the articles right the system doesn't actually control the shifting. It just relays information to a ANT+ computer that allows for the display of Di2 data and customizing features. I have the the 1st gen E-Tube Ultegra and the wireless functionality solves having to connect your computer to it with the special E-tube wiring / software. So the hacking would actually not shift the victims bike, but change custom settings, number of gears, etc. You could reverse what the shifters do, etc.
  • 4 0
 oh sh*t even more Di2 stuff to go wrong on customers bikes Wink


hint: I am a professional bike mechanic regularly making "repairs" (firmware updates, diagnostics, charging flat batteries, replacing faulty batteries, damaged cables, faulty shifters and faulty junction boxes) to bikes fitted with Di2 electronic shifting systems)
  • 4 1
 @hampsteadbandit, get ready to fully format a bike.
  • 2 0
 I have about 4,000 miles on mine through two Seattle winters, multiple hose washes, no firmware updates (although that would be cool) and zero problems at all. Never adjust anything it just works. Same for my buddies.
  • 6 1
 Why do roadies need this? Are they doing tail whips and bar spins now?
  • 3 0
 All we want is a pinkbike app
  • 1 0
 @snide

many of the Di2 problems I see on my customers bikes are user error:- crashing and damaging components. customers are then replacing with new items bought on-line with different firmware version installed = dead system

or from cables being damaged during transit, or in crashes, or bad installations.

we have also seen an increasing number of "faulty" components with no crash damage that have just stopped functioning after a couple of weeks / months of use - typically the handlebar junction box and the microswitches in the STI handlebar shifters. Shimano are 100% good with warranty

I think I'll stick to mechanical shifting (Shimano Ultegra) on my own road bike Smile
  • 3 0
 never thought i'd see the day bike wrenches started talking about firmware compatibility...
  • 2 0
 Wait for the shim stack nerds to start talking of firmware tuning... as soon as we get the electronic CCDB, I will call my self an Off-road Cyclist on an old bike Smile
  • 2 0
 anybody knows what channel this uses? i asume 2.4Ghz
  • 1 0
 @iffy

too true...

thought I'd only be updating firmware on my Blu-Ray player or to hack the region lock on my PC's DVD-Rom drive....bikes as well now!
  • 1 0
 do a shortcut of your pinbike internet page on the desktop of your smartphone. have mine, even with the logo XD
  • 1 0
 Electric bikes will kill off strava
  • 4 0
 Nothing can kill Strava. Strava has a second name and soon it will reveal itself as the Skynet!
  • 2 0
 Waki that ie great lol
  • 36 2
 Come ON!!!! I WANT A WIDE RANGE 10 SPEED CASSETTE DAMMIT!!!! How hard is that? Seriously, Sram has a cool thing going, but 95% of riders these days are happy with 9-10 cogs out back but WE JUST WANT 11-42!!!! And aftermarket solutions are OK but come on man, step up and give us a proper production 11-42 10 speed cassette!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 10 2
 One problem with the 9-10 speed cassette that spans 11-42 is that you're forcing the derailleur to jump farther with each individual shift, which in turn makes the rear shifting jumpier and more likely to throw the chain. It would be fine if you're only occasionally shifting gears, like is normal on the front chainrings, but when you need to be able to shift a lot it is horrible (anyone who has tried to shift a cheap bike equipped with a MegaRange cassette can probably attest to this). By making it an 11 speed cassette it allows for the larger range with less shifting issues because the chain doesn't have to jump so far from one cog to the next. This is one reason why there has been very little change in the range of old 5 speed road cassettes and modern 10 and 11 speed road cassettes. The increased number of cassette speeds because it allows for smoother more accurate shifting because the chain is moving from an 11 to 12 tooth cog instead of moving from an 11 to 16 tooth cog.

I'm not saying you don't have a point. I'm just saying that there are mechanical factors behind making such a large ranged cassette that in the long run will make your ride a lot worse than it would be with an 11 spd.

Truth be told though in my experience if you're happy with a regular 10 speed 12-32 cassette then 10 speed is hands down better than 11 speed due to spacing issues. Only place where 11 speed beats 10 is when you want a crankset for a cassette.
  • 3 1
 I think that a nicely machined 10 speed 11-42 cassette would shift very well. If you read about what people say about the aftermarket solutions like General Lee or 1Up, they say it works *almost as well as a factory piece. A true factory 10 sp 11-42 cassette with an appropriately engineered RD would be fine. Adding the 1 extra gear does almost nothing to the overall gear spread.
  • 4 1
 But the General Lee only goes up to a 40 tooth, which may seem small but end ups having an effect on the overall spread. If you look at the gearing spread from SRAM XX lower end of the spread is making jumps of only 1 or 2 teeth, while the upper end eventually makes a 4 tooth jump to 36. The XX1 however, allows for the lower 5 gears to stay within 2 tooth increments, and is still able to make it to 42 without overreaching a 6 tooth jump. The SRAM 1070 on the other hand forces the derailleur to make both a 5 tooth jump and a 6 tooth jump for the final two cogs and it only gets to a 40. To reach a 42 tooth you would essentially have to ask your rear derailleur to perform an 8 - 10 tooth jump which are the kinds of jumps a front derailleur makes.

- SRAM XX: 11-12-14-16-18-21-24-28-32-36
- SRAM XX1: 10-12-14-16-18-21-24-28-32-36-42
- SRAM 1070 with General Lee adapter: 11-12-14-16-18-21-25-29-34-40
see-pinkbike review of General Lee

Yes, you can tune such large jumps to work, but in a realistic setting of mud, rain, and general mountain biking conditions the shifting performances of such large jumps begins to deteriorate very rapidly. This is the same issue that happens to front shifting performance when you're making your derailleur try and jump 8-10 teeth on a dirty cable (hence one of the perks of electric). Yes you can make it work, but most riders don't want the shifting response time of a front derailleur when they're needing to make fast accurate shifts. Not only is the SRAM XX1 providing smaller increments of shifting throughout the entire range of the cassette, but it's also offering a larger 10-42 tooth spread compared to the 11-40 offered by General Lee. (Don't forget that for the smaller range you're also paying $150 for half a cassette). It may not seem like much but adding that extra-gear is what allows the cassette to even reach 42 teeth, without forcing your rear derailleur to shift like a front derailleur.
  • 4 2
 If you add one gear to a 10 speed cassette, each jump has to be average 10% bigger. If you spread it all the way down into the high cogs, you'd never notice.
  • 13 1
 i like bicycles
  • 5 2
 For me personally the smooth gear ratio transitions are felt only when I am able to feel them, and that is fire road or asphalt. When I am riding on the technical trail I don't care that much because very often I am pressing cranks so hard that I wouldn't be able to shift anyways. Ithappens few times, even on a short ride, that I have to live with some gear for few meters until I can shift. I started riding with 7 speed and I learned some gear shifting lessons then. These days I do enjoy smooth shifting under power but I remain sensible to how the chain travells between cogs. So many of us still ride 2 ring chainsets, if you can learn to effectively shift from 22-24 granny to 34-38 middle ring, then you will also be able to shift a 7 speed 11-42t cassette. Sram went for 11t just because they could. They had to change the rear mech to work better with the new cassette and so they had to change the shifter. Therfore they might as well make it 11 speeds as those new things would not be compatible wth the 10 speed stuff anyways. Most of the people who complain about extra large cogs do it not just because of shifting, but also because they are at the very end of what 10 speed derailleurs can take. Sram's rear mech is specificaly optimized for such cassettes and other mechs aren't.
  • 4 1
 I wanna see some guy in the peleton riding around with an AWACS device on his bike jamming signals on Galibier.
  • 6 3
 AWACS uses a passive electronically scanned array radar system which would not jam anything
  • 13 1
 you must be fun at parties
  • 1 0
 bholton - I laughed so hard, oh... that was the best thing I heard in a long time. Fortunately I got my huge share of fun before I read Poahs comment... we have this thing called Gothenburgian joke here in Sweden - it's about being ironic at another's irony - I hope it was that...

Never let the truth kill a good story, otherwise it may end up on a cementary and someone might ride it over with a bike Big Grin
  • 2 0
 poah: ya but that AWACS thing, whatever it does, would look so cool on a bike...or a helmet. Besides no one would notice.
  • 2 0
 I thought it was funny too - next time he tells it, the joke will be factually correct
  • 2 2
 ugh... but it is utterly irrelevant whether AWACS is a radar, jammer or a toaster - it's one of main weapons of electronic warfare in Hollywood films, able to spawn F16s or cruise missiles out of nowhere, or make F15s ready to take off from the nuclear aircraft carrier (luckily passing by), not mentioning tdirectign fire from a Hercules Spectre being in the attack position ready on call. It's just an icon, virtually nobody gives a damn what it actualy does
  • 2 0
 never seen anything of what you describe happen in a Hollywood movie
  • 2 2
 Where do you take your data from? I can't tell if you are right without looking at your data - do your research! Transformers, Enemy of the State
  • 2 2
 I am surprised though you haven't noticed F15s taking off from an aircraft carrie bit...
  • 2 0
 I would be stoked with just an 11-38 9 speed cassette, even made of steel, and Shimano would have sold a lot of them over the last couple years if they would just start paying attention to riders actual needs.
  • 1 0
 I think one thing people might be forgetting to consider when contemplating the 42 tooth option for standard 9-10 speed drive trains is the kind of torque and stress they will be putting on their free hub body. At first I thought that Sram had just gone to 11 speed so that people with 9-10 speed drive trains would have to hop on the band wagon if they wanted the latest and greatest, but someone pointed out that the 42 cassette is going to put a lot of stress on the standard 9-10 speed free hub body and so it would make sense for Sram to move to the 11 speed, which provides them with the opportunity designing their product from the ground up with some of the stress and fatigue in mind. I was actually really considering going with one of the 42 tooth options but after seeing the maxed out b-tension, having to swap to a mid cage, paying over $100 for a single cog, and then considering some of the risks of destroying my free hub kind of pushed me away. I purchased a 30 tooth narrow wide from Race Face this last fall and paired with an 11-36 cassette and it performed pretty awesome. I'm interested in hearing about people's long term experiences with the 42 tooth cogs though.
  • 1 0
 I'm not sure there would be more torque with a 30F/42R than with a 22F/36R... ??? Right? The gear ratio is almost the same... lower with the 22/36 even. Sounds like a way for them to claim their design is necessary.
  • 1 0
 @maxlombardy, now that you mention it I agree, gear ratio for the 30/40 and 22/36 is fairly similar 1.4 and 1.63 respectively so really maybe you are correct 11 speed might be unnecessary. I have to admit though that I do like the interface between the X01/XX1 cassettes and the new hubs, so if for some reason the entire industry shifted to the the new interface but 9 and 10 one piece cassettes were produced (when pigs fly right) I would be ok. I think the main problem with high torque values might come with the single 42 tooth cogs rather than the one piece assembly like some XX cassettes, I am sure you have experienced the grief when the teeth on the inside of your cassette which interface with your free hub body have gouged up your free hub and made removal difficult, sometimes nearly impossible. I am guessing the single 42 tooth cog will have some potential torque issues that users will have to deal with at some point, and torque may be a moot point if you have a nicer free hub body that is not just aluminum but has some steel inserts.
  • 2 0
 Yeah I see what you mean. Really, the standard cassette/freehub interface is ok, but seeing that it's been around for like 30 years, I do agree that it's time to re-think it. I definitely can get on board with Sram's new gig, but I just like the idea of a 10 speed option too. I honestly think it would be awesome if someone just made a proper 10 speed cassette that went up to 46 in the back. If General Lee does as good a job as they say, Shimano could definitely do them 1 better. For example:
XX1: 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 21, 24, 28, 32, 36, 42
10sp 11, 13, 15, 18, 21, 24, 28, 32, 36, 42

I doubt that if you did a blind ride on either one you could tell the difference. Then people could buy the cassette, and yeah, maybe the rear derailleur gets maxed out on the b-screw, but if Shimano introduced a medium cage derailleur that accepted a 42t Max cog, you could buy it down the line. You wouldn't have to though, at least not right away.
  • 27 4
 I had a chance to play with this set up on a road bike. Its cool. Until the batteries die. Bikes are reliant on human power that is part the appeal.
  • 7 2
 the battery takes a long time to die, easier to plug in a battery overnight then to swap cables and housings out once in a while no?
  • 8 1
 1 recharge every 6 months - not that bad.
  • 1 0
 The batteries are good for 10 tour de france's on a single charge.
  • 2 1
 Well I fitted new cables to my bike on the eve of a race and then the cable housing got smashed on the first stage thereby ruining my shifting. And that is certainly not the first time that has happened. If anything cables are the weak link and less reliable option. Bikes are equally reliant on components lasting and gear cable is not one of the more reliable components in my experience.
  • 3 0
 guess it's a weight thing, but would be sweet if they rigged the batteries to recharge with the power generated by riding the bike.
  • 1 0
 Most people get a whole season out of one battery charge. and the junction box lets you know well in advance if you are loosing power. eventually the front der stops working and it will only power the rear so you can still get home.
  • 5 0
 I prefer human power and mechanical ingenuity over blue tooth enabled derailleurs. What I realy want to see is a mass acceptance for frame mounted internal transmissions. Derailleurs suck.
  • 2 0
 @joeyjd the Di2 version of durace weighs less than the mechanical version, and that's including the battery
  • 14 0
 There will be tons of fun had once someone hacks the signal. Shifting someone to the hardest gear once they hit a climb? Priceless.
  • 1 0
 I need this device! cya Froome!
  • 1 0
 Who is gonna take the time to figure out how to hack someone's bike signal, then go wait around in the forest just to switch someone's gears? Seems like alor of work for a pretty mediocre payoff.
  • 2 0
 Even better on the declines when they are throwing all their weight into the cranks to get the power strokes. Quickly throw them into the granny gear.
  • 4 1
 It's not that mediocre if the pay off is a win at Tour de France...
  • 3 0
 @nfstreet: you severely underestimate the power of bored people.
  • 2 0
 @TJquinn "you severely underestimate the power of bored people" Haha
  • 9 0
 Sigh, if its not gift wrapped in a review folks here never seem to find out anything themselves.

www.ebay.com/itm/11-40-Recon-Cassette-10-Speed-Titan-for-Shimano-XTR-Deore-gray-/390739199068?pt=US_Cassettes_Freewheels_Cogs&hash=item5af9df045c

10 speed 11-40 cassettes ready to go. The 3 largest cogs are aluminium, the next three are titanium and the 4 smallest are steel. Works on any shimano compatible freehub body. I've got recon cassettes on several bikes. They shift as well as shimano.
  • 2 0
 That's pimp tight.
  • 2 0
 BTW thank you, all powerful Deeeight, purveyor of all non-pinkbike published drivetrain knowledge. Please, what else have I foolishly been completely ignorant of??
  • 3 0
 Pfffft. 11-40 for just $300-400, what a steal! I'd rather buy a normal shimano 11-36 10 speed set up, take off the 17 tooth and put on that 42 tooth by Oneup Components that I saw a review of here on Pinkbike. That'd only cost $200-250, I'd have an even easier gear than the 11-40 allows, and I'd have a green shiny bit on my bike.
  • 6 3
 maxlobardy - he knows more about weird bike details than nazis ever knew about art pieces in France.
  • 2 0
 deeeight what's your opinion on alloy/ti cassettes, don't they wear a little bit fast? as in a lottt faster than steel?
  • 1 0
 Ha! WAKI... Wink
  • 2 0
 You guys do understand the concept of "First taste" right?! Shimano is appealing to the largest market segments first with their 2015 product releases and this place sure ain't it.
  • 10 1
 Ah that was a let down. I want to see more goodies from Shimano.
  • 17 8
 Go home Shimano you are drunk!
  • 6 1
 I want to see narrow wide direct mount crank allowing to select 22t-38t single ring. Where is it, Shimano?
  • 9 4
 useless trinkets. go ride your bicycle, geekheads
  • 6 0
 1x chainring up front?
  • 2 0
 Yeah, as long as Shimano resists going 1x, then SRAM has little pressure to trickle down their 1x11 stuff to X9 or X7.
  • 1 0
 I did not know Shimano was resisting the 1x chain ring. But it would make sense considering that means one less front derail sold for Shimano. Personally I think more than one chain ring is great, best way to get a quick 1/3 to 1/2 quick up shift for those surprising inclines/down for declines. But I hate the additional shifter/derail/cable and problems they may induce. But I guess sometimes yo gotta take the good with the bad. And unless you are doing tail whips on your trail bike, I don't see why having a 2x or 3x chain ring would be a problem.
  • 1 0
 There is nothing electronic I appreciate on my bike. I can't speak about road biking and sunday cruisers, but my offroading is done in very wet conditions possibly. The only electronic / electric gadgets I use is a completely waterproof mp3 player that is designed for swimmers and some lights that are offered to divers. This is just the first point, not mentioning about mechanical resistance of a bike landing without a rider, bushes scratching everything, mud, sand etc. I also don't see a reasonable point in any bar display for an offroad puprose. There is no chance of reading anything when cornering and on rough surface.

I can see producers plan to introduce some electronics into biking and this is a dead end direction. Developing bikes should firstly involve making it so reliable that it won't break in the middle of nowhere. The simpler and the less electronics, the better.
  • 1 0
 Di2 is actually very waterproof and reliable already. there are videos of people pressure washing the crap out of those bikes, and there were no issues
  • 2 1
 I am usually the opposition of new stuff that are introduced to be a revolution which makes everything better. This began after several new ideas that were suppose to improve my life and didn't. In case of biking I could remind myself shimano airlines, 29 inch wheel size, narrow chain with more gears. In my opinion all of the examples resulted in money only instead of any improvement. I watched cars going from very cool 20 years ago and earlier, to plastic shit which is offered nowadays. I don't want bikes to become commercial, fashionalbe items which are so posh to posses. I want them to be able to take me into wild and back. This does not demand iphone attached to the bar with useless apps. Water resistance is just one of possible criteria. There is another where to get power from? Heavy batteries which challenge the memory to get them charged before riding, or changing the rider into recharger to power apps that are not needed. I have enough beautiful views around me when biking. Afterall I don't believe electronics is needed in objects like a knives, cars, bikes, garden tools etc. It is the first thing proven to go wrong, and just not necessary. More and more I get to thinking that bikes are quite perfect already, but there are producers and inventors who need to earn money so they try to reinvent the shape of a wheel again, and again, just to make us buy, buy, buy.
  • 1 0
 The exciting thing about Di2 wireless is it's closer to moutain bike electronic shifting. running wires through a full suspension bike has its pitfalls. Do you need electronic shifting? well no, but from having tried road Di2 it is remarkable, and has the disclaimer of "don't try it unless you can buy it"
  • 1 0
 I remember pitching this idea to a gadget maker buddy of mine about 5yrs ago, I guess I wasn't the only one with that idea.

I could see upgrading to this when my stuff wears out & if they get any kinks worked out. But I don't see a whole lot wrong with our current drivetrains these days.

My only question would be how much is that rear derailleur going to cost & how long will I cry when a rock reaches up & grabs my derailleur while I'm out on vacation on a limited budget?
  • 1 0
 Its great that new things are being created, but honestly. there is already electric shifting (Di-2) which is already light as hell.
Add to this the wireless shit, its probably going to be heavier and less precise,
Also, batteries. How the hell will one know if the battery is about to die or if youre on a ride and it gives out. To say that it runs on a little batter and youre going to have like 3 of them on the damn bike.
And shit happens, things get corrupt. the whole wireless thing is a little to far.
I could see someone messing with you and shifting your gears for you.
May as well be a new way for teams to cheat with one another.
  • 1 0
 Lets just keep it simple stupid, Why dish out a couple grand on this,,, Cables are fine! its been fine since the first bike with gears were invented.. why make shit more complicated, And also think repairs.. How easy is it to repair cables versus that of a electronic rig. Its like fixing a toyota versus fixing a mercedes...or whatever, Not worth it!
  • 4 4
 See combining multiple technologies and then making the product cost more than the original two products is a really stupid marketing plan. It may work for the pros who don't have to pay for shit but for the average rider who doesn't have a money tree in their backyard you'll get the optimum price/performance ratio, which usually lies in Ultegra/XT or 105/SLX level components.
  • 8 1
 Except for the fact that the technology at the "optimum price/performance ratio" is trickled down from those products that "cost more than the original two products", so before you go singing Hail to Chief to second tier products remember that they were last years top of the line.
  • 9 0
 The problem with your logic and a lot of other people's logic on Pinkbike is that this stuff isn't aimed squarely at the 'average' rider. You are correct saying that the optimum price/performance lies at that Ultegra/XT or 105/SLX and for 'average' riders that's all that they need. For people who do have money and enjoy spending it on bikes and/or accessories this stuff is awesome and they love it. So no, not a stupid marketing plan, just not aimed at 15 year old boys.
  • 2 1
 I've been told many times on the internet to not hate such high tech as it will trickle down and if I doubt if it's any good I should not bash it before I try it. I guess then that in 3-4 yearswe will see it in 105 or Alivio for half of the price... this is what technology does they said. I'm not sure though but I will reserve myself this time... I want wireless brakes...
  • 1 0
 ITT You're 15 if you don't have much $ to spend on bikes
  • 1 0
 The electronic Dura Ace groupo is $4200 USD. Mechanical version, $2700. I'm thinking $80 will break the bank. Ha.. Not really. I remember going for training of the old Mavic Zap electronic shifters, like 20 years ago? Still have the service manuals. Rode a bike that had Mavic on it for a week or so. Cool I guess. It worked just fine. I just rode new bikes with Shimano's DA and Ultegra. Performance was fine. It all works. I still don't get why some people are pushing it as being so much better. Because I didn't have to use force to shift? Multiple shifter locations? That's all I can see and it's fancy. I guess it's like taking a great blender and adding a gas (or petrol) engine to it. It's still a blender, just more expensive. I asked about the default, if it stops shifting, doesn't sound fun at all. I had one of my mtb shifter's go out about 12 miles from home once. I was able to shift it to make the climbs to get home. Wrapped the cable around a small stick, can't do that with Di.

I can't see electric being lighter or more durable then the mechanical counterpart, Alivio vs Alivio, at the $1000 price point. Trickle down or not...
  • 2 2
 Am I the only person that when I run out of gears on an 11-36 cassette, thinks hmm, maybe I need to get fitter, and not hmm, I need more gears?! We're gonna end up going in circles, we'll run out of rear gears and new enduro specific adapters for your front chain ring will come out, meaning you can run 2 chain rings instead of 1?!
  • 2 0
 1x10-42 gives you less range than 2x11-36. running 1x11-36 isn't ideal for everyone
  • 1 1
 Is this seriously where the bike industry is trying to go? have they run out new innovations with everything else that they have to honestly screw with something that has been standard for the past 70 years or more... sure lets burn more energy to charge our shifting systems... what's next ... solar panels built into the head tubes to charge the damn thing? If you want to produce something like electronic shifting....sure go ahead, keep it for your top grouppo, and still offer a mechanical group. the last thing I want to worry about is the juice in my shifting system. And if I have a failure on the road with my equipment, at least I can work with something to get me home. Electronic shifting can go the same route as Mavic's ZAP system from the early 90's? ...it can go sit on a shelf and some collector of obscure bike parts and hang it on theirt wall. Mecanical stuff works just fine.... let's leave a good thing alone. So what's next.... a 135mm rear spacing on a road bike with a 14 speed cassette?
  • 1 1
 for the most part i live in a cave, wtf is this?! electronic shifting? if this is seriously an electronic shifter on a mountain bike i have lost all of my faith in humanity. why do we feel the need to take a perfectly fine way of shifting and turn it into something so complicated? this is what im picturing the future of mtb is shredder#1:"lets go ride man"
shredder#2:"hold on bro my derailers charging"
  • 3 0
 I HAVE NO IDEA WHAT THAT LITTLE BOX DOES
  • 1 0
 Perfect now I can finally take the gyro off my road bike...... whats next, your support crew during the tour shifts your gears for you?
  • 1 0
 Just another part to to break, technology like many bikes are known for having electric failures, I'd rather keep it simple with a regular derailer.
  • 4 1
 nah, I stay with cables
  • 6 4
 I didn't realize that pinkbike covered roadbike stuff too.
  • 2 1
 you learn something new everyday eh?
  • 3 1
 "Enduro" tends to be an overrated word.
  • 2 0
 i was hoping a 40t/42t cassete!!!
  • 2 0
 Shimano is overrated. SRAM is worlds better!
  • 3 2
 This is old news, and roadie news as well
  • 4 2
 Yawn... huh whazzat?
  • 4 2
 NO. NO. NO
  • 1 0
 No more shifting cables: I'm in!
  • 1 0
 Shifting wires? the electronic Di-2 thats currently in the market
  • 1 0
 This looks like itd last one ride, if it works
  • 1 0
 Better they'd done an XX1 cassette analog.
  • 1 0
 battery dead? go home in that gear!!!
  • 1 0
 I can't shift! My battery died!
  • 1 0
 Maybe upgrade your hubs first....?
  • 1 0
 BS toy for roadies...
  • 1 1
 If your battery dies on a di2 system it means you suck
  • 4 7
 Not light enough for Enduro sorry
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