Spank Spike Race28 Wheelset Review

Jun 5, 2013
by Mike Kazimer  
Spank Spike Race28 Wheelset

Spank Spike Race28 Wheelset overview:
• Intended use: all-mountain, freeride, downhill
• 26"
• Adaptors available for most axle standards - 15mm, 20mm or QR front; 135mm, 12x142 or 150mm rear
• Colors: black/white, blue, red
• Weight: 2010 grams (actual) with 12x142 adaptor
• MSRP: $499 USD

Spank offers several different component lineups designed to suit various styles of riding. Their Spike series is intended for everything from light freeriding to downhill racing or bike park usage, and includes handlebars, stems, rims and pedals, along with the wheelset tested here. For the Race28 wheelset, Spank uses a traditional three cross pattern to lace their Spike Race28 EVO rims to 32 hole Spoon hubs. The wheels are hand built and trued in Taiwan (a small card is included with the wheel builder's signature) using Sandvik triple butted spokes and brass nipples.

The Details

Rims
The Spike Race28 EVO rims are constructed from a 6000 series aluminum alloy Spank calls Dynamal, which was chosen for its balance of high strength and light weight, the elements needed for a modern mountain bike rim. Spank's rims are joined using a sleeve that is pressed in and then bonded with an epoxy for added assurance against separation. The rims measure 23mm wide internally and 28mm externally, with a total height of 19mm. Instead of dipping down in the center where the spoke holes are like many rims do, the rim has a wave shaped profile that creates a raised center rib. This raised portion, part of Spank's patented OooBah rim profile, is designed to provide additional bracing for the rim's sidewalls, preventing them from collapsing in under heavy loads. The rims also have a pronounced bead hook to prevent tires from rolling off the rim, even when riders run low pressures. We tested these wheels with tubes, but Spank does sell tubeless rim tape for riders who wish to run a tubeless setup.

Spank Spike Race28 rim profile
The raised portion in the center of the rim is designed to add additional strength, bracing up the sidewalls against heavy loads. Also note the small lip below the bead hook, part of Spank's BeadNip design that is intended to allow riders to run lower pressures without rolling the bead off the rim or suffering pinch flats.

Hubs
The Race28 EVO's front hub comes set up for a 20mm thru axle, and the rear is available set up for 10x135 or 12x150 spacing, with adaptors available separately for riders who wish to run a 15mm front thru axle or a 12x142 rear. Both hubs use common sized Japanese sealed cartridge bearings – two 6804 bearings in the front hub, and four 6902 bearings in the rear. The steel freehub body uses a three pawl system that engages with the 27 points inside the hub shell. In order to reduce weight, the number of splines on the outside of the freehub body has been reduced, and rather than having splines along the entire circumference of the freehub body there are only three splined sections for the cassette to slide onto. Constructing the freeehub out of steel also makes cassette removal easier, with there being a greatly reduced chance of the cassette digging in and mating with the freehub's splines.

Spank Spike Race28 Wheels
A three pawl steel freehub body spins on the 27 engagement points inside the hub shell. Axle removal is simple, and the wheels can quickly be converted to work with various axle spacing standards.

Performance
Our set of Race28 wheels have made the rounds over the last few months, seeing action on everything from hardtails to downhill bikes. They've withstood the rigors we put them through amazingly well – besides a couple minor adjustments on the truing stand, there's been no need for any other maintenance. The wider rim profile was a good match for 2.3" and 2.5" tires, giving them plenty of room to spread out and work to their full potential. No matter what bike it was on, the Race28 wheelset never called attention to itself, which isn't a bad thing - it simply means that the wheels did what they were supposed to without any strange performance quirks. We didn't notice any undue wheel flex, even during hard cornering and harsh g-outs, and the rims remained dent free despite months of sending them off jumps and bashing them through roots and rocks. Even after countless rides in wet, muddy conditions, the bearings are still spinning smoothly and have yet to develop any side to side play. There was no funny business from the freehub body either – even in colder temperatures, which is when pawls can sometimes get sticky and slip, there were no issues.


Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesDon't let the word 'Race' in the name of these wheels fool you into thinking this is a fragile, handle-with-care wheelset. The Race28 is a workhorse, a blue collar pair of wheels that can easily handle aggressive riding in the worst weather conditions. Plus, the use of standard J-bend spokes and a traditional three cross lacing pattern means that if you ever break a spoke it won't be too hard to find a replacement, which can come in handy should a roadtrip take you to a remote location with limited access to specialty parts. For the gram counters, the Race28 falls into sort of a middle ground depending on what they are used for - they weigh in on the lighter side of the scale for a DH wheelset, and on the stouter side of things for all-mountain wheels. However, we wouldn't say they're too heavy for all-mountain riding, especially for riders that tend to be tough on wheels - a few extra grams is worth the peace of mind that comes with not needing to worry about tacoing a wheel. We were impressed with the performance of these wheels, and the reasonable price makes them even more appealing. With bike parks beginning to open up and race season getting underway, this could be a solid choice for the rider looking to upgrade their stock wheelset without breaking the bank. - Mike Kazimer

www.spank-ind.com


96 Comments

  • + 105
 Finally, a wheelset review on a workhorse set of wheels that people can actually afford!
  • + 9
 Yeah, not some carbon 2000 dollar thing that I wouldn't buy just cause I think it would suck to get a flat spot on. I wonder what happens to a carbon wheel that would normally flat spot a medal rim. I'd like to know I'm thinking about getting these wheels to save just shy of 300 grams from my Azonic Outlaws. I'm kind of a freak about color coding my bike, which is stupid but necessary for some. I'm stoked there's a wheel out there now that is an upgrade and available in Ano red. Thank you spank! I love your products. Been rocking the 777 bars for about 2 seasons now and loving em.
  • + 12
 It is nice to see a "common man's" review component wise. I think this is a wheel set that a lot of DJ riders wouldn't mind tossing on their hard tail... at least, that's my plan (once I get a new DJ, since mine got stolen... bastards...)
  • + 4
 Just a bunch of random comments/notes, so don't get pissy if you can't read, just ignore:

Finally a real review on a real, no BS/marketing product. I've been saving up for some rims/28race wheelset..they definitely need WAY MORE attention for the durability, performance, and quality of their stuff. All I hear is great things. It's pretty hard to believe for the amount of gram's they're, how durable + solid they are. Can't forget, they look sexy as well with all their color combos/etc.

What I heard from one of their employees + to point things out:
2,000g's is decent but it's also super easy to use a lighter hub to get the weight significantly down. Spoon hubs are very solid but obviously weigh a bit more. Also, we all know Flow/Flow EX's are super light, but they're definitely not super durable rims. Versus Flow EX (or older Flow's), I heard these 28Races will outlast them many many times over but with only about a 10g increase in weight per rim, personally that's almost hard to believe with only 10g+. Also, from what I heard (one of the Spank guys doing internal testing) that the 28Race rim did surpass the ultimate yield strength of a FR600 rim (and many others) but -100g in weight which is once again crazy, hopefully it's true... Obviously no real test has come out, but then again, everyone i've met says they're super solid and durable over the many other popular rims.
  • + 3
 They use a metal called Dynamal which has the favorable properties of 6K alloy (ductility/not as brittle, good fatigue wear, ease of use, etc) but the strength/fatigue values are increased and resemble closely to the ultimate yield strengths of 7K Alloy. Also, they say they work-harden or some extra process is done afterwards to increase general durability/strength more.
Random note: Santa Cruz bikes uses 6069 alloy which resembles very closely to the values of Dynamal alloy..so it's very plausible and not full marketing BS like some other companies do so often...

If you can't afford the 28races or want a tad bit more width, Spank makes an AM line called "Subrosa 30" EVO (newer version), which is 520g's (20g's+ over 28race) per rim and tested/raced by some WC people before 28race fully came out and handles DH easily and holds up well. To read more on that, google it, you'll see a guy who rode Whistler (I believe) and tested out the Subrosa EVO's and abused them quite well, but they held up great. Price difference (depending), can be $20-$30 per rim. So not bad for only 20g's extra and 2mm of width.
  • + 2
 The weight is misleading. The hubs are quite heavy as already noted, which means the reciprocating weight is similar to an 1800g wheelset. I have used several sets of spank rims, and they are great- the most durable aluminum rims I have used.
  • + 1
 I have used this wheelset for a while now and they haven't required ANY maintenance. The spokes are still nice and tight and the rims are still true. These really are a do all wheelset.
  • + 6
 *Edit*, some individual rim weights w/ average prices, just in case if anyone was wondering. They didn't include weight of individual rims:

Spank 28Race Rim = 500g // $80.00~$92.00 (28Race Wheelsets go for ~$380.00 (Amazon) - $450.00 (PB Buy/Sell)
w/ Hope Pro II Evo Hubs F/R.150mm = 1870-1890g
Spank Subrosa EVO = 520g // $60.00-$75.00
Stan's Flow EX = 490g // $90.00
DT Swiss FR600 = 600g // ~$100.00
Supra D (Azonic Outlaw?) = 588g // ~$82.00
Supra BH (Azonic Outlaw?) = 612g // ~$50.00
Mavic 729 = 675g // ~$100.00
Enve DH Rim = 475g // ~$999.00

Of course the rims above have different widths, so each to their own..but it's just apparent by comparing price-to-weight ratio, durability, and practicality of 28Races, no other rim is really on Spank's level.
  • + 1
 Wtb frequency: 40$ on promotive, 80 regular, 475 grams a rim. I ride a lot of rocks with these bad boys and they've held up great
  • + 2
 got mine at sea otter and laced em myself the next day. threw em on my dirt jumper and they rock. strong light and super stiff
  • + 3
 I've had these wheels and no the rim isn't any stronger than the next companies, I'm not the hardest of riders in fact I'm pretty easy on wheels but after 3 runs down fort william using 30psi plus I managed to split the pinned joint(I thought we'd stopped using those in favour of welded joints for heavy duty applications) on the rear and put approximately 6-8 dents in the rims some of which were quite large. I then changed to my deemax ultimates (basically a lightweight ex823) rode the rest of the weekend and they're still as good as before with zero dents. Also the spank spikes don't have steel eyelets which will eventually lead to cracking around the spoke holes. Fort william is known for being hard on wheels but the damage that occurred was ridiculous compared to other stuff I've used many more times on the same track.

Also I'd like to say that they are a nice wheelset but not as durable as they could be, I could live with the dents it's just the pinned joint I can't get past.
  • + 1
 I had Spank 35 EVO rims and for the most part before, I ran Mavic 729.
The Mavics are a hard alloy and have double steel eyelets. They are durable but when they dent they crack and the eyelets don't stop the cracking either. All my 729s cracked at the dents and spoke holes eventually (1 year) but were still a great rim. Still ride them with cracks though.
The Spank 35 rims are softer alloy. They did dent but because of the OooBah profile they stay nice and round. They never cracked from the spoke holes either. Really liked the wide 35mm rim.
  • - 4
flag dirtman04 (Jun 5, 2013 at 17:44) (Below Threshold)
 ive thrown my bike up into the air about 15 ft and watched it come down on the wheel and there is zero evidence of any impact. i beat the crap out of wheels but i havent had to touch these. only ones id compare them to are the bombshell fatdaddys which weigh a ton. thats the only difference
  • + 12
 stop doing that to your bike.
  • + 1
 26" wheels Yeaaaaaa. ....... 3 pawl drive booooooooooo.
  • + 1
 haha dont worry man i dont do it anymore. but its is my bike.......
  • + 10
 Last point...really! On the topic of hubs, Novatech, Spank, and the rest of the industry...wow I'm amazed at how well educated the market is today. Spank is not (YET) a hub maker. We make rims, handlebars, stems, and other accessories well, but it takes years and years of research, development, and testing to launch a successful and innovative hub design the first time. We are deep in this process and soon will have something REALLY exciting to offer the world. For now though, in the first few years of our factory wheel program, we work with a couple of the industries top hub makers. The Spike Wheel is no secret, we work with Novatec on that hub. Its a modification of an existing platform, where we used some upgrades to internal axle shafts, bearings, and weight optimization machining, and tweeked spacing a bit...to make a special version for Spike (and Spoon) wheels. The beauty of it is we get a hub that was proven right up to the world cup for several years already, a partner that is willing to work with us to improve it, and a system that can be repaired with standard parts anywhere in the world. Where weight is concerned, no...they are not the lightest on the market...but that was never the intention here. Our goal from the beginning on this wheelset (and it was ambitious), was to offer everyone a World Cup level wheelset at a price they could really afford. We set a target of sub 2000g, and a price cap of 500$ retail...and after a lot of hard work, we hit it.
  • + 1
 if you work with novatec, make a race 28/oozy 30 with the new novatec factor hubs (or at least the rear one .... 6 pawls, bigger bearings)...
  • + 1
 Hi Spank, Your Wheelsets look and sound like a good deal from what I've read about them so far.. They seem ok in price compared to most mtb wheelsets... I know you make 24" rims aswell as 26"... So really what I wanted know was, do you or are you gona do as set of 24" mtb wheels?? Possibly =Front 15 or a 9-10mm axle hub, and with the back as a 135mm cassete hub but with 24" rims instead of the usual 26" rims?? Those Evo wheels with the strait pull spoke hubs would be even better but if not just other one's?????? Thankyou if you can help!! Sash
  • + 7
 Hey Guys! Mike from Spank Ind. here...we might be able to give a few replies to questions, and shed some light on a few issues. First regarding eyelets, it was a fundamental part of our design philosophy from the beginning that Spank rims would not use soft malleable eyelets on our rims. After all, if its possible to make something stronger with 2 parts instead of 34, well thats a no brainer, (if it works). We have all had terrible experiences with eyelets cracking, deforming, pulling out, or coming loose and rattling around, basically making a perfectly good rim a piece of junk. For sure, in the beginning (10 years back now) Spank had its troubles...but the opening of our exclusive in-house rim development and production facility, the employment of the relatively new Dynamal alloy and the evolution of our "360 Degree Orbital Nipple Seat" in the patented Oohbah profile, meant that for the past 5 years or so we have been able to exceed spoke pull through tests with eyelets, on the same rims without eyelets!

That brings me to point 2...Spank rims are designed, developed, and manufactured in house. In fact due to the success of the new EVO rim line, we have been approached by so many brands hoping to improve their wheel programs, and we actually now make many of the top brands in the world's top of the line alloy rims. So Wakaba...ironically very funny...but check your facts and you might be surprised!
  • + 1
 Great to see this wheel set getting the attention it deserves. I've had the same set on my DH bike for 8 months and I haven't had to touch them for any tuning. Besides a few scratches they have been holding up very well. I can't remember the last time I had a pinch flat and I'm consistently getting asked about the style and performance. I've been challenged to see if I can break these rims on purpose while riding. Might try it out to see if any flaws exist...haven't been able to find any yet. A few of my riding buddies have switched over in the past few months and everyone is stoked.
  • + 3
 Joints. Spank has spent the last decade testing joint technologies from past, present, and future. What we learned was there is no perfect joint for every application. So, now when we design a new rim, we choose between one of three joint technologies used in our rim facility and product line. If we are aiming for ultimate light weight (like our Vomax Rim) we use a flash weld. If we are aiming for ultimate strength to weight ratio, we turn to a pressure fit/bonded sleeve (like Spike, Subrosa, Oozy, Stiffy). And if we need something that is crazy strong but also economic and can accept a little added weight, we use a pinned joint (like Tweet and Spoon rims). Its a common misconception that welds mean strong joints. In fact on just about any multipart assembly using welding, the weld is the weakest link in the chain. Think about broken frames you've seen...almost always at the weld.
  • + 1
 Yo mike, put those blue race 28s I got from at Sea Otter on a yellow TR 450 and they are lookin pretty fly. Good to see you on here shedding light!
  • + 2
 gah, hate the random colored spokes in peoples wheels. wish that ugly fad would die off already. call me old fashioned, but there is nothing better for wheels than some black spokes with some black or ano'd nipples. looks superrr clean IMO
  • + 4
 I have these too.. amazed at how well mine held tension. My experience is that they are a "buy and forget" wheelset. Light and strong.
  • + 4
 Been running Subrosa rims on hope hubs for 5yrs and no issues, you can't beat spank
  • + 1
 What kind of riding do you do, honestly? I'm interested in getting Subrosa EVO's too and seen a few reviews where people DH them regularly without major issues except for small retensioning spokes after intial bed-in.
  • + 1
 Mainly anything heading down and a bit of street, not the most super smooth either. They have taken a beating for sure and apart from a few dings on the rim edge are still as strong as the day i got them, been tured twice in 5yrs thats it.
  • + 1
 I have subrosas EVOS's on my covert that were also used on my scratch and my brothers orange five before that so a good few years and and they have completed the mega avalanche 4 times the rear finally gave up in peru after a big case. I run them on hope hubs for all my riding and love them that's why I ordered a new for the rear as they were so much stronger and reliable than my stans flow.
  • + 1
 Anyone give any feedback on the cutaway freehub body please? I know its steel but instinct says that with less splines on the freehub being there to engage with the cassette, the cassette will want to bite into the steel pretty bad. Yes, I want to cycle up the hills/ mountains too... so this is important to me.

Fitting a cassette with an alloy spider will just chew the weaker spider/ last 3 or 4 small gears instead?

Anyway... anyone able to tell me if the above is actually a concern or not? Ah, also the pawls ahre a single spring and don't look quite as erm... "pedalling friendly" as more xc/ AM setups?

Really like the look of these wheels, just want to make sure they will be ok for more trail/ AM use. I can live with the weight, im not the lightest of riders, so strength is more important to me than weight.
  • + 1
 I've had these on my DH bike for about 5 months now and they're awesome, nay ad to be trued once dude a particularly harsh casing (my bad). The rim weight means they spin up nice and fast and they dont flex even under my heavy load Smile
  • + 5
 My first thought was...
what?? Another wheel size??WTF!
  • + 1
 Is what the future generations will be saying about 26" wheels.
  • + 1
 Fun fact: In Germany they call 29ers '28"'. I had a bit of a panic when my Conti tubes turned up with the wrong number on the box, until I noticed the ISO622 part...
  • + 1
 I've been running these wheels for almost a year now and have had 0 issues! Nice to see a good review of them on PB as there were no reviews at all when I first bought them. The price alone sold me on these wheels as I needed a replacement wheelset immediately and couldn't afford big buck wheels at the time. No regrets going with these wheels, they are still as solid today as they were when I first got them. I am a heavier rider at 220lbs geared up on an AM rig. These wheels have taken all the abuse I could possibly throw at them as well as some intentional rock hits just to see if I could get these wheels to cry, nothing!
  • + 1
 Been blasting on these, we're on my trek scratch and when I sailed off a drop and broke the frame the wheels were still fine. Did blast a rock at hyper speed at Downieville of all places on the current tr450,wich left a small dent. Still sweet wheels, the sparkles in the paint look tight in the sunlight but still not over flashy. Good wheels!
  • + 1
 I debated over these wheels and the Azonic Outlaws for a long time. I ended up with the Outlaws, but always wish I had gone with the Spank wheels. I still might buy a set for my every day riding and turn the Outlaws into my park and muddy condition wheels.
  • + 2
 The hubs on Outlaws are nearly identical to these anyway, the joys of Joytech! UK users, if you need spares Superstar Tech hub spares are compatible with Outlaws and these Spanks, I've fit Superstar parts to both.
  • + 0
 How come this review cannot be found on the PB home page? I came across it via a Japanese cycling blog. Any ideas Mike Kazimer?

Are those spoon hubs by Novatec?? It would be nice to know if Novatec adapters would fit them...
  • + 5
 A lot of times the reviewers (such as Levy or Kazimer) post their final drafts of their reviews on their personal blog but it's not posted on the homepage immediately.
  • + 2
 Thanks for the clarification! Does anyone know if they are Novatec generic hubs?
  • + 1
 Right... No, I can't be bothered.
  • + 2
 The hubs are their own. I don't know if they would be compatible with the Novatec bits and bobs, however the adaptors are fairly easy to get hold of, they will send them direct if you're struggling. I know the 135mm come with a QR and a 135mm x 12mm and the 150mm hubs are just the normal 150mm hub. The 142mm or 157mm standards would require an adaptor bought separately. I can vouch that after about 18months of abuse on my All Mountain bike (that I raced DH) they are still running totally issue free. Bought a DH rig 6/7months ago and bought a set for that as well, learning to whip with them (a lot of sideways landings) and they have still been fit and forget.
  • + 2
 Yes they are...after a fashion...

Joytech is the parent company.

Novatec is the offspring "higher end" division, they themselves have an even higher end lineup which was mentioned in the Novatec factory tour a few months ago.

Joytech/Novatec manufacturers hubs under various labels for other brands, of which Spank is one of them (Transition is another)..
  • + 1
 ^^^ This. Joyteck/Novatec make most of the hubs on the market nowadays. I have interchanged parts from NS, Octane One, Transition, Superstar Components, and Novatec. They are identical (if from the same line) other than the lazer etching.
  • + 1
 Spankflavored Novatec hubs. Rims most likely Novatec too, maybe Sun. Three pawl is lower middle product. Min Novatec branded are running strong for 4 years. My SunRingle branded Novatecs same. At the moment their engineering and manufacturing is almost faultless. Hubs are sealed well and last, spokes and nipples stay true, rims are strong.
  • + 1
 The rims are clearly Fratelli Industries.
  • + 1
 Cool, couldn`t place them anywhere, thanks.
  • + 2
 Beautiful wheels and surprisingly featherweight! They're stiff and light but I can't comment on the longevity as I've only had them a few weeks!
  • + 1
 Running the Race28 on my SC Butcher and I'm very pleased with the wheels. Also got the new hub adapter from spank to run XX1...Thanks Mike
  • + 2
 Sorry if this has been said, but why the heck didn't they test these tubeless??
  • + 1
 I run my race28's tubeless on none ust minions @25psi, no burps, not much stans. Feel great on the trail
  • + 1
 They have the same freehubs and axles as Loaded AMX and Rocky Mountain wheels... just an observation since I have both sets and have been able to switch out parts on them...
  • + 1
 I've used this set for 9 months or so, during that time I had to re-tighten the rear hub once, otherwise no problems at all.
  • + 1
 I am really considering these for full on DH, or should I go with the Spike 35 Evo????
  • + 1
 Does anyone know how the 27 engagement points are? It seems a little low, but I really don't know much about it.
  • + 2
 It's a little on the low side, basic Shimano hubs are below that but it isn't horrible.
  • + 1
 if you're not a high level racer, you most likely won't notice any difference between 27 engagements vs. something with 70+ engagements while riding other then sound, especially DH, AM and 4x might notice some delay, but, like said, hope, and most shimano hubs, both have 24POE, This Really solid set of wheels at an affordable price point. For the price it's hard to match weight to strength.
  • + 1
 You will notice the engagemets more with riding that requires a lot of sprinting, or has gated starts. Trail riding, I don't notice much, but BMX racing felt much better with 48 or more POE.
  • + 1
 they are good Subrosa 30 and Spike 28 I have them on installed on my Demo and Trek.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/14371046
  • + 1
 Anyone run a true DH tire tubeless on a Spank 33 or 28 rim?? How'd it work?
  • + 1
 Just laced set of red Spank Spike rims to some gold Chris King hubs... Can't wait to try them out"
  • + 1
 Best combo out. I miss my Spank/King combo. Frown
  • + 2
 Spanking sounds like fun Smile
  • + 2
 Strong,durable,affordable and 26" only!
  • - 4
flag joeofloath (Jun 5, 2013 at 16:04) (Below Threshold)
 What's wrong with other wheel sizes? Some of us can only ride 29" and would really appreciate some wheel manufacturers making decent, strong 29" rims.
  • + 0
 Spank are making more and more 650b and 29" stuff. It'll happen.
  • + 2
 How can you only ride 29's?
  • + 1
 Too tall for anything else, the short chainstays on 26 and 650b put me behind the back axle.
  • + 1
 Very interesting, I am running tweet 28 rims and I am still surprised how the are - still strong, stiff and fast rolling.
  • + 1
 Are these rims welded or pinned? because i didn't see them mention this anywhere unless i missed it.
  • + 1
 "rims are joined using a sleeve that is pressed in and then bonded with an epoxy for added assurance against separation" different!
  • + 2
 I think this is code for pinned.
  • + 2
 sleeved and pinned.... same as many other rims such as easily half the Sun-Ringle lineup, as well as Transition's revolution rims.
  • + 1
 and for the record: built up my first spank rim a while ago, one of the 40mm wide monsters... and I couldn't get it perfectly true at the join. not bad, but there's still a visible hop.

probably a far stiffer rim though.
  • + 1
 Revolutions are Novatec. Sleeved, pinned, glued: Not so pretty but in my eyes the proper way to join a rim in this weight and materialclass.
  • + 1
 I've heard some minor separation issues from only a very few ppl. Rim was still functional and fine, just had that micro-hop to it. I personally thought they would weld, but then again, pinned/sleeved doesn't mean a bad rim, they can easily hold up to abuse if designed correctly and within tight tolerances.
  • + 1
 The pin is a dissimilar material, steelwire and very strong. Not pretty but ok
  • + 1
 Sleeved rims are stronger than people give credit for. I had to fit a tacoed rim in my bin, so took it out into the garden and jumped up and down on it. The damn thing didn't break until I stress fractured the area around the pin and the aluminium shattered, leaving the pin still inside the shattered piece.
  • + 1
 If you have a fireplace or live someplace you can do outdoor fires, a paper/wood fire burns hot enough to melt aluminium.
  • + 1
 Anyone know if the Minion DHF 2.7 will fit on the 28mm width successfully?
  • + 1
 Does that center arch make mounting tires any more difficult?
  • + 2
 Quite easy to mount tires in my opinion. Have tried some schwalbe, onza, wtb but not a wire cased tyre yet. I'm pretty sure they mount just fine.
  • + 2
 I have a pair of Spank Subrosa rims that are very difficult to mount due to the Oobhah technology (raised center). The tire has little room to fall into the groove leaving little slack to push the other side on/off the rim.

I've had these Subrosa rims laced to Pro 2 hubs for almost 5 years without an issue.
  • + 1
 Can't wait to try a 28er!
  • + 1
 Always wondered, why Spank doesn't make eyelets for their rims?
  • + 2
 This question gets asked a lot. They don't need them and they are lighter without them. The material is very resistant to a spoke being torn out and cracking around the spokes. I was apprehensive about buying a wheel set like this without eyelets but I read a lot about them before buying. I think in wheels made of materials that are more prone to these issues it's possibly cheaper to add in eyelets than make the wheel out of better grade material.
  • + 3
 Because eyelets are like cartridge bearings... they're a cheap crutch for many rim makers that try and sell them as being needed for a strong wheel, but they're taking the cheapest route possible with single eyelets. The only eyelets that actually make the rim stronger are FULL eyelets that reinforce the inner and outer walls of the rim. Single eyelets are only in one wall of the extrusion and actually lead to weakening the rim because you need to drill a larger hole to install them, and this often leads to cracking around the eyelet holes.
  • + 3
 customers still have old school expectations, too: back in the day, if it wasn't eyelet-ed, it was crap. due to modern production techniques, the opposite is true, but good luck telling 90% of the bike riding public that.
  • + 1
 Eyelets are a bandaid to compensate for using materials that don't have the needed strength to hold up without them. Unfortunately, entry level rims with poor materials don't use the eyelets either, to save cost, causing the confusion.
  • + 1
 In my experience, which admittedly is severely limited to Notubes rims, I have found that there has never been an issue with any non-eyeletted rim I have laced up. Yes, Stans don't half recommend some low spoke tensions however any rim without eyelets will have been designed as a whole system to reflect that. If Spank don't put in eyelets, it's because they believe they are not required. As Mike from Spank has pointed out above, they can generate stronger interfaces between the rim and spoke nipple without eyelets... so why not! I am all for non-eyeletted rims myself. Just oil 'em up before you lace 'em up people.
  • + 0
 Literally just bought a wheelset, i was only unsure due to the 'race' name Frown was going to get these !!! Gutted
  • - 2
 Dartmoor raiders on Hope pro 2 evo, handbuilt for me, lighter than most and not far off Enve wheel weights..
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