Specialized Enduro Expert EVO Review

May 20, 2013
by Mike Kazimer  
TESTED
Specialized Enduro Expert EVO




BY: Mike Kazimer


When Specialized announced they would no longer be producing the venerable SX Trail, it seemed like another nail in the freeride coffin. But then the Enduro EVO was announced, a bike that picks up where the SX Trail left off and goes a step further, with modern amenities like a dropper post and a press-fit bottom bracket, as well as a revised suspension layout. With 180mm of coil-sprung travel front and rear and plenty of standover clearance from the manipulated downtube, the Enduro EVO is designed to conquer the burliest trails imaginable. As tested, our size large bike weighed in at 35 pounds without pedals. Available in S, M, and L sizes, the Enduro Expert EVO retails for $5600 USD. Specialized also offers a base model version that shares the same frame but has a different component group, and retails for $3200.

Specialized Enduro Expert Evo Details

• Purpose: Freeride
• Frame material: M5 aluminum
• ISCG 05 mounts
• Rear-wheel travel: 180mm
• FSR suspension
• Weight:35lbs (without pedals)
• Sizes: S, M, L (tested)
• MSRP: $5499 USD


Frame Design

The Enduro EVO frame is constructed from Specialized's proprietary M5 aluminum alloy, and features a tapered headtube, press-fit bottom bracket, ISCG 05 tabs and a 142x12 rear thru axle. For 2013, the frame sees a number of tweaks to the
X-Wing design introduced in 2010. The overall shape remains the same, but material has been removed from the front shock mount location to shave some weight, and the angle the of the small rocker link at the back of the shock has been altered, a change intended to improve the bike's pedaling performance. The specially designed shock mount allows the shock to rotate on cartridge bearings instead of the more common DU bushings, which have a tendency to wear out and develop play much faster than cartridge bearings do.

The frame has internal routing for the dropper post cable, and the rest of the cables run along the underside of the frame, with the rear derailleur cable going through a specially designed chainstay protector. Running cables underneath a frame often draws consternation from riders who claim that their brake and derailleur cables will get smashed against rocks, but in reality, it's relatively uncommon to take an impact of that magnitude squarely on the bottom bracket. If you're regularly bottom bracket casing on rocks or logs (not a recommended riding technique), other components (chainrings, crankarms) tend to take the brunt of the impact first. The Enduro EVO frame even has a spot to mount a water bottle cage, an increasingly rare amenity, particularly on a bike with 180mm of travel.

Specialized Enduro rear triangle
  Specialized's FSR suspension is designed to remain active even under heavy braking. Note the custom yoke at the rear of the shock, a feature that allows cartridge bearings to be used instead of bushings, although it does limit the number of rear shock options.

Suspension Layout



Not surprisingly, the Enduro EVO uses Specialized's FSR suspension design. This Horst link design places the rear pivot in front of and below the rear axle, making for an active suspension design that is relatively unaffected by braking forces. Previous iterations of the Enduro had a tendency to remain in the middle of the rear shock's stroke when climbing, which made for a less responsive ride feel. The changes to the suspension kinematics for 2013 were specifically made to address this, intended to make the bike both an efficient climber and an efficient descender. The Enduro EVO uses a coil sprung rear shock as opposed to the air shock found on the non-EVO Enduros, a specification choice that corresponds with the bike's intended usage.

Regarding the suspension, there's no quick way to adjust the compression settings on the rear suspension. It's more of a 'set and forget' affair with this bike – once you get the settings dialed in you probably won't be tweaking them very often during a ride unless you like stopping and playing with Cane Creek's special adjustment tool. We set up the Double Barrel rear shock using the base settings recommended by Cane Creek to start. We decreased the high speed rebound damping slightly to give the bike a little more pop, but stuck with the rest of the settings, finding them to have a good balance of pedaling performance and big hit suppleness.

Key Components

To ensure it can handle whatever terrain it is subjected to, the Enduro Expert EVO gets a Kashima-coated FOX 36 Van RC2 up front with 180mm of travel, and the ultra-adjustable Cane Creek Double Barrel coil shock in the rear. A ten speed SRAM XO Type 2 derailleur handles rear shifting duties for the 2x10 drivetrain, while Avid's XO Trail brakes are mated to custom XO levers. Specialized's Butcher SX tires in a 2.3” width keep the bike rolling in the right direction, and an appropriately short 40mm stem hold Specialized's 750mm Demo low rise bar. A three position Command Post with 125mm of travel takes advantage of the internal routing with a remote lever integrated with the lock-on grip on the left side of the bike.

Specialized Enduro EVO
  The Enduro Expert EVO comes equipped with a dropper post, meaty Specialized Butcher tires, and a 2x10 setup with bashguard and chainguide.


Specifications
Release Date 2013
Price $5600
Travel 180mm
Rear Shock Cane Creek Double Barrel Coil, 8.75x2.5"
Fork FOX 36 VAN RC2 Kashima coating, 20mm thru-axle
Cassette SRAM PG 1050 11-36 10spd
Crankarms SRAM Carbon S2200
Chainguide Gamut Dual Ring
Bottom Bracket SRAM PF30
Chain KMX X10
Rear Derailleur SRAM XO Type 2
Front Derailleur SRAM X7 direct mount
Shifter Pods SRAM X9 10spd
Handlebar Specialized Demo Low Rise, 750mm
Stem Specialized P.Series forged alloy, 40mm
Grips Specialized Sip Grip
Brakes Custom Avid XO Trail, 200mm F. rotor, 180mm rear
Hubs Specialized Hi Lo Disc
Spokes DT Swiss
Rim Roval DH 32 hole
Tires Specialized Butcher SX 2.3"
Seat Specialized Henge Comp
Seatpost Specialized Command Post Blacklite
Specialized Enduro EVO



Riding the
Enduro Expert EVO

bigquotesRock drops, road gaps, step ups, step downs, and steep boulder strewn sections of trail didn't pose any problems, and it never felt like we reached the limits of the bike's capabilities, even on trails normally ridden aboard full-on downhill bikes.

Climbing
Let's get one thing out of the way – the Enduro EVO is no light weight. With a fighting weight of 36 pounds with pedals, it requires some extra leg strength and stamina to get this bike to the top of the mountain. That being said, for a bike with 180mm of travel, the Enduro EVO climbed remarkably well. Most of our rides started with extended sections of logging road climbing, and we found that with the rear shock set to Cane Creek's recommended 19mm of sag, the bike climbed with much less bobbing than expected, even when standing up out of the saddle. With the dropper post fully extended, the 75 degree effective seat tube angle allowed for a comfortable climbing position, one with enough room to make long climbs as tolerable as possible. We appreciated the 2x10 drivetrain – we didn't feel any shame using the 24x36 granny gear if it allowed us to get to the top without pushing. That's really the key point regarding the climbing abilities of this bike – it allows riders to access trails by pedaling, not pushing their way to the top. You probably won't break any speed records on the uphill, but it's much less of a chore getting this bike to the top than it would be aboard a downhill bike.

Photo credit Chris Kazimer
  Confident in the air, the Enduro handled drops of all sizes without complaint.

Descending
Once the trail angle went from positive to negative, the Enduro EVO shook off its mellow-mannered climbing demeanor and got ready to rumble. Rock drops, road gaps, step ups, step downs, and steep boulder strewn sections of trail didn't pose any problems, and it never felt like we reached the limits of the bike's capabilities, even on trails normally ridden aboard full-on downhill bikes. The 65 degree head angle puts the Enduro EVO's geometry right in between that of a modern downhill bike and an all-mountain bike, although it's worth noting that a few years ago this would have been considered a slack enough angle for a World Cup DH race bike.

The Enduro EVO easily handled trails usually ridden on downhill bikes, but it did so with a different style. Rather than feeling like it had gobs of travel that could be plowed through anything, the bike felt like an overgrown all-mountain bike, until that extra bit of suspension was needed. At slower speeds it was still easy to pick our way through technical rock sections without feeling bogged down by the suspension. There was a nimble, sporty feel to the way the Enduro EVO devoured the terrain – more like a rally car and less like a trophy truck. And by nimble we don't mean twitchy – far from it. Especially at higher speeds, the bike held its line, tracking straight and true no matter what kind of chunder was in its path. On steep and twisty dirt chutes, the kind where the brakes are on the entire time, the bike carved its way down without any brake jack or odd handling traits. With a low bottom bracket height and chainstays measuring in at a relatively short 420mm, cornering and direction changes were easy, even when balancing on that fine line between keeping the rear wheel rolling and locking it up on steep slopes.

Photo credit Chris Kazimer
  With 180mm of coil sprung travel, as long as the rubber side stays down, smooth landings shouldn't be a problem.

Air Time
The same geometry that makes the Enduro EVO easy to maneuver on the ground translates well to the air. Takeoffs felt natural and controlled, and once aloft it was easy to get the bike lined up in the right place for landing, with the sloping toptube leaving plenty of room to get the bike sideways. Taking full advantage of the Double Barrel's high level of adjustability, we were able to set the shock up so it would smoothly absorb a landing, and then have plenty of pop to boost off the next lip, the type of scenario you would run into if there was a step down or drop followed soon after by a step up. It was this 'pop' that was most impressive, making it easy to reach the transition on jumps that normally were a bit of a stretch to clear on downhill bikes. The Enduro EVO could certainly be used for bike park riding - there's no doubt it can handle jump lines like Whistler's A-Line or Dirt Merchant with ease, while still being capable enough to tackle the rougher, less manicured trails.

Component Report

• Avid's XO Trail brakes were solid performers, remaining fade free even on sustained steep sections of trail where we had the brakes on for extended periods of time. However, we would have liked to have had a contact point adjustment on the XO brake levers. With only a reach adjust, it wasn't possible to get the brakes to our preferred close to the bar, quick engagement position.

• We've praised Specialized's Butcher tires before, and the accolades still hold true. They're predictable even in the wet, with excellent cornering performance and traction.

• Speccing carbon cranks was no doubt a weight saving move, but we would have liked to see protective rubber end caps included. Combining a 175mm crank length and a low bottom bracket height is a recipe for scratched cranks, and carbon definitely doesn't like to be scratched.

• We didn't have any performance issues with the Command Post Blacklight, but lately we've been spoiled by other dropper posts that don't have pre-set positions. It would be nice to see a version of this post with the ability to stop it anywhere in its travel.

Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesIf you're a gram counter seeking a light all-mountain rig from Specialized, the standard Enduro lineup is the place to look. There you'll find any number of sub-30 pound carbon fiber steeds with 165mm of travel. But, if you want a long travel bike for search-and-destroy freeride missions along with laps in the bike park, the EVO may be just the ticket. Granted, the Enduro EVO isn't for everyone. Similar to how a lifted 4x4 truck isn't ideally suited for city driving, this bike is overkill for most trails, with more suspension and slacker angles than what is necessary for many riding areas. It's a bike specially designed for a certain niche of riders, those who don't believe the proclamations that 'freeride is dead'. For those riders, the ones who continue to seek out the most technical terrain they can find, terrain that often doesn't have a road leading to it, there are few bikes on the market as capable as Specialized's Enduro EVO. - Mike Kazimer

www.specialized.com

Must Read This Week

222 Comments

  • 89 12
 Horrible cable management under that BB
  • 8 5
 i agree the cable routing is a mess
  • 7 2
 I never get why specialized does that... Giant does that on some too... makes no sense... the couple buddies I have with specialized have them zip tied to the top of the down tube because they break them all the time....
  • 20 1
 I have Specialized enduro for the pass 6 years (3 different models) and I never had any issues with the cables routing - and believe me I manage to destroy other parts on the bike, so I would not worry about it if I were you. BTW this is really a dream bike for me, but the fact the the shock is a proprietary shock (the link make it attached in such a way that you cannot replace it) is the biggest issue with this, otherwise amazing bike - and thanks pinkbike for at last testing this kind of bike and not another middle of the road trail bike - please test more bikes like this one.
  • 3 1
 and ugly dropper post cable placing.
  • 3 0
 Salsa does it also. Its fine to route derailleur cables which you can fit tight, and if they rip out all you end up with is a single speed, but when you rip out the rear brake hose... not so fun.
  • 24 5
 The story of how the Enduro Expert Evo was developed:

Employee 1 - Hey dude! It's F*cked Up Friday again! Wanna sneak off early and get hammered??
Employee 2 - Well, I have to do the cable routing on the Enduro Exper... F*CK IT, LET'S GET F*CKED UP BRO!! YEAH!!
  • 2 0
 the cables hahah...function over form, sure. having both is just good design. so maybe next time...
  • 7 7
 yeah i can already think of about ten things those damn cables will rub against or get in the way of. the whole bike is a bit of a mess, i see that some people may want a bike they can shred DH with but also can ride uphill a bit, but I don't think it works. I love Speesh and a ton of their stuff is awesome, and while I haven't ridden this Enduro, I wouldn't want it. Ditch the dropper and the front shifting I'll take it. If you're gonna have an enduro bike, it should not be 36 pounds. If you're gonna have a freeride bike, it should be slack and simple. This is a fucking mess.
  • 1 0
 @cglasford, giant moved the cable routing on the reign 2013 to the top of the down tube. My reign 1 has two chunks in the frame from rock strikes under the down tube and one probably would've damaged the rear brake cable if it was still routed under. The wide hydro-formed down tube probably doesn't help matters.

@cgzasv, the proprietary shock was one reason I choose the reign over an enduro or stumpy. OD2 was a negative for the reign, but at least you can get different head sets for 1.125 taper or straight steerer, not so with the shock.
  • 3 0
 I have an SX trail and a Stumpy with that cable routing and the SX trail has trashed the cables from the bike park and shuttling and the Stumpy has got rocks thrown up and trashed the shift cable. There could be a plastic sleeve for protection is Specialized insists on running the cables there or just reroute them on the top side of the downtube.
  • 7 0
 Specialized needs internal routing... NOW
  • 4 4
 lots pf bikes have under BB cable routing. Its never been an issue. As Mike said, if you're hitting the cables under the BB you're doing something wrong.
  • 3 1
 If you hit the bash ring on the crankset EVER, you're hitting the cable housing on these bikes also. Smacking a rock ledge will just push the housing upwards which is fine, its the log/tree crossings you run into problems, where a short branch stump sticking out hooks the housing and yanks it out that you have an issue.
  • 2 0
 it would be really nice if they had a video of the person testing the bike.
  • 4 1
 Quitya bitching, grab some zip-ties and redo the routing yourself if it's that big of an issue...
  • 12 2
 Cable management is always a challenge, and there is no perfect solution. We find that under the BB is the least of all the evils. It has less movement than TT/link routed cables which means less ghost shifting. There are tens of thousand of Specialized bikes in the field with BB cable routing, and while you might think the cables are susceptible to damage, it's actually pretty uncommon.
  • 1 0
 I love cables under the BB. Works fine. Use good housing.
  • 7 1
 To those who don't like the cable routing, fine. To each, their own. But it's just not true that you hit the cable housings any time you hit the bash on these bikes. I've ridden Enduros and SXs for several seasons in the PNW and Whistler, and I've never had a problem with the cable routing. If you our your buddies like grinding trees or rocks like rails in a skate park, I can see you'd have a problem. Could cables get hooked or hit? I'm sure it's possible, but is it a problem? No more so than having a rear derailleur.
  • 2 0
 I would rather hit cables than BB. Cheaper to replace. Never was a problem though. Bashguard ftw.
  • 1 0
 Specialized has always had crappy canle runs, my SX and stumpy are the same but they're a helluva bike
  • 6 0
 @jason-at-specialized

would love to see you guys do one of your cool custom plastic pieces for downtube / cable protection on your bikes using downtube mounted cabling.

similar to what you have done with your swing arm / chainstay protectors (I have one on my Stumpjumper Expert Carbon 29'er, a really neat injection moulded plastic wrap around item)

in the UK? We typically cut up a Mr. Crud 'Crudcatcher' rear mudguard with snips, to create a long, slim piece that will cover the downtube from the 2nd (mid DT) to 3rd (lower DT, next to BB) cable guide mounting holes.

We then drill 2 holes in the crudcatcher to match the pattern of the threaded inserts on the DT, run longer bolts so we have the crudcatcher sitting against the plastic cable guides

This protects both the DT and cable/hose from horrible rock strikes and strange impacts - the type that are not common, but can ruin a day's riding on aggressive terrain, and potentially cause damage to nice carbon fibre downtubes.

cheers!
Rob C, workshop manager, Specialized Concept Store Covent Garden, London
  • 2 0
 Noted. Thanks!
  • 1 1
 A plastic downtube guard is just another place for mud to get into. The routing is fine, and you can put a zip tie around your downtube and around the cables, next to the bb, to keep them closer.
  • 1 0
 @protour

that's a fair comment; but since the guard will sit a good 1" off the downtube (due to the cable guides underneath) its super easy to keep it clean by flushing this area whilst cleaning, as its open at the bottom any mud or debris will flush free

unfortunately we have too much experience of mud here in the UK Wink
  • 73 5
 My 2011 Big Hit with 2013 Totems and work components headset is my SX Trail replacement. Will be for some time. On a side note, RIP specialized Big Hit.
  • 16 5
 Is it not kind of on the heavy side???
  • 11 1
 YES!!! I had a big hit and it was such a fun bike!!!!
  • 4 1
 Oh, it's not 35 pounds, but with the build I've got, she's lighter than a Status...
  • 5 12
flag fracasnoxteam (May 20, 2013 at 14:11) (Below Threshold)
 Give me back my 2001 BigHit and I'll show you how it "pop" like a 5499$ 2013 brand new bike...
  • 14 5
 how is it a person can spend almost 6K on a bike made of aluminum....that's over 35 pounds? booooooo hisssssss
  • 5 9
flag t-turi-mullett (May 20, 2013 at 20:31) (Below Threshold)
 I have last years enduro evo it has a steeper head tube 160 mm of travel and is perfect. it cost me 3200 bucks and is probably just as good as the 2013 expert evo wich costs 6 grand.
  • 8 0
 Nearly $6k for a bike with X7 and X9 derailleurs and shifters (yes I know, XO rear mech)? A Fox Van fork? Not to mention most of the parts are specialized components, which I don't have the biggest complaint about. They last for sure, but it's not like having a pair of Chromag bars, with custom hoops laced to a pair of I9's. I mean it's an awesome bike for sure, but ~$6k for not even the markets best components anymore? And not carbon..i'm scared yet excited for the future.
  • 1 0
 or you could get this years enduro evo for the same price ^
  • 10 0
 I still love my 08 SX trail. Plus I think its better looking (keeps my wallet better looking at least).
  • 1 0
 I love my 2010 big hit! its a medium so its abit small for me, but soo fun! gos up the big hills and flys down again! like rideing a big bouncy bmx because you can just throw it around! I have had afue little problems with some of the components on it but its still a great bike! until I can find a 2011 endure cheap enough it will continue to be my every day rider!
  • 40 4
 In my area, lifted 4x4 trucks probably out number cars for daily drivers. Everyone come to red deer alberta and see doucheness to the max hahahaha
  • 5 0
 Yup, I live in Red Deer and can confirm the above statement. Much doucheness!
  • 34 0
 I live on planet earth and can confirm ........ Much Doucheness!
  • 2 0
 Very true! The cops in Lacombe lost the crown vics and got a grey F-150 as their ghost car, that's how many trucks there are in central Alberta.
  • 5 0
 visit southern california....the place where the name brodozer originated.
  • 4 0
 Honestly, come to central alberta where the term "crackhead steroid meathead goon metalmulisha sikspak monster knuckletat roughneck rigger douchebag" originated. No offense to anyone who is cool who drives a lifted truck or works on the rigs for a living, thats just the stigma that follows a small portion of those who do.
  • 1 0
 Yeah the inland empire (southern calif) pioneered lifted truck culture. Metal mulisha etc. it's lifted truck douche central down here.
  • 1 0
 We called it the SPE package (small pecker express). Lifted diesel trucks with stacks in the bed that never towed a day in their life
  • 2 0
 Freeway 4x4!!
  • 26 1
 I have just got myself a 180mm bike to replace a 160mm all mountain and a 200mm dh, love it. Being able to use it as an actual bike instead of an uncompromising beast that restricts me to shuttles or pushing up is well worth the slight loss of stability a dual crown fork brings, I can now ride areas of outstanding big/technical trails that are inaccessible to DH only rigs.

Freeride is far from dead, yes going downhill is great and the whole reason we participate in our sport but to go down you have to get up there first.
  • 3 1
 Same with my Uzzi. I'm happy because my Uzzi only weighs 1.7lbs more than this Enduro. However, I think this might be my next frame when the Uzzi dies.
  • 1 0
 What bikes did u trade in and what did you buy?

I have a Carbon V10 and RM Switch and am thinking of doing the same....
  • 1 0
 Had a 2011 Orange Alpine 160 and a 2010 Norco Atomik, now have a 2012 Orange Patriot, rides similar to the Alpine but obv a little burlier, definitely the best of both. Thrashed it at UK bikepark on Sunday after casually exploring Bath trails on Sat. Single chainring can be a bit harsh for climbing but you don't get fit by taking easy options!
  • 14 2
 I have a 2012 enduro expert evo and its perfect for New Zealand I can ride it in pretty much all locations. If there is no shuttle I can ride up and its quite at home in Queenstown on the gondies or in Rotorua on the shuttle. Its super stable and just gets better the faster you go. I love it.
  • 2 0
 Got the same bike, but in Switzerland. Handles everything great!
  • 15 2
 I'm sure if you can spend 5600, you sure as hell can afford a pair of RF crank boots off Amazon for 10 bucks.....I actually think you get quite a bit of bike for the money.
  • 9 0
 I have to give props to Specialized on this bike.
1. They gave Pink Bike a realistic build package on this bike.
2. They designed a bike that is really in a class by itself. This is definitely not a "me too" bike.
3. The weight issue is not really an issue.
Yes ,it's heavier than most other Enduro Bikes. Yes, it's on par with some DH bikes. But here is the difference, it's DH bike that you can ride on trails AND on downhills. That's really hard to combine.
  • 1 1
 except the pivot firebird, with 170mm of rear travel and 160-200mm forks, and comes in at around 31lb, with some examples as low as 27lb
  • 2 0
 I'd be interested to see the parts spec (and price) needed to get a size large Firebird down to 27Lbs.
  • 1 1
 Details are on videos on YouTube and I bet It came in under five and a half grand haha even with carbon wheels
  • 3 0
 I checked that out - nice to see a vid from a Seattle bike shop. I'm actually more impressed with the Enduro Evo after seeing what the Firebird weighed pre-modification and what it took to get the weight down. The Firebird started at 34lbs with no dropper post, a coil fork, an air shock, and a carbon bar. Put full-coil suspension on the bike, a dropper post, and an alloy bar, and a comparable Firebird would likely be heavier than this Enduro Evo.

The guy easily put $3k into the bike to get it to 28-27lbs (still no dropper post), and the end product was not a bike suitable for freeride, park riding, or even aggressive all-mountain. Even the shop dude that built the bike kept referring to it as a "long-travel trail bike" and highlighted that the tires were "alright" for trail riding, but not for Whistler. The wheels, tires, and suspension on that build were all matched for the intended purpose - trail riding.

If you want a sub-30lb, more pedal friendly, enduro/all-mountain bike for a lot less money than this guy spent, buy a carbon Enduro (or a carbon Nomad). You'll even get a dropper post. If you want an even lighter, more pedal friendly, aggressive trail bike, buy a carbon Stumpjumper Evo.
  • 2 0
 If you are looking for an all-mountain bike and weight is your priority, then you should look at the 165 travel S-Works Enduro (26in for apples to apples). It is 25.94 lbs out of the box with Command Post, without pedals.
  • 12 2
 Great bike! and 26" ...perfect!
  • 11 1
 haven't seen a 26" test here, for ages!
Nice to see one at last Wink
  • 12 8
 I own the Specialized Enduro comp, I love it and havnt had any problems. This bike I feel is for as said, a niche of riders, personally i feel its a waste of money. Ridden one and no where near as stable as a DH bike, and climbs like a bitch. Get a Demo for downhill, a Status for Freeride or a standard Enduro or Stumpy Evo for everything.
  • 2 2
 Like you and the article both said, it fills that niche. I do agree with you, but it's for the rider who is inevitably going to have to pedal themselves more than others. That small gap between the Enduro and Status. If I had no other choice, I'm sure I'd rather scoot along on this than the Status. I've never ridden either of them so obviously my opinion is only so valid, but I see the point.
  • 3 3
 It's a great bike for someone who lives in big mountains with rough terrain and focuses on downhills, maybe wants something really robust to take beating over a longer period of time. Then such target user might like to ride in bikeparks often and wants something bit more agile than a DH bike, but still able to cope with absolutely anything in a confidence inspiring way. A niche indeed, but there are many bikes of that kind so there is a demand for them. For instance Cannodale Claymore or TR250.
  • 1 0
 Fair point, but its a lot of money compared to a Status
  • 3 0
 I got my '10 SX Trail for a great price, but even new I think it's a good value. The 'niche' it fills is pretty much anyone who isn't racing, likes to hit up everything from all day epics to Whistler, and doesn't have $15-20K to spend on a fleet of single-purpose bicycles. It keeps me fit on the uphills and is way faster and more fun on the downhills than a slightly lighter "AM" style bike.
  • 7 3
 Really nice bike and really riding inspiring.
I don't understand the dropped post, I think it's unnecessary on this kind of bike (it lays more towards the downhill than the climbing).
What I don't like is the cable routing down the bottom bracket, a very critical area where cables can be pinched by rocks too easly.
  • 1 1
 Well but it's always better to have dropped post on a bike than don't have one, right ? Wink
  • 1 0
 i thought droppers were lame until i got one of these bikes. they are very legit, and help a lot on trails where any amount of pedaling is involved, even to cross flat sections of DH trail. droppers are very worthy on this bike and the style of riding its designed for. i use my dropper constantly. Spesh cable routing is lame, i put all my cables on the top of the down tube and over the bottom bracket where god intended them to be. few extra zip ties but no crushed lines from rocks or shuttling, which is the real cable killer
  • 4 0
 I rode the 2013 Spesh Enduro Comp yestreday on the Specialized Test Day and it punched far above it's asking price.
The geometry is super. Climbing position was great with 160 mm fork and no wheelies on the steepest uphill sections. And then the downhill. whoaa I felt I was sitting on a full-on DH sled ( It hasn't got a dropper post so I left the seat in the high position on the DH ) and It felt amazing too. Soaking up hits in the butter smooth way on the back but the fork was a nightmare.
I can only use 110-120 mm travel from the 160mm because it wasn't set properly or I don't know. Brakes are bad too. They felt like an on-off switch and the reach adjuster is in the worst place so you can't even use it. Tires sucks too. They didn't have any grip on the rear but maybe that was only because of the brakes. Front was okay.
Rear shifter is as quiet as hell. No chain slap on anything.
Bar is way to narrow but the stem is a good choice.
Wheels are perfect, they are as strong and stiff as DH wheels but in a reasonable weight.

If I had the money for an Enduro rig, definitely I'd buy an Enduro but only the frame as the components are bad.
Buy the carbon one, that is way more stiff than the alloy one, but the alloy frame is very stiff too.
  • 9 2
 tested my favorite bike! thnx pb
  • 9 13
flag zenis (May 20, 2013 at 2:05) (Below Threshold)
 OK, I admit, I think I've done a mistake building my Banshee Rune V2 Lrg 2013, The Specialized was always on my blood and in my opinion the Stumpjumper and Enduro are the best bikes of Specialized, of course after The DEMO 8 S-WORKS 2013 Smile
  • 21 1
 You regret building a Rune??? Wash your mouth out dude!!! Ha ha
  • 9 7
 The rune is a far nicer bike than the enduro. I see an enduro in every corner of the mountain. i find that lame... its nice to have a bike that is rare...
  • 3 2
 Yeah guys, its so good to have rare bike and I love the way I have build my RUNE and it rides perfectly, I just grown up with Specialized and I wish I had one, but can't afford two expensive bikes in my house. The BANSHEE RUNE V2 was my dream bike and I will never sell it, even if I brake all of my bones and not being able to ride it anymore. I Adore it, love it, proud of it.
  • 3 1
 @zenis

you cannot go wrong with either Banshee or Specialized. Have owned too many bike models of both these brands, and never disappointed with any of them

happy trails!
  • 1 0
 Hahaha, exactly, i feel the same way about my Knolly Podium. Never seen another one, people in the moutain where i ride evan asked, "Knolly, whats that?!"
Its my dream DH bike! If i sell it, its to buy another one.
I cracked my stumpy and there are too many Demos in my mountain so i didnt really want another splesh.
  • 2 0
 come on man, it's like seeing to much ferrari! you never get enough with em' :-))
  • 2 0
 Nahh, its like seeing a mercedes, then a banshee is like seeing a maybach...
  • 2 0
 @freedy-b yea I agree with what you said about it being nice to have a bike that is rare, but im sure a lot of people would take priority on how the bike rides over how rare it is, customising a bike like an enduro works a treat
  • 6 0
 Beautiful bike, but not nearly enough to make me want to replace my SX Trail.
  • 4 1
 Umm so its a freeride bike? wtf??? first they try and kill freeride then they make "enduro" bike which has the same amount of travel and similar geometry... haha add a few extra parts and ladies and gentleman its a totally new category! what a bunch of bs its basically a freeride bike with extra sh*t on it
  • 1 0
 it still looks dope though lol
  • 1 0
 The frame design is completely different from the SX, so it makes sense to call it an Enduro since it resembles their other Enduro models more. This is the bike I want more than any other, especially if they improved the climbing performance.
  • 5 1
 This bike has absolutly moved up my list to possible next bike. I have a 2008 SX trail and this looks like a new upgraded version of the same bike.
  • 2 0
 The 08 SX is still a very capable machine.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, I upgraded my '06 SX to a '10 SX... they are all excellent bikes. This new version looks nice, but it honestly doesn't seem that much different.
  • 4 0
 The latest Enduro EVO is a lighter, more plush version of the SX Trail. Same park bike strength and performance but climbs better if you need it to.
  • 1 0
 Yes, the Enduro EVO looks like a wicked cool bike. Personally I would look more into the Stumpy EVO to complement my SX Trail and get a more trail-specific bike.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for chiming in Jason... it definitely looks lighter but I'm surprised to hear you say it's the same strength/stiffness? I was switching back and forth between a Status and my SX at Whistler last weekend and the rear end on the SX is almost identical to the Status. At least in appearance they are both quite a bit beefier than this bike?
  • 4 0
 We designed the Enduro EVO to meet the same strength standards as the SX Trail.
  • 4 2
 Note how the wheel size is not mentioned ( that I saw) and in the only pic, even the 26 is obscured by the frame. Its a conspiracy I tell ya... That said, lovely bike, but waaaay too much of a monster truck for SA trails - in fact, probably a good DH race bike for us..
  • 2 0
 How much could it cost a bottom bracket / down tube protection? With cables running behind it these will be well protected by impact and rocks thrown by the front wheel... I would have loved it with air suspensions, that's more a mini-freeride than an enduro bike (and at such point the dropper post is useless as well).
  • 2 0
 i have the 2012 nduro evo (yellow and black) the bike is good, funny, but so heavy for pedal. But the cable on the bottom of the down tube and the BB and the shock custimezed for that bike not makes tha formula1 of aluminum frame..
  • 4 0
 I am guessing that this is the bike that 80% of the users on this site need if they could only have 1 rig.

I'm thinking this will be my next brand new bike.
  • 1 0
 it is a great bike i have one and strongly recommend it
  • 1 0
 You dont have the newer model evo though. This is another level of beast entirely.
  • 1 0
 i know but the 2012 has less travel and is more versatile for the everyday ridder
  • 1 0
 Thats what the non evo rig is for. This a 7" freeride monster. It just happens to pedal and climb decent as well.
  • 3 0
 Awesome bike, shame its not getting distributed in the UK! due to this reason I opted for the 2013 hanzz sl, this worked out cheaper, lighter and with better spec.. Still this breed of bike is unbelievably fun to ride!!!
  • 2 0
 Personally as a big fan of Specialized I'd happily accept this as a replacement for the SX Trail, Or even the Big Hit. But this seems like a higher spec version of the Status? It looks f*cking awesome anyway, nice one Specialized!
  • 3 0
 Such an awesome bike, I tried a friends out at our trails. Def something you will own and love for many many years. That fsr just keeps going with no problems. Pedal to the moon on that bike.
  • 5 3
 personally i think if i was going to spend that much money on a rig like that i would go for either a status or an enduro, not the middle ground in between. Having said that, this bike is still sick!
  • 5 0
 Why is it poorly?
  • 3 1
 No, i just think it is addressing a very specific area of riding that doesn't quite exist. its good at uphill but not like an Enduro and its good at downhill but not like a Demo. Nothing wrong with it its just answering a question that wasn't asked.
  • 4 0
 Honestly for me this is my kind a ride a wanna have! for example where i live there is no parks you have to climb up one the hills and the ride it down the hill, the only bike that can do that is this one! of course u can't have a perfect climber and yet perfect downhiller! There for they created this machine that probably is 8 of 10 as climber and 8 of 10 as downhiller. For me this is my dream bike. Yes and more one thing, all of like to have 3-4 bikes each for every kind of riding! If you don't have the money this one can afford to cover them.
  • 1 1
 It's more like a 3 out of 10 on climbs and 9 out of 10 in descending. It's really a freeride bike, not a trail bike. Not saying it isn't a great bike, and I LOVE it, but having rode one myself, it doesn't climb very well. On the other had however, the regular enduro is more like 6 out of 10 for climbing and 7 out of 10 going down. Smile
  • 2 0
 Too bad the enduro evo is sold out...I tried to order from the first batch, and the second batch, but apparently they are all accounted for. Have I been misinformed by my Lbs?
  • 1 0
 No, but if you searched hard you could maybe find a shop that still has one.
  • 1 0
 ridden one, and I must say I expected it to be more "compact", so to say. I've never ridden an SX Trail, but my impressions were that it probably must have been "smaller" under you, while the Enduro felt a bit too bulky. The frame size was right.

However, apart from that subjective oppinion, there is nothing negative I could add, great bike for its purpose.
  • 2 1
 I was able to pick one up before they sold out for the year. Swapped to XX1, 50 mm stem and StansFlow EX tubeless wheels (stock are the Specialized DH rims). Bike in size small weighs 30.70 lbs. and has been my trail bike for the last month or so. Pretty blown away on how much fun this bike is out on the trails. Amazing on the climbs for a bigger travel rig. I am racing Enduro this year and this was to be this years race bike. I find now I have too much fun out on the trails and it is now my go to all around bike. Specialized just needs to make more of these as its a very sweet ride.
  • 2 0
 Great idea. I bought the S Works and put a 55 up front, an offset bushing in the upper shock eyelet(55-ish) HA, Flow/Minion wheels/tires and bigger brakes - I really like it but the thought of getting back on a coil shock is very appealing. Do you have any pics of your bike posted anywhere?
  • 2 0
 Interesting idea, was considering the same with mine however I plan to go the sworks direction and build up since I mostly ride trail.
  • 2 0
 I ride mostly trail too. The DB air is the best air shock ever, but it is not as supple as a coil - despite the marketing talk. Ideally someone will make a coil for the S Works at some point. I am very happy with the bike though. Best aggressive AM bike I've owned, and I've owned many.
  • 1 0
 Great set up!
  • 2 1
 Not to be a tool weight weenie here...but isn't 35 a little heavy for a 180mm freeride bike, much less one being sold as a big hit enduro bike? A 5500$ build on a downhill bike would be lighter. I just don't really think that this bike can be billed as an "enduro" bike when the stock demo isn't too much heavier.

Freeride and mini dh bike it is, but an enduro it is not.
  • 1 0
 you could build a lighter DH bike for less but it wouldn't be as much fun or as useful and versatile. It's definitely an Enduro if you can pedal it up, but a heavy duty one.
  • 1 0
 I love my 2010 Enduro and the current models look like an improvement. I have never had an issue with the cable routing in the couple of thousand miles I've ridden.

Speaking of cables, can you really call the routing for the dropper post internal? Most of the length of the cable is actually outside the frame...
  • 1 0
 I have been rocking a 2010 SX Trail for a while and have changed to a 2013 Enduro S-Works and I can honestly say the bike is as cable as the SX and the riding uphill is flawless. Very happy with the change but I must admit I don't want the let the SX Trail go. Such an amazing bike.
  • 1 0
 Imagine : S Works Enduro with a coil shock...
  • 2 1
 Nah, CCDB Air feels just the same as coil, honestly......
  • 1 0
 I ride an S Works with a DB Air. It's good, better than any air shock out there but it's not as sensitive as a coil.
  • 1 0
 I find it very similar to the performance on the SX Trail to be honest. Plus prefer the progression of the shock on big hits! I do ride it a bit soft so can be a trade for up-hills.
  • 1 0
 IS ANYONE ELSE AS STOKED ABOUT THE WATER BOTTLE CAGE MOUNT AS I AM!??!?!?!

Seriously though, looks like a dam fun bike, I ride my current enduro which weighs over 35lbs up anything, this would give me another 20mm of travel, but uh, i'll have to pass on that price tag! Wonder if they will offer a frame set like the old SX trail?! That would make for a fun build
  • 1 0
 '09 SX Trail for the win! It's heavy, around 38 lbs, but you get used to it. I wish they would have stocked a 170 or 180mm fork on it though. That's the one part I want to upgrade so bad. Would probably save a pound by getting rid of the 160mm RS Domain that's on there. Sweet, fun, bike!
  • 1 0
 the last enduro was a great trail bike i rode the stock one and the evo they are fast light and nimble i had the santa cruz nomad to very different bikes they ride totally different but do the same thing so to say that the enduro has a special nitch well thats not true there are a lot of bikes that are in the same class as the the enuro but the enduro is a very sick bike i liked them better that my trek remedy but i just got a sx trail 2 now that is the bike for me heavy stable top bar out of the way best stand up pedaling ive ever ridden besides my old bmx thats whats up
  • 5 0
 Loving it!
  • 3 0
 Too bad there are no more to purchase. Figures a test would come out on the bike as it's sold out!
  • 4 1
 even if 650 is faster... do you race? or do you like to take the most of the runs? 26 all the way
  • 1 0
 Love my 2011 evo, it replaced my 2010 demo 7. But I agree with the cable routing, they rub on my tailgate bag. But once they rub through its time to replace them. The new evo is a good replacement for the demo 7 and sx
  • 1 1
 I have a friend who works at a reputable mountain bike suspension company - he flat out tells me that their mgmt fully admits that new wheel sizes are pushed purely to inject more money into the industry by offering something "new" to consumers.
  • 2 1
 With so many great bikes in this category you could probably blindly pick one and be happy. That said i'm sure this is a great bike, just saying it doesn't stand out.
  • 1 0
 It does seem like a relatively solid spec though. Good for the rider who doesn't want to build their own, or worry about upgrading the sacrifices that may come along with a build kit.
  • 3 0
 Those cables are not a problem on my enduro.
  • 2 0
 Why is this model not available in the UK? We can have the lower spec'd EVO but why not this one?
  • 2 1
 Spesh kills it, always. Curse my desire to root for the underdog! I can't buy a spesh because they are too well known. To well loved.
  • 2 0
 I'm selling a 2012 enduro expert Evo in the southern California area. Pretty much the same exact bike but mine is lighter
  • 1 0
 Just an Idea but the rear shock is a 8.75 x 2.5, so what if you put a 8.75 x 2.75 on it? is it possible to get 200mm rear travel?
  • 5 2
 That is a sexy ass bike
  • 1 0
 on their site they say the bike has 165mm travel rear and 170mm front. id rather it be the 180, but which is it?
  • 3 0
 asteezc1, It has 180mm travel front and rear. Where it says 165mm/170mm is just poor proof reading by whomever is responsible for the website. Read a little further down where it shows the actual specs as opposed to the description and you'll see. Confusing for sure.
  • 1 0
 ah i see,well im glad its a 180, seemed odd before.
  • 2 0
 your looking at the other enduro bike, there is one with 165/170 and this one with 180/180
  • 1 0
 www.specialized.com/us/en/bikes/mountain/endurofsr/enduroexpertevo

"The 165mm-travel M5 aluminum Enduro Expert EVO is an all-mountain machine desigened to rip on denscents. With a Cane Creek Double Barrel Coi shock, 170mm-travel coil-sprung Fox 36 Van RC2 fork and custom Avid X0 Trail World Cup hydraulic disc brakes the Enduro Expert EVO blurs the line between DH and All Mountain. "

though in specs section its 180
  • 2 1
 Can't the Stumpjumper Evo do pretty much everything this can going down and be far better on the ups?
  • 1 0
 This bike has a good extra inch of travel over the stumpy evo.
  • 1 0
 I've got a Stumpy Comp EVO, and it's significantly lighter than the Enduro. Mine tips the scales at 30 pounds with pedals.
Same under BB cable routing, which I've never found to be an issue even though I've got quite a few marks to my bash guard.

The travel and rear suspension mount are the bigger concern if you're intending to ride the Stumpy the same as the Enduro.
The 155-160 travel on the Stumpy EVO is more than enough to eat up most terrain you'll encounter, and if you're not just slamming it into landings then you should be just fine.
Where you can run into a problem is the upper shock mount bolt on the Stumpy if you're a bigger rider, or if you're really putting it to harsher terrain than what might be considered "aggressive trail riding."
I'm getting my '12 Comp EVO back this week after a warranty frame replacement. When I got the bike in August of last year, the stock upper shock bolt was steel. I'm a bigger guy (215 pounds) and don't always ride light, and I noticed the upper eyelet bolt was slightly bowed after about 4 months of riding and racing, so I had it replaced. The replacement was Spesh's new factory standard aluminium bolt, which after a couple months of riding decided to snap at the thread//shoulder interface. It's not like I'm out hammering the jump lines at the bike park or slinging myself off 4' drops to flat landings, either. Regardless, that bolt snapped and when it did, it bent the right shock hanger plate on the frame.
I'm certain that the replacement frame is going to stock with another aluminium bolt, so I've already locally sourced suitable steel replacements and I have a handful of them at the ready.
  • 3 1
 A full inch, wow. Smile

I'm only 180 pounds in weight. I bet I could rip faster on the Stumpy Evo. A guy I know runs 170's up front on a Stumpy Evo. Sold his Demo saying he doesn't see the point in having it anymore. He has to pick some slightly different lines at times, but in general he's faster on the stumpy. Plus there ain't too many up lifts here in England. Beef the Stumpy frame a little more Specialized with the same travel and bin the Enduro. Can we have a coil sprung Stumpy Evo next year with beefed frame mountings, somehow? I buy straight away Smile
  • 2 0
 It's 180mm. Ofcourse is gonna kill the dh. Rather have a kona entourage.
  • 2 1
 Exactly my thoughts haha, the Kona looks a bit nicer as well.
  • 1 0
 nice review! Nice bike! Bit heavy though but for its weight class I guess its ok. Do you know the Frame weight?
  • 1 0
 It might be heavy for an all mountain bike - that is why we have the regular Enduro. I'd be curious to see some 180 park bikes that are lighter?
  • 1 1
 My Uzzi is much lighter
  • 1 0
 If those are photos of your bike on your profile, the builds are not even close to the same. I would be very surprised if the Uzzi frameset is lighter than the Enduro EVO frameset with the same shocks.
  • 1 2
 I wouldn't be surprised if the Uzzi is lighter oh yeah and it doesn't have a silly proprietary shock
  • 3 0
 The Enduro EVO, painted with coil shock is about 8.6 lbs. If you believe the Internet the Uzzi appears to be over 9 lbs. but I welcome the surprise if that is incorrect. The Enduro is available with either CCDB or Fox which should satisfy most riders. The leverage curve is optimized for a coil shock, so switching to an air shock degrades the performance. The shock extension also rides on ball bearings, which makes the ride more supple and eliminates worn out DU bushing. It's a price many people welcome for a proprietary shock.
  • 1 0
 With a coil shock the frame is in the 9lb range with CCDB air it is 8.5lbs. Cosidering there are a few air shocks that perform as well as a coil why bother with the added weight? I don't believe that weight on the evo frame, my 2011 SXT frame was close to 10lbs and I still built it to 33lbs with a heavy totem. 36lbs complete is heavy for that kind of bike especially when a full dh rig is 36-40lbs.
DU bushings are not that big of a deal to replace to justify being stuck with a proprietary shock. If the shock blows waiting weeks for a replacement or repair is a bummer
Also no frame only option.
  • 1 0
 You are right - the old SX Trail was a bit of a beast. I just weighed the Enduro EVO frame personally, but you don't have to believe it if you don't like. Most people consider reduced friction and longer life a feature. Specialized stocks all proprietary parts and we can service you as fast or faster than Fox and CC. Framesets were offered but not all markets carry them. The complete bikes are a great deal compared to building custom.
  • 2 0
 You have to admit that $5600 for this bike is an amazing deal. The same build would cost more on an Uzzi for sure. Swap out the wheels, go tubeless, switch to a 1 x 10 setup, throw on some carbon bars and you could drop a significant amount of weight.

Personally, I would buy it and ride it as is though.
  • 1 1
 You have to love that Kool Aid, It is a good deal for a complete but too heavy for my taste. I would rather a frame only and build it up much lighter. At 36lbs it is in Demo territory I wouldn't want to climb on it. The SXT was a pig climbing and it wasn't that heavy. It's just not an efficient design.
  • 1 0
 Not exactly a precise conclusion there - "it's just not an efficient design." Not sure what you mean, but a large, painted Uzzi frame is 9.6lbs and the small is 9.2lbs. Build it up with the same parts and you're 0.7lbs to 1.1lbs heavier than the Enduro Evo, depending on the size. That doesn't mean the Uzzi isn't a great bike, but it doesn't work to say that swapping out the exact same parts onto a lighter frame will somehow lead to a heavier bike. I'm not sure who's drinking what, but you might want to check your cup, bottle, tumbler, whatever, and refer to the Law of Conservation of Mass from grade school science.

Also, the SXT and Enduro Evo are different bikes, with different frames, and the Enduro Evo reviewed rides on a new frame design this year. Seems strange for you to argue that the frame couldn't be 8.5lbs just because a 3 year old, previous generation, different model bike had a frame that was 1.5lbs heavier.
  • 1 0
 The Enduro EVO is a 180 freeride park bike. Plush, coil spring performance and durability was the primary focus. Weight was a secondary consideration, however I think you would be hard pressed to find a lighter freeride frameset with park bike strength.

If you are looking for an all-mountain bike and weight is your priority, then you should look at the 165 travel S-Works Enduro (26in for apples to apples). It is 25.94 lbs out of the box, without pedals.
  • 1 0
 How does everyone think this compares to the s-works carbon?.....aside from pricing.
  • 1 0
 My WORD that is one dead sexy bike... If I lived in Whistler I'd own one of those for daily park sessions hands down.
  • 3 0
 Oh and let's see... that's now TWO FSR/Horst/ART bikes (Evo and the Range Killer B) that Pbike has reviewed and declared amazing in the rough and still good pedaling... Horst-Link bikes rule plain and simple..
  • 1 0
 S Works has similar componantry, is far nicer to climb but would be as much fun as this in the b park, go with the S Works however, dont be fooled into thinking the evo is a DH bike its just not
  • 2 0
 Won't replace my nomad! But nice rig. Smile
  • 1 3
 FSR can't cpmpare to VPP at all
  • 1 0
 hey, i got my S Enduro EVO (not the EXPERT) ... need to test this this summer , cant wait ...
  • 1 0
 Are these available in the uk?i can only see the comp for sale not the expert.
  • 3 1
 sx trail replacement?
  • 2 1
 Nice! It's like what the Santa Cruz Bullit used to be except way better..
  • 2 0
 I love it too.
  • 2 1
 One of my next bike options
  • 1 0
 A picture of the full bike would be good.
  • 2 0
 I WANT IT!
  • 1 0
 Spot on review. Check my profile if you want one on the cheap.
  • 1 0
 still missing my sxtrail :-(
  • 1 0
 I´m saving to buy myself one of these, can´t wait any more! Big Grin
  • 2 1
 I have my 2013 EVO under 31 lbs. Rocket ship.
  • 1 0
 I got this bike well the non expert model for 2k sick as hell
  • 1 0
 sick
  • 1 0
 What a beast!!!
  • 2 1
 I miss my enduro!
  • 2 1
 yes please!!!
  • 1 0
 No XL frame!!! Frown Frown
  • 2 1
 I still ride a hardtail.
  • 1 0
 Super long top tube
  • 1 2
 Looks like a canfield jedi
  • 1 2
 Free Ride Weapon. Id ditch the dropper post.
  • 1 1
 love it
  • 1 1
 long live the big hit Big Grin
  • 2 3
 not bad
  • 4 5
 But 650b?
  • 11 2
 Don't do that.
  • 6 3
 My mate just got a 650b AM bike and he is unstoppable! i cannot pass him, where as in the past i'd be whoopin' his arse
  • 3 0
 ^^ New bike fever?
  • 2 0
 Must be those wheels - an inch is all that it takes to go from flop to flyin' :-)
  • 2 1
 Barel was interviewed just before the Enduro World Series and said he thought 650b wheels were 1 second quicker every 3 minutes. That said it all to me to be honest - they MAY be quicker, but the difference is so negligible there is no reason for me to change. Likely the bike as a whole (plus new bike fever) made him quicker. My mate traded up from an old Cannondale to a new carbon superbike and has suddenly become quicker than me. Any difference is down to a number of factors and the small difference in wheelsize is only a small part of that...
  • 3 0
 i do understand that a new bike makes you want to push harder and shred faster. but this was just a matter of physical grip in the bike, it may have just been one continuous fluke but all i know is he was dam quick and since our shop started selling 650b's they have been selling like tasty tasty hot cakes to some respectable riders. (not trashin' on 26' i still loooove mine but i am trashin' on 29')
  • 2 1
 Specialized has spent wayyyyy to much money on 29ers to join the 650B revolution anytime soon. Only lost sales to other brands will get them to change their tune. They're going to continue to offer just 26ers and 29ers for the next couple model years.
  • 1 0
 Someone told me they cut most of the 26 range in the UK too?
  • 2 0
 650b has taken momentum by bike manufacturers way faster then 29er ever did.
  • 1 0
 After riding a 650b, this is how I describe it: it's like riding a 26", that rolls like it's got 1.8" tires, but grips like it's got 2.4" tires. I gotta admit, I was pretty blown away. It seems like you can make a more capable bike in the bigger size, too: the bike I rode (KHS sixfifty 5500) has trail-bike geo, and climbs like one, but descends like an AM bike.
  • 1 0
 What is apparent is that people around here do not take sarcasm.
  • 1 0
 @headshot: That is what she said.
  • 1 3
 I really like the disappearing pedal option.
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