Tech Tuesday - Finding and Fixing that Creak

Oct 11, 2011 at 0:05
Oct 11, 2011
by Mike Levy  
 
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Disclaimer: Today's Tech Tuesday covers the very large topic of finding and fixing noises on your mountain bike. Given that each and every component has its own installation instructions and torque recommendation this article could easily be as long as a small book on the subject. Instead of actually writing that book, this is intended to be a brief summary on how to find and fix that annoying noise. If you have to remove a component, be sure to have read the instructions on how to reinstall it as well, including the torque that it should be tightened to.

What causes a creak?

Today's mountain bikes, as advanced as they may be, still seem to be able to creak just as bad and as often as those from many years ago. Sure, we may have cutting edge suspension, nearly maintenance free disc brakes and enough carbon components to make an F1 car jealous, but our state of the art machines will often have the most curious noises emanating from who knows where. How can this be? And what causes these god awful sounds that can make us want to abandon our expensive bikes in the bush and walk home?

Those noises, often referred to as a "creak", are usually the result of two components shifting under load against each other. While it can sometimes be as simple as the seat post within the frame or the handlebar and stem clamp, it is more common to have the noise be a result of two threaded components not being properly torqued down to the manufacturer's spec, allowing them to shift ever so slightly when you push hard on the pedals or lean into a turn. The tricky bit is that the part doesn't actually have be loose to make the noise - the actual movement may be exceedingly small - which can mean that it may be difficult to track down. Add in a bit of dust, grime or water to the joint between the two and you'll have the perfect environment to make what will quickly become the world's most annoying sound.

Tech Tuesday
You may need to use a number of different tools in order to track down and remove that pesky noise, but a torque wrench and some grease will help you the most.

Safety warning: The good news is that creaks are often not a major issue, but rather just your bike telling you that it's time to take a day off from riding and give it some love. The bad news is that that isn't always the case, with the noise sometimes signalling that you have a cracked frame or a part that is close to complete failure. This is why it is important to not let those creaks and groans go unnoticed for long. Not to scare you, but that sound could quite literally be a warning that your head tube is about to depart from the rest of your bike, or that your lightweight two piece crankset is close to becoming a three piece unit. Spending a few minutes tracking down the sound may just save you from having to search for your front teeth mid-ride, or at the very least a long walk of shame out of the bush with your broken steed on your back.

Finding the cause: The two most important weapons in fighting the war against noise are grease and knowing the proper torque, but often the most difficult part is tracking it down - it usually isn't as easy as just listening to where the noise is coming from. Mountain bikes, especially those that are built around an aluminum frame, are really good at helping the sound to resonate from its origin. It may sure as hell sound like that tick is coming from your rear wheel, but don't be surprised when you find that your stem was the source all along. While a creak can come from pretty much anywhere that a component is clamped or threaded into another part, including a front derailleur band or even a water bottle cage bolt, there are a few common offenders. For this reason it helps to know a some tricks on how to isolate the noise and make it easier to find...

Some helpful pointers before you begin:

• Proper torque is key to eliminating creaks and groans. Check out Park Tool's page on torque specs, and be sure to find out what your components require.
• Depending on the component, you may need to use grease, lube or Loc-tite to stop a noise. It is important to not only use the right one, but to also wipe away any extra that may be present after reinstallation. It will only attract grime and cause even more noise.
• Tools you may need include a hex set, torx wrench, bottom bracket tool and a torque wrench, among others.


Tech Tuesday
Bottom bracket, crankarms and pedals: These are the most common offenders of them all. Head out onto a quiet side street and pedal hard against your brakes while standing up (standing will eliminate your saddle and post). You don't have to go fast, it's the torque from your legs that will cause noise, not how fast you're going. Listen carefully for the noise during the hard downstroke of each pedal revolution - that is when it will be most likely to occur. Found the culprit? Start by crossing out the easiest causes first. Remove your pedals and give the threads on both the arms and on the spindles a cleaning, applying a dab of grease to each before reinstalling. Head out for another ride to see if the noise is still there, and if it is the next step is to remove the crankarms and bottom bracket from the frame. Spend a few minutes cleaning everything so that it looks as good as new - using a solvent will help. Be sure to read the manufacturer's instructions before reinstalling the components, and also lay on a coating of grease to the crank spindle, as well as the threads on both the BB shell and BB cup. Remember that torquing each part to the recommended amount is key to eliminating noise.

Often one of the trickiest to spot, chainring bolts can make quite a racket when slightly loose. Aluminum chainring bolts are even more prone to noise. If you've done all the steps above, but still have a noise when standing and pedalling under load, it may be the these little guys. Remove one at a time, cleaning and putting a small dab of grease on the threads before reinstalling. Never use Loc-tite on chainring bolts - it isn't needed and will make life difficult down the road.
Tech Tuesday
Spokes and nipples: When you hear a mechanic say that the "wheel has lost its tension" he is referring to the spokes becoming looser than is ideal, allowing the wheel to flex more under load. This is also likely to allow the spokes and nipples to shift slightly, even if they don't feel loose to the touch, and it's this shifting that can cause noise. Before re-tensioning wheel, something that should only be done by someone who has experience working with wheels, drip a small amount of lube into the nipple hole at the rim, as well as at the hub and where the spokes cross. A wax based lube will dry and leave a residue that will last much longer than a teflon based lube. Be careful not to let any drip onto your brake rotor.
Tech Tuesday
Saddle and post: If you suspect that the noise may be coming from your saddle clamp or the post into the frame, pedal hard under load (dragging the brakes can help) while seated and then while standing. If the creak disappears when you are out of the saddle there is a good chance that it is one of the above. Begin by marking or measuring your saddle height before removing the post, followed by a good cleaning of the inside of the seat tube (including under the seat post clamp) and the post itself. Reinstall after applying a thin coating of grease or non-slip compound to the inside of the seat tube, post and under the seat post clamp. It also makes sense to remove the saddle from the post and clean the clamping surfaces as well.
Tech Tuesday
Rear suspension: A coil spring that doesn't have enough preload applied to it, letting it shift on the spring clip and collar, will also be prone to making noise. This is a good place to start, much easier than removing and greasing pivot bolts, if you push down on your bike's rear suspension and it makes a groan. Simply grab the coil with your hand and see if it is loose enough to shift on the shock. If so, give the collar half a turn and retry. Repeat until it no longer moves, but keep in mind that coils springs should only have a few turns of preload on them. A small amount of lube between each end of the spring and the collars can also help, but be sure to wipe any extra away so as not to attract dirt.

Pivot hardware can also make quite a bit of noise, although this is one that can be intimidating for the home mechanic, requiring the removal of the pivot axles and bolts, applying grease (as well as Loc-tite if required) and retightening to the exact specs provided by the manufacturer. While I would love to cover that in this Tech Tuesday it would make for a rather long read. If you don't feel up to it take it to your local shop and have them perform the service. It will be money well spent.
Tech Tuesday
Derailleur pulley wheels: These little guys will often make a high pitched chirp that will sound as if a bird is following you on the trail. You'll know if they are the culprit if the intervals between the chirps are quick and happen with consistant timing while you pedal. Remove one at a time, giving it a good clean before reinstalling. Most pulleys actually use a bushing that, while designed to run dry, will benefit from a very small amount of teflon based lube. If your's use a sealed bearing you can use a hobby knife to lift the edge of the seal up to remove it and allow you to lube the bearing. Apply a small amount of blue Loc-tite to the threads on the derailleur cage to prevent the pulley bolt from coming loose down the road, but be careful to not let it run down onto or into the pulley wheel itself.


There are a lot more places on a mountain bike to make noise than just those talked about above. Do you have a noisy horror story to share? Fighting the battle against creaks? How about a tip? Put those comments down below!



Past Tech Tuesdays:

Technical Tuesday #1 - How to change a tube.
Technical Tuesday #2 - How to set up your SRAM rear derailleur
Technical Tuesday #3 - How to remove and install pedals
Technical Tuesday #4 - How To Bleed Your Avid Elixir Brakes
Technical Tuesday #5 - How To Check And Adjust Your Headset
Technical Tuesday #6 - How To Fix A Broken Chain
Technical Tuesday #7 - Tubeless Conversion
Technical Tuesday #8 - Chain Wear
Technical Tuesday #9 - SRAM Shift Cable Replacement
Technical Tuesday #10 - Removing And Installing a Headset
Technical Tuesday #11 - Chain Lube Explained
Technical Tuesday #12 - RockShox Totem and Lyric Mission Control Damper Mod
Technical Tuesday #13 - Shimano XT Crank and Bottom Bracket Installation
Technical Tuesday #14 - Straightening Your Derailleur Hanger
Technical Tuesday #15 - Setting Up Your Front Derailleur
Technical Tuesday #16 - Setting Up Your Cockpit
Technical Tuesday #17 - Suspension Basics
Technical Tuesday #18 - Adjusting The Fox DHX 5.0
Technical Tuesday #19 - Adjusting The RockShox BoXXer World Cup
Technical Tuesday #20 - Servicing Your Fox Float Shock
Technical Tuesday #21 - Wheel Truing Basics
Technical Tuesday #22 - Shimano Brake Pad Replacement
Technical Tuesday #23 - Shimano brake bleed
Technical Tuesday #24 - Fox Lower Leg Removal And Service
Technical Tuesday #25 - RockShox Motion Control Service
Technical Tuesday #26 - Avid BB7 Cable Disk Brake Setup
Technical Tuesday #27 - Manitou Dorado Fork Rebuild
Technical Tuesday #28 - Manitou Circus Fork Rebuild
Technical Tuesday #29 - MRP G2 SL Chain Guide Install
Technical Tuesday #30 - Cane Creek Angleset Installation
Technical Tuesday #31 - RockShox Maxle Lite DH
Technical Tuesday #32 - Find Your Tire Pressure Sweet Spot
Technical Tuesday #33 - Three Minute Bike Preflight Check
Technical Tuesday #34 - MRP XCG Install
Technical Tuesday #35 - Stem Choice and Cockpit Setup
Technical Tuesday #36 - Handlebars - How Wide Affects Your Ride
Technical Tuesday #37 - Repairing A Torn Tire
Technical Tuesday #38 - Coil spring swap
Technical Tuesday #39 - Trailside help: Broken Shift Cable
Technical Tuesday #40 - Installing a Fox Float Air-Volume Spacer
Technical Tuesday #41 - Replace the Seals on Your 2011 RockShox Boxxer World Cup Fork
Technical Tuesday #42 - Clean and Lubricate Your Fox F32 Dust Wiper Seals
Technical Tuesday #43 - Thread Locker Basics
Technical Tuesday #44 - Install a SRAM X.0 Two-By-Ten Crankset
Technical Tuesday #45 - VPP Suspension Bearing Service
Technical Tuesday #46 - Rotor Straightening


Visit Parktool.com to see their entire lineup of tools and lubes
Must Read This Week






90 Comments

  • + 52
 I have always applied grease accordingly where metal touches metal on all of my bikes, then every 6 months or so it gets stripped and done again. If there is one thing that annoys me its creaks on my bike. I love it in stealth mode...
  • + 104
 I love my stealth mode...enhanced by my Hope Pro II hubs...
  • + 1
 i have a very anoying sound somewhere near the rear shock on my demo9, i greased and got apart the whole rear end, put everything together again... and still. its a very anoying vine or somesort, and it only comes noticable when i bottom the frame a few times while riding, then stop and carefuly compress the frame by hands on seat... its like i have dolphins in my frame... lol it is realy anoying. could it be the shock itself? any ideas much appreciated.
  • + 1
 sorry i can't be of any help, but funny i had a similar creak on a demo 9 frame, no idea where it came from.
  • + 1
 You need to do yourself a check list, start at the rear end first and take something off. Clean it thoroughly, regrease it and put it back on.Ride the bike and if it persists try again.You would be surprised what will creak, i had a creak on a GT LTS many moons ago that drove me wild. It turned out to be my rear mech hanger.If you try this, eventually you should locate the CREAK, if not then maybe some body else will be of assistance. Hope it helped???.
  • + 4
 Could be your du bushings.
  • + 1
 I need a rainy saturday sometime, so i can completely strip down my bike.
  • + 1
 ribo88

Did you check your seat clamp? I had a similar problem on my dirtbag... I totally know the dolphin sound your talking about! Just lube that bad boy up and make sure everything's nice and tight.
  • + 3
 should be pretty soon, as we live in england. Wink
  • + 5
 START WITH YOUR PEDALS!!

first starting point of finding drivetrain related creaks is to remove YOUR pedals and borrow some OTHER pedals

pedals often develop play in the bushings / bearings and can create a rotational creak or click

if you do this, you may find the noise is gone...

before going further into your drivetrain, always eliminate your pedals from the equation Wink
  • + 8
 I let my Cane Creek DB creek just because it says creek in the name....Wink
  • + 1
 I dont mind these step things but what ever happend to the tech tuesday videos?
  • + 3
 @ Kona-stinka - There will be more vids in the future, but the step by step photos are always popular as well. Some prefer this style, others like the vid. Either way you'll see more vids soon.
  • + 1
 k thanks, I was just woundering since there hadent been a vid in awhile
  • + 15
 My bike made a creekin sound and I kicked the rim and it stopped that all I do lol
  • + 5
 Bike maintenance, the redneck way.
  • + 8
 i take apart my rear end linkage once a month and clean the bushings and regrease them. Sure it might be overkill but the amount of fine dust that gets in there is insane, especially riding somewhere like whistler.

source of 99% of the creaks.

Its easy to do as long as you do 1 linkage bolt at a time, and put everything back where it goes so you aren't stuck trying to redesign your rear end linkages when they are all in pieces.
  • + 3
 sorry, dude- meant to positive prop you. i totally agree. taking your linkage apart regularly keeps your bike working so much better for so much longer. and doing one part at a time makes it really easy to remember how each washer, bolt, cover, axle, cap, etc.. goes in.
  • + 7
 disagree on the chainring bolts.. ive torqued mine down correctly and lost 3/4 riding whistler. drop of blue loc-tite on each thread area does just the trick, and i've never had issue taking them back off again. Other than that, helpful write-up
  • + 2
 Loc-Tite on chainring bolts... dude! I hope you don't have the standard ones and you do can use two allen or torque keys to loosen them...
  • + 13
 i did, not any longer though haha!

+1 on stealth mode with hope pro ll evos, my friends don' let me ride behind them because it sounds like their getting chased by a chainsaw
  • + 3
 So far nothing I heard compares to Chris King...
  • + 2
 There is a product called "Gun Tite" it is made by Loctite and is a very mild blue version used for misc. screws on guns. Works very well for chain ring bolts. It has given me no issues on any style chainring bolt.
  • + 1
 I agree 100% with no grease on chain ring bolts I have had all four rattle out going down whistler I can assure you they were properly torqued as well. I find that grease on the out side of them does help. just not on the threads
  • + 2
 you don't want to use either grease nor loc-tite on chain ring bolts - its the wrong application for those products

the best substance to use on chain ring bolts is Shimano Anti-Seize

then torque the chainring bolts correctly, will not work loose or start creaking, and Shimano Anti-Seize is extremely resistant to water / dirt (you will know this if you ever got Shimano Anti-Seize on your clothing - its does not come out even with hot maching washing!)
  • + 2
 Linnseed oil. any hardware store carries it. Keeps things lubricated but holds it's sticky qualities. It' s used as an old school wheel building trick that works flawlessly. And is very inexpensive. Just dip the threads in before screwing them in to the nipple. Never had a spoke go loose on one of his wheelsets. And I can true the spokes very easily without thatfeeling oversnug. Now I have been using it on chainring bolts also.
  • + 2
 Linseed oil is where it's at. A must for any wheel builds and in some other spots.
  • + 2
 Linn seed is also good for your stomach Razz
  • + 6
 Last year I built up a brand spanking new Covert and first ride there was a quiet creaking coming from the crank right arm. Took it all apart, checked and greased again, still there. After a few days of trying everything it was still there. A mate rode it and said he could hear nothing. Same with another mate too. Turned out it was my right knee! Shame I can't grease that.
  • + 1
 try sipping a spoonful of good flax seed oil in the morning, or olive oil. You can lubricate the joints this way ")
  • + 4
 This is one of the best posts i ever seen on pb. So many people ignore creaks until it snaps clean off. I the designated squeak trouble shooter at our trails and have seen lots of bike fails. The one topic they left out is headtube/headset issues, usually make the most noise. It hard to tell if its the headtube or headset or steerer tube. Maybe next time they make tech tip all about front end issues for us real huckers.
  • + 3
 i had issues with a creak when ever i made a right turn ... i creased everywhere and spent maby half an hr one day just going up and down the driveway to figure out what it was ... turns out i had a creak where the spokes touch each other, they can rub and creek
  • + 3
 Interesting that they chose to use polylube 1000 on their bottom bracket cups. At room temperature that stuff is a semi liquid and doesn't create a very watertight seal. At our shop we use an anti sieze that park tools makes and is much better at forming a barrier against dust and grime than the polylube. Time after time when we pull a bb that has been threaded into a shell with polylube everything is nasty and grimy.
  • + 4
 Plumbers tape. Wrap this stuff on all screwed in things. Make sure to wrap in direction so that it does not unwrap as you screw in. Cover with grease for easy application and extra nice fit. Silent!
  • + 3
 Another often-overlooked noisy part on a bike is the dropout/through axle. With a standard QR, take out your wheel and apply lithium grease to the inside and outside of the dropout. With a through axle, it's important to make sure that the threads and shaft of the axle are thoroughly greased.

Also another noise-maker can be the bearings in an integrated or cartridge bearing headset. Make sure that the headset cup/your frame is greased liberally before you install the bearing.

And then sometimes creaks are cracks in your frame/swingarm. Frown
  • + 1
 agreed - the rear axle / skewer can often cause noise that travels up the downtube and causes all kind of noise searching problems

try a smear of Shimano anti-seize on the rear skewer / rear axle and also your front wheel skewer or through axle
  • + 1
 True, you should check regularly that there's no play in your wheels. I had hell for a month trying to find a creak in my bike that seemed like it was happening under pedalling. It turned out the front trough axle wasn't fitting right so I had tons of play in the wheel. Checking play in the wheel should narrow some things down.
  • + 2
 If you have a creek up by your bars, start by cleaning your headset bearings, cups, caps, seals, ect, until everything is completely clean of any grease. then rinse them off with water(this is so no residue from the cleaner that you used is left on the parts) and dry them by using compressed air. even if its just from keyboard duster, although that might take a little longer than using an air compressor. then grease everything, headsets require a lot of grease, enough to surround the entire bearing, even if some squeezes out the sides after you reassemble it. Then, after putting it all back together clean any excess off. If there is still creaking then its just in your cable housing. cable housings are a plastic inner, surrounded by many thin wires, then the black rubbery plastic on the outside of all that. sometimes when you turn your bars from side to side the thin wires in the cable housing rub against each other and make the creaking like sound. its nothing to worry about but if it bothers you, you can get them replaced.
  • + 2
 I found this tech tuesday to be a good one. Never thought to relube the spoke contact point. I find the noisiest part, after I pull and clean everything, is the chain guide (E13 SGS). I pull apart the pulley, clean, and relube as part of my general maintinance but it still ends up sounding like a reliant K car reentering the earths atmosphere when I'm grinding it up a hill after a couple of rides. I also find the biggest thing in keeping the bike quiet is cleaning it. A good clean of everything goes a long way.
  • + 2
 It may have already been mentioned, but derailleur hangers can creak. Usually just tightening the bolt(s) is sufficient. In extreme cases, using blue locktite to fill in the gaps between the hanger and the frame can help.
  • + 5
 i think this one will come in handy. my bike needs a good overhaul.
  • + 1
 The most annoying creak I've had (occurred on almost every revolution of the right crank) was caused by the rear derailleur hanger/frame interface. I removed the hanger, lubricated the frame and re-attached the hanger and installed the rear wheel with the quick release tightened up a little tighter. Creak was gone. :-)
  • + 1
 A really common fault with bikes we find in the shop I work at is that the bikes bottom bracket will need stripping down and facing which means the BB sits properly against the BB spacers/frame in alloy framed bikes. This isnt a problem so much with push fit and square taper BB's. Quite often though we will find a bike has come direct from the factory with a shit BB facing and thread therefore needing a face and tap run through it to elimate sqeaks.
  • + 1
 i have a Intense 951 and it seemed to have developed a creaking sound when i push down on the bike and the links move, i went to my mechanic and had the bearing replaced on the upper link and the lower vpp link replaced, i had it greased and used a presser to install the bearings, torqued the bolts and tested it and the creaking sound is still there. then we replaced the shock bushings and cleaned out the drop outs jus in case and cleaned and greased the axle. it is still there. My mechanic thinks that i might be the vpp link and it mus be dis aligned. your input would be greatly appreciated. thanks!
  • + 1
 It may be as simple as a housing end cap, or maybe some housing wire that has pushed through the cap. This one is simple: shift down to your smallest cog/least cable tension, then push the derailleur up to the largest cog with your hand. This will give you the cable slack needed to remove the housing from the cable stops. now cycle the suspension and see if the noise is still there.
  • + 1
 i find one of the main creak culprets can be the headset! makes a horrible cracking/snapping sound or sometimes a creaking if theres not enough grease or its not quite tight enough! or if the wedge isnt greased/properly inserted!
  • + 4
 the most annoying creak: a small bearing ball in the handlebar ... drives you insane
  • + 1
 Ibis mojo hd i dont know what year it is sadly, but it makes an annoying creak when sprinting or applying force and most of the time i found myself tightening the rear axle as it always came loose so i did grease on the axle and loctite on the threads, but it only decreased noise by a little, i still dont know where the sound comes from anyone here help a bro, greatly appreciated
  • + 1
 i have a really bizarre one right now where if i hold my bike not moving and slowly lean it side to side it sounds like a flock of geese, it's not very loud so i'm not overly concerned. sure would like to know where it's coming from though...
  • + 1
 Try it while holding your brakes.
  • + 1
 Doesn't happen when i have the levers held. I was pretty sure it was in the brakes cuz it seems to be front and back and coming from the hub/brake area.
  • + 2
 Will be loose bearings then causing the wheels to move ever so slightly to rub against brake pads. Tighten your bearings or replace them if sealed.... My 2 cents
  • + 1
 I had always problems with place where handlebar touches stem. When I don't grease it, it will creak all the time when you do bunnyhops or just ride on some stairs/stones. It's pretty annoying.
  • + 1
 Yo, Yo, Yo - no advice on removing creaks on square taper cranks, WTF?? What about the BB, they are prone to creaking, especially them square taper type - long live the square taper
  • + 1
 Square taper crank arms are very prone to creaking if not torqued down properly. Start by removing the arms, cleaning the spindle faces and crank hole and then greasing both. Torque them back down and give it a go. If that doesn't work it is time to remove the bb to clean and grease the threads. Very good chance that it is just the spindle/crank interface though.
  • + 1
 I've found two things work well for square taper crank arms.
1) Glue them on with a product called Shoe Goo. It's a viscous flexible waterproof silicone like sealer that prevents water from getting in. Don't worry you can still get the arms off easily when needed. However, cleaning off the residual is a pain.
2) Try Teflon tape (used in pluming). Wrap that stuff around the spindle and tighten the arms on. Cleaning off the residual is easy and my preferred method. Works well.
  • + 1
 I am chasing a creak right now with my year old Giant Anthem with 500 miles. I found one a few months ago, rear linkage needed re-torqued, but this one not so easy! Grrrrrr. perfect timing pinkbike. thanks...
  • + 1
 So apparently I should be servicing my bearings more then once a year! I took the lower pivot brackets off to grease and clean and when I spun the bearings they felt like they had sand in them Frown . I think the creak was coming from a through bolt that was starting to corrode to one of the inner bearings. - removed corrosion, cleaned and greased and all is quiet for now.
  • + 1
 I have an annoying creak, ill try the seatpost & grease technique but it sounds more like its coming from my seat and where it bolts on, its a loud creak and sounds unhealthy? Any help?
  • + 2
 Try to take off the seat, and clean the part of the seatpost that is holding the rails of the seat, and grease it before you mount the seat back on. Also, the seat can be the problem to. If the rails get loose even a little bit, they will be really annoying for your ears!
  • + 1
 Thanks a lot buddy! I'll give it a shot before the weekend!
  • + 4
 i have the best solution to creaks and squeeks.....TURN UP THE MUSIC...lol
  • + 1
 @ 0.10 u can here the cracking www.pinkbike.com/video/221140 ...now its really loud
i think its because of the links of the frame or does someone hear something else? ^^
Have to oil them this weekend.
  • + 1
 Creaks from the spokes?! Hummm Blank Stare
I would like to read about Headsets. Headsets, cranks/pedals and frame pivots are the most common to these creak problems.
  • + 1
 That absolutely happens my friend. Especially when your wheelset becomes a couple seasons old. I have had it happen where the spoke interfaces the hub as well.
  • + 1
 yup, where the spoke enters the hub flanges you can get all kinds of odd noises, a drop of Finish Line Dry Lube on each junction can work wonders!
  • + 1
 Aero spokes on road bikes are especially prone to creaking and it sounds like it is coming from the frame.
  • + 1
 Stuff just shouldn't creak, not for the price you pay for components! But then it doesn't help people jet washing their bikes!
  • + 1
 Stem bolts, grit and grime under lock-on grips, cable outers starting to fray at the ends, fork crowns... All pretty common things to creak...
  • + 1
 I came across this video that helped me out tipsperformance.com/how-to-remove-and-install-sram-crankset
  • + 1
 How do you measure the bb and cranks torque if it requires a special tool? (hollowtech2)
  • + 3
 nice report, thanks!
  • + 1
 My bike is creaking a lot, but because in my country is freedom of speech i can't do anything with him.
  • + 1
 Seems like the most obvious cause of creaks was left out. Bent metal that causes gaps.
  • + 1
 my cable housing creaks at contact points on my frame all the time, nothing a little tri-flow won't fix real quick!!
  • + 1
 I own a Scott Genius LT 30 and it creaks like hell. I don`t know what to do anymore! Does anyone know this problem?
  • + 4
 Did you even read the article?
  • + 1
 sure
  • + 5
 Did you do or are you planning to do any of the things outlined in it? Because that could be a very good place to start if you're trying to get rid of a creak in your bike.
  • + 1
 i did allready all of those tech-tips. except the derilleur pully wheels . thats why i ask, maybe someone has/had the same problem.
  • + 5
 You didn't explain the problem though... all we know is that you have one.
  • + 2
 When the obvious doesn't help - try the subtle. I had an annoying creak that took forever to track down, turned out it was the metal cable end rubbing against the frame when the rear suspension was active. Also, don't trust your ears, the noise sounded like it was coming from the cranks, but was generated half way up the frame. Just work through every possibility and eliminate one thing at a time, if possible, take parts off as you eliminate.
  • + 1
 Annoying sound for me is stones getting into my BMX fork, sounds like a child's rattle when I bunnyhop.
  • + 1
 how do you get stuff inside you fork?
  • + 3
 Tape off those openings.
  • + 1
 i positive propped you, because you're mike levy.
  • + 1
 My old bike had a creaking sound when I pedaled, it turned out to be the frame was cracked Frown
  • + 1
 another one is the pedal bearings/bushings, worth checking.
  • + 0
 hey can some one do a how to on taking apart and the rebuild of the rockshox argyle 318 plz mine are all sorts of messed up
  • + 1
 Headset bearings! creak to the max.

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