REEB Cycles All-Mountain - Review

Nov 18, 2013
by Jordan Carr  

REVIEWED
REEB All Mountain

WORDS Jordan Carr
PHOTOS Tal Roberts

Beer and bikes have been a natural match since the early days of cycling, and the parallel progression of beer culture and the cycling world has continued since then. Today's malty beverages fuel a variety of mountain bike events and the crossover between beer and bikes continues to grow with REEB's lineup of fun loving bikes. After ten years of supplying handcrafted malt beverages to the gritty, knobby tire culture of the Rocky Mountains, Dale’s Pale Ale has ventured into the bicycle business with an Oskar Blues-branded bike, cleverly named REEB (that's beer spelled backwards, by the way).

Inspired by several months of beer-infused conversation, REEB Cycles debuted in late 2011 with a hand built, trail-oriented, belt-driven, steel singlespeed 29er. REEB’s number one proponent and Oskar Blues Marketing Manager, Chad Melis, gave us the run down on the brand and what makes their handmade bikes so unique. “We wanted to build a simple bike that was fun to ride on the steep, gnarly terrain that we ride in our backyard around Lyons, Colorado,” he explains. Melis, the brain behind REEB Cycles, is immersed in the beer and bike culture: “It’s just a fun thing to be involved in; offering up the ‘tools’ to help people have fun: bikes and beer.” We all know how well beer and bikes go together, but does the REEB All Mountain fill a niche that has been left open by other bike brands on the market?
bigquotesMost singlespeeds on the market are based around tame cross-country riding, but we wanted something different. - Chad Melis, Marketing Manager



REEB All Mountain Details

• Intended use: trail/all-mountain
• Wheel size: 29"
• Frame material: True Temper OX Platinum steel
• Paragon Slider Dropouts
• Tapered head tube
• 12 x 142mm DT Swiss thru-axle
• Gates Centertrack belt drivetrain
• 100% American Manufactured frame
• Lifetime warranty
• MSRP: $1500 frame only




REEB Construction Details

REEB set out to create a bike that was not only comfortable and efficient for big days in the hills, but also capable and confidence inspiring on the descents, two traits that aren't easy to come by when talking about aggressive hardtails. Furthermore, the bike needed to conform with the unique singlespeed subculture by being understated and classy, but with a touch of edginess. The result is a humble, yet tasteful raw looking OX platinum steel frame, paired with a 44-mm head tube to accommodate today’s tapered steerer forks, Paragon's slider dropouts, Gates Carbon Drive, and a “trail style” geometry and build package.

REEB
  The OX platinum steel frame makes for a decidedly punk rock look compared to the polished lines found on most other bikes

Handbuilt in Denver, Colorado, by Chris Sulfrian of Generic Cycles, the REEB All Mountain's attitude pairs well with Oskar Blues’ approach to hand crafting beer. “We wanted to create a unique brand that fit well with our brewing approach” Melis told us, “Our beer is no joke and neither are the bikes. Both are meant to pack a punch.” The build partnership came about through some mutual friends and a passion for riding bikes, and although Sulfrian does all of the welding and design work, the development and tube sourcing is done by REEB. It's also important to think of the All Mountain as a work in progress, as they are continually making changes and updates as more prevalent options become available. The design is clean and simple, with an elegant clear-coated finish that exposes the detailed craftsmanship of Sulfrian’s work, and simple, flat-black decals fit well with the badass hand-cut metal headbadge. Our REEB test bike got many looks from a wide range of riders out on the trail, proving its simple design philosophy resonates well, even in a marketplace that often places too much emphasis on flash over function.

REEB
  Paragon's slider dropouts make for easy tension of the Gates Carbon Drive belt






Climbing/acceleration: On the trail, the REEB is the smoothest pedalling bike you will probably ever throw a leg over. The simple one speed drivetrain is made up of a Gates carbon belt drive system that creates a light, quiet pedalling motion while offering what is claimed to be superior durability over traditional chain drivetrains. Acceleration is noticeably snappier than a geared bike, and the belt system makes the bike extremely smooth through bursts of power. Like any singlespeed, though, the REEB takes some muscle and lungs to get the uphill. Its slack geometry and belt driven drivetrain make it a beautiful complement for a rider who spends most of their time aboard a fully suspended trail bike. Grunting up steep climbs keeps you honest and makes short punches a guilty pleasure while you continue to improve your fitness and find a new appreciation for rolling terrain. Gearing choice is always key to getting the most out of your bike, and that is especially true when talking about a singlespeed bike like the REEB.

REEB
  The REEB does climb very well, but also very differently than the usual singlespeed 29er offering.

Technical climbs can honestly be tricky on the REEB due to its slacker than usual head angle that was pushed out further by our 140mm travel fork, with this being especially true when the gearing choice seems a bit tall for the terrain, but prospective REEB owners will likely be okay with this tradeoff when the trail points down. If you are buying a singlespeed because it's the lightest and fastest climbing rig out there, the REEB may not be for you. But if you look at owning a singlespeed as a way to hone your overall riding ability and to push your climbing and fitness to a new level, the REEB delivers and keeps riding fun as hell.



Descending: Yes, it’s a hardtail, a singlespeed, and ultimately, it is a 29er, but let's break it down to the main reason we all ride bikes: fun. Shredding downhill is an amazing feeling, and when done on a proper bike, it can be straight up euphoric. The REEB delivers on that front, and is especially rewarding when you completely nail a tricky section. We chose to pair the handbuilt steel frame with a 140mm travel Fox Float 34 despite the frame being designed around a 120mm travel fork, a decision that was made to give us slightly more relaxed handling. That slacker head angle, paired with the bike's short chain stays, helps to keep the rider's weight in a much more rearward position than what you might at first expect from a singlespeed steel hardtail, and the longer fork makes up on the downhills what it loses on the ups. The bike's handling could still be called neutral and the front didn't push any more than a steeper angled bike, but we simply had more confidence on the REEB than a hardtail should hand out. That added up to loads of fun, proving that you most certainly don't need six or more inches of travel to get the most out of your ride.

REEB
  It is obviously most at home on smooth terrain like pictured above, but that doesn't mean a skilled pilot can't guide the REEB through some chunky sections of trail


Once turned downhill, it is obvious that the REEB is a much different beast than most 29er singlespeeds. The bike's 140mm travel Fox 34, 2.35'' Schwalbe Hans Dampf tires, and 780-mm wide bars make it much more of a trail charger than unsuspecting onlookers likely guessed, which is honestly where a lot of the fun comes from - nothing like sticking it to your buddies on their long travel bikes. The OX platinum steel frame also provides a degree of forgiveness that an aluminum frame simply can't offer. No, it's not in any way comparable to suspension, but it does help to mute those high frequency rattles that can get to be tiring during a long or fast ride.



Technical Report

REEB prides themselves in allowing a customer to build their bike just how they want it which is why we chose to pick up a REEB frame to allow for ultimate trail customization. Working directly with consumers or through small boutique bike shops, the REEB philosophy is much different than most other brands on the market. With the ability to run both the belt drive and/or a gear setup, its build options were almost endless. We chose to build the bike as a complement to our trail biased repertoire of bikes, thus giving us the greatest amount of versatility on this simplified machine.


• Gates Carbon Drive Centertrack Drivetrain - Gates’ new Centertrack belt-drive system provides a smooth drivetrain with little regular maintenance. Centertrack offers easy setup with a center track on the drive ring and cog that fits neatly in the special notched belt. This system keeps the belt centered on the drive rings even under torque. Caked with early-season mud, the belt-drive system worked flawlessly day after day.

REEB review test
  The belt system proved to be impervious to mud and debris, rolling smooth for many miles.


• The 140mm travel FOX Float 34 is a smart addition to this trail oriented hardtail that slackens the already lax geometry of the REEB and makes for a much easier transition when swapping between its simplicity and the everyday versatility of our daily trail rig. The 34 functioned well performance-wise, although it did make some odd noises when going through its stroke.

• Schwalbe's Hans Dampf tires are among our favourite jack-of-all-trades rubber, and their relatively high volume was an ideal match for the REEB hardtail that took the edge off of smaller trail chatter.

• X-Fusion's Hilo dropper is one of only two 27.2mm diameter options currently available, and we went with the longer 125mm travel version for our build instead of the 100mm model. Unfortunately, we ended up having some issues with the Hilo that saw the original post rebuilt to keep it from sinking into its stroke over time, a fix that last about three weeks until it began to repeat the same behaviour. REEB told us that they went with a 27.2mm size post to allow for some compliance in the frame, but we think we'd trade that off for the ability to fit a 30.9 or 31.6mm dropper post.

• Bashing through rocky terrain on a hardtail brings about a whole new level when it comes to wheel durability, but the REEB's Specialized Roval Traverse SL 29 wheels showed well, and at 1640 grams they brought durability and stiffness but didn't detract from the REEB's lightweight build. It didn't hurt that they setup tubeless extremely easily to boot.



Pinkbike's take:
bigquotesObviously, a trail oriented singlespeed hardtail is not going to be for everyone, but the benefits lie hidden beneath its simplicity - riders looking to improve their fitness level and technical skills will find this bike a key part of their quiver. Oskar Blues has designed a fun and elegant bike that brings simplicity and function to the forefront. Its angles not only make it versatile out on the trail, they also add an element of playfulness and trail worthiness to its masochistic mentality, and paired with quality components the REEB is at home on almost any trail that the rider sees fit, although technical, high speed trails take a new level of finesse and line choice. Whether that is a plus or a minus depends on how you approach mountain biking. If your goal is to improve as a rider while still getting your shred on, the REEB will bring you loads of smiles and leg burning pain, but riders who avoid a good amount of suffering when out on the trail or don't understand the benefits of a hardtail should look elsewhere.- Jordan Carr


www.reebcycles.com


178 Comments

  • + 90
 I love the fact that manufacturers are now finding time to make these little niche bikes. They're not for everyone but i bet a few people out there are going "that's exactly what i need!"
  • + 21
 check out the kona honzo too. much less expensive for very similar geo.
  • + 8
 Yeah the Honzo is a cool ass bike. This one is gorgeous, but I'd have a hard time dropping $1500 for a steel SS frame - I guess it's just a little too niche for me. But if you want that look on the cheap, you could always buy a Honzo or a Surly frame and have it stripped and clearcoated for less than half that. Did that to my Long Haul Trucker when I bought the frame used and it looked sexy.
  • + 31
 I have a Production Privee Shan, this is the sexiest steel hardtail out there by miles! ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb10133114/p4pb10133114.jpg
  • + 0
 Oh hey there you slack sexy thing..... I'm jealous
  • + 5
 the production privee shan is the best hardtail bike ever! rode on at a bikepark once, and it was awesome, in a whole different league than for example the NS surge and Dartmoor hornet i have owned
  • + 1
 @Rich-Downhill28... how does it run? Any foibles? The holes in the headtube suggest regular headset maintenance in theory but how is the practice?

How would you compare it to a Stanton Slackline? Have you ridden both? Or something from the On-One or Cotic Stables? Or Curtis? I am interested to hear about some people's experiences if you have any...
  • + 1
 Just curiousity yorntjfreerider, can you tell me the key points of setups on your Surge vs Shan? Fork/cockpit/tyres/rims?
  • + 3
 @orientdave - Holes in the headtube are negligable, never had an issue. It pins itself into corners like a full sus, it's such a light, solid bit of kit. It looks better than the other hardtails in that league by far in my opinion too. It's slacker than the other bikes you mentioned, making it slightly more versatile as you can drop the saddle low and do some light dh/freeride on it. But get a dropper post on it and it's possibly the most fun bike out there!

@WAKIdesigns Surge vs Shan - The Shan is a league above the surge, surge's are heavy. The Shan is a proper quality piece of kit and looks absolutely mint, it's slacker and slightly more versatile not to mention stronger. The rear end forces itself down into the corners, you get so much grip and confidence. I can use it for pretty much everything (I have a DH bike aswell) but riding rough stuff on the Shan is awesome. XC, 4X, Enduro and light DH all in one wicked package!
  • + 2
 PP Shan is one desireable bike, definitely on my wishlist along with several other LTHT's or AM HT's if you wish. Pretty hooked on LTHT's since i have my Liteville 101. Which is one awesome bike too. Wink
  • + 7
 Don't forget the Transition transam 29. Ditched my full suspension for it and couldn't be happier
  • + 9
 Ride bikes, drink beer!,
  • + 8
 Chromag Stylus, I love it: www.pinkbike.com/photo/10336023
  • + 1
 @Waki designs: I do not own a shan but i mentioned i rode one(with 780mm bars a 50mm stem and 160mm fork, just like I ran my surge and now run my dartmoor), it's just better in every way.. also, what Rich-downhill28 said
  • - 3
 Cool to hear that about Shan. I'll ride one soon!
  • + 2
 How did the interview happen Waki?
  • + 3
 You might want to look into Ragley. I had a blue pig for quite some time and I tell you it was the most fun I've had on a bike in a long while, only reason I sold it is cause I want to start DH racing. It's a great slack steel hard tail though, I loved it.
  • + 2
 @Mortified - happy to hear that as I just took a chance and ordered a Blue Pig. For those not familiar it's a steel 26" with slack head angle, 31.6 seatpost (dropper friendly), accepts tapered forks and has ISCG-05 tabs. Maybe not quite as polished as some others mentioned but very affordable.
  • + 2
 Like I said, probably my favorite bike ever just needed a race bike. Did you get the new one? I think it looks sexy as all get out with the curved top tube like that
  • + 2
 Yeah, it's the new model in black w/blue graphics. Pretty sharp looking.
  • + 2
 It will treat you right. For me it seemed I could constantly push it and it would still ask for more, really improved my riding.
  • + 1
 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! IS IT 650B !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ?
  • + 2
 Oh yeah, if your after a very cool, radical, inovative, custom, well designed, hand built frame with a Teutonic reputation. Check this out:
www.nicolai.net/162-1-Argon+AM.html
  • + 1
 @goflowz I know the 2010 I had could accommodate a 2.3 650b wheel with *enough* mud clearance.
  • + 16
 I recently purchased a Cotic BFe - steel hardtail 26'er with 140mm forks - all I can say is - buy a hardtail. Doesn't matter what one, but buy a hardtail. It re-invented riding for me.
  • + 3
 Agreed! I got one three years ago and I gravitate to it and another 853 long travel hardtail nearly every weekend.
  • + 0
 I must say that I gravitate away from having a big fork on my HT. I have a Sektor RLC with travel adjustable between 120 - 150 and I prefer to ride on 120 for most of the time. It's abit rougher but at the same time more balanced. There are very few forks in sub 150 range that have good damping (Rev with RCT3 finaly!) and I just don't like that wallowy front going into the holes and then the stiff rear shooting me forward. Then in my books putting a Lyrik size of a fork into HT while having a fully is a bit of missing the point. HTs rule!
  • + 2
 must be a better rider than me Waki! I need all the travel I can get to soak up the mistakes I make on the trails :-P I see where your coming from though, it is a lot of travel to have up front when there's absolutely no give in the rear travel at all.
  • + 3
 Yep, I just got a Stanton Slackline a few weeks ago. Massively enjoy riding it. I'd completely forgotten how instant acceleration on a hardtail is.
  • - 1
 OZ Mike - mnah Im not a good rider, but I bike for 13 years now, two of those I've spent on a cheap-O stiffie, three on a HT with 100mm fork, and 2 on HT with 150 fork. I ride a fully since 2007 and got myself an HT as a second bike in 2009. It was my wives HT with my old components with V-brakes Big Grin I have a legit HT since 3 years aside of a fully, with a half of a year brake for a Niner EMD9 which was terrible. It is really rewarding to be able to ride the toughest lines on HT with 100mm fork, same ones I rode with 6" fully. It is actually easier in many aspects because HT is more stable under braking, squat does not mess up your balance.
  • + 1
 @Waki I'm very jealous of your setup!! HT with adjustable travel in the front (and a susp corrected rigid fork for when I really wanna punish myself) is what I plan to build up next spring. Like you, I usually prefer less travel on HTs because to me the point of riding one is to have something quick, responsive, and flickable. If you bury it behind too much travel up front you lose some of that ability to pop off stuff or jerk your front end around to pick through tech stuff. OTOH, it's really nice to have the option to bump the travel up for a downhill bomb or something.

You know, I actually had V-brakes up until a few months ago on an old litespeed softail frame and I actually didn't mind them with some KoolStop dual compound pads. The only part that bothered me was having to keep my wheels super true all the time!
  • + 3
 Oooh, I am liking this conversation. Interesting. Here's my experience gentlemen that you can all chew over. I am in agreement with you MIke, everyone should try out a HT... and best with the idea of an adjustable fork (so if you get the chance bkm303, go for it).

The BFe started out with a 95-140mm U-Turn Pike on it which is good for nearly everything and anything. The great thing was that both the frame and fork (pretty heavy the old coil spring 454s) were burly enough to let it take close to the same levels of abuse that my first generation Blindside could deal with. Reducing the travel to around 100 to 120 depending on the climb/trail was a lot more balanced when it wasn't pointing down, however the 140mm was very much a necessity given where you could point the frame on the way down. I regularly felt more in control on the BFe at 140mm on the downs than on the Blindside with it's honey-filled sofa-esque plushness...... a great combination if you can get hold of an OLD U-turn Pike.

The Sektor (150mm solo air) I got when I managed to pick up a Slackline for a steal and as Waki says, it can wallow into g-outs and holes and really sink into its travel the way the Pike never does, however, if you build up a HT on the light side, and I mean try and get it really light, then take those two hardtails away from the technical stuff and onto a flowy trail then the Slackline/Sektor are so much more fun than the BFe/Pike. Tubeless ZTR flows and a solo air Sektor on the Slackline and it just accelerates like a (insert something here).

GIven my experience with 853 HTs, I think I can say you can find just about any number of possible combinations of builds around any Cotic, Ragley, Slackline, On-One (yes I know they are all UK brands, I'm a Brit and make no excuse for my bias!), to match what you want / need. As you say OzMike... BUY A HARDTAIL and see a different side to a trail; they really are not only educational, but GREAT fun.
  • + 1
 I bought a Cotic BFe last year and really like it. I have a Micro Ti 55 now and it's reduced to 140mm. With 25 percent sag or so, it really works well. Has lockout for climbs and I run the rebound one click on the fast side, so I can "pop" the front end up with ease. Want to get a dropper post for it. It's a really fun bike. A tad smoother than my SC Chameleon, but a bit slower overall on the flats and climbs. The build kit does make it a pound or 2 heavier, but it has a fun factor downhill and jumping it.

Every once in a great while I miss having rear suspension, but it's not enough to switch back. The best part about the longer travel fork, you can kind of ride the fork in the rough stuff. Went from 100 to 125 (now 130) on the Chameleon and am very happy at that setting. It went from "Oh no, too fast into this rough stuff" to "Wow, that was a fun section". The Cotic is happiest at 140. Even with the settings above and all the other settings I can do to the fork, I have about a half to 3/4 on an inch (12-20mm) of travel not being used. If you ride light in the saddle, use your legs and clipped in, a hardtail will make it through a lot. I am running flats on the Cotic, Clipped out a few times doing flat (one or no footed) tabletops.. haha
  • - 1
 Orientdave - weird with the Pike. Mycoil Sektor works exactly as "unimpressively" as Pike 409 I had for a month, and they both had same dampers, just like 454. My Pike was stiffer but equally wallowy or harsh (depends how you set thr compression)

I am thinking of buying 853 tubing from Reynolds and maje a steel proto of my frame Big Grin just have to get bloody 73mm BB and tapered HT from steel from somewhere - it's a btch to find!
  • + 1
 Really Waki? Wow, I am surprised. And intrigued. The 32mm stanchions are the same, as is the motion control right, so that leaves 1) the spring rate... or how about 2) the frame? Now as you know, I am no engineer, so maybe you could throw some of your ideas this way.. Would the nature of the rather seriously burly BFe frameset allied with the heavier 454s make for a more stable platform than the same forks on another bike? Could it be that the BFe and Pikes just really work well with each other, because the difference on the same trails when compared to a Slackline (lighter frame and narrower tubes (Cotic use an oval top tube)) was quite noticable.

And trying to get 853 BB and HT... have you tried going to the likes of the small scale 853 makers and asking if you can get a few from their suppliers in Taiwan? Not perfect I know, but they may be able to put you in touch with a man who can...and after your recent brush with the glitterati of the UK publishing scene, maybe they know someone who can help you out...!
  • + 1
 @ Waki: check these guys out: www.paragonmachineworks.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?search=action&category=BB02

If they don't have it, they will make it for you!
  • + 1
 Waki: you want R853? look at these bikes www.rsdbikes.com
  • - 2
 @Orientdave - Pike is stiffer that Rev/sektor due to crown that is as massive as the one in Lyrik, that is also the main reason why it is so bloody heavy.Pike 409 comes at 2,5kg while Sektor Coil RLC is 2,0. Maybe older MoCo dampers were better in some mysterious way.

Willie - thanks, I'll use their shop when I will get in a mood for another frame.
  • + 1
 I picked up a Cube LTD SL 2012 a couple of weeks ago for a good price. Wanted an HT bike as I never had a proper one. Its a cross country bike, I changed the cockpit with some 760mm handlebars and a 50mm stem. Its originally a cross country bike, but you don't sit low as on a cross country bike. With the new cockpit it feels alot like my all mountain bike. Its pretty heavy for an XC bike too, 13kg, but...
this thing kills, its unbelievable how fast the bike accelerates UPHILL. My other bike is a Transition Covert with top components which also weights around 13kg, and even with the rear shock on ascend I can't get anywhere near the same climbing speed.
I'm sure in few weeks once I get fully used to it I will bomb downhill with it as well (obviously not on a DH course)
  • + 1
 grim007 - to be perfectly honest, that's why I don't fully get that NUschool LTHT hysteria. An XC race bike, with race geometry is a very good HT. Just throw wide bars, wide rims and fat tyres! Those XC racers tend to have low BBs and long TTs. the only thing that really sucks with them is that if you put a 140mm fork on it, the seat angle will go too slack. I mean it sucks if you pedal seated a lot. People want slack head angles, fair enough... but are they sure they can live up to that stability? Do they really shred so hard, that they are so ready to give up low speed handling? Ok if you stand up on pedals you can compormise for that, but are you sure you stand up so much? People seem to believe as if slack HA had no trade offs, that it is a domain of aggro riding and only noobs along with leg shaving fire road warriors would like something steeper than 67. Then they talk static geometry on HT and all sorts of half-relevant mumbo jumbo... wide bars compensate for lack of stability! By the time slack LTHTs were invented, we still rode 685 bars, 711 at best! Then bikes with larger wheel sizes have more intrinsic stability due to BB drop, if you slack them out, they will become freight trains. Just before Enduro World Series struck the gravity MTB world, people were into 62HA DH bikes. Everyone wanted angle set, as if bike manufacturers were robbing us from some potential. Suddenly Enduro comes, people see that those blokes shred DH WC level tracks on small bikes and wow, I don't need that! I need a nimble flickable bike, bike parks are full of them - what happened?! HTs will come to that as well, I hope.
  • + 1
 I don't know if I would call it hysteria Wiki; more like eye-opening experience on the part of riders. Personally, compared to what I had been riding previously (an old Norco Torrent freeride HT and a Manic too), when I first built up and rode my BFe it was like a light had come on in my head: "Why hadn't I ridden something like this before?", the frame geo just felt so much more in tune with me and the trails I was on. Add an adjustable travel fork on the front so you can, when you choose, sharpen up the front end steering for low speed technical handling, great! However, when you want a slacker angle for a faster trail with more "flow", then roll out the 140-150mm of travel and enjoy! The BFe took me places that my Norco HT didn't. Of course, once news of the great fun and handling that could be had on a longer (than 120mm) fork equipped LTHTs, then everyone wants to make one.... hysteria from the mass market producers maybe I'll give you that. There will always be people who want [insert latest trend component here} because it is the latest thing, however that doesn't mean it lacks real worth/utility/value in the right hands for the right reasons. Take any small scale LTHT maker and the story is similar, the BTR Belter for example, a DH HT of what many would call a ridiculous 61HA...61!!! Crazy? Well, no, not for Tam and Burf, that's where his riding took him and they made the bike they wanted... same story with the Cotic Soul and Stanton Slackline... riders making the bike they wanted first and foremost and then they found that others also wanted one after they had had a go on one. If people jump on the bandwagon because they think it is the bandwagon to be on, more fool them. If they ride a LTHT and find they love it... why not!!??
  • + 1
 I call it hysteria, because "you got to have a slack head angle" in "gravity MTB" world is symmetrical with "you got to get a 29er" among fire road warriors. I only comment on that very assumption that we all tend to have from time to time that "this one thing" solves everything! For instance I am currently at the stage where "long reach solves everything!" And it never does, because many originators of "trends" put lots of other ingredients into the mixture, while followers and buyers tend to focus on the magic thing that made the formula work in the end. Like people who put 650B wheels on 26" bikes, it is an utter lack of realization of number of issues going into a bike design and then relations between each other. I am more than sure that most people think of properties of a wheel alone when they think of trying another wheel size. We get used to almost anything and we are able to rationalize almost anything. And everything depends on your trails, your fitness and skill set - then we can talk preferences Smile
  • + 1
 If you are talking industry wide bandwagon jumping then I am with you on that one... one "golden" thing never solves anything, so, more fool people who think that it does. God, I have had a hard enough time over the years with matching stem length, bar rise and sweep to the TT length and my horrendous posture to expect to find a golden anything these days.
  • + 1
 Everything is a compromise. Give up something to gain something else. There is no magic bullet!!!!
  • - 1
 It's not only "the industry". Slack&low frenzy wasn't started by the industry, they have actually shown plenty of resistance. It took not more than a year from "interesting finding" to overkill.
  • + 1
 So, who is responsible for the overkill as you see it Waki? Where does that come from?
  • - 1
 Morm... jk - nearly every bike geek Big Grin
  • + 1
 I can see how that would be an attractive thesis given how the bike industry (and even more so riders) seem to always want to dive head first into every "latest thing" with riders often doing so without thinking too much about knock on effects on other aspects of a ride or set of components... however, you are at a risk of "throwing the baby out with the bath water".. as my parents used to say. Just because you can see overkill on the LTHT sector doesn't mean they have no value. I mean, given the choice of only keeping one of the frames / forks I have ever owned....the BFe with the Pike would come bloody close to winning out given where and how I ride 10 months of the year. Cheers for the interesting ideas as ever... off to bed.
  • - 1
 Slack HA was the case of tune up. It happens in every industry from time to time. Someone finds "the hole in the system" and feels so damn smarter than the users of "stock stuff". It's like people clocking up processors. I'm not saying there was nothing in it. I'm saying, sometimes people bring too much value to things like that. For instance recentyl I realized that I hate my Mavic CMax ST wheels and I hate my XTR crankset. I feel so poor because I'm stuck with them and I have no money to change them immediately! They are so out dated and the new stuff, like wider rims and spiderless cranks feel so brilliant! There are so many reasonable and logical arguments for wider rims - that would make my riding SO MUCH better! XTR is from 2009 and CMAX STs are from 2011... so outdated, such low-profile products... Big Grin
  • + 9
 Kona Honzo will do all of this and has shorter chainstays. www.konaworld.com/honzo.cfm
  • + 4
 and gears.
  • + 6
 It is significantly uglier though. Not a huge deal but it does play a part in decision making. This Reeb bike is one of the nicer looking 29ers I have seen.
  • + 2
 TransAM has the premium steel AM.
  • + 4
 Yes, kind of chuckled then they said 17.3" are "short chainstays". 16.3" is short. Canfield and Kona have got it figured out.
  • + 1
 Been on a Canfield Yelli Screamy the last year, and the last few months been running it as a single speed. It's really changed my riding going SS... and coupled with the adjustable travel Revelation, one of the most solid bikes I've ever ridden.
  • + 1
 I'm loving my single speed canfield nimble 9 with a 34mm stanchion 120mm travel fork. Bring it on REEB! Another option is great for everyone. It would be great to see this type of bike and riding replace the traditional xc stuff that's out there.
  • + 1
 The Honzo has shorter CS and the frame will cost a 1/3 the price.
  • + 2
 Canfield Nimble 9 gets my vote....I had a Honzo as well and I like the standover of the N9 which is why I switched (not to mention the guys at Canfield are awesome to talk to). Other than that they are pretty similar. Slack, low, short SS 29ers are a must for any bike quiver.
  • + 1
 Yep. Standover on the new N9 is what motivated me to upgrade from my original N9. Plus it's chrome. Mmmmmm, chrome. The honzo is an awesome bike too. I went with the N9 for mostly aesthetic reasons. Both are what I would consider optimal for western Pennsylvania trail riding. Efficient yet tank enough to hit stuff as hard as you want.
  • + 10
 Gotta love hardtails
  • + 7
 HUGE marketing mistake calling it 'All Mountain'. If they called it 'Enduro' it would sell much better.
  • - 1
 i would agree with you with on the mistake of calling this an all-mountain bike, but i wouldn't credit the "enduro" name for this bike either. a true all mountain is a 5-7 inch full suspension bike made to get to the top, ride a good amount of miles & mash the decent, technical, hucks, drops... preferably on 26 wheels. enduro to me is a 5 - 5 1/2 inch bike with 27.5 - 29 wheels for faster ascending & anything in between the true all mountain style of riding.

it's just an aggressive hard-trail single belt driven 29" REEB.
  • + 4
 Enduro is a type of racing that uses " all mountain" style bikes.

Think of Grand Prix races: they are run with formula one cars.

And all mountain bikes in all wheel sizes can be used for Enduro racing.
  • + 1
 Dude, it was a joke...
  • + 0
 Fair enough, my bad. Wish they had a sarcasm font.
  • + 1
 I hear ya...I tried with the all caps and quotes.
  • + 6
 Go home REEB, you're drunk. Wait no, have another. Great beer and a cool concept.
  • + 3
 I built up a dialled alpine with 160's up front a few months ago and it has completely changed trail riding for me, and im sure after a few more months riding i will see some technique benefits on the DH rig, especially riding flats.
  • + 7
 I hope they bring out a NIOREH and KCARC for the really hip hipsters.
  • + 2
 I have 3 steel frames.
Dialled prince albert, dialled mx20 bmx and jawbone dj bike.
Fair to say that 99.9% of the time my Azure, Nomad, V3 or Scalp are taken out to play.
As fun as a bt can be, it is not as much fun as a marathon bike, with 50mm stem, 750mm bars and 2.0" tyres, no dropper post, clipped in and still hit the jumps.
Something refreshing about a short travel bike and skinny tyres when you ride dh.
  • + 3
 1500$ for the frame only is too steep, especially for a 4130 cromo frame. Neat concept but if they were able to make it 1500$ for the whole bike they would be in business. In this economy this is not worth it.
  • + 1
 of course it climbs well, look at that gear ratio. a sweet bike, but you would get spun out pretty quickly on a moderate down slope. and for all the doubters, a skilled rider can tear sh*t up on an aggressive hardtail that a lot of people wouldn't even try on a full suspension bike. Does anyone know about the belt drive system? Can I buy the belt-ring, cog and belt and just put them on my singlespeed?
  • + 1
 To my knowledge, the biggest limiting factor for a belt drive conversion would be the need for a "break" in the frame in order to install the one-piece belt. It seems like this usually occurs at the dropout.
  • + 1
 as pdxkid said. You need a place for the belt to slide between the seatstay. Best place is at the dropout.
  • + 1
 Can someone tell me - define an ALL Mountain bike? I thought they were long travel trail bikes capable of everything - DH, XC, capable climber. Seems every manufacturer therse days is labeling just about all bikes ALL Mountain. Clearly a HT is not All Mountain - You can only get so agressive fast on an HT. Yes, some guys surely can haul on them, but for most of us - FS is the way to go.
  • + 5
 An all mountain bike is an enduro bike with out all the hassle and pressure of being enduro. J/K.. Many years ago, it was one bike for all aspects. I raced everything on one bike (COUGH!!!!) 22 years ago. Then came DH bikes with like 4 inches of travel. Those became 6 than 8. A few 12 inchers out there. Well, some bike manufactures liked the added travel and you ended up with bikes that have 4 inches of travel that could be light enough and pedaled efficiently enough to race the odd xc race and sturdy to do mild Downhilling. The Stumpjumper FSR for example, changed it's design twice, but the current design was pretty much a light weight version of it's first downhill bike. Anyway, so they had these "inbetweeners". Some call them trail bikes, some all mountain. I think, not sure, but if a bike has more than 120mm of travel, it's unofficially considered "All Mountain". I think a magazine or 2 threw All Mountain out there and it kinda stuck. This is a long travel, hardtail, single speed. Don't know what to call that. Enduro bikes on the other hand, are AM bikes...
  • + 3
 To summarize, "all mountain" covers just about every bike in between a pure XC race bike and a DH bike!
  • + 2
 a stable, slack hardtail with a 140/160mm fork can feel just as capable as an fr/am/enduro bike, you can go really big on them and even ride gnarly downhill tracks, it's just way harder to learn..
  • + 2
 There is no single definition that everyone will agree on.

As for "but for most of us - FS is the way to go"... it may interest you to learn that in many places, hardtails are the norm. I ride a single speed hard tail 90% of the time despite considering myself a downhiller / OG freeride dirtbag. After riding DH, it seems pointless to ride full suspension on my local trails. The local trails are more fun and indeed faster on a HT. Of course, it all comes down to where you live.
  • + 2
 @pslide.. Uhhhhh yeah, sure... haha.. There was a change a few years ago to longer travel trail bikes, those had All Mountain in the descriptions. The Rocky Mountain Slayer may have been the first. Pivot Firebird is all mountain. Specialized Enduro is all mountain. I'm sure the word Enduro will replace all mountain in a few years and it will all become simple again. XC, trail, enduro, DH. Interestingly (maybe, I remember too much useless crap for my own good) the Mountain Cycle San Andreas was one of the first bikes used for Downhill racing that became an "All Mountain" bike in it's later years. Oh shoot, forgot about freeride and DJ bikes...
  • + 3
 You also have to take the manufacturers descriptions with a grain of salt. Look at the manufacturer descriptions and (not surprisingly) you'll never find the details of what a bike can't do well. They will always tell you the bike can do anything. Every bike will "take you anywhere you want to go". Every bike "handles the steepest climbs and the most technical descents" blah blah blah.
  • + 2
 IMO the pro's of this bike being a AM; 1. Low vibrating steel frame 2. Medium slack on head tube 3. AM front fork (which is really all you need because your legs are always the rear suspension). Some people ride faster and more aggressive with a HT because of the responsiveness.
The con's - IMO; 1. Wheels to big 2. No gears 3. You will become weary of big drops with the HT or most people will try to avoid them.
How does anybody think a 29'er HT is a AM bike? = With beers.
  • + 2
 i agree about the wheels being too big, i think you then lose the main advantage over a FS, and that's being able to pick up the bike over obstacles,with the bigger heavier wheels i can imagine that's way harder to do. and you can do big drops, if there is a good transition. it is a lot more scary though IMO !!
  • + 1
 What is "frame compliance"? I noticed their titanium frame uses 30.9 so why wouldn't they use the same? I'd love to see this bike with a bigger seat post. In fact, I don't think i've seen a steel belt compatible frame with a post size larger than 27.2.
  • + 1
 A ride quality. Either a bit of flex or a way to keep vibration or trail hits not so harsh. In this case, if you were seated and hit a bump, it would give a small amount in the post/seat. Might also let the BB sway a tiny bit, giving it a smoother feeling ride. I have a 31.6 on my Cotic and it has a stiff BB, but the seat stays are designed to give a bit or be compliant. If it had straight seat stays, instead of the arch, it would be a pretty harsh ride. My Cotic is as every bit as stiff as my over built aluminum bike, but has the every present "smooth ride" of a steel frame.
  • + 1
 Great looking frame, I'm trying to find myself a reasonably priced transam after selling my very well equipped vagrant - need something more enduro/all mountain and don't want to go anywhere near 29ers.

I want steel and and I want it with a solid group set and a burley long travel'ish fork. For less than 2k???
  • + 2
 check out Surley Instigator if you haven't already.
  • + 1
 I haven't ridden many hard tails so my question is, what exactly is the biggest difference between them? What makes one ride better or different that another? I'd assume geometry is the biggest factor, and materials like carbon can make them lighter, but is there anything else? Without suspension there doesn't seem to be much else going on.
  • + 1
 There is a lot to your question and as seen by all my posts today, I'm slow at work. So, yeah, geometry is part of it. But lets say you find your perfect geometry and everything, take 3 different sets of stock steel tubing Ox, mid grade Reynolds and just some other "cheap" stuff. All the same diameter, weld up all 3 frames, all the same design. The Ox will probably be the best of the 3 in feel, stiffness and be the lightest. The others would be heavier and have more flex. Now, get 3 more sets of tubes, shape the cheaper sets top and down tubes a certain way and change the seat stays or change the butting thickness or diameter of the tubes and you could have something completely different riding wise. It will never be an air hardened ride, but you can try to make it ride a certain way. With any hardtail, you can change the way a bike rides by playing with the tubes sizes and design. Working at a bike shop for years, I was able to ride a lot of different bikes. I rode a full XTR Titanium framed bike once that a salesman brought in. Boasted about how great it was, it was the flexiest bike I've ever ridden!!! Derailleur rub in the middle ring flex. A month later rode another Ti framed XTR bike of a different brand, I could not believe it was the same tubing. Night and day difference. It's all how they put them together.
  • + 1
 This looks like a decent rig, but somehow brings to mind all the "branded" bikes of the 90's. I'm referring to the car and beer company versions of standard mountain bikes that people now try to pass off as "collectable." I certainly think we're seeing something very opposite of that here!
  • + 2
 For $1500 I'm either buying a Dekerf-built Chromag Surface or 2Souls QH Quarterhorse frame. But I saved myself over $1000 on the frame and still stoked with my 20212 Honzo after 2 years of riding.
  • + 1
 Plus the 27,2 seat tube, WTF were they thinking?
  • + 1
 Ok nice bike. But if they really liked beer shouldn't it come with a bottle opener on it? I know spoke's, pedal's, stems, seatpost's, barend's, chainring's, axles, etc etc work. But something on the frame would've been cool.
  • + 2
 Oskar Blues on sells craft beer in cans....
  • + 2
 I think it's really badass that REEB sent you a bike. They're a legit home grown operation and deserve some mad props for what they do.
  • + 1
 I want to know more about belt drives. Can you not run a spring loaded tensioner and have one on a full suspension rig? If so, I want a pinion AM bike with one. Lighter and low maintenance with long life? Sounds like a plan.
  • + 1
 Belt drives need heaps of tension so you can not run a tensioner. Also, the frame needs to split at the chain stay to pass the belt through.
  • + 1
 most full suspension bikes have a pivot point the belt could run through. I found a belt drive full suspension rig, but it has a system that requires no chain growth: twentynineinches.com/2013/06/25/mitech-epsilon-pinion-gear-box-fs-29er-final-review.

How much tension are we talking, since you can use the paddles like teeth on the cogs? Is it going to ruin the plushness of the suspension? That seems unlikely since you can put the tensioner near the BB and use a mechanical advantage to move a very tight tensioner.
  • + 1
 I looked into it further for anyone who might be interested (probably just me). The gates belt drive requires between 65 and 80lbs to avoid skipping. You would need a tensioner that guarantees it remains at that point, without causing too much trouble for the normal suspension.
  • + 3
 The tension is so great that you can barely wobble the belt is feels real tight. Like if I set up a BMX and tightened the chain at the low spot, and then rotated the cranks to the high spot and you feel the chain is about to snap - about that tight. Honestly. I worked with a shop that specialized in IGHs, custom singlespeeds, cargo bikes and all the sort of niche stuff that most bikes shops wouldn't touch. The guys there were so into it they had custom titanium rings and cogs made for their Gates belt drives.

The tension is so great that the cranks won't spin freely, and there is enough resistance from the pressure that measurable drops in long rides were measured. The shop started shying away from belt drives once they found their point-to-point times increasing.

I was thinking that you could run one on a concentric-BB suspension system (like a Lenzsport). Having to take the swingarm off every time is a PITA, though that wouldn't happen very often. Mind you, there are no more quick changes of the rear tube when you flat - think about what has to be done to remove the rear wheel for either of those bikes. And then you have to get the belt up to tension... at night in the pouring rain etc.

On a hardtail commuter I think the belt drive makes sense, but if you want to race or ride aggressively IMHO a chain is still the way to go.
  • + 1
 That's the info i was looking for. Thanks
  • + 1
 Great idea....................1500 bucks for the frame? If it was Titanium yes. Steel. maybe 900 bucks.
With a custom bike you pay for the hours spent on attention to detail.
  • + 1
 nah...i previously had a ns surge 2 tho sold it. now im considering a dartmoor phantom just love those slack lines. 27.5 wheels imo would be better. if only steel was more mainstream than aluminium.
  • + 1
 I bought a trek Stache 8, did some upgrades and I hardly even used my 26" full suspension all summer. I never thought I would end up doing the majority of my trail riding on a hard tail.so much more fun
  • + 1
 I think if I was going to go for a single speed steel hardtail it would be one from Sam Whittingham on Quadra Island: timetogetnaked.com/gallery/sams-made-a-29er-ss-with-belt-drive/2012/07/13
  • + 1
 I like the reeb. I am busy stripping the paint off my fugly old ali atx 890 Its getting a fork upgrade and proper brakes Looking forward to rolling on a HT after 8 years on dual ...
  • + 3
 No bottle-opener built into the bike = major fail for a bike based on beer.
  • + 5
 Oskar Blues beer- all cans, no bottles.
  • + 1
 There are at least 3 companies making a 27.2 compatable dropper post: Gravity Dropper (across all models), KS (lev and supernatural 27.2), and X-fusion (as mentioned in the article).
  • + 3
 Woah, woah, woah, pinkbike just reviewed a hardtail trailbike - holdy $hi^!
  • + 1
 Why is that considered slack ? 68,75 ° on a Hardtail is probably around 70° when in use. As "slack" as a marathon/XC bike. But the looks are truly great.
  • + 2
 A mathematical equation would place this into the slack category for a 29er. It needs a steeper angle, different fork offsets, etc to steer lightly. Most 29er's probably float around in the 71 degree range after sag is set. They did put a 140mm fork on there and it's designed for a 120, which would put it at around 67.9 degrees. It is a good looking bike.
  • + 1
 Yeah most 29er XC bikes float around 71°, thats exactly the point. You will get the same angles if u put a 120mm fork in a Stumpjumer 29er HT or a Niner AIR 9.
Cotic Solaris for example has a 69° HA after sag. So the REEB has a real steep HA, considering its intended use, name, and fork travel.
  • + 2
 I rode a stumpjumper evo and was happy to give it back. I then rode a reeb AM geared and almost bought it right there because it was super fun.
  • + 1
 Just picked up on of the first generation On-One 456 summer seasons....raw steel with a clear coat.....really looking forward to building her up with 120-150mm RCT3 Rev.
  • + 0
 Steel frame, singlespeed AND 29er. That is the ultimate hipster bike.
And notice the lack of homophobic adjectives in this sentence (which was pretty hard to achieve considering how, uhm... Well you know, this bike is).
  • + 2
 Hub geared version would make it perfect! or even better wheres my gearbox in a bottom bracket mr shimano!!?!?!
  • + 1
 have been enjoying a Transition Covert 29er all season and just last month picked up a Kona Unit SS Rigid and wow I didn't realize that I'd love riding a Rigid SS this much.
  • - 1
 Well a high end, Handmade in USA, OX platinum steel frame with 44mm head tube and sliding dropouts to run everything from single speed to 12 x 142 is nice. And a sweet paint job that accentuates the weld burns is nicer. But it's the nicest when it's only $1,000. Unless of course you have a real need for a 68.75 degree head angle on a hard tail? Although that's probably what you get with a 140mm fork on any frame. Check out the new Vassago. It's the Fiznizzleshizzle. I am a proud owner of one myself. And no I don't work for the company. www.vassagocycles.com
  • + 2
 Speaking of handmade in USA, why not go with a proven and reliable 27.2 Gravity Dropper Post? I would.
  • + 1
 awesome! the bike that I would love to have at the moment would be this kind of simple bike with wide rims and 3 inch tires
  • + 1
 they make a fat version... Lyons CO does see snow
  • + 1
 FYI Reeb are available without belt drive. Seen many out in the front range with normal derailleurs or SS chains.
  • + 1
 I feel like I could take these specs to a metal shop and have one built for 1/3 of the cost.
  • + 1
 I want the Dekerf Implant reviewed by Pinkbike and see how it compares as an all mountain hardtail
  • + 1
 Super easy frame rapair, would buy it just for a solid simple bike that will live forevaaaa
  • + 1
 man all this cool niche bikes make me regret spending so much time riding bikes instead of becoming a millionaire.
  • + 1
 Looks hot! Chris should make a Ti version of it, since he's already into building Ti frames Smile
  • + 2
 The TyREEB has exactly the same geometry, only the inner seattube diameter is larger. The All Mountain is just a steel version with a 27.2 seattube to safe some weight...
  • + 2
 Where`s the keg-holder?
Like the bike!
  • + 1
 Why does the seat tube angle get slacker into the bigger sizes? Isn't that the opposite of how it should be?
  • + 2
 its BEER spelt backwards Razz Big Grin
  • + 1
 reaaaally????
  • + 2
 Looks like an enduro Trek !
  • + 1
 I would love to ride this one!
  • + 1
 Cove Stiffee with a marz 160mm! oh baby it shreds!
  • + 1
 Anyone know what saddle is on this bike??????
  • + 2
 charge scoop
  • + 2
 You had me at beer.
  • + 0
 Go home REEB, you're drunk. Wait no, have another. Great beer and a cool concept.
  • + 1
 Nice, looks fun!
  • + 1
 Time for a Reeb run!! Wink
  • + 1
 so punk rock
  • + 7
 its pretty metal too
  • + 1
 I could like this bike!
  • + 1
 nice
  • + 1
 looks great!
  • - 1
 great bike ! and what an awsome frame ... you can also have a look here (french builder ) : www.curve-bike-engineering.com
  • - 1
 I stopped reading when i got to 'steel singlespeed 29er'
  • - 3
 I prefer one of those : www.pinkbike.com/photo/10291191
  • + 3
 lol
  • - 1
 Q:Is there a steel hardtail in your future? See what we thought of the REEB All Mountain.
A: No
  • - 2
 It would be alright if it didn't have silly wheels
  • - 3
 Agree, would look better with 26
  • + 1
 Agree, would look better with 650b or 29+
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