Tioga MT-Zero Platform Pedal and Psycho Genius Venture DH Tire - Eurobike 2011

Sep 2, 2011
by Richard Cunningham  
Tioga has been working nights and Sundays on two radically different downhill concepts that are sure to rock the status quo. The first shot over the bow is the MT-Zero Pedal first featured in Pinkbike earlier this Summer. Less than ten millimeters thick and cast from chromoly steel, the MT-Zero places the sole of the rider's shoe nearly on center with the pedal axle. Actually, the Zero doesn't have a true pedal axle. The pedal platform is cantilevered from a stub-shaft that rides in a single ball bearing.

Tioga's clever design took a year to perfect. Reportedly, the machining tolerances required to manufacture the steel housing that threads into the crankarm on one end, and supports the bearing and all of the pedal's bending moments on the other end. Tioga MT-Zero pedals sell for $99 USD in black or white. Weight is reported to be only 135 grams a pair.

Tioga MT-Zero Pedal

MT Zero Pedal
Tioga MT-Zero Pedal is only 7 millimeters thick in its center-section. The pins are replaceable through the back side of the platform, and the super-low foot position it offers stabilizes the foot while riding choppy trails.


Tioga Psycho Genius Venture Tire

Psycho Genius Venture DH tread
Triangular tread blocks are thinned at the tire crown to keep the Psycho Genius Venture tire rolling fast on pedaling sections.

Taking the lead from its Psycho Genius all-mountain/XC tire, Tioga put in a year's development to translate the shape-shifting triangular tread block design of the original into a viable downhill racing tire. The Psycho Genius Venture's large-volume, 2.5-inch casing provides a tactile feel where traction is delicate, while sturdy edging tread blocks are designed to bore through loose topsoil and find traction for cornering. Tioga gave the Venture a low, fast-rolling center tread with widely-spaced triangular blocks, split three ways with deep grooves engineered to distort under driving and cornering pressure. The grooves cause sections of the tread blocks to lift, which offers up extra edges when the tire is hard pressed for traction.

Psycho Genius Venture sidewall
The cross pattern molded into the Venture's casing adds a degree of side-wall protection for the tire.

Tioga says that in spite of the fact that the Venture downhill tire benefits from knowledge garnered during the original Psycho Genius development, it took four molds and a year of testing to get its performance tuned to perfection. To maintain the tire's supple, fast-rolling feel, the Venture's side wall casing is molded with a cross-hatch rubber pattern that adds a degree of abrasion resistance without robbing the casing's flexibility. Tioga says that it is presently working on a large-volume 29er version and a 2.35-inch sized Venture for 26-inch all-mountain use. Psycho Genius Venture tires will hit the stores around December 2011.The weight is coming in at 830 grams, while the MSRP has yet to be fixed.


Tell us what you think of Tioga's Psycho Genius tires and that thin-profile MT-Zero platform pedal design.


122 Comments

  • 27 2
 I just want those pedals, thinner feels better -fact

Chromo is stronger than alu, thats why the axles in your current pedals are made from it (and they are probably not much thicker than 10mm thick either). Chromo also bends before it snaps unlike alu. These will be stronger than all these magnesium pedals that you all seem fine with but i keep seeing destroyed. Big bearings are also better than than small bearings, this is not a hard concept to grasp. So your pedals that have run fine on tiny brearings will continue to run fine on a bearing over twice the size.
fInally tioga isnt going to spend two years developing a pedal that snaps after a run and means you can sue them for injuries, the flypaper pedals have never broken, not a single pair, and they where 3 mm thick too, i'm sorry, but pinkbike can all be so bloody ignorant and stupid sometimes.
  • 12 1
 I don't think so. That's not what she told me haha
  • 1 0
 lolz Big Grin
  • 8 2
 thinner feels better... thats what she said
  • 2 2
 chazdog, honest question, i dont understand, is that why people are so into these thin pedals? Do they feel better? Ive been wondering for a while why everyone is so into thin pedals?????????????
  • 2 2
 or is it just weight? (obvious next question)
  • 6 0
 Clearance.
  • 4 1
 lower center of gravity?
  • 2 1
 Don't buy the lower center of gravity for a second. we are talking about 4 or 5 mm difference max.
  • 1 3
 Don't get thin pedals, seems like a huge waste of time and money. if the Atherton's thinks they are going to help enhance performance I can see it. But a regular dude going down Whistler? I'm thinking no, which means once again the marketing is working very nicely.!
  • 5 2
 just because the wife tells you thinner is better doesn't make it true Smile



but seriously, how can you tell how thin a pedal is other than the crankarms feeling a tad shorter or longer whatever the case may be. To me it's all about pin placement and number, shape of pedal body followed by rotational feel.

These pedals may weigh 135 grams and ( they look like it), they probably will retail here for close to $135 and I bet they last about 135 seconds on a DH run.
  • 10 1
 Think of 2 see-saws.

One with the sitting plank on top of the log, and one underneath. If you let go of them both, the one on top of the log will tilt to one side, because its trying to balance on a point below the mass of the plank.

The one underneath the log if let go will no tilt either direction, because its hanging from a point where there is no weight above the pivot, so nothing is trying to fall.

The same principles from that apply to this, the slimmer the profile, the closer your foot is to the pivot point, meaning having your foot over one end of the pedal more than the other will have less effects on your riding, plus it means you're less likely to slip off as the weight of your foot is more centered and less likely to tilt either way under load. Ideally someone should make a pedal where the platform sits below the bearing/bolt, that would have the best stability of any pedal.
  • 3 1
 ^^ yay ^^ All true, people just try some thinner pedals before you judge, ditch the horrible dmr v8's youve had since the 90's and buy a cheap pair of superstars or something! I've notced a lot from just a few mm thinner,i've not slipped the pedals once compared to before, clipped the ground a whole lot less, and generally felt stabler and more planted. BB heights on frames differ by a few dozen mm here and there, but that doesnt stop some riding better than others, a few mm can make a big difference.
  • 4 1
 mm make a big difference and tom-cuthbert has it right too. And whoever said mm in crank length doesn't make a difference is way off too. I borrowed a bike and started pedaling and immediately felt the difference. It pedaled harder and when I looked I saw the arms were 170's. I was used to 175. The human body is a fine tuned thing. You eyes can detect a single photon, why shouldn't your leg detect 5mm?
  • 4 1
 Exactly. Try walking a pair of shoes with one with an extra 5mm glued onto the sole.
  • 1 14
flag rydindirty (Sep 3, 2011 at 9:19) (Below Threshold)
 tom.... you're wrong. If the your little see saw plank is centered and balanced it doesn't matter what side of the pivot its on. Thanks for playing. Kids.

and wtf does gluing 5mm of rubber onto the bottom of your shoe have to do with this subject? Makes you feel 5mm taller? Cool, now take off your high heels , skirt, and wig and go ride your bike.
  • 7 3
 rydindirty, first of all, ur being a duchebag second of all, of course the pedal is gonna be centered... if there's nothing on it. If your putting your weight into the pedal it's going to be pretti fukin uncentered how about u go take ur skirt off
  • 1 12
flag rydindirty (Sep 3, 2011 at 10:21) (Below Threshold)
 someone needs a "timeout"....douchebag lol....stay in school ! Kids are so dumb these days.
  • 3 2
 i love how you went with saying that im stupid in stead of replying to what I said and proving that im stupid that was pretti weak
  • 7 0
 People who are saying that thin pedals don't help are just ignorant. They are probably the same people who are riding DH bikes with 67 degree HA's and 15" BB heights. Are you going to argue next that 27" bars are waaaay better than 30"?

Here are the advantages (most are already mentioned)

Lowers your center of gravity
Extra pedal strike clearance
Less teeter totter effect (feet less likely to spin off the pedals)
Better ability to pedal through the dead spot on the top of your pedal stroke

Not saying that I want to try these pedals specifically but others like po1nt podiums or canfield crampons (I own both) are extremely well made pedals where you can feel the benefits the first time you ride them.
  • 2 0
 What cedrico said. Rydindirty, Go do the test I said with the seesaws, then come back. Because its straight basic physics.
  • 1 2
 yeah but when you connect the top and bottom plank then both move when you let go which is exactly like a pedal and if your theory of the outboard bearing being more centred and at one side makes for a more stable pedal in the way that it cant rock back and forth due to no axle then its exactly the same physics no matter if its an axle thats used or outboard bearings imo...its still gonna rock back and forth exactly the same way..
  • 2 0
 That doesn't make any sense but here's a simple experiment you guys can do right now. Get a fork untensil. Hold it by the very end of the handle, and push down as hard as you can on a table with it, it will try to wobble, because the pivot point is so far away. Then hold at the other end of the handle, closest to the prongs, and do it again. It's much more stable.
  • 1 2
 what and your 2 planks theory does?? if you put 2 identical planks on a pivot in the exact same place and centred then let go ,and as you say the top one will drop on one side but the bottom wont .thats rubbish coz if the top one rocks then the bottom one will too coz there identical and both have the same gravity pushing down on them... what ever dude. its exactly the same no matter what .axle pivot or outboard pivot its gonna rock just the same..
  • 3 0
 I'm not even talking about different types of pivots, I'm talking about the point of leverage on pivots and the distance between where the pivot point is, and where the weights is applied that can change performance.

I never said anything about axles or outboard bearings.

Do you understand basic physics?

The seesaw with the board on top will tilt, because the weight of the see saw is above the pivot point, it can fall because it has potential energy. The one below has no potential energy because it is below the pivot point and cannot release any potential energy as it is already below the pivot point that is the fulcrum that holds the weight, and cannot put anymore weight below that pivot point, but one with weight above can.
  • 5 0
 @tom-cuthbert You've got the physics slightly wrong; the real physical advantage is to do with a reduction of the torque (or moment) created by any force (active or reactive) from the foot that is not incident through the pedal's axis. Torque is the rate of change of angular momentum (which is proportional to how fast the pedal is turning on it's axis), ideally of course the pedal would not turn on its axis at all relative to the foot (note "relative to the foot", the pedal of course needs to rotate relative to the crank arm so one can pedal). Torque is calculated as the Force times the perpendicular distance from the axis (F x r), and so a reduction in pedal thickness reduces this distance and therefore reduces the torque. The tendency for the pedal to spin due to forces from the foot is thus reduced, and the foot remains more planted on the pedal, resulting in a feeling of being more planted and secure not he pedal whilst riding.
  • 1 0
 *on the pedal

woops
  • 1 0
 I don't understand N1I0c, but as Tom said but put another way, if you put heavy stuff in a basket and hold the basket by the bottom you have to balance it. If you hold it by the handle you don't. Think of the pedal as the basket. The axle (or where the axle would be) is where you choose to hold the basket. If you did a side bearing like this and had the platform below it you would have a basket with a handle up top that would want to hold in your foot the most. No one has done that yet, but the closer you get to it the more stable the design, the less likely to get your shin chewed up since your feet stay on better. There are other downsides to be sure, like a thick pedal is way tougher.

If you need anymore help visualizing it, than really think about how wearing a shoe with a thick soul (like a platform) would feel while riding compared to a low profile shoe (like a skate shoe).

It isn't hard you doubters. You just need to think about it.
  • 1 0
 "fInally tioga isnt going to spend two years developing a pedal that snaps after a run and means you can sue them for injuries"

I once bought 60,- euros Tioga pedals: they weren't light at all, they gripped worse than lubed dick, and I broke them after about 5 tot 10 rides... After this I lost all my faith in those new 'super-duper-tioga' pedals
  • 1 0
 This is why rydindirty doesn't design products. He uses his "I'm always right" skills and not basic principles taught in schools.

The seesaw experiment might not work for him because the hot air in his head is offsetting the weight of the seesaw.
  • 1 0
 @taletotell

You're not quite right there, the example of the basket is to do with stable vs. unstable equilibrium. As a pedal is fixed on a central axis this is not a valid consideration.
  • 1 0
 N110c...thank you. These kids think they know everything
  • 1 0
 rydindirty, you don't know shit about any of this so just shut your mouth. why do you think you have a million neg props on this page? YOU f*ckING BLOW. "these kids think they know everything", you realize n1IOc is 19 right? get the f*ck outta here you old doosh.
  • 1 0
 Neg props don't mean anything on pinkbike. If someone criticizes a product he'll get a shitload of neg props because the average pinkbiker doesn't understand nothing about parts etc, and even if the criticizer is correct he'll get negprops propped by ignorant kids who don't know anything and just net prop the person for criticizing instead of telling how awesome it is. Didn't follow this discussion so I'm not sure about this case, just wanted to say that more neg props on pinkbike often means more idiots who don't know anything about the subject.... ....not always but often....
  • 1 0
 Just go to rydindirtys page and see the comments he leaves for people, he is ignorant.
  • 1 0
 @rydindirty

I don't want to sound like a dick. But as a 19 year old Physicist at Oxford University, I am a kid, and I think I know everything about this particular subject xD
  • 1 0
 we've been exercising our brains for the past 22 years of our lives, rydindirty probably hasn't had any kind of education in over 20 years, which would explain his ignorance.
  • 19 0
 "Reportedly, the machining tolerances required to manufacture the steel housing that threads into the crankarm on one end, and supports the bearing and all of the pedal's bending moments on the other end."

Reportedly, the tolerances... ? I think someone forgot to finish that sentence properly. I think the author/publisher (the person who clicks publish, dunno how it works for you guys) should read the article before commiting to it going public fully. Speaking from expirience (i'm writing for a local IT/tech site). Mistakes like that happen, yes, but they can be avoided by reading it again after it's written. And these mistakes are annoying for someone like me that has certain cases of self-diagnosed OCD! Razz
  • 12 0
 I read it 3 times trying to figure out what exactly was said.......nothing really. Totally incomplete sentence.
  • 11 0
 Ya that had me wondering too... I should hope there are tolerances..
  • 1 0
 same here. but i thought it was only my english skills letting me down.
  • 5 0
 That sentence was about as bad as that Trek 9.9 add that always pops up. "We solved that." Solved what!?
  • 4 0
 speaking from 'expirience', huh, Mr OCD?
  • 14 0
 weight can´t be right.... 135gr a pair??
  • 10 0
 If thats accurate Im especially worried.
  • 1 0
 it cant be right coz in the first artical about them they were claimed to be 500 grms which isnt light at all. either theres a miss print in this article or the first one but either way if they are 500 grms then its not all that good considering the thinness of them eh...
  • 2 0
 probably 315.
  • 1 0
 Even then its not that great my NC-17 Mag 2s are 370, with Ti axles 290.
  • 1 0
 They weigh 450g/pair, which is not light...not at all...
Maybe the 135g weight is without the bearings.
  • 1 0
 yeah i had a set of xpedo mx mag peds that were 320 grms with 12 pins each side and cromo axles ,so if i stuck some ti axles on and halved the amount of pins per side they would have been like 240 grms and they were 17mm thick...
  • 25 6
 WHO GIVES A FUCK ABOUT A PEDAL WEIGHTING 500GRAMS A PAIR YOUR JUST BEING PUSSY COMPLAINING ABOUT 200 OR 300 GRAMS MAN UP AND HUCK IT
  • 6 8
 chill... dude...
  • 7 0
 I agree with rickardandhikona08 100% but im not going to get so mad about it. its less then half a pound...man up and go do some squats if your bike is too heavy.
  • 5 2
 No suprises there mate, That kona of yours its probably a tank.
  • 6 1
 richard, you (and your kona) need to lay off the monster energy dude.
  • 4 3
 These pedals would probably match the users of pink bikes murses, tight pants and loser painted nails. O and your emo faggotry hair and neon colored matched everything attitude as well. Like Richard says, a few hundred grams is nothing. You take a shit each day weighing more than that. If your worried about weight, take a shit each time before you ride. Problem solved. These pedals suck... period. It's for weight weenies and people that can afford to replace pedals every race. Just like the 17lb bmx race bikes that frames needed to be replaced twice a season, or those 34lb DH bikes that needed half the parts changed on them after one crash. IMO if my Sealed Primo pedals bend after abuse, all these weenie flat pedals won't stand a flippen chance. This is race only stuff, or XC or at most AM stuff. This ISN'T DH stuff if your just a joe schmoe like me.
  • 3 0
 A lower center of gravity could be nice. And don't call me a weight weenie. My 6" AM/FR bike is 36lbs. It's like an artificially low BB but without the bottoming outs.
  • 1 0
 in relation to my previous comment I'd probably snorted 200-300 grams my self there when I wrote it.
  • 5 0
 hahahahahahahahHAWHAWHAWahhhhhhhhhh! after reading most of the rants above, i am feeling better already ! you'd think we were discussing something deep, with a real purpose in life - like starvation, torture, child molestation, cancer or whatever...but nope, we are just riding bikes kiddies; as much as i love ripping down Garbo, at the end of the day, yep, just riding bicycles...
  • 5 0
 I have to geek-out here because I think it's an interesting/ballsy approach: Simply put - pedals are cantilevers that mainly have to deal with bending and shear stresses, which are both greatest at the interface with the crank... (hence tapered axle designs). In a conventional pedal, all the bending and shear is carried through the spindle. This design ensures that the bearings are only loaded normally (perp. to axis). This is smart because bearings don't like to deal with bending or shear. Unfortunately, the required spindle and bearing diameters limit how thin you can go with the pedal. Thinner and lighter is better... but of course they must be strong and durable enough to actually use.

Removing the spindle and bearings and thinning out the pedal is fine - the body can handle the stresses... The only question is, can that bearing withstand those forces (where they're at their greatest) and still spin smooth and tight and not fail completely?

Personally, i'm skeptical but intrigued... would be interesting to see the inside of that massive bearing housing. Looking forward to a long term test report on these.
  • 9 0
 I Want those pedals
  • 1 1
 "Reportedly, the machining tolerances required to manufacture the steel housing that threads into the crankarm on one end, and supports the bearing and all of the pedal's bending moments on the other end."

HUH? What about the tolerances? Are they so huge the pedal is garbage? Are they so tight that it took years to get right and you should buy them? WTF?
  • 8 0
 Hope we dont see lots of pedals broken, where pedal meets "spindle"
  • 5 0
 This may be the time someone needs to step up and tell everyone that makes pedals that there comes a point in which they can make them to thin. But so thin we dont need an axle running thru them... Wow...
  • 4 0
 So many comments about the pedals... I'm more interested in the tire... If it's reasonably priced then i may have to try them out. They look promising.
  • 2 0
 ditto - I love my straightlines, the pedal don't interest me at all... but I would love to see a set of those tires at a LBS...
  • 1 0
 They look like they maintain traction best at very high speeds.
  • 1 0
 ya, 850g is pretty light for a dual ply tire. I don't care how it looks I just want to hear how it works
  • 4 1
 Excited to see if those axle-less pedals proves to be strong enough. If so, I'd like to see a standard for crank-arms and pedals, with the pedal-bearing fitted inside the crank-arm.
  • 2 0
 What I like about Tioga tires is that they don't cost a bomb, so I may just give these tires a go, as they'll probably only be around £25, and if they're pretty decent, is an absolute steal!
  • 2 1
 Seen the pedals...meh...don't like the inboard bearing design that some companies are playing with...we'll see how they do long term. And those tires...WTF...I don't think I have seen a worse tire design...maybe the CG tires...or those lame as Marzocchi tires a few years ago....but those look better than this...I might and probably am wrong...but how the heck is that going to hook up when braking? No thanks...
  • 5 0
 Seriously, how can you say they will preform by just looking at a picture?!
  • 7 0
 Tioga have owned entire tire markets before. They absolutely dominated BMX at one point. If you weren't running them you weren't winning, a little like maxxis today. Don't write off anything tioga spends a year developing till you try it. It may in fact be no good but def don't make that assumption before giving them a thrashing.
  • 1 3
 its easy to tell how shitty those abortions will be just by looking at them
  • 1 0
 Hmmm . Just a theory. I run a 170mm crank. Now my pedal sit about 5mm from center . So If I would run these on a 165 crank arm. without the spindle it would place the ball of my foot in the 170 feel position it use to be right? So now a 165 crank for me would feel like a 170. +265g weight savings WINN!!
  • 1 0
 These pedals LOOKS sick BUT ain't going to last long on a dh bike, they will snap just in front of the bearings, your weight is all on these 2 lil piece of alu and don't forget that the reste of the pedals is making a huge lever to snap the pedals body. Honestly, i will keep my so high center of gravity AND my cromo axle instead.
  • 1 0
 Those tires don't look like they'd ride very well. The top profile shot of them makes it look very flat and not rounded at all...I can't imagine leaning the bike more than 20 degrees before it'd break loose on you and slide.
  • 3 3
 fuck tioga they are fucking pieces of shit that dont give credit where it is due, they spend all there money on marketing fancy names, the guy that designed there new treads concepts and the new pedal is gone, next year for tioga will just probably be some fancy colors of the same shit , this 2nd tires original design was made in less that 10km of riding off road, in the frozen north, fact!!!!!! dont believe the hype!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • 4 1
 those pedals look like something i would put in my blender to make dough.
  • 1 1
 No kidding. Those look like they belong in a Hobart.
  • 1 2
 What's the point in spending a hundred dollars on some super thin pedals when you wear those fiveten shoes with the ridiculous inch thick soles on them? It defeats the object of thin pedals if you ask me. Get off the 5.10 bandwagon, buy some thin soled shoes like most of the pros wear when no one's filming them, get the same effect for a lot less cash!

On the other hand, thin soled shoes coupled with these pedals would be a great combo!
  • 3 0
 Bandwagon? Have you tried 5.10's? The soles are not 1 inch thick. That is an exaggeration. The grip is unparalleled. 5.10's have allowed me to run just knee pads instead of bulky knee shins because once you buy them you will never slip a pedal again. Plus, the impact's provide much more protection than any other shoes, and have prevented me from stubbing or breaking a toe at least once.
  • 1 0
 No, I've never used them but I've heard they're really good from a mate who's sponsored by them. He still regularly uses Adidas Sambas though for day to day riding. At the end of the day fivetens are overpriced. I haven't measured them but I've seen more than a few pairs in the flesh and the Sam Hill ones and those red and black bootie ones look a lot more than an inch thick to me.

Bandwagon? Yes. I ride with a lot of guys and almost all of them wear 5.10s when they're standing around next to the pumptrack talking. It's a fact that while they might well be better than your average trainers, they're also five times the price and wearing them isn't going to turn a 2/10 rider into a 9. Practice is going to do that, and that's what we should all be doing instead of getting fat looking at 5.10 shoes on the internet. As for thick hobnail booties protecting your toes, I'd rather just not hit my toes on anything that might break them. This is made easier by bearing shoes that actualy allow me to feel where the pedals are.

I've got some 5.10 rock boots and they're pretty shit hot mind.
  • 1 0
 Well, I have 2 pairs of 5.10's. Impact High's that are 3 seasons old, and Sam Hill's that are 2 seasons old (inherited from my brother who works in a gear shop!) My Impact High's have easily 200 days of riding on them. There is no other shoe that would still be functional after this much use. Not only are these functional, they are practically as good as new. Not a loose stitch anywhere, no de-laminating of the sole, and even the original laces. They do cost more than your average skate shoe, but when you factor in how long they last, you are actually saving money in the long run. When you look at the sole, it does seem like it's an inch tall, but that's because it wraps around the side of the shoe for protection. The actual sole under your foot is average height. The bottom line for me is that 5.10's are the best riding shoes, and the best costs money.

The cost is not an issue for me. I'm not made of money, but I do not feel bad at all pouring all of my disposable income into bikes, skis, snowmobiles, outdoor gear, etc. I'll will never own a new car, or a house, or have kids, but I have my priorities dialed. If I'm going to ride a $4700 bike, why would I skimp on a $100 pair of shoes. Come to think of it, all my shoes from dress to hiking boots cost more than $100 so I would actually rate the price of 5.10 riding shoes as average. By the way, I also have 5.10 Camp 4 hiking shoes that have lasted 3 years also. I honestly think that 5.10 is making the nicest, most functional, and most durable shoes available for my needs right now.

And as far as the toe incident. I was riding at Winterpark last year and came around a high speed berm really fast, then put my left foot out moto style. About 1/2 way through the berm, a big rock had come loose and fallen to the bottom of the berm. I jammed my toe right into it, and my stiff 5.10 toe box saved me from major injury.
  • 1 1
 cast from steel chromoly and only 135 a pair? that's even lighter than some XC pedals i know. i ain't believing till i see it on a weighing scale.
  • 1 0
 Must be a typo
  • 4 6
 no thanks...I'd imagine myself catching my foot on the axle housing, tested or not they look like they'd snap after one run and the axle looks vulnerable........imo....this is "bike jewelry" for people who like to stand and look at their polished shiny bikes......not suitable for ogres or serious use !!!
  • 26 4
 i bow before your mighty engineering and materials knowledge and opinion gathered from a few photos and no experience. Salute
  • 2 3
 ^^^ bwaahaha, summed it up pretty good chazdog
  • 5 10
flag gnarbar (Sep 2, 2011 at 14:08) (Below Threshold)
 @chazdog...I've bent the axles on two sets of "light" pedals, so I know a few things about what goes wrong with light/bling components for DH...as for "experience"...whatever, kid...at 20 years of age you know nothing whatsoever about life other than this Pinkbike dribblefest...you on the other hand being an agreeable sheeple don't even know when to say "enough" at light components that won't stand up for the long term
  • 9 0
 If that's the case then these could be the pedals for you seeing as they don't have axles...
  • 1 5
flag gnarbar (Sep 2, 2011 at 15:04) (Below Threshold)
 or structural integrity ?
  • 8 2
 am a mechanical engineering student and at 20 have lived for a while...
  • 2 3
 watching daytime TV, wandering around Swilley scoring rocks, and living off kebabs is not "living"
  • 2 0
 LOL at kebabs
  • 2 2
 @ chazdog: Yeah, mechanical engineers... no offense, I have lot's of friends who are mechanical engineers, and they're cool, especially since they don't act like other mechanical engineers going around ranting about the fact that they know everything on materials and design.

A shitty looking product, as much engineering and time are put in it, is still and will always will be a shitty looking product.
  • 3 0
 Pewrsonally think it looks pretty cool, but whatever, and yeah i know people throw it around, but it does give you a far greater grounding in material properites etc, and i am designing a pair of pedals as a hobby atm, And we live of home made rabbit pie and the like, least studenty students ever...
  • 1 0
 I don't think they'd release them if they were going to break at the first sniff of action. Ever heard of testing?
  • 2 0
 I guess Evil Revolt's were tested, so were the first batch of Turner DHR's. Tested.....sure. Tested the way Chinese made toys are tested for QC ?
  • 1 0
 Tioga is Japanese. They don't fuck about.
  • 2 0
 I'd like to see the bearing integrated into the crank
  • 1 2
 its amazing that the mountain bike industry still has people in it that would design tires like that. Even worse that there are people who would buy them.
  • 1 0
 not too keen on the tyers haha
  • 1 0
 Im little noob about this and, whats so good with thin pedals?
  • 1 0
 - marginally lowers the rider's centre of gravity (probably negligable)
- increases ground clearance (this is the biggest benefit in my opinion as pedal snags suck!)
- puts the foot closer to the axis of the pedal for better power transfer and balance (imagine the opposite effect of a pedal that was 6" thick... i.e. unstable)
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 Why is there a Canadian flag next to my name when I'm not Canadian?
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 you must be somewhere in canada. im not canadian too but im here in calgary, alberta and whenever i post, i get tagged with a canadian flag beside my name.
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 I'm in Taiwan and the flag never used to appear at all next to my name. Just this week they've given me a Canadian one. There must be a way to change it. Bothersome.
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 my mate from england comes up as being canadian on here aswell O.0
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 doesn't look like grip will be very good on those pedals.
  • 1 0
 A pair of each please Smile
  • 1 2
 I wont those pedals for my XC bike
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