VP Angle Adjustable Headset - Taipei Cycle Show 2011

Mar 17, 2011
by Mike Levy  
Angle adjustable headsets have been one of the most talked about products in recent times, but how about one that allows you to make adjustments nearly on the fly? Inside you can check out the VP Components version that does just that, letting you make up to 1.5° of non-indexed adjustment.
VP Components' angle adjustable headset allows riders to quickly and easily adjust the steering angle of their bike by up to 1.5 degrees - without needing to remove any headset cups. All that's required is a set of hex keys and a few minutes. The complete upper assembly (right) looks a bit unwieldy in this photo, but keep in mind that it is still in the testing stages and will likely be trimmed down before reaching production.


Adjusting your bike's head angle is all the rage right now, and for good reason. When a bike's angles are chosen, the engineer has to decide on geometry numbers that make the most sense for the majority of places that the bike is intended to be used. That method does make a lot of sense. After all, the designers know how the bike is intended to be ridden, and they are obviously much better versed in the physics behind the numbers than the majority of riders. Here's the thing though: sometimes a rider could actually be going faster or be in more control if the bike's steering angle is adjusted to be slacker or steeper. This is especially true when it comes to the emerging all-mountain and trail bikes who's suspension action is so well sorted that they can tackle some serious terrain with some serious speed - sometimes it is just the angles that hold the bike back. All of this talk begs the question: should we really be mucking about with how a bike handles? Might not the designers of the bike know better than us? The answer, of course, is that they probably do, but that hasn't stopped anyone in the past. Riders have been adjusting the geometry of their mountain bikes for nearly as long as there have been mountain bikes; from tuning the suspension's ride height to alter the geometry for the terrain, to offset shock bushings and taller crown races. Cane Creek's AngleSet adjustable headset opened the floodgates, but it's all been happening for a long time.

While the AngleSet is no doubt very effective and works quite well, what if you could adjust your bike's steering angle faster and easier? No cup removal and no hammer needed, just a set of hex keys. Would you be more likely to tinker with the handling until you found a number that you liked? Is being able to adjust a bike's head angle within just a few minutes a bit over the top? Have a look at VP Components new adjustable angle headset, shown here on Pinkbike for the first time, and decide for yourself.

The complete upper assembly. Angle adjustments are made by turning the tab on the bottom right hand corner, which turns the offset gimbal and alters the bike's steering angle. Once adjustments have been made, you lock them in place by tightening down the two clamps on either side of the sliding plate. These, combined with the pre-load from tightening your headset, keep the unit from shifting.


The new VP Components adjustable headset, which has the rather dry official name of 'VP-ADJ01', works in much the same way as you would expect, but it's how you change the head angle that is rather clever. Starting at the bottom, the lower bearing sits directly into the headset cup, sans gimbal, and is allowed to pivot freely in the lower cup while adjustments are being made. This is possible because of the bearing's outer race, which has a conical shape that lets it find the proper alignment when making adjustments - picture a cupped bearing or how your shoulder fits into its socket. VP Components actually manufacture the special conically shaped sealed bearings that are used in the lower cup (the top is fitted with a standard bearing) and are very confident that their design does not require a gimbal to function. Inserting the bearing into the cup by hand and pivoting it around as it would when you are making adjustments revealed an exacting fit that moved freely, but has zero room for it to shift wrongly within the cup. I would be interested to see if the same could be said after a few months of hard use, although they are adamant that the models being tested in the field are performing well.

The clever bits, what allows the on-the-fly adjustments to be made, are all hidden within the upper assembly. The top headset cup features a conical depression into which fits the offset gimbal. The gimbal itself is allowed to rotate on a sort of sliding plate that is captured within the upper cup. You adjust the headset by rotating the gimbal within the headset's top cup, and because it is offset, it changes the head angle of the bike. The fork's center line stays in line with the rest of the bike because the sliding plate can only move side to side, thus it only changes the head angle as you make adjustments. This is only possible because the gimbal sits within a sliding plate that is allowed to move freely, sliding slightly side to side, as you make adjustments. There are two small pinching clamps on either side of the sliding plate that tighten down to keep adjustments in check. Still a bit fuzzy on how it works? Watch the video below to see what's going on.


The VP Angle Adjustable Headset In Action:

Views: 16,865    Faves: 3    Comments: 2



VP-ADJ01 details:

• Angle adjustable headset that can be adjusted quickly
• +/- 1.5° of adjustment (based on 100mm head tube length)
• Adjustment is non-indexed, allowing you to choose any angle between stock and 1.5° of difference
• Prototype shown fits full length 1.5" head tubes (other sizes are a possibility)
• Fits 1.125" (standard non-over sized and non-tapered) steerer tubes
• Sealed cartridge bearings
• Stack height: 15.7mm (upper), 6.8mm (lower)
• Weight: 186 grams
• Still in testing stage, price TBD


Take note of how the upper gimbal is offset. This is what allows you to adjust the head angle as you rotate the assembly.


There is no doubting that VP's new adjustable headset is a cool piece of kit, but there are certainly a few questions that come to mind at this point. The beta version that I got to photograph and tinker with worked smoothly in my hands, only requiring light finger pressure to turn the upper gimbal, but I'd like to see how easy it is to make adjustments after it has been in the field for a few months. The tolerances to have the system work must be very high, especially the upper gimbal and sliding assembly - how well will it take to the elements or accidentally riding with it loose? At this point in time there are only beta versions to fit full length 1.5" head tubes, but that could change when it hits production. I doubt that it would be that far fetched for the design to work in a tapered head tube, especially considering that the upper bearing and assembly are all external already. Although, the prospective frame would need to accept a standard press-in external upper cup for the system to work, not the semi-integrated design that many currently use.

The upper assembly will obviously have more stack height to it than a standard headset, but at 15.7mm, it isn't as much higher than many other non-adjustable models.


Does VP's adjustable headset make sense? I would say yes, given that it will allow riders to adjust their bike's handling quicker and without having to remove any headset cups. I see this being ideal not only for racers who adjust their bikes for each course, but more so for average riders and garage mechanics who want to find out what angles work best for them, but are intimidated by the idea of having to remove a headset cup to do it. In the same vein, I'm sure frame manufacturers would love to get their paws on this headset to make geometry choices during testing much easier. For it to be successful VP will have to release a model for tapered head tubes - I don't see many frame manufacturers going back to using full length 1.5" head tubes just so this clever unit can be used. Once that happens, and once the unit has been proven to stand up over time, I can certainly see a place for it.


Check out the VP website to see their entire component lineup.


I like the idea and I like the execution, now I just need some trail time to see if the design really works. Keeping in mind that the unit shown here is still in the prototype stage - it may get slimmer and less obtrusive once it hits production - what do you make of VP's angle adjustable headset?


111 Comments

  • 65 11
 I don't need to adjust my head angle. These niche products try to find a place in every garage, but will never be essential. Pass.
  • 24 5
 i agree i have no need for offsetting my headset specially with this boat anchor, if anything manufacturers should be more set on how to innovate products to make things much more integrated to reduce weights and to simplify. not to add more hardware to give us an on the fly adjustment angle for your steer tube.
  • 9 3
 Weight currently sits at 186 grams, certainly heavier than some, but not exactly a boat anchor. Keep in mind that the cosmetic details could change when it does hit production. Good points on the simplifying things though, I can certainly see that side of the coin!
  • 16 1
 Agreed, I'm not into this new fad of adjustability. Simplicity is a far more valuable asset in my mind.
  • 5 3
 The reason for these are because if you buy a frame made buy most generic brands the headangles are immovable and if you are a serious rider you will notice this slight difference in the head angle and frames just may have a to slack of a head angle and therefore you can adjust it with this, although i dont get the fast alteration system.
  • 4 0
 There's definitely a market for adjusting your HTA, but really I'd rather just have something like my works components angled reducer headset where you just set it and forget it. Having to fiddle with adjustments nonstop is annoying.
  • 26 2
 I would just do my research and buy a frame with a head tube angle that works..
  • 6 1
 Yes sebbs i understand that. But why would you buy a frame with angles you dont like? I believe in buying the right tool for the job, so i dont have to compromise theframewith extra parts that add both weight andmore problems.

Posted via mobile device
  • 6 0
 i think this would be useful for folks who race DH where they can find the right bike setup for a particular course in a convenient manner with regards to the bike head angle or this could be useful for bike manufacturers if they are looking/experimenting for the right head tube angle to come up with a production bike for the masses. but for my own use, an average mountain biker joe, i don't think so.
  • 4 0
 Not everyone can afford to go out and buy the best possible frame. I only have a Wildcard because I got a wicked deal on it. And after a full season of riding decided I wanted to change a couple little things about it.
  • 6 0
 that's a good idea. if you want a bike that pedals better than it descends or vice versa, instead of buying a different frame, sometimes a simple head angle tweak might do the job.
  • 9 0
 Being a racer, i would prefer constancy from the angles on my bike. Changing the HA would change the way the bike reacts, and every time you do so, you have to get accustomed to it. Predictability is very important, as everything is done with feel. I dont want to get used to a new angle before every race, i want to stick with what im used to.
  • 1 0
 I will agree with Z on that one. I don't really race, but have been changing stuff on my bike consistently for the past year and a half and it's pain in the ass getting used to the changes every time then going and changing them again.
  • 14 1
 haha just picture some guys riding and one stops in the middle of the trail and starts fiddling with this "what are you doing? "i'm adjusting my headset angle for this drop bro"
  • 3 0
 ^^^^ LOL! There are people who would totally do that too...
  • 6 0
 if you dnot like the product, dont buy. just dont start ranting about it. for some its helpful, if you buy a bike thats perfect with everything except for HA then this will come in handy. if you get a different fork and it slackens or steepens you A, this helps.
  • 4 0
 As a rider of bikes I can see the point in this. I don't run an adjustable headset but I don't see this as something I would be changing for every different kind of track or terrain i ride, consistancy is what I like. Look at the adjustment this way, I like the head angle of my bike at this point in time but say as my level of ability progresses and my style finds new direction, now the head angle doesn't suit my style of riding what do i do buy a new frame? No I go out and spend £150 or so and get this adjustable headset getting exactly what i want.
  • 2 0
 @ Cmontjumper - "What do you make of VP's angle adjustable headset?" - written at the bottom of the article. Try reading.
  • 1 0
 Another good thing about these new headsets (not this one imparticular, you can see it from space) is that you can salvage older style frames that have whacky geometry, like older bikes 07/08 have 65 degree headangles or higher, like my blindside, with this, or the angleset, I can make it 63.5 which is way more modern and has a much better angle for handling in steep stuff.
  • 2 0
 My session88 has a 65 degree h/a and it's fine for DH. The novelty to have a slack h/a will soon wear off! I mean come on guys the mondraker summem pro can go as slack has 61degrees! Who the hell needs an h/a this slack?
  • 1 0
 I have been waiting for this!!
  • 1 0
 These definitely have a place in mountain biking. Say you have an older bike with "outdated" geo, you love your bike but hear how awesome slack head angles are, instead of ditching your old ride you put an angle changing headset on there and your old bike is a whole new animal. Or if your shopping for a new bike and find exactly what you want, in your price range but the HA is .5 degrees off what you want, now your golden. while on the fly adjustment is a little goofy being able to tweak your bike to what you want just makes sense.
  • 3 0
 if your ridding outdated geo and you really think 1.5 deg HA is going to change your ride that much, your are one interesting person, usually old bikes feel like crap for many many reasons aside from 1.5 deg offset in your head angle. things like top tube length, suspension ratio, bb hight, etc i could go on forever. point is 1.5 deg offsetting your head tube isn't going to make a difference for an old bike at least it wont be noticeable. instead of busting out 150 bucks on your old outdated frame a more better take would be to take out the trash and get a new rig.
  • 2 0
 on top of that how many old frames exist with a 1.5 headtube? if your idea did help it might apply to maybe 1% of ridders with old dh rigs with 1.5 headsets....
  • 1 0
 i hate how people think that a slacker head angle makes a better bike and ride...
  • 1 0
 damn , everyone takes everything so literally these days. in the mountain bike world outdated could be like 2 years, when i posted that the santa cruz buillt came to mind, like a 67.5 head angle but a nice bike for the price.... if your one of those guys who wants to try out a slacker head angle you could keep the bike around. yeah yeah head angle isn't everything but it certainly can make a bike feel different( better?) for some. so take it or leave it but some people would want to do this, if your not one of those people then don't buy it and go buy your brand new bike.... the name of mountain bike game is finding what works for YOU, hence why everyone doesn't ride the same bike....
  • 1 0
 Slacker head angles make handling in steep terrain easier, as the weight as further back on the bike and you don't have to lean so far back, thus keeping centred and still in the attack position.
  • 1 0
 Or you could just get an intense, fitted with G3 dropouts Wink That's what i did haha
  • 8 0
 im seriously apalled by the all the ignorance that has been demonstrated by the comments.
1. who gives a f*ck what it looks like. get over yourself./
2. Sure this isnt the most useful on say dh bikes.....what most of you bitch about the headangles of, but think of the other kinds of bikes out there- more versatile bikes. these may just need on the fly adjust before heading back down the mountain or seshing up the jumps
3. you can use it on 1 1/8 headtubes.....come on, give em some props!

nice job VP, you guys are killing it. i can see myself buying one (but to expand your buyers, maybe make it look prettier?)
  • 1 1
 i am a fashionista on my rides, but yeh, who gives a crap about the looks if it works - i am pretty anyway and make up for any ugly add on
  • 6 1
 I don't see how more adjustability in a bike is a bad thing. People change aspects of their bike (think gears and the height of their seats) all the time; why not your head angle?

And for those complaining about it being ugly: you don't think your bike would look cleaner without a seat post collar and rear cassette? Of course it would, but sometimes function trumps form.

I thought adjustable seatposts were a gimmick until I rode one and realized how useful they are. Moral of the story: don't be so ignorant/naive that you dismiss new products before giving them a try.
  • 6 0
 Because kids on here think if they don't have a use for it then no one else could possibly have a use for it.
  • 5 0
 there is a shop in my town with organic food and low-harm cleaners. They have pretty much anything you need to your household. When I entered it for the first time few weeks ago I was like... finaly a shop with two types of shampoo, one type of toilet cleaner, one type of sallad. Max 3 kinds of everything they had there: it was... awesome...

many people I know share the same feeling about that place: shopping there is a relief, a pure relief
from ever present, constant need to choose...

There is an excellent idea going with angle headsets: BEING A COOK OR A CHEF. You can follow someone's recipe and advice or you can try to do it your way with pieces of knowledge you have and following your "creative instinct". In the second option you have a good chance of cooking something that tastes pretty bad despite of many attempts...

Cheers!
  • 3 0
 Man waki, you always have the most random stories that somehow relate to articles on pinkbike. I love it.
  • 2 0
 yep, can't get much more 'organic' than that !
  • 4 0
 just because Sam Hill does not use one of these, so what ! all you dissers need to step back and give it a chance; i for one am not Sam Hill who can ride his ass off compared to most of us - and i have had a few very cool rides that i sold JUST because of the steep angle [ no one trail usually has a terrain that is just for one type of ride ] and i can recall my old Balfa Belair rocked on XC / All MT but would have never been sold had i access to this innovation cause my ol BB got a few DH runs in but i had to back off simply because of the angle and at that time it was all i had and could afford...and for those of you who would rather have a bunch o bikes to do the ride you chose on that day, go for it...i too have more than one bike now, but there are times when you are out on a rip and decide to try something different that requires the slacker angle, so...anyway, with some of the closed minds on this, it's a good thing you were not around 100 years ago or we'd still be in the dark ages and inventors of the light bulb or penicillin or washing your hands to prevent disease would all be burned at the stake !
  • 3 0
 Ah but imagine buying one between a group/shop. It would allow you the get a feel what your next purchase might ride like, and in which direction you need to go to get the best machine for your riding. Just pop it on for a few rides and have a play then return it to your LBS who clean it up and have it on hand for the next person who wants to fettle!

Personally I wouldn't run it, but if it works for racers who're looking for that split and have the same bike for the season it may make the difference!
  • 9 2
 Is it April 1st yet?
  • 5 0
 With X-mas shopping deals starting at the beginning of Novemeber, bike products labeled as 2012 displayed on Interbike 2010, you can only assume that the "MARKET" expects the 1st of April to come earlier too...
  • 6 0
 Yeah, I just put my new 2014 Avid brakes on, they just released yesterday. The 2012 stuff is sooo two days ago.
  • 7 0
 that can mean only one thing! Chinese must have taken the posession of... THE TIME MACHINE!!! They manufacture commodites in the future and sell them to the unaware Western world! basterds! we must lower their wages! They must have learned that our economical system is getting more and more inflated, and as we buy so much crap we don't need - their wages grow so they can earn more from production in the future! They don't care for our basic needs! They just want money! Needs like... El Mariachi Margarita shaker for 1,99... or anodized crank bolts...
  • 2 4
 way to take it too far waki
  • 2 0
 It's a dream inside a dream, and you first need to wake up inside the other one to enter even deeper dream and find a way to get to the final dream from which you can get to the first one - utatatatum tatatum uta utatatata! ush waashh shaaashh uashshhhh wush Oakley Jawbone
  • 5 0
 PB wouldn't be as much fun without waki.....
  • 1 0
 pure genius Waki!
  • 1 0
 I'm starting to wonder if WAKI has an actual job or if he just surfs PB all day.
  • 1 0
 Im honestly seriously addicted and that's why I have to quit ASAP. Before I get fired and my wife leaves me. It's been great to be here and share these tons of thoughts that are born everyday in my head. I believe PB helped me to sythesise lots of ideas i believe are good and can become useful.

Just remember who told U that: Bikes are overdeveloped, way better than we need. Until some moment I that can't specify, it was fun, but now most of techbological progress is just separating us from nature. Better suspension, lighter stuff, bigger wheels all to go faster and easier over rocks and roots & through mud - aren't they the essence of why we ride a mountain bike?

Care for the nature, care for the trails, every stone and every root on it deserves respect.

All the best

Cheers...
  • 1 0
 This is a sure case of over developed tat yet WAKI considers this a good example of what you believe to be innovation?

"1.5, remotely adjustable seatpost, angled headset, widebars: all of these are true inventions making a true change to your riding."

I don't see how its a better solution than Cane Creeks angle set or even the simple yet effective frame specific Scott High Octane/Gambler adjustable steerer or Commencals equivalent.

Heres a fail for small companies bringing us innovation!
  • 1 0
 is waki actually leaving us?
  • 2 0
 First of all jonnyboy I support technological diversity. Just as biodiversity, architectural diversity and all kinds of diversity. VP is not a small company, they make headsets for most companies in the world including Cane Creek, just as Wellgo does pedals.

I support anglesets or any HA adjustment systems (like on my wifes Meta 4x) on only one basis: as a lesser evil. As a more user and environment friendly item that might make someone think twice before selling his bicycle and buying a new one. Just because he watched few podcasts from Trek or whoever where Steve Peat or Gee Atherton said: this allows me for better accelerating out of the corner or makes my ride more stabil. I was doing it myself, catching up every their word on what to do to be faster, what tyre to use in which conditions. All the possible crap that will make you think twice whether the thing you have is fast enough

Go to any used buy&sell bike site and what kind of bikes you find there most often? Road bikes and DH bikes, then XC bikes, in general bikes and components that are used in some kind of racing. All round bikes and components going well with them such as forks and wheels are there, no doubts about it, but they are very little. yet these are the best selling high class bikes! These are the bikes that truly are most versatile, you can do anything in the worst terrain with a 6" bike, and go anywhere effectively with 5" bike. Because people believe that by buying certain stuff you can gain some advantage. This is ridiculous. As if 1 degree of head angle would make an edge between winning and loosing especially in a sport with so many variables. So as soon as Fabien lowers his HA to 62 people go bananas and ebay is full with DH bikes.

If such product as head angle is going to stop someone from sellig his bike and buy a new one, putting another piece of metal to the environment then, let it be, GO!

ONE BIKE!
  • 2 1
 ^^^^^^ keeps it mad real son.
  • 4 2
 this is so lame, if you really need to adjust your angle that much maybe you either need to learn how to ride what you have or get different bikes for the riding you do. this is just a waste of money and extra unneeded weight.
  • 5 0
 well... if you can't afford different bikes this wouldn't be a waste of money. instead, turn your current ride into something more versatile. IMO, having more than one DH bike is a waste of money! That being said... I have only one... it's not adjustable... and I am still able to ride it everywhere. Cool idea but something I'll never spend my money on.
  • 3 1
 So if you have a nice AM/FR bike, and go from an area with steeper descents to something a bit flatter, you might want to slacken out the HTA for the steeper stuff, why have 3 bikes for varying terrains when 1 will do? the added 25 grams isn't going to kill the ride.
  • 2 0
 lucky 13 - duhuuuh ! so let me get this straight : instead of buying this innovation which is a waste of money [ probably about $50 bucks tops ] i'll save money and buy another bike for about...well depending on the need, maybe $600 to $6000 ! hmmmm the only thing lame here is your 'logic'...
  • 2 0
 This "one bike to rule them all" idea is getting out of hand now. I've got a hard hitting full sus for when it's needed and a short travel hardtail for when it's not. I don't want to have to tinker on with different adjustments, I'd rather just grab the suitable bike and hit the trails. I'd rather have more bikes over fancy adjustable travel and head angles and stuff any time.
  • 2 0
 i think people on here are jumping the gun on this saying its no good. I think this is similar to when the hydraulic seatpost came out. At first i said that is $300 wasted, to what, do something that i can do in 10 seconds? But now more and more of us see the benefits of having the hydraulic seatpost and it is becoming more and more of a necessity. With this now you can take your freeride bike up climbs you have never done before and then kill it downhill doing all those jumps you love to do.

However though, i think if you are gonna ride a freeride/DH bike then your not gonna be climbing and the bike is already set up for what you you want and i think should not be changed. And heck if you wanna climb get an XC bike
  • 2 0
 Its all the rage because people want it. I have been saying for years that bikes should be more adjustable. I think every manufacturer should drop the tapered head tube and build bikes with pinch bolts on a 1.5 head tube to make it easier to change cups. I.E. Intense M9. Done !
  • 2 0
 most stuff we are told is awesome and we need isnt, i ride a hardtail for just about everything and ive only got a £2500 stinky deluxe because i got it for £750 friend price not because of the development, fancy adjusters and pro endorsements. Its the rider not the ride, i ride "XC" and DH on my 40lb Stinky and its awesome and the same on my Hardtail and its awesome. Not once have i thought "i could do with tighter/slacker angles" i just adjust myself and the style i ride and save £100-200!! WAKI is correct in saying most bikes are "overdeveloped" marketing money makers. If you find yourself needing to loose a degree here and add a degree there you have gone too far up your own ass, buy the right bike or change the way you ride it simples :-)
  • 2 0
 I guess I'm kind of alone on really digging this product. Its definitely not intended for every rider, but for the right bike and the right biker, this little piece of technology is invaluable.

In my opinion this little nugget of a product is the missing link for a one bike quiver that could actually do everything. Take a bike like the Voltage FR for example. This is a bike that was intended to have a morphing personality. Set it up with a DH fork and you have a bike that is capable of tackling the steep and gnarly, put a 130mm single crown on it and you have an all mountain, trail bike that can compete it a world class slopestyle contest. In concept its great, but up until now the real limiting factor on designing a bike like this has been the ability to achieve the desired head angle while adjusting the travel to up to two or three inches. Without this product there will always be a compromise. With a fixed head angle, fork height and bottom bracket height are the only two factors contributing two the overall head angle. You can limit how much bottom bracket drop you will get when putting in a shorter rear shock by using different length shock mounts, however dropping your fork two inches will always lower the front of your bike approximately two inches ( 2/3 of 2"s with a fixed rear shock length). Lowering the front of the bike is what you want on a shorter travel bike, but it becomes very limiting when seeking the right geometry.

So back to the Voltage FR. Set up with a 180 mm talas and this headset, you can have two bike with perfectly dialed geometry in one. At 180mm of travel in the front and rear the bike sits with a bb height in the high 13s and a head angle of 65 degrees. Dialed. Put on a shorter rear shock with longer shock mounts, lower your fork to 140mm and you have a bike with a 67 degree head angle and a 13ish" bb height. Almost dialed. Rotate your gimbal and bam, dialed! 68 degree head angle just like you dreamed of.
  • 1 0
 i agree - and what most don't seem to grasp as far as looks: this is a prototype and will evolve, and in fact may even look much nicer when it hits the Mkt.
  • 2 0
 Well after ready these comments I have official decided NEVER TO READ THE COMMENTS AGAIN. Some of you people are stupid, plain and simple, others have valid points but sadly the stupid outnumber the valid by a huge ratio. Goodbye PB comments.
  • 2 0
 its cool to see the industry innovating like this. im not sure how well its going to be accepted but its definitely thought provoking. i love riding dh trails on my all mountain bike and i could see myself using it after a big climb and getting ready for a descent but it would only be practical for certain trails with long climbs and long descents. either way its still very interesting to see a company doing something like this.
  • 6 0
 wow this is big
  • 10 1
 that sir, is what she said.
  • 1 0
 rofl ,and she said it again and again and....
  • 1 0
 "• Adjustment is non-indexed, allowing you to choose any angle between stock and 1.5° of difference" ???

Surely by the look of it... if it is set anywhere between stock and 1.5* then the fork will also be offset left or right? Because the gimbal is offset so as you turn it it moves either left or right.

Someone please explain if i'm wrong...
  • 1 0
 The 'sliding plate' that the gimbal sits in can only move front to back, thus preventing any offset to the side.
  • 2 0
 Ah of course, silly me, I understand now, thanks.
  • 1 0
 I still cant visualize how theres no side to side movement relative to the center line of the steerer. I though I was pretty good in 3 dimensional visualization.

Can we see a vid looking down the steerer tube to show how this works?
  • 1 0
 On one side it's great, you can now adjust a bike's head angle to suit your personal preferance but you dont need that on the fly. It's annoying enough if you forget to unwind you talas fork or switch off to propedal before going downhill again.
  • 1 0
 On one side it's great, you can now adjust a bike's head angle to suit your personal preferance but you dont need that on the fly. It's annoying enough if you forget to unwind you talas fork or switch off to propedal before going downhill again.
  • 1 0
 It's still a couple of weex away from April fools day,so it can't be an April fools joke,though it should be.Because this monstrosity is pure uncalled for.Cane Creek solved this problem some time ago with their Angleset.There is no need at all to complicate things like this.Someone has too much time on their hands me thinx.Overengineering at it's worst.Not for me.Syncros are gonna have a job on their hands coming up with a bigger joke than this for April fools day.Ha-ha-ha.
Gary. lol Facepalm
  • 2 0
 its a cool idea I would love to be able to make my headtube angle a little slacker when I'm descending on my AM bike, but I would never put that giant thing on my bike.
  • 1 1
 I didn't bother reading all the posts

The idea is good theorectically but in reality this looks like it would only be effective in two positions... Straight slacken or steepen, as anywhere in between you fork would not be straight up and down (perpendicular)... Total face palm for the engineer that designed this!
  • 3 0
 i am one of the people at VP working on this product... the steerer is always in alignment, so it stays straight at all positions in the 3 degrees of adjustment... this is the function of the sliding top plate...
  • 1 1
 the upper cup rotates in a circle... the hole is off center... if the hole is not at either the 12 or 6 o'clock position, it's not aligned, it is off axis.

edit: please explain how this magically keeps the steerer perpendicular to the ground at all times. thanks
  • 1 0
 Hmm, I was paying too much attention to the vid and not actually looking at the top plate and it's interface between the cup side being two seperate pieces... It's all too obvious now to visualize the plate sliding as the angle is adjusted, I'm going to blame my total lack of sleep for two days... Then give myself a facepalm... This is actually a pretty cleaver design and deserves a chance. Keep progressing the proto, let the haters hate...
  • 1 0
 not sure if it's a 'cleaver' design [ still sleepy eh :-) ] but yep, very clever, and just needs some cosmetic tweeking.
  • 3 0
 needs a big ass lever so you can adjust hta as you ride along
  • 2 3
 the idea of producing an angle set which can be leveled while being outdoor is interesting but on the other hand completely useless (imagine a ride you really need such a possibility! ) and this one is such a failure
a little bit bigger and wider and it wouldn't even fit between a dc-fork

thumbs down !
  • 1 0
 Take a closer look, it's rounded on the edges, probably to accomodate just that.
  • 1 0
 It's not brand new!!!!! 10 years ago I had an Italian downhill suspension fork called "STM". Very similar design and function, but i think the weight kills the prototype..
  • 1 0
 I could see this item possibly being of use to those who make bikes for use when testing. It's be of no use to me, frankly.
  • 2 0
 id like to see that in action
  • 1 0
 hope they seal it well, cant see it working that smooth when its covered/impreged with grit an mud.......
  • 3 3
 Wow.... so it's like the engineers at VP sat down and said "How could we make a Cane Creek Angleset but have it look like shit and be harder to work with?"
  • 1 2
 This is a waste of resources, just get used to the way your bike rides and rail it! I dont see sam hill using one of these, he seems to do ok with one head angle on several types of courses
  • 4 1
 youre suuuuuuuuuuuuch a dumbass.
  • 1 2
 I cant put it any other way, Innovation and Bad Ideas are two different things, this, unfortunately for the boys who made it, is the latter. it is nothing more than a bad idea.
  • 1 0
 Im guessing that this can only work with a 1.5" headtube and 1/18" steerer tube?
  • 2 0
 Yeah VP!!
  • 1 0
 goofy. oh well, maybe something good will come of this.
  • 1 2
 This is BY FAR the stupidest "Innovation" I have ever seen. That off the fact that this company has quite literally taken the CCAS, and put a twist to it. Thats all this is.
  • 1 0
 i like it but in a i deal world i could aford a new frame instead Frown
  • 1 0
 CRACK! Oh well for your frame warranty!
  • 1 1
 pass, Cane Creek set looks much better. on the fly seems overkill, just get the skills to deal with changing conditions
  • 4 3
 thats pretty cool guys
  • 12 4
 LMFAO .. what an ugly piece of kit that is.. Whip

c'mon nobody is seriously thinking about this .. ? i thought it was april fools.. lol
  • 4 0
 i was hoping when they said see it in action that it would be on a bike, thats what i want to see!
  • 1 0
 dude Eek R U you serious.. ?
  • 1 0
 well yeah man if they have a serious product that actually has a chance at working, then sure show it to me! i'm not going to discard something before its even had a chance to be proven not to work... not saying i would get one, but im sure that people would
  • 1 0
 ow it will work probably.. but serious.. would you mount that onm your bike ?
  • 1 0
 haha no i wouldnt. but there are people that would.
  • 1 0
 4 what fames ?
  • 1 1
 that things fugly. i would never want that on my bike
  • 1 2
 That's a joke, isn't it? How would but such a brick on his bike...??
  • 1 1
 NO DICE
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