Video: Chromag Releases New Chris Kovarik Signature Dagga Pedal

Jul 12, 2019
by Chromag Bikes  
Views: 3,548    Faves: 4    Comments: 0


PRESS RELEASE: Chromag Bikes

We are excited to introduce a new pedal to the Chromag line up for 2019 – The Dagga. It’s a DH pedal at heart that excels in high impact and demanding conditions where traction, size and durability are an asset.

Chromag Dagga Pedal

Chris Kovarik, known as one of the forefathers of flat pedal riding approached us with several ideas to make the pedal he always wanted. The Dagga is the result of our collaboration, featuring the widest stance of any pedal we’ve made and the largest overall platform with increased length, fore and aft for pressure dissipation.

Chromag Dagga Pedal

Chromag Dagga Pedal

The Dagga is designed to be a rugged, impact resistant pedal. The bodies are initially cold forged and then CNC machined and feature a solid perimeter to resist rock strikes. Chris wanted maximum traction and the pins were an important consideration. We settled on a two-step design that tapers in the length with threads right to the tip. The pins are height adjustable via the included washers. The Dagga features Chromag’s G3 axle system with a hardened, precision ground chromoly axle. A wide layout bearing/bushing combo and a double seal to keep contaminates out.

Chromag Dagga Pedal

Chromag Dagga Pedal

Chromag Dagga Pedal

Chromag Dagga Pedal

Profile // Concave Design, 14.3mm at platform center
Material // Alloy
Size // 120mm x 115mm
Pins // 24, Adjustable Height
Weight // 480g/Pair

Chromag Dagga Pedal

Rider: Chris Kovarik
Video: @petrifilms
Photos: Rebecca Ritz

The Dagga is currently available in black at quality bike shops, with red, blue, silver and purple available in August.

If you want to see more of Chris give him a follow @chriskovarik, or keep an eye out for him destroying Whistler Bike Park.
To see more from Chromag visit our website or check us out on the 'gram.


66 Comments

  • + 67
 Love it. Dagga in South Africa is the Afrikaans word for marijuana. Stoner flat pedals for the win.
  • - 4
flag tulipanek (Jul 12, 2019 at 6:09) (Below Threshold)
 LoL i just googled the word Dagga and you are right Big Grin
  • + 2
 It's also a wonderful dance in Jamaica
  • + 2
 It's also a wonderful dance in Jamaica
  • + 11
 They need to start making swat boxes. But obviously called them Dagga boxes. You know, for when you want to chill between runs.
  • - 2
 Chromag selling pedals. But most of the photos above is rider having one feet off pedal.
  • + 3
 @GeeHad: SWAT stands for Snacks, Weed, Alcohol, and Tobacco.
  • + 1
 Guess the Aussie version of the word for marijuana “gear” didn’t work too well for a pedal - lol
  • + 20
 I had no idea Tinker Juarez rode flats.
  • + 0
 *hole
  • + 0
 Whoops wrong comment. Sorry
  • + 0
 I mean Tink probably has like 20 years on this guy but ok.
  • + 13
 Dagga gotta hurt me shin sooner or later....
  • + 4
 Dagga deep hope in me shin
  • + 1
 @ejopdahl: Hope it’s not to deep... kidder
  • + 12
 Always love watching Karver rip it up! Cool vid Petri!
  • + 3
 Hopefully these ship with out the washers under the pins so you don’t have to waste an hour taking them all out, removing the washer, applying loctite and reinstalling so you have acceptable traction before you ride.
  • + 6
 You know they won’t... Good thing we obviously have time to waste.
  • + 1
 My Chromag Contacts have the same washer setup and they were installed from the factory. Not sure about the Dagga but that is how the Contacts came set up.
  • + 4
 skidding was the first trick i learnt, i haven't progressed much in the following 50 years
  • + 5
 DAGGA i got told of for Skyfing that shit!!???? hello Africa ????
  • + 3
 Sounds like a kief jol my china
  • + 4
 If I buy them and it means I can slay corners like that, then i'm in Smile
  • + 7
 That's how marketing works Big Grin
  • + 5
 You had me at 120x115!
  • + 1
 Did they test this to see if it would stand up to Kovarik’s riding by using it to explode a few Claymore mines? “YUP! It’s good!”
  • + 3
 the hunger for skid videos is without limits.
  • + 3
 Now fiveten just need to bring the karver back
  • + 1
 Not sure if I have missed it somewhere but I cant find the all important price?
  • + 1
 Being a forged pedal, I don't expect it to be cheap but it should last you a good while. That said, do people ever break the platform of a generic extruded-CNC pedal or of a die-cast pedal? People typically destroy bearings or the thread where the pins go. I'm curious to see a typical JRA pedal platform failure.
  • + 1
 210 CAD
  • + 1
 @vinay: Most pedals as you say are extruded and then machine finished, usually 6061 or a similar grade, Hope go one step further to 2014 (and their pedals seem to last literally forever)

Though the forge tooling wont be cheap, near net forging will decrease machine time and waste so over 5-10 years or however long the product life-cycle is things will probably balance out a little.

You are right though, just how many well designed pedal bodies fail, its usually issues with the axle, bearings / bushings eventually giving up or them looking so bashed up / missing pins they get replaced.

Still, its a nice looking pedal, £120 ish or 200cad would put be off though.
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: If I recall correctly, back in the days Kovarik was riding Easton Cully pedals, which were extruded too. Wouldn't have been surprised if these were made by Wellgo or VP. How the machine time compares to that of extruded pedals depends. How much you need to machine on extruded pedals is usually pretty clear. They've got three cavities (where the axle goes and inside those wings) which limits the amount of machining to be done. I'm curious what the raw forging is like here before they start machining. Obviously the whole cavity where the axle goes needs to be drilled and reamed as it would be to hard to forge it with the cavity already in there. Shimano forges hollow cranks, but a thin product like a pedal with a relatively large bore for the axle seems near impossible. Also, are these wings already open before they start machining or do they need to cut all the way through?

Add to that the fact that aluminium extrusion is relatively cheap and already interesting for relatively small batches. I honestly doubt that the machine time on these pedals would be less than what is needed on a properly designed extruded-cnc'd pedal.

Either way you're correct that if the pedals last, they'll be well worth it over the cheapest pedals. But as mentioned, that is more related to the durability of bearings and the threads where the pins go than the grain structure of the platform.

Are Hope pedals from Al2014? I think that is a tougher alloy (more fatigue resistant) than 6061 if I recall correctly. The thing is, I don't think it can be extruded. So yeah, that's where Hope has an edge. It is not the machining by itself that makes the pedal stronger. It is that they can use a tougher alloy because they don't need a knead alloy that can be extruded.
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: It has more to do with durability than it does breaking I think. Less bending and denting when you get a pedal strike with forged pedals vs. extruded. I've never seen a platform pedal break but I've definitely seen them bend...
  • + 1
 @millsr4: hmmm, Im not convinced about that, you cant really 'dent' a solid body pedal like this in any case (unlike pedals like HT nano's etc which have a hollowed side-profile) unless you absolutely mashed them into something quite sharp, in which case you probably have the axle to worry about and it would still only cause a ding - there is no hollow space for the pedal to deform into.

Just look at pedals like burgtecs, cnc machined from 6061 and nobody ever bends the body itself, axles yes but not the body.

If the bearings / axles are up to the job I am sure these things will last years, as I say the Hope pedal certainly does, as does the burgtec.

As I say, cold forging has quite a few benefits aside from grain alignmen, it may help reduce manufacturing time and will certainly reduce waste.
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: You most certainly CAN dent a solid body pedal. Metal doesn't need to be hollow to dent, that is just a fallacy. In addition to grain alignment, forging also compacts the grain structure itself, this is why forged pedals wont dent as easy as billet pedals. I'm telling you I've seen dented and bent pedal bodies with my own eyes... I've even done it myself... I'm currently running the Nukeproof Horizon pedals, which are forged, for over a year now and these things can take a beating like no other pedal I've owned.
  • + 1
 @millsr4: Yes of course you can 'dent' a solid block of aluminium, I just question your ability to do so in a manner that actually makes any difference to the pedal other than minor cosmetics?

I have stated the improvements in mechanical structure with regard to forging v extrusion, I dont think thats under question?

Yep, the Horizons are nice pedals, got some myself, bent the axles last year in the alps too.. I also have some burgtecs and think to severely dent or bend either pedal body you would probably write the axle, crank and your leg off in the process...
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: Dent's have more of an accumulative effect over time IMO and will make the pedal body hang up more in future strikes which adds more risk of injury. In addition dents can also lead to mangled pins and pins that you cannot remove because the threaded hole itself is out of shape. You stated some of the advantages of forging I was just pointing out one more in respect to dents... You mentioned grain alignment not compaction.
  • + 1
 @millsr4: Hah, dents have an 'accumulative effect' ?! sure if you use a hammer or something?

Would you like me to run into the workshop and grab a block of 6061 and mash at it for you on video to see if I can create an accumulative void that my bike will use to grab the passing terrain?

Would grain compaction not fall upon the collective of alignment?

Look, im not denying the obvious mechanical benefits of forging V extrusion, just pointing out that it may also be used here for other reasons, such as manufacturing benefits.
  • + 0
 @justanotherusername: Wow way to take what I said out of context... mashing of material and making high points that can snag on jagged rocks is most definitely an issue in my book, I said nothing about voids... when something dents the material is just displaced and creates high points around it that can snag, especially in something solid where the material can't be pushed back as in something hollow. I'm very familiar with the mechanical properties of 6061 as a former aerospace machinist and current aerospace manufacturing engineer/project manager... grain alignment and compaction are 2 completely different concepts. You should take a chill pill lol.
  • + 1
 @bok-CZ: $210 is a lot for a bicycle pedal but compared to other high end flats it's not that bad. Race Face Atlas are $170CAD, that's what I run and they have been great but I'd be fine pay a little extra for Chromag because I like what the company is about and would say this is a premium product.
  • + 1
 @millsr4: yea, all of the massicr raised bits on my pedals sure do reach out to grab rocks and roots, It’s amazing I stay on the bike really, some of them just be at least one or two mm tall! ;-) you crazy.
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: there is a reason almost every pedal has a chamfered leading edge with rounded corners and smooth profiles... I may be crazy but you're ignorant... ????
  • + 1
 @millsr4: In my experience the edges of the pedal just wear off with indeed some notches here and there but nothing that would catch onto something that the pins wouldn't already.
  • + 1
 @millsr4: aaah quit with this madness will you, of course they have a chamfered edge, exactly why a 2mm ding caused by a rock won’t make the whole bike ‘ hang up’

Are the pins not taller than these mountainous dings you create on your petals too?

Care to share some pictures of these ground grabbing pedals you have.

Funny shit.
  • + 0
 @justanotherusername: We were talking pedal body, not pins... That basically only leaves the leading edge to discuss... also i never said the ding alone would cause you to hang up... they will just add friction when it already snags and could be the difference from the pedal sliding or sticking and pitching you OTB. You're f#cking obnoxious... You want a pic? I have plenty of your mom if you want! Wink
  • + 1
 @millsr4: well, I would rather be ‘obnoxious’ than a fantasist incapable of backing down on the obvious bullshit about pedal dings standing bikes up and ‘causing friction’ hah.

No, that’s fine, you keep those pictures of ‘my mom’ all to yourself, why not hold onto another fantasy that exists only in your mind, eh?
  • + 1
 @millsr4: oops, looks like vinay thinks your talking shite too....
  • + 1
 @justanotherusername: You need to look in the mirror when you talk shit about not backing down... this whole time you have been defensive and aggressive with all your arguments. This whole thing started because, in addition to machine time savings, I said forging was more for durability of the pedal body rather than it being to keep it from breaking(because I agree with you that billet pedal bodies don't really fail), basically less denting and bending. Vinay may not agree with me but at least he isn't a prick about it nor did he misconstrue what I said... sometimes people really do show their true colors on the internet...
  • + 1
 @millsr4: all the colours of the rainbow.....
  • + 1
 Super rad thanks Chris. I'm hunting you down this weekend to check them out at NW Cup.
  • - 2
 Hard to justify buying pedals repped by a guys that has 1 foot dragging in the dirt every other corner...Are they so good that you only need 1 pedal to stay on the bike? should be half the cost!
  • + 9
 Was thinking the same thing, it's like Jeff Kendal Weed having a signature front tire
  • + 1
 Assume the pins will work with scarabs as well?
  • + 1
 Oh my. Yes please.
  • + 1
 Cool skid!
  • - 3
 Sexy pedals. Waiting for the plastic version .
  • + 6
 Keep waiting
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