Where the Trail Ends - Exclusive Freeride Entertainment Interview

Jul 13, 2012
by Lunchbox Larry  
Who knew that racing modified Schwinns down California mountains could come so far? Purpose built 'mountain' bikes came from now legendary builders like Gary Fisher, Tom Ritchey and Joe Breeze. These guys produced bikes that could go anywhere and handle any kind of terrain. More importantly, it was the most sublime yet gnarly thing you could do on a bike.

Specialized then brought it to the masses and made it obtainable for budding off road cycling enthusiasts. Not long after, the forefathers of adrenalin would put racing on the map and gravity at the helm. The emergent mountain bike racing scene became the driver for ever-better bike technology. From frames to components and every part in between, trickle-down race technology eventually brought serious mountain biking to the masses. Right about now a shitload of people start to shred their local trails.

Photo by Blake Jorgenson Red Bull Content Pool Property of Red Bull Media House
  Darren Berrecloth - Photo by Blake Jorgenson / Red Bull Content Pool

Outside of the race world, a new school of mountain biking was evolving on Vancouver's North Shore. Purpose built trails followed these new bikes, and the Shore became the essential testing ground for many manufacturers. It turns out that building trails just to get rad also provides invaluable insight toward building better bikes. At about the same time, the concept of freeriding was growing. Freeride was a term borrowed from the snowboarding philosophy, basically: 'I don't need to race or compete bro, I ride for the stoke and the experience. It was this philosophy that riders could make a living off of photographs and film segments that would transcend the genre and create the poster children of the sports future.

bigquotesI don't need to race or compete bro, I ride purely for the stoke and the experience.

Photo by Blake Jorgenson Red Bull Content Pool Property of Red Bull Media House
  Darren Berrecloth and production crew - Photo by Blake Jorgenson / Red Bull Content Pool

As the the sport pushed to new heights, things like chair lifts, shuttle vans and helicopters came into play. Entire crews with huge cameras in tow, documenting the epic journey. Freeride bred new big mountain comps, which eventually led to new riding genres such as slopestyle and dirt jumping. The technical and trick side of freeriding progressed rapidly, and bike parks, pump tracks and week-long mountain bike festivals became a lifestyle for people around the world, effectively bringing us to where we are today.

Where The Trail Ends celebrates the roots of tradition and the painful glory of freeride's progression...

Photo by Blake Jorgenson Red Bull Content Pool Property of Red Bull Media House
  Darren Berrecloth - Photo by Blake Jorgenson / Red Bull Content Pool

Where the Trail Ends, the long awaited feature film produced by Freeride Entertainment, rejuvenates the original mountain biking mantras of exploration and adventure. "Exploring is defined as the act of searching or traveling a terrain for the purpose of discovery, " says Jeremy Grant, Freeride Entertainment's chief Editor and Director of the 3 year long project. "This film follows the world's top freeride mountain biker's as they challenge Mother Nature in search for unridden terrain around the globe. It's probably the most progressive and ambitious mountain biking film ever attempted. It was a journey to seek out the future of big mountain riding and put the adventure back in freeriding." Although he's new in the director role, Jeremy knows what it takes to make kick ass mountain bike movies. Grant has been Freeride's main editor for 12 years. It was Jeremy's initial directing foray that took Darren Berrecloth and Cameron McCaul to the Gobi desert of China almost 5 years ago.

Photo by Blake Jorgenson Red Bull Content Pool Property of Red Bull Media House
  Production Crew for Where the Trail Ends - Photo by Blake Jorgenson / Red Bull Content Pool

bigquotesFor over a decade we travelled the world in search of the best riding locations with the best athletes. That was mostly based around singletrack and jumps and places like Cappadocia, Turkey, where you could hit a lot of one off stunts and lines. This film is about putting tire tracks in places that have never been ridden and never knowing the outcome! - Derek Westerlund

Photo by Blake Jorgenson Red Bull Content Pool Property of Red Bull Media House
  Garrett Buehler - Photo by Blake Jorgenson / Red Bull Content Pool

The New World Disorder series was about progressing the sport...Where the Trail Ends is about progressing the sport in a different way. Pushing it in a different direction, pushing it back to its roots. When the original pioneers of freeriding, the Schley's, Simmons and Tippies of the world were seeking out the original freeride landscapes, it was very much an adventure and this was the true essence of what the sport was. When we finally woke up after 10 NWD films we realized that we had pushed it so far in that one direction that freeriding as a sport was predominately based on slopestyle competitions, dirt jump contests and stunts built specifically for filming. A lot of that was because of NWD.

In thinking about what was next there was really only one place left to go, back to what it was founded on. People will always follow the road because it is paved. It's the unknown that holds the biggest risk and yields the biggest reward.

bigquotesIt became very apparent that the adventure was gone...definitely not where any of us early founders of the sport imagined it going. It was kind of like the Dr. Frankenstein effect: "Oh my god, what have we done?" - Derek Westerlund

Photo by Matt Domanski Red Bull Content Pool Property of Red Bull Media House
  Andreu Lacondeguy - Photo by John Wellburn / Red Bull Content Pool

bigquotesFreeride Entertainment as a company really needed to do this film for ourselves. Step away from bike porn or the feel good experience videos that everyone is trying to create now. Where the Trail Ends is predominately an adventure documentary driven by Darren Berrecloth, Cameron Zink and Kurt Sorge with a host of other amazing riders and adventurers joining them along the way. - Derek Westerlund

Photo by Blake Jorgenson Red Bull Content Pool Property of Red Bull Media House
  Cam Zink - Photo by Blake Jorgenson / Red Bull Content Pool

In the mid 2000’s when Freeride's New World Disorder series was Flying High Again, cranking out epic feature films every fall with shots procured during the months previous. Freeride’s office would go into lock down mode as editing was limited to less than 3 weeks. One year they were still in the field shooting riders with the Vegas premiere a week away! "This film has allowed us the time to story tell and do things with the camera team that we never had time or the resources to do, " says Derek Westerlund the owner of Freeride Entertainment the mastermind behind the NWD series and one of this film's Executive Producers.

Andreu - Where The Trail Ends - Freeride Interview image Photo by Matt Domanski Courtesy Red Bull Content Pool
  Andreu Lacondeguy - Photo by Matt Domanski / Red Bull Content Pool

bigquotesWhen we were making annual mountain bike films we were continually chasing our own tails. We only had ourselves to out do each year. This is different from a 3-year project like Lifecycles in the sense that it is travel based and we really did not know whether we would be successful or not seeking out these locations. We were the first people to ever ride and film in the Gobi desert and that sparked the hunger to go deeper. We did as much research as we could without actually sending someone there to qualify the terrain. We also have a lot of epic places we did not get to make it to...yet. We had to have proper permits to do a lot of the film which we never really thought or cared about before. It was very expensive to obtain some of this access. A lot of countries you cannot just show up with a 20-person crew and production team with millions of dollars worth of equipment and say. We're here! - Derek Westerlund

Photo by Blake Jorgenson Red Bull Content Pool Property of Red Bull Media House
  Darren Berrecloth - Photo by Blake Jorgenson / Red Bull Content Pool

bigquotesWe really experimented with a lot of film making equipment. We didn't want to be predictable and Phantom cam the shit out of everything. We only chose the right moments for those tools - Brad McGregor

Brad McGregor brought a new creative focus to the cinematography after he was appointed as Director of Photography for the film. Brad is a fabled camera operator in the freeride mountain bike scene. Legendary moments of mountain bike history have passed through his lens. "We really wanted to bring progressive riding to big mountain terrain to see if riders could actually multi trick in uncharted territory like skiing or snowboarding. Progressing the sport is harder then meets the eye. So much of it is based around one off tricks in manipulated terrain. I think we got close. It was incredible to see the world's best riders humbled and scared to throw down and the consequences of actually failing. It is so much different than the Rampage where there are machines and man made lips and landings. A lot of people will probably sit back and say that back flip or 360 is not progressive but you really have to think about where they are doing this. There is not an ambulance waiting at the bottom for you. In Nepal if someone would have got seriously injured it was a 4-day drive to a hospital and anybody who knows anything knows you do not want to go to a Nepalese hospital. We had to have special evacuation insurance to get flown to India or Pakistan."

Photo by John Gibson Red Bull Content Pool Property of Red Bull Media House
  Boatload of talent - Photo by John Gibson / Red Bull Content Pool

"This project was a massive commitment for both the athletes and crew," notes Westerlund. "There was a ton of camping and roughing it to shoot in some of these locations. There are not a lot of athletes that would sacrifice the comforts and amenities they are used to make this film happen. The Claw, Sorge and Zink did every trip and never whined or complained. This brought a new level of toughness and inspiration amongst the crew and other riders knowing the best riders on the planet were working this hard to reach these locations. When I look around at the pro athlete field there are very few names I could look at and imagine actually being a part of this. It was also was incredibly hard and taxing on the riders and crew. By the end people were extremely emotional...and exhausted physically and mentally."

Photo by John Wellburn Red Bull Content Pool Property of Red Bull Media House
  Kurt Sorge - Photo by John Wellburn / Red Bull Content Pool

bigquotesRed Bull Media House had incredible vision letting us have the time and resources to produce this film. Scott Bradfield in particular is probably the single most important person in the world supporting mountain biking right now. His love for the sport and position at Red Bull has helped the sport across the board. He was the one who got Rampage on MTV, The Atherton Project on Fuel...truly the unsung hero running things behind the scenes. When we have two major freeriding events both Joyride and Rampage as two hour specials with NBC for the Red Bull Signature Series, that is saying a lot about their dedication to the sport. What they have done by enabling athletes like The Claw and Travis Rice to bring their vision to the masses I really feel will save action sports and keep it valid in a very de-sensitized world. - Derek Westerlund

Photo by John Wellburn Red Bull Content Pool Property of Red Bull Media House
  Darren Berrecloth - Photo by John Wellburn / Red Bull Content Pool

The team at Specialized also deserve massive props for supporting Bearclaw as this really was his vision from the beginning. I cannot say enough about their commitment to their athletes and their products. It would be so easy for someone to try to push their other athletes into this project where they stepped up with an incredible amount or resources based solely on the fact that they were supporting someone who has been a major contributor to their success in freeriding and beyond.

Andreu - Where The Trail Ends - Freeride Interview image Photo by Matt Domanski Courtesy Red Bull Content Pool
  Andreu Lacondeguy - Photo by Matt Domanski / Red Bull Content Pool

Contour also brought a whole new aspect to this film.The amount of incredible POV and the design and ease of use of their cameras has allowed us to mount and get camera angles like never before. Contour will be releasing exclusive content every other week over the next couple months. Raw POV moments and just enough content to take you there and get you stoked on what you are about to see with the feature film. The video below is a PB exclusive:



Robbie Bourdon - Photo by John Wellburn Red Bull Content Pool
  Robbie Bourdon - Photo by John Wellburn / Red Bull Content Pool

One of the more exciting things for us is the partnership with Dolby and being able to bring real sound design into the sport. We had an awesome sound man in Greg Picard who was mixing up to 6 athletes at once in the middle of nowhere, a challenge all unto itself. I think there are a lot of subtleties that really create the idea of this being a feature documentary.

Dolby as a partner also brings such as serious professional outlook to our finishing of the film... it is mind blowing. They are opening doors to places action sports have never seen or been privileged enough to be before. The audio will be posted at Skywalker Ranch which is owned and operated by George Lucas and our colour correction will be done at LightIron in LA where they have recently finished The Amazing Spiderman and the new Total Recall.

Beyond the movie we are doing an amazing coffee table journal and a timeless clothing collection with Troy Lee Designs. Limited edition clothes that capture the true spirit of Where the Trail Ends the athletes and the adventure through the eyes of Troy, Joel our creative director and their artists and design teams. Needless to say this year at Interbike fans of mountain biking are in for a new experience and the doors to the future are wide open. The Where the Trail Ends trailer has created a serious impact in less then two weeks. The short format trailer is one push away from hitting the 1 million view mark and unlocking the next stage of wherethetrailends.com and the official four minute movie trailer.

Photo by John Wellburn Red Bull Content Pool Property of Red Bull Media House
  Darren Berrecloth - Photo by John Wellburn / Red Bull Content Pool

Please share this amazing trailer with the world and lets see whats really to come! "Where the Trail Ends" is also an 8 part television series, which will air on network TV next spring.

Photo by John Gibson Red Bull Content Pool Property of Red Bull Media House
  Darren Berrecloth and production crew - Photo by John Gibson / Red Bull Content Pool





How stoked are you for this movie? Will it be Freeride Entertainment's masterpiece?


Posted In:
Interviews



72 Comments

  • 76 1
 Darren Berrecloth - Mountain bike legend
  • 5 0
 Don't forget to share, forward and click the teaser link so we can reach 1 million views and unlock the 4min extended trailer!

www.youtube.com/watch?v=iHH5a9IYr3A&feature=player_embedded!
  • 27 2
 the word epic is over used......but somehow its the only word to descibe this....EPIC!
  • 1 0
 no the term epic has been misused for so long... This, this is what epic IS. It will also be the new measuring stick for a while now.
  • 2 0
 Completely agree with you on this one , i think there should be more exposure to kids at a younger age . There was a video posted on pinkbike the other week of a nine year old riding whistler. The attitude stinks towards kids looking to take up a so called "dangerous sport " what's worse is that when you have a group of riders around town and their instantly thugs or vandals . Maybe Red bull should make a video highlighting some of the other aspects of mountain biking , like what taking risks teaches you . Glad someones pointed it out . Plus the only bike you need is the one you want , there's no proper bike , although some are better quality than others . Equally an Enduro bike will do everything i think thats a bonus for youngsters as you only need one to do it all , i've been building up a transition build and to be honest there's beens some big improvements in technology since i started last year but do we all need dropper seat posts and electrically monitored shock systems ... no , like all sports mountain biking is enjoying yourself but if what makes you happy is having all these gadgets by all means fire away but i don't think people should be told they need them .
  • 23 2
 This looks so awesome. A great movie, with great, riders, and even greater exposure for the sport.

...but it got me thinking, specifically about that exposure. Is this what we really want? To grow the sport by appealing to the masses thanks to Red Bull and other such media/marketing giants? For sure another mountain bike boom would be nice. Cheaper bikes, more popularity, more people to ride with. But do we want mountain biking to become a trend? Do we want people to purchase bikes because it ''looks so gnarly on those videos'' or rather because it has become a passion?

I already see too many people on the trails riding for weird reasons, with no real passion for self-improvement. Looking good with their full TLD kits and 7K$ bikes, but slamming on the brakes at every corner (and destroying the trail, let's not forget that). And when they're tired of it, they buy a 7K$ road bike, or Motorbike, or golf clubs. Generally, it's also the same kinds of people that would fuel silly marketing trends like rear-suspension religion, carbon everywhere, and sometimes pointless clipless, not giving real engineers and real independent manufacturers a chance.

I don't want to sound chauvinistic, but I'd rather bring more people into the sport by putting young kids on bikes and taking them to the trails or pump track every Sunday than by the wallets of indifferent new riders looking for their next big-boy toy. That's how I think the sport should be grown. And, unlike the biggest sponsors of our sport, it's not about making money.
  • 6 0
 I can see where you're coming from; don't sell the soul of Mountain Biking. But I don't this film goes any further to that aim than anything else (Lifecycles, Follow me...).

When you get down to it, i don't care why anyone else rides - weird reasons are their reason, not my place to say they shoudn't ride.

I feel this movie will inspire tons of kids to get bikes or get better bikes. More people on bikes the better, IMO. But in the end, "money" is a key part - and in a way it IS about making money. Companies need to make $$ to keep selling bikes, to keep innovating designs and producing them, sponsoring riders and races.
  • 3 1
 chauvinistic eh? you lost me on that one big guy.
  • 3 1
 I see what you mean Dusty-B. I've seen fully decked out riders with $7K bikes as well, standing idly by a jump, waiting for someone to hit it and not hitting it themselves. I'm pretty sure those people are the same people that post up brand new bikes for sale with the selling reason "It's too much bike for me" or "thought I'd get into the sport, but I didn't." I'm sure we've all seen them. I have a friend who only rides XC trails and some of the stuff he posts on FB make me laugh; things like posting up a trailer for "Follow Me" and when people comment, asking him if that's what he does, he replies, "Yup." In that sense, yeah, it's becoming an ugly trend, where people probably deck themselves out with TLD kits, $7K bikes, etc. to reiterate to themselves that yeah, this is what they do when in fact, they don't. And what really bothers me is that they either won't or refuse to "progress" their riding. They just want their bike to stay nice and shiny. I know this because I have some friends that are like that and so many times, I have to remind them that a better/newer/pricier bike isn't going to make them better.

Overall, I'm not trying to bag on them - if people want to spend that much on gear and bikes, then let them - it's their money. All that money will never equal up to the satisfaction of doing something out of your comfort zone, whether it's jumping a gap, trying a new stunt, etc. and it doesn't matter whether you crash or not. I think as long as "real riders" continue to do what we do, riding to progress, getting hurt in the process, dusting off and trying again, the "soul of mountain biking" will never be sold/lost/etc.
  • 3 0
 We should also keep in mind that these people are probably simply looking for a new hobby. Living in Seattle, with Duthie Hill Bike Park, Stevens Pass Bike Park, I-5 Colonnade, etc. having opened up in the past few years, mountain biking has grown here. More of my friends are asking me questions about it; things like what kind of bike they should get, what are some easy trails, etc. I'm also seeing more and more people on the trails, which can make things a bit congested. But just because they don't have the "passion" for it doesn't mean they can't ride. Sure, it's a little excessive if they spend THAT much for gear and riding, but hey, it's their money.

In all, mountain biking should really just be about enjoying the ride, whether it's to progress, for leisure, or trying something new.
  • 5 0
 In regards to freeride, I believe Darren Berrecloth said it best: "Freeriding is basically being on a bike, doing whatever you wanna do, whatever that makes you happy." Drop In Season 4
  • 5 0
 i dont concider myself to be a particular type of rider. im not a dh rider, im not a freeride rider. but i do use gravity to do the riding i do. i have a half decent bike (voltage fr20) and the full face helmet and neck brace and other armour for my knees and elbows. to some it might look like i know what im doing.
all i know is im doing what i love!
im not fast! im not slow! i can hit the jumps and do the drops. but im there to enjoy it. that is all...
i dont need to impress anyone.
  • 1 0
 I think you're over-thinking this. Thanks to Red Bull and the internet mountain biking is suddenly on lots of peoples' radar. The sport appeals to such a wide range of people (status-seekers w/ expensive bikes, adrenaline and cardio junkies, back-country adventurers, etc). And now bike parks and relatively inexpensive quality DH bikes have opened things up even further. I've been riding mountain bikes for 20 years, as have most of my riding friends. Lots of trends have come and gone in that time. This current surge is good for everyone. More people means a louder political and economic voice against the people who would lock us out of riding areas. More people means more $s spent on bikes and gear which means better shops and better community. As a long-time rider I benefit from these things all the time. So there are guys in pyjama suits and neck braces pushing up to do laps of lower Fromme. I think it's weird but really, who cares? People are riding bikes and they're stoked!

Thanks to exposure to a certain aspect of our sport new people will get inspired to try it. Some will love it and eventually branch out their riding to include more stuff. For others it just might not stick. Either way it's fine with me.
  • 3 0
 People can be a) gear-heads, b) have a lot of money and c) not be great athletes. That does not make them less passionate about the sport.
  • 1 0
 I propped you dude, but I think what you wanna say is that its better to keep it quiet about the ripper trails so that the people thinking they are rippers, who are passionate in their own way, spending $$$ in to the sport, and are out there riding and making a mess of your line don't get on your trial. I tell no one anything and my lines are shared just by me - and the buddies I bring along. (i live somewhere that I can do that....maybe some places its not possible to build a trail.... then my advice is hard to apply)

As for the movie - looks killer BIG D!!
  • 1 0
 Completely agree with you on this one , i think there should be more exposure to kids at a younger age . There was a video posted on pinkbike the other week of a nine year old riding whistler. The attitude stinks towards kids looking to take up a so called "dangerous sport " what's worse is that when you have a group of riders around town and their instantly thugs or vandals . Maybe Red bull should make a video highlighting some of the other aspects of mountain biking , like what taking risks teaches you . Glad someones pointed it out . Plus the only bike you need is the one you want , there's no proper bike , although some are better quality than others . Equally an Enduro bike will do everything i think thats a bonus for youngsters as you only need one to do it all , i've been building up a transition build and to be honest there's beens some big improvements in technology since i started last year but do we all need dropper seat posts and electrically monitored shock systems ... no , like all sports mountain biking is enjoying yourself but if what makes you happy is having all these gadgets by all means fire away but i don't think people should be told they need them .
  • 10 0
 this.... is mountainbiking
  • 5 0
 I have always loved the Claw for keeping shit real. He is always riding big mountain, when he designs a course, its going to be big, its not just going to have wooden lips and dirt landers. So keen for this movie!
  • 7 0
 nothing to say..
  • 3 0
 There are other reasons to get out of bed than race. Some simply like to push their personal evelope; this is why these films have the total stoke factor and this is why I ride ....
  • 7 1
 You can't make Freeride movie without Aggy Frown
  • 1 1
 I think he is. They drive up to the top of a mountain get snowed on overnight.. I think
  • 2 1
 This: www.pinkbike.com/video/242122 ?But that's not in that movie...
  • 1 0
 true that !!
  • 1 0
 Aggy is in this Vid. I rode with him a few days after he got back to Kamloops
  • 4 0
 September...September...September...September...September...September...September...September... Are we there yet?
  • 2 1
 Nice trailer but c´mon who have the opportunity(and the skillz) here on the board to do that kind of ridin...?? Even here in Spain it gets more and more reglemented...its hard to do "Freeride" legaly or with the acceptance of others.
  • 1 0
 Not many people will ever have the opportunity to ride the Gobi desert... I don't think that's the point. I never in a million years thought I'd ride some of the places I see in videos, but the desire in me was strong to seek some out, and I cannot wait to return to Green River, and search out more terrain in NM and Utah. I hope it would inspire riders to be creative with their available environments, or to seek out more challenging terrain.
  • 1 0
 Why did I think this had something to do with the science of racing?Didnt they release a trailer in super slow mo,with a clock,ticking off the seconds?Or am I thinking of another video?I realize alot of people get off on watching "free riding" but.....ehh.....
  • 1 0
 could've been 3 minute gaps trailer? Big Grin
  • 1 0
 I am waiting for being allowed to see the film hardly.
My sight. this will be everything times the film of most stunning freeride!!! Smile
Many falls we may see it on the price of a whatnot then!! Everything was contributed to it according to me in the course of the completion of the film!!! 101% !!
  • 1 1
 The English language has many many words that are often used on a day to day basis to describe what i just watched, EPIC/ BREATHTAKING. The list is extensive. None of them can be used here this time. Words do not do those pictures and video footage justice. Oh, i forgot SPEECHLESS!!!!
  • 3 4
 but speechless is an oxymoron!
  • 2 1
 unless you write it
  • 2 2
 but thats just a written speech.... hence his speech above then the use of an oxymoron at the end.
  • 1 1
 Nicely done you boys picked up on both of those prity quick. Very mart.
  • 2 1
 Is that like describing something as nondescript? ;-)
  • 3 0
 Love the picture of Lacondeguy crossing the river. Never think of him as a backcountry guy.
  • 2 0
 what it's all about for me for sure, big mountain riding. Would like to see the original Fro's shred some lines too, they still ride hard.
  • 1 0
 i think this is literally going to be 'where the trail ends'. Freeride these days is getting blown off the stokemetre! I take my hat off to any of the chaps who got and endure mother nature to ride some sick lines!
  • 1 1
 Is this just gonna be another strength in numbers? massively over-hyped and totally hipster with all these meanings to the camera shots and the riding and all this bullshit? I hope it's not, but what the f*ck happened to building a cool trail and filming someone riding it? Bring back new world disorder...
  • 3 0
 holy shit that was a sick trailer!!!!
  • 1 0
 Thanks to whoever pointed out Cam Zinks dramatic pause on the last article...now every time I watch this trailer it makes me laugh!
  • 1 0
 "I don't need to race or compete bro, I ride purely for the stoke and the experience." the best quote that I've come across in a while.
  • 2 0
 Also... SO many desktop backgrounds!!!
  • 3 0
 Cannot Wait!!!
  • 1 0
 Hiked in Nepal and met the XC national champ of 07. Would have been well rad to ride there. Next time!
  • 1 0
 This trailer is wonderful and the pictures to... But the riders are very very strong... Wink
  • 1 0
 Stoked and ready to race this sunday in northen spain Asturias, Epic Enduro series Yeah!!!!
  • 2 0
 bourdon!!! can't believe this guy still shreds.
  • 2 0
 i think i broke my foot....Bourdo is a classic
  • 1 0
 You have to come to Peru for filming, Huge mountains, amazing landscapes and sceneary and Epic trails!!!
  • 1 0
 This Isnt mountain biking this is what the Gods of asgard do in their spare time
  • 1 0
 EPIC edit.
It seems like every new mountainbike video is bigger and badder than the one before. I'm sold on the trailer Big Grin
  • 1 0
 How do I even respond to that?
  • 2 0
 So many PODs here...
  • 2 0
 ...stoked Smile
  • 1 0
 This could be the "Riding Giants" of mountain bike films, looks awesome!
  • 1 0
 seriously, what is with the goat at 0:52 in the trailer???
  • 1 0
 Wooooh, the inside look of their HQ iq ssickkk!
  • 1 0
 THE ART OF FREERIDE with the best Artists
  • 1 0
 soo f*cking stoked for this
  • 1 0
 wath is the song of the trailer??
  • 1 0
 It was composed for this project.
  • 1 0
 nice camara work, and good riding, perfect set up. can´t ask for more!
  • 2 1
 Gopros are better!! They are straight up clearer and have a better picture
  • 1 0
 i think i broke my foot.... lol nbd
  • 1 0
 If robbie broke his foot that f**king sucks
  • 1 0
 This is why i ride free!
  • 1 0
 Please don't stop here
  • 1 0
 More,NOW !
  • 1 0
 SANGAR.......

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