Fox Patent Shows Heart Rate or GPS Controlled Dropper Post

Jun 28, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  

Imagine you're in the middle of an XC race, maintaining a grueling pace at the head of the pack, when you arrive at a technical downhill section. Typically, you'd push the remote lever for your dropper post, weight the saddle to lower it, and then stand up again to make it through that tricky bit of trail. Not this time. Instead, once you reach a predetermined GPS coordinate, the post lowers by itself, and you're able to continue on without even thinking about pushing any levers. It's not as far-fetched as it seem, epecially since that's just one of the many scenarios laid out in a recent patent granted to Fox earlier this month.

The patent has the innocuous title of 'Seat post', but a closer examination reveals some fascinating possibilities. The most compelling details describe a post with an electronic motor at the base that allows it to raise and lower on command. This isn't the first time we've seen a patent for a seat post that can lower on its own – Shimano has supposedly had a motorized one in the works since all the way back in 2009, and Trek was granted a patent for an auto-dropping dropper back in 2016. And don't forget BMC's Autodrop post that emerged in 2019, one of the first real-world examples that the concept could work.

The patent details multiple different ways that the post can be controlled.
<Deleted photo>

A Heart Rate Controlled Dropper

Fox's patent takes things a step further, presenting a wide range of options, including one that would have the post raise and lower based on a rider's heart rate.

According to the patent, “In one embodiment, the seat post is actuated by a controller designed for receiving and analyzing input associated with a cyclist's heart rate as well as the cyclist's GPS coordinates. For example, if the controller receives input that describes the cyclist's heart rate as being lower than a given preprogrammed threshold while riding, then the controller may signal to the seat post to move up or down, causing the cyclist's work rate and heart rate to increase or decrease.

In another example, if the controller receives input that describes the cyclist's GPS coordinates as being such that the cyclist is just about to arrive at terrain having a steep descent, the controller may cause the seat post to lower in preparation for the descent.”

Those may not seem like the most practical applications, although I could envision them being tested out in the cross-country or even enduro racing worlds. If a rider was able to pre-ride a track and program in the sections where they wanted their dropper to raise or lower, potentially while their suspension settings changed at the same time, that would allow them to focus even more on riding and less on fiddling with lever. The patent does mention the ability to combined the dropper post height with suspension adjustment, and shifting adjustment is mentioned as well, raising the idea of a nearly fully automated bike, one that requires minimal input from the rider other than pedaling effort.

In another section, the patent has an extensive list of the various components that could possibly communicate with the post, including a wireless device, power meter, heart rate monitor, voice activation device, GPS device, graphical user interface, button, dial, smartphone, and lever. The idea of someone shouting furiously at their dropper post deep in the woods cracks me up, but it's clear Fox wanted to cast a large net with this patent in order to cover as many configurations as possible.


A small motor at the base of the post (labelled 365) controls its actuation.


How does it work?

The patent lays out a few different possibilities as to how the post will function, but the overall concept is that a small motor at the base of the post receives instructions, either wirelessly or via a cable, and then raises or lowers the post accordingly. The motor is connected to a cam which then opens or closes check valves that allow the post to raise or lower. A PID controller is used to monitor the motor's speed. When the post nears the desired height, the motor slows down, allowing the post to arrive smoothly, rather than with a jarring finish.


When will this futuristic dropper post be available?

I've contacted Fox to see if they'll divulge any more information, but if I had to guess the answer will be, “Not any time soon.” Remember, we still haven't seen any finished products hit the market from Trek or Shimano, and they patented droppers intended to accomplish a similar goal years ago. Fox's GPS, heart rate, and suspension integration features are all clever, although I sort of hope they're not the future. Maybe it's the Luddite in me, but I'm confident I can figure out when to lower my seat post and adjust my suspension on my own, thank you very much.

I'm much more intrigued by the concept of a post that lowers by itself when I push a button than anything else. Make it strong, as low-maintenance as possible, and then sign me up.


162 Comments

  • 441 0
 How, uh, high up does your dropper post have to be to read your heart rate?
  • 91 0
 *in Rick's voice* Put it way up inside there, as far as it can fit.
  • 62 0
 You do what you have to do to KOM.
  • 87 1
 So, basically, you're speeding down the hill and, of course, the dropper is slammed all the way down when you notice a beautiful hiker girl sunbathing by the trail.. Next, you are waking up in an Ambulance after being catapulted otb by your heart rate controlled dropper
  • 3 0
 All the way…
  • 3 1
 Does it come with a red tip too?
  • 8 1
 @crazyXCsquirrel: **also in Rick Sanchez voice** your rectum is taught yet malleable, it’ll just slip right out of mine!
  • 3 0
 Someone really needs to see if their newest formula of “Float Fluid” is food safe before this gets out of hand.
  • 4 0
 @pakleni: yeah. This thing sounds like it will NEVER be plauged by buginess, never.
  • 13 0
 New Fox marketing slogan: right in the gooch, when you least expect it!
  • 1 0
 Reading your blood flow to your genitalia with a sensor beneath the seat... Erection goes up.
  • 1 0
 @crazyXCsquirrel: It has a thermometer on it to manage temps...vibrates to tell you to pedal faster....
  • 4 0
 "WARNING: Due to your depraved browser history (literally, hours a day, seriously get some help), your dropper post has been suspended and is fixed in the down position. In 90 days your rising privileges will be reinstated."
  • 10 0
 **Looks nervously at 34.9mm seat post bike. Hurriedly sells it for 27.2mm seatpost bike.. #marginalgains
  • 2 0
 @crazyXCsquirrel: That would raise the heart rate of the person being penetrated by the dropper post
  • 1 0
 Or they could make it go down by pushing the, vice versa ya know?
  • 3 1
 @joedave: Also in Rick's voice - "This reality is f**ked Morty, time to move to a new one".
  • 172 4
 Fox spent so much time thinking about if they could, they forgot to think if they should.
  • 69 2
 "Hold off on that whole crown issue... we've got something more important!"
  • 29 6
 @Eatsdirt: The crown issue is being solved by there marketing department and this new shiny object has the engineering departments full attention.
  • 17 0
 @daveew - for sure. I'll just leave this here as a primer on GPS accuracy: www.gps.gov/systems/gps/performance/accuracy

I have a hard time seeing how they could ever rely on GPS location in the woods for something as sensitive to being off by a foot or so as dropping (or extending) seat post...
  • 6 0
 Now all my friends will know when I'm too scared to do a drop because my seatpost will pop back up.

Now maybe if it connected right to your brain??..
  • 3 0
 @davemays: That would be better. It likely will require a bit of brain surgery and trans-cranial contacts, but with proper seals and such it should be no big deal.
I can't forsee any possible problems!
  • 2 1
 @g-42: Formula1 uses GPS with amazing accuracy. I assume it's all bout how accurate you need and how much power you are willing to use for that accuracy.
  • 18 0
 I can't understand how we even got to the point where having a cable between the lever and the seatpost was too much of an inconvenience for people; now pushing a little lever is too much of an inconvenience? How are people motivated enough to pedal a bike through the woods for miles and miles every week yet at the same time they can't be bothered to change out a cable once every 3 years or now even just push a lever to drop the post.
  • 1 0
 @g-42: And anyone who’s used a heart rate monitor can tell you how glitchy that can get.
  • 1 0
 @g-42: I was thinking along similar lines. GPS reliability with smart phones is shaky, at best. Certainly not accurate enough to drop the post exactly when and where I need it dropped.
  • 3 0
 @oldmanjoe: F1 use differential GPS systems with a dedicated base station and most circuits don't run through the middle of a forest. Unless you want to lug a tripod, a dish and a control unit up to the trail head and cut all the trees down, I can't see it being anywhere near accurate enough. Most recreational GPS systems are only accurate to around 30m in perfect conditions i.e. not in the middle of a forest on the side of a hill. I've worked with GPS surveying equipment for over a decade so I have a bit of experience with GPS accuracy
  • 3 1
 @robw515: Haven't you heard of E-Bikes?
  • 2 0
 @Attilauk: lol, maybe add a hydraulic dropper that extends 2m, and has a Fox base station (painted bright orange) that can only connect to their proprietary CORS network (which would cost ya)
  • 2 0
 This will be a perfect complement to my e-bike. My thumb was getting way too tired actuating that lever, and my brain was getting way too taxed trying to think about when to tell my thumb to work. This whole pedaling and thinking thing is too hard. Someone needs to invent a bike that shifts and steers for me too (I'm sure they're already on it).
  • 1 0
 @SlodownU: You my friend are the perfect test specimen for a fully automatic E-Bike!
  • 100 0
 Strava tells me that my highest heart rates on a 'winch and descend' style ride are generally on the descents. Not looking forward to the day when I come into the steepest, roughest section of a gnarly tech trail and my clever seat post smashes me in the gooch.
  • 11 0
 Exactly what I was thinking. My heart rate is pushed when I'm descending down;
  • 1 0
 @pwhite2021: Same. Was surprised to see my highest HRs were mostly on downhills, when I first got a HR monitor.
  • 4 0
 Then when your heart rate is on the highest and when your elevation drops it shouldn't work
  • 7 0
 Exactly the same experience.

Highest heart rate is usually on the downs. Or is at least similar on the ups and downs.

I’d personally be super worried about having my seat post operated by something I can’t exactly directly control.

I.e. imagine scaring yourself silly with a near miss on an already intense downhill, and then having your heart rate spike and make the last bit even more scary when a post appears from “nowhere”.

Same thing with gps accuracy. Aren’t most consumer gps devices accurate to like 21ft? That seems small when you’re driving a car on a highway and getting directions. But 21ft can be a huge margin for error on a trail (especially if the ups and downs are short and punchy).

Interesting idea. Just… not sure I’m on board with it yet.
  • 4 0
 Yes, descending at a certain pace and/or in certain terrains is about the most physically demanding activity possible, and whoever thought of this is unbelievably clueless. A really basic misconception, that downhilling is "relaxing". Relaxing is actually what most often happens on the uphills, for users of the type of bikes that use dropper posts, who just take it easy. Completely clueless idea (I was actually wondering whether the post would rise or lower with a higher HR).
  • 2 0
 Yeah and GPS is accurate to about +/-40m, sometimes even worse in trees... I don't want my dropper post moving when I'm still 40m away from where it needs to be shifted. I suspect they're just trying to cover all bases with these stipulations so that someone else doesn't copy the general idea of an automated post that moves based on some particular sensor and then have their own defensible patent saying "oh no this one also takes GPS location and heart rate into account, totally different idea, you can't sue us".
  • 1 0
 I think Ducati did the gps thing with fuel mapping in MotoGP back in the 990 days when fuel was a limiting factor.
I would prefer my seat post to be under the control of my brain, without without a lever. If Fox could do that - let your thoughts control the post - that might be decent. Heart rate? Leave me out.
  • 1 0
 I’ma nerd with a power meter.

Now, I’m a very strong climber, but my highest wattages come from trying to smash downhill sections. I’d have to imagine that heart treasures is correlative.

That said, if we’re going this deep into electronic geekery, a simple inclinometer would prevent unwanted rises.
  • 1 0
 I think we all know the more tired we get the more likely we are to make mistakes. It might be cool to have a "you're probably about to mess up, maybe take a break?" light on a garmin or something, but agree this solution seems inconsistent with the problem.
  • 1 0
 @hllclmbr: As long as the inclinometer is able to recognise when you're hitting jumps and not climbing. Having your seatpost extend when you're pumping into the face of a jump wouldn't be ideal.
  • 1 0
 My heart rate always seems too high these, climbing and descending. I could get this or just run a rigid post.
  • 64 3
 Last time I checked it wasn't April anymore.
  • 1 0
 just checked myself. they usually do it nasty so it's believeable to "normies" so i had to check. odd.
  • 44 4
 whatever next ...... power assisted pedaling
  • 2 0
 Yes maaate
  • 24 0
 I love innovation, but this really seems like a solution in search of a problem.
  • 2 0
 @Peally: ^ exactly this.
  • 18 1
 Can't wait to see someone on a $12k bike with premature 200m post drop before cresting heart attack hill, lol

That having been said, I'd love to see fork/shock damping adjust automatically based on GPS location. (and crowdsourced from a huge DB of settings based on rider weight, riding style, weather, and terrain. Preload the settings map at home or the trailhead to bypass issues with no mobile data connectivity. Fail to a default setting if GPS coords don't resolve.)
  • 35 0
 "Sorry, your last payment failed due to an expired credit card. Please purchase additional Foxcoin© (in $100, $200, and $500 increments) to drop your saddle before this descent.
  • 5 0
 @hamncheez: you are totally right. any way we slice it, the industry will screw this up with subscription models.
except for the 7 dudes who hack this by strapping a Raspberry Pi to their top tube
  • 9 0
 @hamncheez: please drink verification red bull
  • 1 0
 @chrod: RaspberryPi and ESP32 to the rescue! I mean you need one CPU at least to control your engine :-)
  • 5 0
 @hamncheez: EA Sports has entered the chat
  • 3 0
 I'm curious how this is going to work accurately. Its unclear from the fbd whether the concept is using an embedded or peripheral controller with its own gps chip or not... if this piggybacks off a mobile app, you're going to get some wildly variable results.

A pet project of mine recently, just this weekend I did a side by side of two mobile devices running Strava and among many interesting findings observed over a full minute difference on a 2 min segment. Still combing through the tech behind the devices and examining causation, but needless to say there are a ton of factors that can severely hinder gps accuracy (even with good hardware)
  • 15 0
 Engineering department: Hey we should fix Live valve and make it an actual viable product.
--
Marketing department: not a chance we moving onto heart rate data controlled droppers mothaf*ckkaaaaaas.
  • 16 0
 Will there be a setting that slams my seat when I clench my butt?
  • 4 0
 LOL
marketing video: "just squeeze your glutes on the saddle's flexible center fin, and adjust the drop height as you ride"
  • 14 0
 finally a dropper that goes down with the press of a button... I'll take mine without the heart rate and GPS stuff thanks
  • 14 0
 Pushing that dropper lever can truly be an extremely difficult task.
  • 11 0
 You boys are over analyzing this. This is what's known a defensive patent. Usually only used by companies with money to burn on patent protection. Its will not be made by Fox, but they want to prevent any little guys from creating a niche market that could later grow into more formidable competition.
  • 3 0
 @Baller7756: If that's true, that's actually even shitter than the terrible idea itself
  • 9 0
 Just make it so it will go down by just pushing a button without having to press down on it with your bum. That would be way more useful and simpler than the GPS/heart rate integration.
  • 2 0
 This. So much this. I want up and down buttons.
  • 6 0
 Put an electromagnet in the post bottom that gets energized when you push the button and it snaps the post down - or turn the entire seat tube into a railgun so it shoots the post either down or up violently with the press of a button! Genius!
  • 2 0
 @sjma: "or turn the entire seat tube into a railgun so it shoots the post either down or up violently with the press of a button! Genius!"

Specialized beat you to that idea with their Command Post.
  • 13 4
 So where are all the trolls? Hmm notice wheelbased doesn't have anything about this on his site.

How can this possible be? After all PB only copies wheellbase patent articles.
  • 7 0
 Hmm...But if you go to your girlfriend´s house to be a little naughty, the dropper post can hit you right where you do not need to that day in that place...
  • 6 0
 Wouldn't there be positive feedback loop with post height and heart rate? If there were an error in the hear rate sensor, misreading a spike in hear rate, the post comes up unexpectedly, that'd get my blood pumping.
  • 1 0
 Don't worry, there could just be an 'extra-high' setting to deal with that
  • 4 0
 We should be already glad we are blessed with dropper seatpost that last more than 50hs of riding!!! And the advantage of dropping it with your weight is that you can decide and measure with your bum if you wanted it full drop or anyplace else. No auto-drop for me please!
  • 4 0
 The provided examples seem iffy to me, but I could see something like this working on a futuristic smart bike with a bunch of sensors to detect things like which gear you're in, the pitch of the bike, how much power you're putting down, how much weight is on the saddle, etc. Or perhaps more realistically, with a dropper remote that has a button for up and a button for down.
  • 4 0
 In Montana a heart rate controlled dropper would work like this: you're ripping down the trail with the dropper down, come around a corner and see a bear, heart rate goes up because SURPRISE YOU JUST SAW A BEAR, the seat post goes up unexpectedly, you crash, bear has an easy dinner.
  • 3 0
 You'd be surprised at the lobbying power of Big Bear...
  • 10 2
 Wtf did I just read
  • 2 0
 Razzle dazzle. Technology is the new smoke and mirrors.
  • 3 0
 It´s getting completely insane with electronics!
You can move your bike completely with body power, and also shift and the engage dropper-post mechanically, but industry wants to install little motors and batteries everywhere!
It's bad enough to find dog owners yelling at their dogs in the woods, but soon mountain bikers will be yelling at their Fox Post(with voice activated detection module)!
  • 3 0
 2 things:

1. How will this help me on my ebike as by heart rate is always the same?
2. Now skynet will be able to take over our bikes completely when the time comes, will this be enough for them to send back Arnold again to sabotage the engineering and production before it leads to the PB AI comment bot ruling the globe?
  • 6 0
 Covid not only delaying part shipments but also April Fools jokes. Tough Times.
  • 6 0
 Funny watching the post drop as you drive NEAR the trail in your vehicle.
  • 3 0
 I'm holding out for the 2025 Fox Jedi mindreader 240mm dropper, shifter, suspension tune Factory kit. Oh, who am I kidding, I could only afford a 2nd hand performance version.
  • 2 0
 All this less skill required additions to mountain bikes. Crutch bikes. I do my own thinking and reacting thank you. I think professional athletes are very good actually the best at thinking and reacting. These are toys for people who need toys.
  • 4 0
 I don't trust GPS being reliable or super accurate in trees or heavy cover. Seems like it is solution to problem that doesn't exist.
  • 2 0
 Patent applications are a goofy thing. Some companies patent their own "good" ideas to prevent others from copying, and others patent every crazy idea in an effort to obscure what their actual implementation would be. This seems to be a case of the latter. Patent everything that came out of a brainstorming session, whether it is technically or commercially feasible. The only parts of a patent that truly matter are what is in the primary claim, not the "in some embodiments" lawyerspeak. In this case, it appears that Fox is claiming a seatpost that is configurable based on "an input parameter", where that parameter could be GPS, heart rate, speed, altitude, phase of the moon, etc.
  • 4 0
 We need a dropper that raises and lowers based on the size of your balls - Danny Hart's would always be slammed!
  • 1 0
 I want a dropper with a bar mounted down button that doesn’t require any force on the saddle to drop it. I hate getting caught off guard with a high post and in a bad body position to push down on it while flying through chunk.
  • 4 0
 JUST SAY NO to SMART BIKES! I like my bikes made of metal, and without any electronics please.
  • 2 0
 I'll take "things that really didn't need a patent" for $500 Alex. Seriously though patenting the stuffing of every new possible sensor combination into a product really stretches the definition of "novel invention".
  • 5 0
 Nice to see Fox catering to the thumbless crowd.
  • 1 0
 GPS is overrated. Especially on two-direction trails, the riding direction may be relevant for the seatpost whether it should be up or down. That said, if it is a single direction trail, it is easier and more entertaining to spot the rider going the wrong direction.
  • 1 0
 oh FUCK off - for gods sake I joked about this a while back, where GPS and other data would automatically change gears, drop posts, brake for you - while you simply just sat on the bike and moved your legs, no brain or skill needed .. and now, well........ here we bloody are, or getting there just please stop taking things away from us, let US ride the bikes, let US make the decisions on whats needed where, and not this new wave of unnecessary technology - going too far now
  • 2 0
 Human decisions are removed from strategic seatpost dropping. Foxnet begins to learn at a geometric rate. It becomes self-aware 2:14 AM, Eastern time, August 29th. In a panic, they try to pull the plug.
  • 1 0
 Product Mgr/designer: Let's see, how can we add more profit to a product and yet provide no discernible value? Electronic & app controlled functions that are less accurate or reliable than a human brain? By George we've got it!

I don't care if this idea ever makes it to market, there's no way in hell it will be more reliable or accurate than my brain and hand. I am constantly stunned that people will buy anything that alleviates them of making their own decisions even if the product is far less accurate & capable than their own brain. There is truly a fool born every minute and you know what they say about a fool & their money...
  • 1 0
 This is a pretty cool concept, similar to older MotoGP systems that would work by adjusting the settings of the bikes based on GPS so that they could have different settings at each turn and straight. But it would really only work on XCO type courses were you are doing the same route over and over and doing the same thing each lap. So an extremely limited use case but interesting none the less.
  • 5 0
 My thumb still works.
  • 2 2
 If this principle COULD work we would have automatic gear changes by now, since the hardware for that already exists. The reason it WON'T work is the same reason that you never see automatic gearboxes in cars designed for spirited driving. Unless the computer is 100% in control it doesn't understand what to do.
  • 5 1
 Not necessarily true. Many high end sports cars come with electronic automatic transmissions that you can shift manually if you wish. Reality is that it's just a patent and people are making way to big of a deal out of this. Patents don't really mean anything. It just means hey this is an idea. Lets protect it before someone else thinks about it. Just a way to keep future options only without stepping on competitive patents. There are literally millions of patents that have come and gone without the products in those patents every coming to fruition.
  • 2 1
 @onemanarmy: What you are describing is a DCT or EAT with shifting paddles - which is pretty much the same thing as AXS/DI2. Electronically controlled and actuated but MANUALLY operated when the car is driven as intended. AXS/DI2 could have an automatic mode as well to hold a certain cadence or watt output but it simply doesn't make any sense in any performance oriented scenarios - only A to B transportation.
  • 1 0
 @Nygaard: sorta.

There are plenty of high performance cars that come with these types of set ups and you can tune shift points. So if you're someone that can not or choses not to drive a manual transmission you can still drive these cars on the track and/or very aggressively with pure automatic transmissions. I've seen it with my own eyes at the track plenty of times. Not everyone drives a stick.

And beyond that, I've seen a few people driving cars in automatic but manually downshifting on the track.

And we're talking about track usage here. Who says that's the intended market? Who's buying most of the automatic cars? Maybe the thinking is that some folks would rather just let someone else do the thinking for them. I mean some folks want to let their cars drive for them... me... hell no. I enjoy driving. I enjoy shifting gears. So like I said... not necessarily.
  • 3 0
 I guess having your dropper smack you in the taint is a good way to get your heart rate up.
  • 7 4
 Lmao all you salty mfs are hilarious, you’re worse than the UCI trying to shut down anything you don’t understand
  • 2 0
 I’m all for new tech. I want axs and pretty much every other new thing but I am not a fan of live valve or automatic seatposts. I feel like suspension settings and seat post height are decisions I like to make. I want to know what height my seat is at and when it will go up and down just like I like to know how supportive/how much give I can expect from my suspension when I’m hitting things going up or down. I’d rather they work on a dropper that changes the seat angle (others have tried but it never really worked) or a dropper that goes down without your weight or a competitor to reverb axs but I definitely don’t want a seatpost with a brain if it’s own.
  • 2 0
 @Daledenton: that’s completely fair and fox is not gonna force this down into normal bikes. It’s not for you, this is a news article about a patent, not a press release to fit this into every new transfer post sold. Take it for what it is vs applying your imagination to it
  • 3 0
 If there is anything that I want complete control of, it's when I drop my post.
  • 4 0
 I saw a drop. My heart dropped. So did my seat.
  • 4 0
 A button exists. This is beyond stupid.
  • 3 0
 Lighter. More reliable. Maybe an up and down button. That's it. Let me do the thinking about when and where to drop it.
  • 1 0
 Maybe in the future when there isn’t GPS drift and everyone races an xc course like robots. When it comes to heart rate… like nobody ever attacks over the top of a climb into a descent, ever! right?!
  • 1 0
 Perhaps, based on nothing, like all of the comments here, the post will use an algorithm that takes into account heart rate, gps data, and gear ratio, an inclinometer, and an accelerometer and applies that to a very expensive dropper that nobody who doesn’t want it is forced to ride, but will probably work well.
  • 1 0
 Heart rate?? What about a spirit-level type sensor instead, and when a forward tilt is registered the dropper drops? (just don't manual over anything when your descending, of course)
  • 2 0
 So what happens if somone has heart problems?
Their droppper will never wok?
  • 1 0
 There are a few HR monitors that measure other items besides HR such as body position, maybe this is tapping into those stats.
  • 2 0
 Will the post refuse to go down if the suspension isn't serviced by fox? I bet there is a connected eco system here.
  • 3 0
 Will the GPS be as accurate as Strava is? Asking for a friend.
  • 1 0
 I will lay down my bones among the rocks and roots of the deepest hollow next to the streambed The quiet hum of the earth's dreaming is my new song
  • 1 0
 So, if your heart rate drops, does the dropper start slapping you in the arse with your saddle to motivate you to pedal harder?
  • 1 0
 Not to criticize your innovators at Fox, but feel free to shoot me a PM and we can discuss a design that people will actually want on their bike.
  • 3 0
 Sorry environment, we just really like unnecessary sh!t
  • 1 0
 So just when you almost shit your pants but just manage to control yourself and do that huge drop, the dropper might or might not pop up at that crucial moment... Great...
  • 3 0
 A_S pulse here we come !
  • 1 0
 How about making a dropper post that isn't so sensitive to clamp force? Is that not an option?
  • 1 0
 Is it rectal....takes your hr from violating standpoint and you suddenly pedal really hard
  • 1 0
 POC tectal meets Fox rectal
  • 1 1
 All the other stuff mentioned and GPS isn't nearly accurate enough to make this remotely practical. How about a post that just goes up and down reliably?
  • 1 0
 My heart rate will undoubtedly jump if Fox raises my post on a techy descent.
  • 1 0
 Your scientists were so preoccupied with whether or not they could, they didn’t stop to think if they should.
  • 2 0
 This must be Fox trolling SRAM
  • 1 0
 Well, well, well. If it isn't another solution for a problem that doesn't exist.
  • 1 0
 A while back I had an idea of something like this with GPS, speed, an angle of the bike but heart rate!
  • 1 0
 May as well patent mind controlled, droppers, mechs, brakes and sus lockouts after this lemon
  • 1 0
 Solve real problems, enough with this control it shit for you. No order here.
  • 1 0
 Dumb... GPS is terrible in trees as it is. Your post would be dropping/popping up in different places on every lap.
  • 1 0
 This is stupid and unnecessary. No one is going to want their dropper post to have a mind of its own.
  • 3 1
 Kill it with fire
  • 1 0
 Fox, good luck with that. Blah, blah.
  • 1 0
 Kashima Coating... a must!
  • 1 0
 Some parts of the human anatomy work like this too.
  • 1 0
 sphincter Controlled dropper via Bluetooth but plug….
  • 1 0
 just more telemetry like the smart BB's
  • 1 0
 Does it make you a better rider? Maybe. Does it print money? Yes
  • 1 0
 Literally no one asked for this
  • 1 0
 "Things we never needed"...
  • 4 4
 Jizzzzzzzzssss..... Just Stop! S T O P
  • 3 3
 THE JIZZ CANNOT BE STOPPED!!
  • 1 0
 Fox Procto 200mm dropper
  • 2 1
 No thanks.
  • 1 0
 Idiotic.
  • 1 0
 Asshima coating
  • 1 0
 April fool in June?
  • 1 0
 Oh for Fox sakes!
  • 1 3
 Fox is really dropping the competition with this one
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