A Peek Into Privateer Life On the World Cup DH Circuit

Jul 8, 2014
by Dave Trumpore  
 
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The World Cup downhill circuit has definitely become a bit larger than life over the past few years. With Red Bull pouring money into live broadcasts, web outlets pushing for strong photo and editorial content, and teams of all sizes employing photographers and videographers to tell the story, the excitement from each rounds is very much up in everyone's face whether you like it or not. And while maybe not as big time as it was in the late 90's it's getting pretty damn close with each passing season.

With all of this added attention to the biggest and the best, we often overlook what is going on at the other end of the paddock. Overshadowed by massive factory team trucks and pit setups, the majority of the World Cup field is on a do-it-yourself program with little more than a shoestring budget. In Fort William and Leogang there were over 200 riders competing for just 80 spots in the pro men's final. Add to that the impressive number of juniors and women and you have what equates to the population of a small village traveling from round to round and setting up camp in the parking lot week in and week out.

From expensive motor homes, to $1500 vans and everything in between. There are fathers & sons, husbands & wives, and groups off good friends trying to live the dream on the road. From makeshift repairs to stranded vehicles and the bitter taste of just missing out, we take a quick walk through the privateer side of things to give some insight into what it's all about.

Ofetn times this is the image we see of the World Cup. Huge team rigs elaborate pits and every detail accounted for so that riders need only to focus on racing.
  Often times this is the image we see of the World Cup. Huge team rigs, elaborate pits, and every detail accounted for so that riders need only to focus on racing.

WC images by Dave Trumpore

While it s no easy task to assemble such a setup week in and week out once complete it offers factory riders thier own home away from home.
  While it's no easy task to assemble such a setup week in and week out, once complete it offers factory riders their own home away from home.

As the setups of the big teams keep getting bigger and bigger, and sponsorship budgets often times not reaching outside the top 20, it takes some clever planning and a unique lifestyle for the dedicated up and coming riders who are looking to make a name for themselves on the World Cup circuit. While definitely not as glamorous as a full factory ride, and with many many unforeseen challenges along the way, it is the privateers who truly make up the backbone of our sport.

A quick walk to the other end of the pit row and things begin to takeon a completely different look. At least 3 to 4 privateer pits and as many times the riders squeeze into the same size space as a single factory team.
  A quick walk to the other end of the pit row and things begin to take on a completely different look. At least 3 to 4 privateer pits and as many times the riders squeeze into the same size space as a single factory team.

It s all about self suficiencey for many privateers and often times it all about being sure the basics are covered. Sometimes that means just having a soft place to sit while enjoying a home cocked meal.
  It's all about self sufficiency for many privateers and often times it all about being sure the basics are covered. Sometimes that means just having a soft place to sit while enjoying a home cooked meal.

It's all about having the basics covered. Food, water and shelter being the most obvious of course, but often times this is easier said then done. When your main form of transport doubles as your pit space it isn't so simple to drive to the grocery store or nearest restaurant, and when a storm rolls though you had better have a way to stay dry and keep everything from blowing away. For this reason the go-to privateer setup these days seems to be converted vans. While some have the budget for full on motor homes, more often then not it's more of a do it yourself and build your own style that is most common.

For most riders following the world cup on a limited budget the van conversion seems to be the top choice. Transport storage and accomodation all roled into one.
  For most riders following the World Cup on a limited budget, the van conversion seems to be the top choice. Transport, storage, and accommodation all rolled into one.

It s all about being able to roll with the punches and imporvising. Strong storms and wind in Leogang had many scrabling to do what they could to keep things secured to the ground.
  It's all about being able to roll with the punches and improvising. Strong storms and wind in Leogang had many scrambling to do what they could to keep things secured to the ground.

With a bed and a kitchen all these guys need to do is put up their tent once they through with their sun tans.
  With a bed and a kitchen, all these guys need to do is put up their tent once they're through with their sun tans.

Sometimes when far from home for weeks at a time in a foreign country, it's all about trying to find some sense of normalcy and just a little, if any comforts that remind you of home. Access to wifi is limited so communication with loved ones can be difficult, as can staying on top of current events around the world and in you own country. For many there is definitely a sense of being cut off from the outside world.

While Austria is a long way from home Brazilian Bernardo Cruz. Thanks to the Shimano pits he could still stay abreast of what was happening in his home country and a different World Cup.
  While Austria is a long way from home for Brazilian Bernardo Cruz, thanks to the Shimano pits he could still stay abreast of what was happening in his home country and a different World Cup.

Back to improvisation and covering the basics. A river next to the pits and ample sunshine in Leogang meant it was time to do laundry after a week in Scotland. Dave McMillan knows even privateers need to keep their whites bright.
  Back to improvisation and covering the basics. A river next to the pits and ample sunshine in Leogang meant it was time to do laundry after a week in Scotland. Dave McMillan knows even privateers need to keep their whites bright.

Dave McMillan in action at Leogang.
  Dave McMillan in action at Leogang.

McMillan has been at it a few seasons now and his setup is dialed. 1500 plus a few do it yourself upgrades and you have all that you need. Almost.
  McMillan has been at it a few seasons now and his setup is dialed. $1500 plus a few do it yourself upgrades and you have all that you need. Almost.

This is my vote for the best use of space and resources. Work station gear storage and laundry all in a 5x10 space.
  This is my vote for the best use of space and resources. Work station, gear storage, and laundry all in a 5x10 space.

The Banshee team has prime pit space right in front of the host hotel. As soon as the media center opens up and someone gives them the wifi password they ll be even more dialed.
  The Banshee team has prime pit space right in front of the host hotel. As soon as the media center opens up and someone gives them the wifi password they'll be even more dialed.

While there is definitely a stark contrast between the factory pits and the privateers, there are a few teams out there who blur the lines a bit. Team's like Dirt/Orange, Begamont Hayes, and Pivot all have some degree of industry backing to help with some cost and logistics, but in the end they are still very much out there on their own.

A few teams blur the lines between factory and privateer. Ben Reid s Dirt Orange team has a super pro setup but looks can be decieving. They are still self supported.
  A few teams blur the lines between factory and privateer. Ben Reid's Dirt Orange team has a super pro setup, but looks can be deceiving. They are still self supported.

After a season of going it 100 alone Harry Heath is more than keen on this season s setup and for the help of Ben Reid running everythinf behind the scenes.
  After a season of going it 100% alone, Harry Heath is more than keen on this season's setup and for the help of Ben Reid running everything behind the scenes.

Transportation from venue to venue is always a bit of a challange for privateers. Eddie Masters running his own team this year with Bergamont and Hayes enjoys 17 hours of isolation with his frinds on a boat from England to Amsterdam.
  Transportation from venue to venue is always a bit of a challenge for privateers. Eddie Masters, running his own team this year with Bergamont and Hayes, enjoys 17 hours of isolation with his friends on a boat from England to Amsterdam.

Room with a view if not space out on the open ocean.
  Room with a view, if not space, out on the open ocean.

Bergamont Hayes riders Casey Brown.
  Bergamont Hayes rider Casey Brown.

In addition to Casey Brown the Bergamont Hayes team supports Eddie Masters and Jack Moir making them one of the strongest privateer teams on the circuit. Their speed on track and antics off make them a must watch.
  In addition to Casey Brown, the Bergamont Hayes team supports Eddie Masters and Jack Moir, making them one of the strongest privateer teams on the circuit. Their speed on track and antics off make them a must watch.

Privateer life on the road is what you make of it and Jr. rider Aiden Varley is doing it right. Father and son traveling the World Cup series in van th bought from Sam Dale a few weeks back. With a few improvments of course.
  Privateer life on the road is what you make of it, and Jr. rider Aiden Varley is doing it right. Father and son traveling the World Cup series in van they bought from Sam Dale a few weeks back. With a few improvements of course.

Aiden Varley in Fort William.
  Aiden Varley in Fort William.

There is a reason there s no photo pf the Pivot Cycles pits as sometimes transportation gets the best of you. After flying through the air in Fort William Bernard Kerr and his Pivot Cycles team ran into van troubles en route to Leogang.
  There is a reason there's no photo pf the Pivot Cycles pits as sometimes transportation gets the best of you. After flying through the air in Fort William, Bernard Kerr and his Pivot Cycles team ran into van troubles en route to Leogang.

After multiple tow trucks and two extra days of travel Bernard Micyala Gato and Eliot Jackson finally made it to Leogange just in time.
  After multiple tow trucks and two extra days of travel, Bernard, Micayla Gatto and Eliot Jackson finally made it to Leogang just in time.

Privateer life is all about rolling with the punches, improvisation, and looking out for each other. There is a sense of camaraderie amongst the privateers, and while I wouldn't suggest that their isn't amongst the top riders as well, it is just simply different at the other end of the spectrum. Lots of favors are given and owed over the course of a weekend and riders do what they can to help their fellow competitor out.

When your pits space is also your main form of transport and with multiple bikes and riders sharing one or no vehicle for the weekend you have to get creative to move gear around town.
  When your pits space is also your main form of transport, and with multiple bikes and riders sharing one or no vehicle for the weekend, you have to get creative to move gear around town.

It s not uncommon to see riders doubled up on whatever ride they can find at the end of the day.
  It's not uncommon to see riders doubled up on whatever ride they can find at the end of the day.

It's not just the riders looking to get by with a little help from their friends.

Let s be honest here us photographers are privateers as well and share in the same challanges while on the road. Luckily for Matt Delorme and Paris Gore they had one of Greg Minnaar s old motorcycles to commute to work each day in South Africa.
  Let's be honest here, us photographers are privateers as well and share in the same challenges while on the road. Luckily for Matt Delorme and Paris Gore they had one of Greg Minnaar's old motorcycles to commute to work each day in South Africa.

Back to self sufficiancy. When something breaks you have to fix it. If you are lucky you might even get a friends to help. With limited practice times for riders outside the top 80 quick repairs are imperitive to be able to get enough time on track before qualifying.
  Back to self sufficiency. When something breaks you have to fix it. If you are lucky you might even get a friends to help. With limited practice times for riders outside the top 80, quick repairs are imperative to be able to get enough time on track before qualifying.

When you don t have the resources you need it s time to start asking around for help. A quick walk through the factory pits at night and you will see many a prvateer working out of the big rigs
  When you don't have the resources you need, it's time to start asking around for help. A quick walk through the factory pits at night and you will see many a prvateer working out of the big rigs

If you don t have a mechanic and something breaks you do whatever it takes to find a fix on your own.
  If you don't have a mechanic and something breaks you do whatever it takes to find a fix on your own.

WC images by Dave Trumpore

Some Privateer s are even lucky enough to have a mechanic along for the ride. When weather gets gnarly this can be a massive help to share the workload.
  Some privateer's are even lucky enough to have a mechanic along for the ride. When weather gets gnarly this can be a massive help to share the workload.

Regardless of setup or budget it still comes down one common goal, and that is to compete and to race at the highest level. With fields pushing 200 riders and only 80 spots open for the finals, competition is stiff and all riders need to bring their A-Game to qualifying if they stand a chance to make the final cup. Travel nightmares, sleepless nights, dirty gear, and lingering injuries all take a back seat with your in the starting gate. Once those final 5 beeps begin, all is forgotten. Nothing else matters, that's the beauty of racing.

In the end it s still all about racing and every rider out there wants it as much as the next. BUt this is the World Cup and making the top 80 is increadibly hard. In Leogang Portuguese National Champ Francisco Pardal had to swallow thr toughest pills of them all. 81st in qualifying just one place and .5 seconds away from making the big show.
  In the end it's still all about racing, and every rider out there wants it as much as the next. But this is the World Cup and making the top 80 is incredibly hard. In Leogang, Portuguese National Champ, Francisco Pardal, had to swallow the toughest pills of them all. 81st in qualifying just one place and .5 seconds away from making the big show.

If ever there was a theme to privateer life on the World Cup this is it written on the top tube of Dave McMillan s Specialized.
  If ever there was a theme to privateer life on the World Cup this is it, written on the top tube of Dave McMillan's Specialized.
Must Read This Week

75 Comments

  • + 164
 In every sports, privaters are just heroes.
  • + 63
 Yeah, they keep the spirit alive. Hail to the freaks!
  • + 7
 A lot of people (myself included) just overlook that on the starting line some had to struggle much more to get there than others (and I'm not talking about their performance on the bike here).

Having to solve all the problems related to travel, food, laundry etc. is just eating your time while others can focus on preparing the race. In that respect, I think saying these guys are heros is not an overstatement.
  • + 9
 Heroes? or just have enough money to live all us poor peoples dream?
  • + 4
 Very good point its-joe, those who simply cannot even afford racing all over the world are not even overlooked, they are simply not part of it while I'm sure they make for a lot of -unfortunately unknown -talented riders.
  • + 1
 Privateer racing: when you don't have to cover the Maxxis tire logo with a sharpie and a Giant Glory is the best bang for the buck frame! (That's why I have one!)
  • + 80
 I'm currently reading this in a sleeping bag sprawled out in the box of my truck, miles From home and can relate so much to this. I've been living in my truck/couch surfing across British Columbia all summer living the dream riding bikes everyday.
  • - 46
flag ridethree (Jul 8, 2014 at 4:05) (Below Threshold)
 How come you can afford internet connection, a car and a bike then?
  • + 20
 Perhaps it involved working really hard and saving as much money as possible before quitting work and going living the vanlife. You know, like most seasonaires try to do every season.
  • + 26
 Try hustling as well as working, not wasting money on a fancy car that only ever gets you to and from work, not getting wasted every weekend, living in the rough end of town, cooking your own food, never getting in a taxi and not getting your girl pregnant, and you will save yourself enough to do whatever you like.
  • + 12
 Oh come on ridethree you make your whole country look bad...
  • - 3
 Sorry for being curious
  • + 38
 Bit of a stupid questions (but apparently there is no such thing as a stupid question).... how does one enter a downhill world cup/xc world cup/4X Pro Tour/Enduro World Series etc event as a privateer?
  • - 75
flag fracasnoxteam (Jul 8, 2014 at 0:29) (Below Threshold)
 Have you ever raced?
  • + 43
 Don't have to be a smart arse because this is a little different to your local xc/dh club event.
  • + 29
 To enter a WC race you need to have a certain amount of UCI points (20 in the case of DH I think) that you accumulate from racing at UCI registered events, such as your national series. Then you've to go through your national association unless you're a part of a big trade team
  • + 8
 Thank you ConorCraig. And what about the 4X Pro Tour and the EWS seams they are not apart of the UCI?
  • + 22
 For the EWS anyone can enter as it's not a UCI event (Which is what makes it awesome! Did the Tweedlove Scottish EWS myself and it's crazy to be out there with your heroes like Graves, Gracia, Sik Mik, Peaty). Partly why I think enduro is so popular and enjoyable. I've a snowman's chance in hell of ever getting enough DH points to qualify for a WC, let alone ever make it into the top 80 but with enduro I can line up with the pro's and there is no discrimination of age, ability, bike, sponsorship, we're all just there riding bikes and loving it!

Can't comment on 4X as I know nothing of it!
  • + 12
 You have to have 20 UCI points to race in a World Cup. You get uci points in National Series races, National Champs, IXS races (I think) and of course World Cup races. To just be able to enter a World Cup means you're a damn good rider.

So while those guys who miss out on qualies are "slow" compared to the Gee Athertons of the world they are all still very fast.
  • + 3
 In 4x everybody can enter the Protour, you just need to register online and pay some entry fee Wink
  • - 36
flag fracasnoxteam (Jul 8, 2014 at 2:27) (Below Threshold)
 @Hammm Just asking bro! I'm not in a "local xc/dh club" and I personnaly never race. But I know when you're not in this UCI point system and stuff, it's just like a Microsoft Excel hell. By the way, thx for the smart arse.....
  • + 26
 great article PB thanks for that
  • + 22
 After i'll win the Lottery i want to open a "Privateer Sponsor Program" (AKA = PSP) that will just help any privateer in every bike race.
  • + 5
 That's one of the greatest ideas ever and the best way to have fun with all that lottery money!
  • + 4
 I hope you win
  • + 5
 i guess i would open a free mechanic and beer truck
  • + 2
 How about a business plan and try for funding on Kickstarter?
  • + 14
 That's one of the best articles ever.
  • + 1
 This^
  • + 1
 @jimeg don't be insolent and pedantic - Ever tried being on a foreign language forum?
  • + 9
 You can also apply through your national body to race a WC. For example at Fort William, with British Cycling being based in the host nation they are offered an additional six places for riders. For those seeking UCI points, go to the UCI website, click mtb, calendar and find some UCI ranked races. A UCI cat 2 race scores 10 points for a 1st and 1 point for 10th. So you can see how hard that is at say a BDS here in the UK. That's why many Brits go and race a UCI race in some far off land like Bulgaria to gain points. Hope that helps!
  • + 5
 Thanks Si, that clears things up. All I have to do now is win 2x Cat2 races then and I'll be golden?......bugger!
  • + 3
 Ah. so I guess that's why British dhers tend to do well on the WC circuit, even why they're new. The BDS is like a meatgrinder for downhill racers.
  • + 8
 Being a privateer racer has many parallels with being a punk rocker in the music industry. Endless time touring in a van, sleeping on floors, paying for production of ones own music...DIY. All hail the punk rockers of DH racing!!
  • + 8
 The truth that is seldom heard is that at many WC venues, privateers are not made welcome. Ft.Bill being by far the worst (Leogang perhaps the best). Many World Cup rounds are sold to money grubbers who have no interest in the sport, only in maximising returns. If you don't slip them a thick wad of cash to set up, they will harass privateers to the point of trying to get them arrested!! "No awnings, park end-on 1.5m from the next car" = no space to work on bikes. "Get out 30 minutes after practice or be charged with a Breach of the peace!!!"

UCI officials not interested -"That's how it has to be...we want factory teams and their VIP guests...privateers can set up a mile down the road." The media too scared to rock the boat and stick up for a 16 year old junior trying to get into the top 80.

Two years ago we arrived at an Alpine WC round, saw how shit it was going to be as a privateer racer and drove across to Italy for one of Enrico's Superenduros. Like we'd died & gone to heaven!! No sell-out VIP bullshit at Superenduro or EWS (yet)
  • + 4
 @EeBzy there are two sides to every story. You called out Fort William so I'll address that one first off. That venue is small, very very small, and can barely hold the trade team trucks as it is. There is no parking for spectators on site, or media for that matter as there is simply not any extra room. The team trucks pay big money, yes, but that is to be expected at the highest level of any sport. Let's be honest, the World Cup is about the best of the best, and if you want to be catered to despite running plate #150 it's not going to happen here and you are better off at a local event. Thousands, yes thousands of people are bused into Fort William from a mile away so that's how it is. I mentioned in this article that being a privateer is about rolling with the punches and for that particular event the logistics of running such a heavily attended event in a remote area means no on site camping. So you adapt, and get accommodation down the road and car pool... it is what it is.
Leogang, MSA, and a few other have HUGE overflow parking areas so there is actual space to set up on site. Sometimes it is free and sometimes you have to pay, but it is still cheaper than hotels and guest houses.
  • + 1
 No!! Do not dare patronise Privateers. Ft. William is as big a venue as any. The people who run the WC there are notoriously ignorant. This is our home WC. In a year when my son was selected for the World Champs (that year and the next) please don't patronise him), in a very notorious incident, immediately after practice, he went back up to walk the course. All of the privateer racers were ordered out. Because I wouldn't leave him behind , in the space of 10 minutes the Police were summoned and all were threatened with arrest!!

As privateers, I supported his racing all over the World , winning National Champs, National Series , Maxxis Cups, IXS podiums, World cup Junior podiums. But this betrayal of young riders stopped my interest dead. It was made plain to me that WC downhill was less of a sport and more of a marketing exercise.
  • + 1
 Track walk and practice schedules are published for each and every World Cup. I can only assume you guys went somewhere that was closed, and close to everyone. If you say top 80 were walking and your crew was kicke off I'm straight calling bullshit. I've attended as a racer or photographer dozens of WC races all over the world and there has never been a case of privateers getting kicked out of anything for simply being privateers. Follow the rules like everyone else, and don't blame the organizers saying they are just money grubbing and dishonest.
  • + 1
 EeBzY I know nothing except what you mentioned, but it does sound like a safety issue. Chances are, people who aren't racing try to ride the track and thus an issue of safety during practice and race runs come up. They could have mistaken you for a spectator riding the track unauthorized. Anyways, hope you can cheer up. Forget about the UCi and go ride your bike with your son!
  • + 7
 This was a really good article because it is differant than the normal team videos and WC articles. I think it would be pretty cool to see something on the trail builders, like how they prepare the track for a WC race and all that.
  • + 2
 I agree that it's nice to see the flip side of the deal. Yes, those guys might not come up on the podium but they are doing this week in week out not flying away in helicopters to gala balls and such. These are the ones who keep it real. Something tells me the photographer has experience in this world. Wink
Good work!
  • + 2
 @Chezotron, I've definitely done my share if caravan life. Luckily for the World Cups I live/travel/work out of the truck in the first photo so it's not too bad at all.
  • + 3
 There is something rewarding about being a privateer. For three years I did everything on my own: living out of a truck, camping, fixing bikes with duct tape, etc. Now I am on a well developed team. I must admit that back then there was always a feeling of "I did it!" no matter how poorly I did in the actual race results. Today, all of the pressure is on the race itself and I find that I a much harder on myself and that things often times feel less rewarding.
  • + 3
 Great photos, lovely to see this aspect of world cups represented. Having raced the Pro Tour for a couple of years tripping around in an MPV with my dad it is a wonderful circus at every level, from us to the largest factory teams.
  • + 4
 Would love to see a Privateer come up the ranks 1 season and get some top 10s, but it seems abit unfair that the top 80 gets more practice time, its just gunna separate the pack even more
  • + 3
 Perhaps limiting practice time for privateers is ther for a reason? All that because they fear a guy from nowhere could beat the top gunsWink
  • + 12
 #illuminati
  • + 0
 There are a huge number of privateers in the top 80 and there is no discrimination against riders based in their level of sponsorship in regards to practice time.
  • + 1
 I think he means that they could be caught up doing other things like organising pit space, van broke down and late to venue, washing gear, shopping for groceries etc. I know good organisation would eliminate lots of these but riders on factory team set ups can just turn up and get on track as soon as track opens without having to be bogged down with the other details. That's the benefits of being fast as fook I suppose!
  • + 1
 @DirtyDee riders in the top 80 get preferential practice. The sessions last longer and there is an additional session on the first day that includes timed training. for riders outside the top 80 practice is limited. Just a few hours the first day, and a few hours the second day right before qualifying runs.

The above comments eluded to there being some UCI ulterior motive to keep the little guy down, and that simply is not the case. The World Cup is for the best riders in the world. It always has been, always will be, and honestly that is a good thing.

washing gear, buying food, laundry, all happen outside of practice so it doesn't cut into the time. However mechanicals certainly do though, and factory supported or not if you are outside the top 80 and need to fix your bike it cuts deep into already short practice time.
  • + 1
 Ah right Dave, thanks for clearing that up. Didn't read some of the above comments fully, thought they meant for riders in top 80 the privateers get less practice than those on full team set-ups, which didn't sound right to me.
  • + 0
 illuminati?.... capitalism.
  • + 1
 if they get top 10, they aren't gonna be privateer for much longer
  • + 1
 well yeah, they may get signed to a team but i dunno if they will be able to join a team mid season.
  • + 2
 Great article, we were in the midge invested car park over the bridge at Fort William. It was a bit of a pain going back and forward to the van but we parked on the roadway right across from the gate on Saturday. It was awesome knowing that we parked free and other non privateers were 3 metres away from us on the other side of the Herris fence having paid a small fortune!
  • + 6
 How ironic is that my dream is to live in a team caravan Smile
  • + 3
 That is truly living the dream. I'm a bit to old to be racing a world cup season and being anywhere near fast enough. I hope those younger guys realize how much fun they are actually having and enjoy it for what it is.
  • + 2
 This was one of my favourite PB articles ever. Nice insight into the real world for a DIY World Cup racer. Need more write ups like this.
  • + 2
 Really great article! Kudos to all the privateers out there who are dedicated and following their dreams. I also want to say that the photo of Casey Brown is sick.
  • + 2
 This is GREAT! These privateers are keen on this sport and should've got more exposure!!! UCI and Redbull and even more medias please give them more shots!
  • + 2
 Awesome article. Thanks PB I would love to accept the position as proofreader.
  • + 2
 Fantastic article! Very insightful and humbling. Thanks guys
  • + 2
 'Peek' not 'Peak' (unless it's a mountain related pun).
  • + 2
 *Life of a filler. #filler
  • + 2
 The flip-flop fix is genius!!!!
  • + 2
 Great write up!
  • + 2
 yeah dave & thommy!
  • + 1
 most mens real world - great to see it here
  • + 1
 A ford transit and a pop-up trailer would be great for a team of 4.
  • + 2
 2nd awesome write up
  • + 1
 Fantastic Article !!
  • + 1
 they are so lucky.
  • + 1
 Run what ya brung!
  • + 1
 Peek*
  • + 1
 Nice article

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