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Abbey Tools' Premium Truing Stand Starts at $1,450 - Eurobike 2023

Jun 26, 2023
by Ed Spratt  
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Abbey creates some of the finest tools in cycling, and after what we were told was years of development they have finally unveiled their take on the truing stand.

It may have taken a while to release, but Abbey wanted to ensure that it could feature everything a mechanic would want and find areas to improve where other truing stands might fall short. Abbey's own product page for the truing stand says: "There's so many ways to 'hack' a truing stand, if you're going to make a proper tool why not go all out?"

Abbey has definitely taken truing stands to the next level as it built a system from the ground up to allow mechanics to obsess over every precise detail of building a wheel. Abbey started off building the equipment with a solid machined 6061 aluminum base plate with four adjustable feet allowing for the perfect level workstation before creating a stand that we were told has been mirrored to ensure near-perfect accuracy.

The arms have also been constructed from machined aluminum and have been designed to accept hub widths from 70 to 220mm. Abbey told us that there is space for most hubs and it has even included the ability to avoid needing different adapters for thru-axle hubs with the built-in cones accommodating most sizes. If a hub doesn't fit the many different fitting options Abbey has said it can create custom plates. Built onto the stand's arms is a rotor indicator that can be used on rotors from 140-220mm. Abbey has made it so this can be swapped to either side of the truing stand.

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For its launch, Abbey will be offering its truing stand in three different arrangements. There is a standard version of the stand for $1,450, then you can opt to have Mitutoyo indicators for an extra $200. The top-of-the-range model uses the Islandix digital system for a sizeable chunk of cash totalling $2,350.

Islandix is a system that can collect data in real time and send this to a computer to create live data visualisations. Abbey says: "Visualization overcomes traditional problems with quantitative truing: eliminating the need to zero indicators, remembering alignment around the wheel, and scaling to work quantitatively right from the start or knock out gnarly repairs. Visualization combines data from multiple sensors, helping find the shortest path to perfect alignment." When being shown the truing stand we were told Abbey was initially apprehensive about this way of building wheels but after trying it out they found it allows you to create a near-perfect wheel build with greater confidence in accuracy when compared to other methods.

While orders are open now the first shipment isn't expected until September, and Abbey told us there are no plans to hold much stock of these truing stands with them instead falling under a more made-to-order style production run.

More info: Abbey Tools.

Author Info:
edspratt avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2017
3,316 articles

133 Comments
  • 178 5
 That's absurd. I want one.
  • 150 0
 I tie zip ties to my seat stays and fork legs and cut them short for true indicators.
To be fair though,they’re pretty high end zip ties.
  • 9 5
 @scary1: dang dude, I can’t afford to waist zip ties, instead I used an old rubber hair band and an allen wrench.

I actually bought a used Park Stand for $100, it works fine.
  • 11 0
 @sanchofula: I put a half twist in the zip ties so I can reuse em for truing wheels.
  • 4 0
 True dat.
  • 3 15
flag void (Jun 27, 2023 at 0:34) (Below Threshold)
 @scary1: Frame/fork method is superior to most stands, it allows application of lateral force to the rim to release some tension on the spoke being tightened. That's easier or alloy nipples and helps to avoid windup.
  • 10 3
 This industry never disappoints; overpriced products and the fools who buy them.
  • 2 0
 @sanchofula: same. I just put my index finger against fork/stay
  • 2 0
 @scary1: This is the way Big Grin Just rebuilt a wheel this last week while on bike park trip in a cabin garage using this method.
  • 4 0
 @cougar797: May The Forks Be Wheel True…
I dunno. I tried
  • 1 0
 @loganbeck: tell me more about this halftwist hack. The half twist means the teeth don’t engage so it’s easy to remove without damage? But if it doesn’t engage then it’s not secure? What am I missing?
  • 2 0
 @kingbike2: yeah right. I do just do it when I'm truing wheels so they don't need to be secure, just stay in place which they do just fine for me.
  • 5 0
 @mtb-jon: I zip tie my finger to the fork/stay
  • 1 0
 @scary1: I use my thumb to true wheels. You can feel movement in a wheel easier than seeing it. Cheaper than zip ties.
  • 60 3
 At this point, I think they're just f*cking with us and seeing how far they can push their prices lol
  • 19 1
 Consumers always, always, always hold the pricing power. Rarely do they ever, ever, ever have the willpower to implement it.
  • 3 0
 It applies to everything bike related, doesn't it?
  • 10 2
 Building wheels is like knitting. You take your time and slowly see your creation take shape. When bored, you put it away until you feel like picking it up again. A cup of tea, music, ahhh... I tried knitting for three months and kept messing up, then I quit. Wheelbuilding is much easier, luckily. For a professional wheel builder however, just like a professional knitter (does that exist, outside sweatshops even?) time is money. If something allows you to work faster, it will eventually pay for itself. The fancy anodizing and machined decorations won't do much sensible so you might wish Abbey left that out, but I can imagine the computer thing might make sense. I've been using the Park Tool spoke tensionmeter for a while (before that I just plucked the string and listened to the pitch) but for my most recent wheel I used that in combination with their app. It helps you identify the places that are most off and set your priorities. Obviously for lateral (axial) deviations a truing stand will already help you identify where the largest deviation is, but for radial deviations it will only rub at the highest points whereas you also want to see where the lowest points are. I can imagine it would be helpful to see the complete picture. And again, for the professional mechanic, that is.
  • 3 1
 Still less than P&K Lie, about the same as DT Swiss
  • 3 2
 @vinay: @vinay: having been a professional bike mechanic for 14 years, a good ERD (effective rim diameter) tool with the actual diameter printed on the tool (or scale that you fit against the overlapping rods) and a fast online spoke length calculator is what makes wheel builds go smoothly.

Unless the rim is out of round beyond normal, gradual, systematic, and deliberate tensioning brings most wheels up to within +/- 2mm (round or true) with about 75% of final tension. Most people (and mechanics) are just too impatient to wind 1/4 turns of the spoke at a time when approaching 100% tension. Of course an accurate tensiometer helps, and should be used by all professional wheel-builders and shops, but you get a pretty good feel for tension within different spoke gauges with time, and the tensiometer is just a verification.
  • 3 0
 @vinay: I use the Park TS-2 for radial every time I build a wheel. Sure, it only makes a noise when a high point scrapes the feelers, but you can also just *look* at the gap to the feelers to see where you have a low point (this assumes you've adjusted them so they're just under the rim, not "bracketing" it).

I also tried knitting and quit in one day. I just didn't find it interesting. Building wheels, though, I love doing.
  • 1 0
 @XC-Only: My first wheel I built for the Megavalanche Alpe d'Huez (and it survived) so I'm happy enough. That was in 2008 so I may have started building wheels about as early as you did, I'm just no pro mechanic so I have built a fraction of what you have built. There is no point for me trying to cut corners and save time anywhere. I may have a feel for what is about right but it the combination of the tensionmeter and their software that helps me set priorities and also helps me decide when it is good enough. I try to keep the spoke tension (per side) within a 10% range as I gradually increase the tension and once I'm close, I lower it to 5%. Once I'm there I call it good enough. I don't know what is common practice and whether this even makes sense, but it feels good to have some point where I can say it is good enough.

@barp: My spoke tension meter and my spoke key are from Park, but my truing stand and dishing gauge are from Tacx, the axle adaptors are from Shimano. Obviously Tacx stuff is true consumer grade stuff (and produced locally) but that's what I am. Has done the job just fine for me so far. It has a separate feeler to look for high points but obviously I still have to look for the gap to find the low spots. It would be of added value if their (Abbey) stand would map all the deviations in their software so that you wouldn't only find the highest spot. Yes ideally the lowest point is opposite to the highest but less stiff rims can also go in kind of a triangle, especially single wall rims. This may only be in the lower end market, but I'm also curious whether this could also happen with that thick laminate Zipp rim. Either way, the only time the Tacx stand felt inadequate was when I tried to lace up a 4kg wheel. Nexus 7sp hub, roller brake installed (because it is relevant for the axle spacing), thick 12g spokes, steel Van Schothorst (Ryde) rim. It was so heavy that the poor truing stand was constantly bending away. That didn't help the process indeed. But as for regular wheels and MTB and BMX wheels in particular which are fairly light, it does the job just fine.
  • 41 1
 When I talked to them at Sea Otter and raised the question: "why is it so expensive" They literally told me to f*ck off to feedback sports because it would be a win-win
  • 14 5
 Special. They know their customers; if you need to ask the price, you can't afford it.
  • 17 0
 I used to make something similar and literally had people queing for them which wasnt my intention , sold all 10 to one guy from a cycling organization in one hit , believe me the right people will buy these
  • 10 0
 Part of me hates it, tools by my personal definition should be “fit for purpose” and free of flourish… but then the other part is kinda happy these guys get to make nice things and there is a market to sustain them.

Pretty off putting response if true though!

But if I was going full wanker, I’d go for the P&K Lie!
www.pklie.de/truing_stand.html
  • 6 3
 @Tambo: ...or you're an idiot and enjoy overpaying for the bullshyt products this industry puts out?
  • 1 1
 @dirtyburger: I think Islandix vs P&K Lie is a tough call. Both offer great resolution. If you don't mind staring at more screen, Islandix mat take the cake.
  • 3 1
 @Tambo: nobody who can afford it wouldn't care about the price... People with money didn't get that money by spending it frivolously
  • 3 2
 @badbadleroybrown: indeed, they keep their money by investing it wisely in high quality bike tools. Smarts!
  • 4 1
 @Tambo: no, they definitely don't... and there's nothing wise about buying overpriced tools.
  • 4 4
 @badbadleroybrown: Mostly, they inherited the money.....but that's another conversation entirely.
  • 1 1
 @badbadleroybrown: there was me thinking the sarcasm was obvious...
  • 1 5
flag badbadleroybrown (Jun 27, 2023 at 21:01) (Below Threshold)
 @wyorider: that's not a conversation, that's just your envy and ignorance talking.
  • 1 2
 I would guess that 100% that is a lie. They may be jerks but not dXXXheads.
  • 24 0
 I’ll take two. Front and rear
  • 20 1
 no support for 246 mm rotors?? already outdated smh
  • 22 3
 But does it do teeth?
  • 8 3
 Don‘t you do teeth? Why do you read this article?
  • 2 11
flag Eland FL (Jun 27, 2023 at 7:14) (Below Threshold)
 @FuzzyL:
I don’t do teeth, I’m not a dentist.
I was making a reference to the price and dentists being able to afford it - a long running joke (maybe a bit tired) here on Pinkbike.
I read the article because it’s on Pinkbike and the title focused on its price point, hence my comment. Is that not okay?
Do you work for Abbey tools per chance?
  • 3 0
 @Eland: Actually I got that. I was also trying to make a joke that, if you‘re not a dentist, you had no business reading an article about a 1.500 dollar truing stand in the first place… sorry for the irritation.
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL:
Oh I see.
Poor folk like me who don’t do teeth, aren’t allowed to dream and read about things we can’t afford. Perhaps instead I should follow motorsport, I’m sure it’s cheaper.
Either way, I really should stop reading pinkbike, along with the other 99%, as we just can’t afford more than half the stuff that gets reviewed here these days, and leave the site to you, your dentist friends and your dentist tool! Wink
  • 13 0
 I bought their threaded BB tool. It was $30 and is a piece of art and fun to use. I just bought my kid a DJ for less than this truing stand. I want one.
  • 17 3
 Following their badly laser cut boxes, this looks like a rich kids University grad project
  • 10 0
 What amuses me is that essentially the same design has been available on AliExpress for a couple years now for about $250 delivered with the dial gauges. Okay not with all the green annodizing but still... it'll do anything up to 200mm in OLD hub spacing and rims up to 29 inches which covers basically everything in MTBs and Fat bikes except for those chinese 32ers (yes its a legit size now).

www.aliexpress.com/item/1005005506211717.html?spm=a2g0o.productlist.seoads.5.3cd9298eDbuf7N&p4p_pvid=2023062700285413670774612528340000142937_3&s=p
  • 14 0
 Yeah, but that one's not made in the USA or green, so it'll obviously be terrible and probably burst into flames at some point...
  • 4 2
 Does anyone actually use aliexpress? There are some insane deals on there but it feels like there's a 50% chance I'm never seeing my cash or the object again
  • 5 0
 @HankHank: I've used it a few times and I've never had an issue. The only negative is the delivery time but the orders have been well tracked, so you can keep an eye on them.
  • 5 0
 @HankHank: Forty orders over the past 2 years delivered successfully. Many in far less than the claimed shipping times. An alloy rigid fork for a gravel bike build I'm doing placed June 13th arrived June 25th.
  • 8 0
 @HankHank: I bought a spark plug wrench. I am hesitant to buy anything that will harm me if it fails; handlebars, stems, condoms.
  • 4 1
 @deeeight Tool box wars posted this stand on their feed in the Instagram a few days back and the comments from people who bought it were lack luster.

For someone who makes a living building wheels, the AliExpress isn't going to satisfy, but for a DIY home mechanic, it may well be alright for a few builds a year.

The Abbey stand appears to me to be a piece you buy and use long term, day in day out. Well built, stiff, accurately made, high quality indicators and Islandix options built in.
  • 3 0
 @HankHank: Out of literally hundreds of orders, there were perhaps a couple I didn't get. But if you make a dispute promptly you will get your money back.
  • 2 2
 @HankHank: I used it just once, about a month ago. I ordered a part for my washing machine. The next day, a message from the seller said the item is out of stock and asked me to cancel the order myself. I figured that's their job, not mine, so I ignored them and bought it from another source. About a week later, I get a notification that my AliExpress order *has* shipped, which was annoying since I didn't need it any more. Two weeks after that, a notification that my order was cancelled after all and I received a refund.

Can't say it made me want to try using the website again.
  • 1 0
 What amuses me is that if I follow your link it tells me that I will have to pay EUR 18.-, delivered to Germany. I‘ll try to avoid the usual jokes about the Canadian dollar…
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: I'll bite. What are the usual stories about the Canadian dollar?
  • 2 0
 @woofer2609: Well, maybe it‘s just my impression, but it seems to me Canadians an U.S. Americans in their comments below many articles here on Pinkbike make fun of the relative volatility of the CAD compared to the USD whenever prices are given in both currencies. I‘ve seen comparisons to maple syrup, etc.

And if the original poster is shown a price of $250 (I assume Canadian) while I see a price of EUR 18 that seems like a case in point. [Obviously it isn‘t really, it‘s probably a configuration error on the website]
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL:

Check the link again, with aliexpress they put different options behind different image icons in the listing. The 18 euro is probably the price for a single dial indicator alone.
  • 1 0
 @FuzzyL: Gotcha. Yeah, the fact that prices for most things in Canada is always fluctuating, and always higher compared to USD, is annoying at least.
  • 10 1
 Digital indicators have a time and place.
Data point logging: Yes
On a regular truing stand: definitely not.

That islandix setup sounds super sweet though
  • 11 0
 I'm turning to selling drugs to finance my Abbey Tools problem.
  • 30 0
 I'm turning to selling Abbey Tools to finance my drug problem.
  • 7 1
 A truing stand needs to do 2 things. 1) Securely hold the wheel in place in a repeatable position. 2) securely hold a feeler in place in a repeatable position. That is all.

Everything else is just nonsense fluff to trick people who aren't very good at building wheels to donate their money to someone elses bank account.
  • 2 0
 But it has to be adjustable to accommodate different hub and rim dimensions, and still be solid,so not that simple.
That said,here in Denmark in workshop, I've worked with ancient Danish and Belgian trueing stands,which just works for decades.
www.speedbicycles.ch/works/preciray_truing_stand/preciray_truing_stand.html
,the Danish one is impossible to find on the internet i think. This is just bling. At home just tie a zip tie to the seat stay as indication
  • 1 0
 @lenniDK: Fantastic! I actually used to use a Preciray jig many years ago. Best jig I ever used, but I couldn't remember the name. I've been googling it like mad ever since this article popped up, but had no luck. Then you pop up and post a link straight to it! What are the chances?

The only thing I didn't like about the preciray was the play in the rollers that made it really hard to tune out the final half mm of variation from true. I took the rollers off and just replaced them with fixed plastic pads. The perfect jig.
  • 10 5
 I want, I can afford, I just don't know if it's that much better than my nice Park one.

the other thing is, I don't have a dedicated space to keep it out all the time, so that is probs some of my reasoning here.....why have the 911GT3RS and keep it under a cover all the time? lol


See.....now I just explained to myself that the only reason to own this is vanity, and the bad part is I am totally ok with that.
  • 3 1
 Life is short.
  • 5 1
 I just got a private number plate for the ferrari and thought people are going to hate me as it turns out they dont they think im f*cking awesome and i have guys offering me their wives

In reality world however i think as someone once wrote to me its analgous to high end audio gear once you start looking at 50 grand turntables and speakers ( though i do have to admit the carbon fibre speakers are pretty awesome sounding ) people buy it because they can i use a truing stand made out of 8020 slotted aluminium these days the bipolar in me flits from third world mecano to machined to f*ck regularly
  • 7 2
 "Abbey started off building the equipment with a solid machined 6061 aluminum base plate with four adjustable feet allowing for the perfect level workstation"
I don't see the point. If you clamp the wheel properly you should be able to true it in vertical, horizontal or any orientation in between. Differential spoke sag under asymmetric gravitational force is beyond even this stand's accuracy.
  • 19 0
 I'm just spitballing here, but the adjustable feet might be to avoid a wobbly truing stand, which is annoying.
  • 6 0
 Because you don't own an Abbey work bench its going to be uneven and needs to be accounted for by the truing stand.
  • 6 0
 @TEAM-ROBOT: why not use 3 feet instead?
  • 4 1
 @thewanderingtramp: THAT is most likely exactly what they did. The over-engineered something that already existed but which they could convince suckers who don't ever look at Amazon or Ali to see what exists as alternatives to a Park Tools TS-4.2 with the optional dial indicators installed, which even at wholesale is a really expensive stand that also accomodates hubs up to 220mm.
  • 2 0
 @Tambo: *taps temple with pointer finger*
  • 3 0
 Gaper equipment sold with 1980's audio equipment levels of spin.
  • 5 0
 Machined not forged uprights. This would be a great beta prototype but it's not a finished product. The Park TS-3 was the epitome of truing stands. This is another overpriced toy from a small company that doesn't have the resources to forge the aluminum bits. I'm sure it's plenty precise, but so is even a basic truing stand.
  • 3 0
 Err they were cast
  • 6 0
 Also, the bike industry should know that if you can see machine marks (witness marks) on your parts, it's considered unfinished in the rest of the real manufacturing world.
  • 3 0
 Bike consumers should know that machined parts are weaker and waaaay cheaper to make than good forged parts.
  • 1 0
 Yeah, this reads to me like a poor man's (or, okay, a rich but ignorant man's) guilloche.
  • 7 0
 For that much lace the wheel, too.
  • 4 5
 Man, the world and humanity is going to be in bad shape when something like that can be fully automated.
  • 81 0
 @cmi85: uhhhhhhhhhhhhh do I have news for you
  • 4 0
 Man, can't wait for that to get covered in wheel grime, simple green, and a rainbow of every tire sealant brand under the sun. A clean wheelstand is one that's not doing any work.
  • 4 0
 I dont even know how to true wheels and I want one!!!! I shall place it on my mantle.
  • 5 1
 It's scientifically proven that green anodized tools make your bike perform 12.6% better on average.
  • 2 0
 Facts
  • 2 0
 Wait until you use purple anodized tools. My wheels trued themselves, and I beat all my personal bests. Side effects may include an urge to listen to Alice in Chains and grow dreadlocks.
  • 1 0
 Just ordered the Harbor dishing tool and a few other goodies and now they release this. Son of a B%$*#&! My HAG has been a staple around the shop, and the Decade chain tool is amazing. Their rotor truing stick is at best a green bottle opener though.

I got the HAG stem adapter as well so I can truly level peoples levers before the bikes leave the shop.
  • 1 0
 I think you edited out the part that said ChatGPT will true your wheels for you and learn what tension is appropriate for your riding style… but seriously, if you were really into wheels and this would last a lifetime, why not. I’m more of a zip tie on frame guy myself.
  • 3 0
 The workshop I work in has an abbey H.A.G. and a cassette tool/chainwhip. Absolutely gorgeous tools, and I want more.
  • 4 0
 I could buy new wheels cheaper
  • 1 0
 I bought a 220mm rotor which needed truing out of the box, even the shop hasn't been able to get it straight. I could buy this truing stand, or about 14 rotors and hope one of them is straight.
  • 2 0
 Park's TS 4.2 stand which is far more reasonably priced can also accomodate truing 220mm rotors.
  • 3 1
 You need a lapping machine to get them totally flat bro
  • 1 0
 I've never needed to have a wheel so straight I needed a stand like this. Actually, I've been riding with a broken nipple on the one wheel for about two months now, It's fine.
  • 2 0
 Problem is,the micrometer watch will react to the stickers on the rim...
  • 1 0
 @lenniDK: If I were your benevolent dictator, I would forbid any manufacturer from putting stickers on their rim that get in the way of a truing stand indicator.
  • 1 0
 @barp: I'm trying to say that it's a waste of money and overengineering with those micrometers. I've peeled the stickers of my dt rims cause their plain ugly
  • 1 0
 @lenniDK: And I'm saying I'm a shop mechanic and some of my customers wouldn't appreciate my removing their stickers when I true their wheels Smile
  • 3 0
 If I was spending this kind of money I'd still want the dual dials of a P&K Lie
  • 2 0
 Considering I’m unhappy with 3 of the 4 Abby products I own, I would not consider buying this. I have had quality control issues with 3 of those products.
  • 2 0
 IBDs need to stop hording their Jeff Bezos amounts of profit and break off a little for shop tools that better represent their massive profitability.
  • 5 3
 I wish I could afford more abbey tools products. They are as impressively nice as they are impressively priced.
  • 3 0
 Zip ties on your chain stays work too.
  • 1 0
 You do this with your bike upside down on the kitchen table?
  • 1 0
 @woofer2609: I have in a pinch.
  • 3 0
 For this price it better straighten my life out too...
  • 1 0
 theses tools stand in a bike shop where a thin glasses moustache guy sells you an expensive coffe while you see expensive urban bikes/ebikes
  • 2 0
 That guy is almost as tall as the truing stand
  • 2 0
 only a retiree who enjoys wrenching their own bikes can justify this
  • 2 1
 The dentists have their own specified trying stand now. I really want to become a dentist
  • 1 0
 Fun fact: My bike costs about as much, helps me true the wheels AND I can ride it as well
  • 2 0
 Does Morpheus show up at some point ?
  • 1 0
 A truing stand worth more than the cost of 2 brand new high quality wheels. Sure thing.
  • 1 0
 Do you want to experience true true?

www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQoRfieZJxI
  • 1 1
 And here I thought the Park Tools is overpriced! Jeebus, someone make a $10K version that's gold plated and compatible to the dentist's chair?
  • 1 0
 I recently learned that the Abbey Bike Tools Truing Stand #001 has recently been purchased and delivered.
  • 1 0
 Dude in the white tee got some photo action on PB!
  • 2 0
 Pffft. Peasants.
  • 1 0
 Looks like mardi gras decorations, but I’d hit that!
  • 1 0
 Geez $2350!!! I'll let you guys know how it goes in September
  • 1 0
 Legolas' wheel truing stand.
  • 3 2
 People still true their wheels?
  • 1 1
 Pffft, I'll just use this rock in my backyard and slap it by eyeball...

What do you mean my warranty is void?!?!?
  • 1 4
 I'll be honest. I think it's underpriced.
I owned a machine shop for over 20 years and I know what machine work of that caliber costs.

I mean, look at that thing, it is one seriously gorgeous piece of CNCed artwork. You can argue that this level of craftsmanship is unnecessary but you can definitely see where the $ is being spent.

Top of the line Mitutoyo digital gauges, copious CNCed aluminum for solidity, linear adjustment of the arms for precision.
It may be the perfect tool.
  • 1 0
 takes bike into LBS to get wheels trued.

"that'll be $300"
  • 1 0
 I would buy that, but I don't like the green
  • 1 0
 are you fu*kin kidding me abbey..
  • 1 0
 Only hot girls, as well as me write to me ➤ u.to/mWPGHw
  • 1 1
 Does it come with handlebar mustache, riding cap and an espresso?
  • 1 1
 The stuff is pretty gorgeous machine work though…
  • 2 2
 For yeti wheels??







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