Abbey Top-Cap Sockets - Review

Mar 1, 2016
by Richard Cunningham  
Abbey Fork Cap Socket


If you work on your own forks and watch your pennies, you probably found the nearest 12-point socket wrench that fit your fork's cap nuts and then sanded the face of it flat so it would engage the thin aluminum hex without doing too much damage. If you work at a bike shop, or you are a professional race mechanic, you may have searched for a six-point socket and done the same trick - which would have been the better-fitting, less-damaging option. For mechanics who appreciate professional quality tools, however, Abbey Bike Tools offers the ultimate top-cap wrench kit.


Abbey Top-Cap Sockets

Abbey Top Cap wrenches are six-point sockets, CNC-machined from high-strength aluminum alloy to a very close tolerance fit. They are anodized green and laser etched with each size in millimeters. Finger grooves are machined into the upper section of the sockets so the cap nut can be gripped and manipulated easily with oily or gloved fingers, and they feature a 3/8-inch square driver - not the bulky half-inch driver found on most large sockets. Five sizes are included in the kit which should cover all popular forks: 24, 26, 28, 30 and 32 millimeters. The five-piece kit sells for $150 USD. Abbey Bike Tools
Abbey Top Cap Socket Wrench 2016


Abbey Top Cap Socket Wrench 2016


Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotesIf you've read this far, you either appreciate good tools, or are curious enough about the actual merits of Abbey's Top Cap Socket kit to temporarily overlook the lofty MSRP. I'll admit to owning a selection of sanded steel sockets (only one six-point) and also admit that I have dinged the edges of "more than one" top cap nut while servicing forks. It was a pleasure to use the Abbey sockets. They feel good in hand. The shorter height (about one inch) and exaggerated flat face of the socket helped stabilize the wrench and keep it lined up with the top-cap nut - and the close fit spreads the torque forces more evenly and thus, does not mar black-anodized cap faces. Would I pay 150 bucks for five top-cap sockets? Probably not. I can live with a slightly damaged top cap, as long as it remains serviceable. If I were working on other rider's forks, however, I would be proud to own Abbey's kit. A new cartridge shouldn't have wrench scars on it. - RC







149 Comments

  • 125 3
 I am really not trying to take away from the tools in the review; I'm sure they are great. But I for one cannot afford to spend that much on some sockets that I will only use 2-3 times a year at most.

So, a smart alternative are these: www.lunarbikes.com/tools.htm

You can't go wrong for a wrench that fits perfect, for $9.
  • 10 0
 Agreed. Bought a set and glad I bought them. Only thing I did was add a wrap around the handle area...
  • 4 0
 best wrap for anything like that is handle bar grip for road bikes or tennis racket wrap
  • 7 2
 Hockey tape works even better!!
  • 14 4
 oh yeah. good idea.
Or you could buy new "enduro specific" lightweight lycra protection tape. Now in a compact roll to fit in your hip bag (fanny pack) or new boost equipped swat gear.
  • 9 0
 My dad has raised me with the idea that you can never have enough tools..I think I could admit I have more than enough tools before I buy one of these $150 sets.
  • 7 2
 @Canadmos DUUUUDE thanks for sharing the link. I just ordered mine for $9. I've been meaning to put an extra spacer in my Fox 34 to see how I like having it a little more firmer and progressive. After reading this article I didn't realize how easy it is to damange the top cap. I just thought, "hey just use a socket that fits."

Can't wait to get this in the mail~

Screw $150 for those sockets. I agree they are nice but what exactly justifies the cost? Are they limited? Hand made from scratch? Made out of some sort of rare metal from another planet? I'll bet someone can take that socket and CNC it or the like and come out with the same exact socket for a lot less.

Unless, they can prove to me where the extra $100 is coming from I'm never investing my hard earned $$ on them.
  • 9 0
 For the individual, it's fine. For a shop that really ought to be getting torque spec right all the time, every time, flat ground sockets are a godsend. Not saying you need to buy Abbey, but sockets are rad. I refuse to trust my hands. Colds, bad days, great days, brunch paid for by your date, all of those things will screw with your sense of fastener tightness. I know I have to get a wrench calibrated every so often.
  • 22 4
 Let me break the cost down for you all. On a 3 axis CNC mill each of those parts required two setups. Since it's a production part they are probably machining it balls out, so it's roughly 15 minutes of machine time per part. Machine shop rates are often at around $85 an hour. That puts you at $106.25 for five of them not including materials or markup. Since they are making a bunch of these they probably don't value their machine time at $85/hr, but once you throw in materials and a markup I think $150 isn't too crazy for what they are selling. That said I would cast them and machine the face flat super fast if I was running production for them.
  • 6 0
 Spot on @taquitos . Also worth noting that most sockets and spanners are forged and chromed. Expensive to set up, cheap as chips to produce hence the $9 spanners!
What does elude me though is why manufacturers are so insistent on using these tiny, buttery top caps...
  • 6 0
 I'm betting they use soft metal on the top cap to save the inside of the stanchion if Mr Hamfist comes along.
  • 2 1
 What's wrong with a normal socket?
  • 3 2
 I use a nice adjustable wrench and it works well, never does any damage, but I use extreme care and only do this about 2-3 times per year. If I wrenched for a living I would want these. Just like the small selection of Snap On tools I still have from when I worked on motorcycles - if you do this all the time you want and need the best options.
  • 1 0
 I onced damaged my top cap to the point that I could not get my cartridge out someday... And then I bought a lunartool wrench.. For 9 bucks trust me you can't go wrong; it's better than having to buy a whole new cartridge ! Plus aluminium on aluminium contact will never damage anything !
  • 6 0
 The problem with a normal socket is the inside edge is chamfered to help the socket "find" the fastener. This isn't normally an issue when the nut is tall enough that most the surface area is covered. With a really short height like the top cap of a fork it's not - the rounded and angled inner edge doesn't touch a portion if much at all of the top cap. So the socket wants to slip, and tends to round the soft aluminum cap. @KUNTHER
  • 3 0
 Being a car mechanic by trade I have had zero issue with snap on sockets fitting the top caps. I find if you loosen them before removing the fork from the bike you can use you hands on the tool with your legs holding the wheel. Been doing it this way for 10 years without one issue. Granted not everyone has the cash to drop on snap on sockets but I have also done it with craftsman sockets.
  • 3 0
 I just crack it loose more or less with a nice flat wrench and turn most the way by hand. Many ways to skin a cat........so long as you are careful it will usually be fine with a socket yes. If you did suspension all day though... I can see a benefit.
  • 2 0
 I think these are a GREAT IDEA !!!!! for a bike shop... but pricey too Frown

I recently was installing my Pike Charger damper and remembered I had a 6 point impact socket set..
(I removed it using your basic 12 point thin wall socket)...

well the impact socket has a much thicker wall, and the Pike has like a partially recessed crownFrown
which scratched my CSU as i tighened it ....SEE ATTACHED PIC...

www.pinkbike.com/photo/13224134

I don't think those wrenches would fit on the Pike either????...

so I kinda like them Smile
you could grind the chamfered lead of any 6 point socket(as others have mentioned), and have the perfect tool too for a lot less money if you wanted to...

I still think they are nice Smile

and pricey...but so are all snap-on,Mac,Matco and so one
  • 7 0
 @ taquitos - Your breakdown only works if your $85 per hour is on a machine made in the 1980's - If you are taking 15 mins to machine one of these sockets you would be out of business quite quickly as a machineshop!

I think with a bit of time optimising things I could make one in less than 5mins and that is being conservative, I would be sacked if it took 15 mins to make that part.

Not that any of that matters anyway - its a business, the guy doesnt own his own machines so its profit for the shop, profit for him and maybe profit for the bike shop if he sells through retailers too - Work it out.
  • 2 2
 How can you ensure proper torque with a box-end wrench?
  • 3 1
 I don't. I just tighten it by feel. If I was working on other peoples suspension I would but I can feel when it's bottomed out, o ring seated and I'm done.
  • 2 0
 Just telling the truth Wink
  • 1 0
 Thanks! I just ordered one
  • 2 1
 @LiquidSpin ,yeah why buy Snap On when you can have Walmart ?
  • 4 0
 I bought the Lunar Bike tools wrench and it never fit the top cap quite right. On one fork I couldn't get it on as it was just barely barely too small. And yes I was using the correct size. Luckily my work has a full machine shop and they were able to grind down a normal socket on the lathe. Works way way better than the lunar bike tool wrench every did.
  • 1 0
 @Racer951 judging by the small radii on the hex and square those were running a 3 mm tool max after the corners were drilled out. You would be chattering like crazy if you ran a 3 mm tool full throttle at that depth of cut. That stacked on top of the fact that it takes two setups makes 15 minutes sound reasonable. I would agree that it is conservative, but not out of reason given the final product. You would similarly or be out of business if you quoted a run assuming 5 minutes per part and then they took 10. Really my point is that with a rough estimate the cost makes sense. If you want I can program you one super quick and give you a real number though haha.
  • 3 3
 Did no one else just grind a normal socket down until the bevel/taper is grinded away?
  • 1 0
 Did you read the article? @Breeconay
  • 4 0
 @DARKSTAR63 Mine has went through a nice grind. you can even get away with a belt sander and a machinist file for less than $10. Just don't understand the need for a really redundantly nice set for a really high cost..........OK I WANT THEM!!!
  • 2 0
 @usmc

I work on cars, too. My inital thought was that these are even more expensive than snap-on sockets.
  • 1 0
 @Racer951 www.pinkbike.com/photo/13226704 I'd say my initial estimate was pretty damn good haha. Could definitely do away with some of the aesthetic features and make the surface finish worse to get machine time down a little bit... but who doesn't like a shiny part.

That aside this thing is programmed. If anyone would like one I might be willing to help you out if you send me a message.
  • 3 0
 @taquitos if you want to save time, get it made on a y axis lathe with a sub spindle - 1 operation Smile Surface finish changes might save a few seconds but using the right machine will be the fastest option.
  • 2 0
 I completely agree! Only have access to a 4 axis mill though, which doesn't really help here. I suppose I could do it in one in the fourth, but it wouldn't be very rigid...
  • 1 0
 Thank you for sharing that with us
  • 1 0
 They looked great, but 25dollars to ship it to the UK!?
  • 2 0
 Pissed my Lycra reading that.
  • 1 0
 I'll wait for the bedazzled set...
  • 2 1
 Just got my lunar tool in the mail. Seriously, this thing does the trick and it's cheap. For the guy who has his own shop at home this is fine. Maybe if you work at a bike shop and work on hundreds of bikes a week then yeah maybe getting your bike shop to get those expensive ass sockets a go but seriously, still think it's just not worth it.
  • 1 0
 Mr. Hamfist is everywhere. Your town, your province, your country, every single goddamn cheap-ass bike factory around the world. He's accompanied by his cousin, Mr. No Lube. You do not want to find yourself in a dark alley with both of them in a randy mood, that's for sure.

I'm a shop guy and a total f*cking torque-wrench nut, and for any kind of final tightening, will immediately reach for the plastic case of a torque wrench. Beam wrenches aren't expensive, so if you work at home, those are fine too. All you need is a head cold, and suddenly getting to torque on a big bolt will feel like you're trying to roll a boulder. The lunar tool is nice, but buying or grinding a flat socket in 24/26/30mm isn't a big deal.

The last thing you want is the threads on your air spring or damper vibrating loose or dying to having been overtorqued repeatedly, all while you're bombing singletrack at 40kph. You can be sure as shit that Fox/RS/DVO/CC/MRP/whoever won't be paying out an insurance claim for your teeth/funeral.

@UtahBikeMike even if snap-on tools are cnc'd only, they likely have economies of scale to make up for it. If it's forged and then machine finished (most probable), that will make a huge difference. Abbey machines everything and then hard-anodizes it.
  • 2 0
 @friedrice:

So? They're expensive because they use expensive manufacturing methods? That makes it worth it?

My bluepoint 24mm works great.
  • 39 0
 I could buy a bench grinder and a basic socket for this much. And then I would have a bench grinder and a top cap tool.
  • 4 0
 Concur and already did that actually.
  • 1 0
 I thought that is what we were supposed to do. Oh well, another tool that I want cause it looks cool but can make it cheaper myself.
  • 7 0
 Same here - got a 24mm socket for a few bucks, installed it in my power drill and ground it flat on a stone. Sockets CNC machined out of alu??? Only in the bike industry.....
  • 3 0
 I have had a Fox 32mm Float for years and change the oil every 30 hours, good quality 6 point socket ground flat on the bench grinder, fork torqued right and never had a problem. I doubt someone at home would ever need the complete set of 5 sockets and they should come in different colors to match your bike.
  • 3 0
 Right on vicrider222, if only I could get a carbon fiber ratchet with a chris king free hub
  • 5 0
 Went to my local machine shop with a standard nut, asked if he would cut it down on his lathe, gave him 5€ in beer money, got my special top cap tool -> Yaayyy
  • 32 2
 $150 is nucking futs, to quote Dickie Roberts. I use a 6 point socket and it works just fine. Top caps don't have a high torque spec, so no reason at all to spend that much money on 5 freaking sockets. At least give me a full set of sockets and call me pretty if you're going to try to screw me.
  • 3 3
 One upped your props for that last line. Niiice!
  • 9 0
 Just continue using your normal sockets and put a plastic bag or a paper towel between the socket and the topcap. Works like a charm! Or stick some isolation tape to the inside of the socket. This all is good for a tighter and more secure fit on the low height topcap.
  • 4 0
 I have never had an issue in 10 years using a socket without grinding it. I wasn't even aware people felt the need to grind down the socket. Leave the fork on the bike use both hands on the tool. Use you legs to hold the wheel. The tourque is really low it does t take a Guerrilla to remove it. That said these aluminum sockets are going to be wearing out every year in a shop that does a lot of suspension work.
  • 10 3
 I bought a crescent from target and it works just fine. Total cost? $15

This is a very niche, bike-shop targeted idea, that very few real-world people will deal with.

Beautiful machining, though.
  • 3 10
flag cmi85 (Mar 1, 2016 at 20:09) (Below Threshold)
 and you torque-spec how?
  • 4 0
 Don't need to be super tight. It's not like suspension or carbon pieces.
  • 5 7
 to each their own . Good luck with that answer if something on your fork shatters and you send in for warranty
  • 4 2
 I spec to what I opened. I'm not going happy gilmore on a 1k fork!
  • 7 6
 When you work on many types of equipment, you learn the torque spec by feel. It becomes muscle memory. I also have used a crescent wrench (spanner to you Brits) for years with no issues ever. I would never, ever own aluminum sockets - they will not last. IMHO of course. :-)
  • 6 0
 *adjustable spanner to you Brits Wink
  • 1 1
 @therealtyerdurden - Are you saying that Brits have a non-adjustable spanner available? What does that look like?
  • 3 0
 I also use my trusty Channellock adjustable wrench, but I was drooling over some Knipex Pliers Wrench in case I were wanting spend more money on my tools.
  • 2 0
 buy a Raptor Adjustablle crecent wrench, it has thin profile jaws, adjust extra wide ( if you've worked with tools you know why ) and its tollerances are to within 1/32nd when assembled, i.e. the jaws don't move out of adjustment by any more than this on their own. I thought steelpolishs comment about "non adjustable crecents" was hilarious !!! made my day lol. also torqe specs are only there because they are required with ANY produced Bolt or nut.. don't believe me?? google it. a bolt, screw or otherwise is engineered, and as such has torque specs, sheer strength tests, static weight tests, erosion tests ETC... piles of tests. if you actually think there is a REQUIRED torque for a top cap then you are an idiot.. and I say this as a mechanical contractor... some things absolutely do need to meet torque requirements.. your fork top cap is like this.. Comes loose or bleeds fluid .... too loose.. stays tight after many days of riding and doesn't leak fluids ... perfect. usually about Wrist tight.
  • 7 0
 Why don't they sell the individual sizes? I would buy the one I need perhaps for 30$ but no home mechanic is going to buy a set for 150 when they most likely only need one.
  • 2 0
 That's what I was thinking too, wish I could just buy the one I need.
  • 1 0
 I was browsing the comment section just looking for this remark someone surely should have made. I agree completely. You typically buy the fork before you get a tool like this so you already know what size you need and which size you'll probably never use.

I sometimes wonder what kind of world these reviewers live in when they write that the finger grooves are convenient to grip them with gloved fingers. Are you actually going to service the delicate fork internals with your dirty riding gloves? Or are (some) fork oils so toxic you'd rather not have them on your skin? I was never aware of this.
  • 1 0
 Agreed. I'd happily buy the 32mm for my Fox 36. Might even spring for the 26mm for the old Fox 32s I have on bikes I don't ride much. But a set of 5 is a waste of money.
  • 8 2
 Ill pass, I really like my top caps to be extremely stripped to where I need to twist it off with pliers. Then to spend $150.
  • 4 0
 Many problems come up to me right now. Why Aluminium? Why CNC machined? Why laser etched?

Sockets have been around since a long ass time, none are aluminium because alu is soft and this is the number one feature of a tool, it should be stronger than what you wanna wrench. I can see the 1/2inch drive of those getting rounded up pretty fast by anyone who actually works on forks more than once a year.

CNC machining those is just to make them more expensive and difficult to make. FORGE THEM like all the real tool company does.

Laser etching...well if I need to explain why this is useless and stupid then I just can't do anything for you. STAMP THEM.

My point is, these are tools, supposed to be use to work not show off. Buy individual 6point sockets at your local Canadian Tire and enjoy your 100$ with your girlfriend for a change.
  • 3 0
 I'm not sure why people are grumbling about the price. Abbey seem to be boutique tools. Like comparing ENVE bars to Kore maybe?
For someone like me, who lives in a small flat (my bikes are in the second bedroom), I don't have a socket set or a grinder. However it's pretty rare to open a fork, it is something I don't mind doing, but I don't have the time. I'm sure shops would be interested, or tinkerers.
I was tempted by the flat wrenches until I realised that tokens in my Pike did exactly what I thought making the air volume smaller would do. I'm not going to buy them, but I have a set of Silca allen keys which were a little cheaper than these and see far more use.
  • 5 0
 $150... who's actually stupid enough to spend that kind of coin on sockets?
  • 3 0
 Good point.
  • 2 0
 Wow actually admitting using 12 point sockets, considering how much people spend on their bikes, that is rough as hell.
A ratchet will negate the use of a 12 point socket, they make sense in only a handful of applications i.e Sampson/breaker bar.
As for the money, well...
  • 2 0
 I literally used an adjustable wrench, bit of insulating tape and some care on my pikes. Not a mark on them. Granted, that wouldn't be right in a bike shop, but i doubt a bike shop would buy alu' sockets, you'd want steel surely.
  • 1 0
 Another one with the steel myth, you want soft sockets with soft materials. And topcaps are made in an especially soft alloy, I guess 30% alu 70% butter. Anyway none of this really matters as long as you properly grind your sockets flat. Home or pro that's the like the very first thing you have to do before ever touching a fork. You've been lucky with your pikes.
  • 2 0
 In ten years of servicing my own forks I have used a socket without grinding it and have never rounded a corner. Also these aluminum sockets with lots of use are going to start rounding internally. When I worked for GM we had an aluminum socket specialty tool that needed to be replaced every year. Even on the soft nut it was taking off it wore out from being used so much. That tool didn't cost near as much as these though.
  • 1 0
 I have done exactly that when I didn't have a big enough socket, it worked fine! I mean obviously these would be a huge improvement but they are too expensive to justify as a kit. Again, they would sell more if they would sell them individually. I hope Abbey Tool Co. reads these comments
  • 2 0
 im thinking of installing bottomless token but dont want to spend more then 10 times the price of the tokens on the tools to install them. ill just risk using a normal socket wrench
  • 4 0
 Don't. If you do, just grind it down and make sure it's six sided.
  • 1 1
 im 99% sure the ones at home are six sided. if not ill borrow one from the bike shop i work at
  • 2 0
 RockShox sells a 24mm wrench that fits their air side top cap on a Pike to change tokens.
  • 1 0
 thanks for letting me know. ill look in to it
  • 1 0
 I used an adjustable wrench. For the amount of times I do it a tiny scratch he or there is nothing.
  • 6 5
 Who the heck wants aluminum sockets?

Best sockets I've found are the black "shallow 6 point impact sockets". They're hardened steel, made to survive impact wrenches. 6 point so never flex, super rigid so never deform a bolt.

I got a full set of the Kobalt Brand from Lowes for $40. Love them, I was so stupid not to buy good sockets from the get go. All the impact sockets I've found are similarly awesome. Stores sell them individually but much more expensive that way.

Who the hell uses sockets made from aluminum?

Wonder how much income do you get to review this weird stuff. Why doesn't pinkbike review some good normal tools that folks should buy?
  • 4 1
 You use them for the intended application - thin aluminium top caps with very low torque requriments.

Anything other than that would be a stupid waste of money on a specialist tool.

Did you even read the text before commenting?
  • 2 2
 Even at low tourqe in a shop that does lots of suspension work I wouldn't see these lasting.
  • 2 0
 @feeblesmith sure I read it but why don't you respond to my question? Justify to me why anyone should own sockets made from aluminum? Oh because they won't spark so you can use in explosive environments? (burrito)

These will wear fast and then scratch the topnuts just the same. And 'its a specialist tool' that you can't (shouldn't) use on anything else. What the heck does that mean?

Honestly if they wanted to impress: build the flat edged steel socket with a liner like what is used by those pathetic Ferrari owners to keep their lug nuts all minty fresh.

Or here is an example of what they should have built.

store.snapon.com/Non-marring-Metric-Socket-Inserts-Socket-Insert-Metric-Non-Marring-22mm-to-17mm-P754078.aspx
  • 1 0
 make no mistakes aluminum does spark... you could easily use a GOOD adjustable crecent wrench, any socket from anywhere and any manufacturing and cut the bottom 1/8 inch off BOOM no chamfer. and I agree completely, I own the same set from lowes likely and they are fine, have had these sockets for almost 10 years now..
  • 2 0
 @dmadness: rats, I guess it is beryllium that doesn't spark.

www.ohiopowertool.com/p-7095-cs-unitec-non-sparking-ball-peen-hammer-249-lbs-copper-beryllium-ex101-1300b.aspx

(Dang, I'm surprised how cheap that is.)

Wouldn't it be funny if they made a flat ground CuBe2 socket set that cost less than these bike tools?
  • 1 0
 I guarantee they do.
  • 1 0
 150 USD is about 20GBP each, which is the same price e.g. Mojo sells their ground Beta sockets. Not to say it's an honest price, but it's well positioned in the fork tools market. I grind my own sockets and they work perfectly.
  • 1 0
 lots of people crapping their pants about the rpice of a socket set. as a gear head i dont find that price all that bad. i have spent $50 on a single socket that i used once so $150 on 6 doesnt hurt my feelings.

and like the reviewer said if i was working on someones bike i use these. im cool with using my go to adjustable wrench on my own stuff.
  • 1 0
 I bought a set of them and they work great no slipping like I would get on some cheap craftsmen sockets or no modifying sockets to fit. $150 seems high but if you rebuild your fork even 2-4 times a year I would recommend investing in a set of them on the plus side if you do buy them and have all the other tools for fork rebuilds you can always charge your friends and make your money back. At least that's worked for me. I also have some of Abby's other tools such as the bottom bracket cup remover for shimano BB and there cassette lockring tool both work great wouldn't go back to anything else
  • 1 0
 You can buy individual flat ground 26/28/32 mm sockets from Epic Bleed Solutions in the UK. They ship worldwide. The 32mm socket sells for £9.99.

Note that you'll need a 1/2 inch drive wrench or an adapter.

www.epicbleedsolutions.com/products/tools/fox-forks-flat-socket-32mm

The sockets are also available via eBay...
www.ebay.com/itm/Flat-Socket-for-Fox-Forks-26-28-32mm-for-Servicing-Fox-32-34-36-40-/172012609026
  • 1 0
 this is the biggest rip off ive ever seen.. 150 bucks for 5 sockets??? really?? you do know that you can get a 150 piece socket set on discount ( forged alloy ) at Canadian tire right?? I use sockets everyday in my trade and mine didn't cost that much, do they realize that IF you wanted to buy just the socket for your top cap ( only 1 ) it would cost you under $10 ... likely under $5 also a, not shit crecent wrench or a non adjustable crecent does the same job for under $3 .. I am beyond tired of companys making stuff that is already made and then trying to tell people its *neW or better somehow... but a fool and their money are soon parted. Salute
  • 3 0
 This or Lunar tools. Really want these but the Lunar tools work great at a fraction of the price.
  • 9 1
 Lunar tools fork cap wrenches are great. The only thing that could make them better is if they machined a 3/8" square into the handle so you could use a torque wrench on it when tightening top caps. Kind of like crows foot wrench attachments.
  • 4 0
 Stopped at 5 piece kit for $150. I'm all for nice tools, but $150??
  • 2 1
 I'm usually the last guy to complain about price for something on here, but $150 for 5 sockets isn't even realistic. It's just a socket. Buy the size from Harbor Freight, have it ground down, save $100
  • 1 0
 I bought some oil filter 6 point sockets same sizes for £10 and ground them down on a grinder. Perfect fit. Could buy a grinder and sockets for a similar price as the Abbey sockets
  • 1 0
 Bought sockets at Bike Tools Etc. I think I paid $5 for ground sockets for working on Fox Forks.

www.biketoolsetc.com/index.cgi?id=210828112533&nr=21&b=any_words&c=&sc=&tc=&q=Socket&s
  • 1 0
 Thanks Canadmos for sharing that link, $40 for those five top cap wrenches is a sweet deal considereing they will do almost exactly as good of a job as those $150 shiny green bits.
  • 3 0
 Option of just buying the one you need?
  • 1 0
 Which one do you need? I'm debating buying the set and selling the ones I don't need. I only need a 32mm.
  • 2 0
 Why are you thinking about buying a set? Not taking the piss, I am interested. As soon as I saw the price tag I laughed and wrote off any idea of actually spending my own money on these. I almost stopped when I realised they were aluminium, but decided to read on as at least their ali construction meant they should be cheap as chips....
  • 1 0
 Well I only need one and if the rest can be sole for $30 each that seems little more reasonable to me. I reached out to them and they said they won't sell them individually. Honestly think they're going to lose a ton of potential business due to that. (Including mine) I'm with everyone that $150 seems pretty spendy but $30 each not doesn't. Especially since the 32mm will take care of both my forks.
  • 3 0
 Yeah $150 is pretty steep for 5 little chunks of metal
  • 1 0
 This set would go well with their Titanium hammer and Silca's HX-1... seriously though, $30 isn't too outrageous of a price to charge for a detailed machined chunk of billet that's been anodized and laser etched. Actually makes me grateful there's affordable alternatives. Kind of take it for granted that big companies have made tools so affordable that everyone can own them, compared to the last century.
  • 1 0
 dv81, as someone who works in mechanical trades I can say with absolute certainty tat $30 for a socket is bait for idiots.. it is a total rip off.
  • 3 0
 aka grind down the one you already have
  • 1 0
 bingo!!! you my friend are a thinker Smile Salute
  • 3 0
 I wish they offered them individually. I only need the 24mm.
  • 1 0
 I was disappointed with their truing stand adapters as the don't fit anything over a 142 rear with my park TS2. Bummer. The crombie tool is pretty damn nice.
  • 3 0
 So stoked until I read $150. AYFKM! What a bummer.
  • 2 0
 Wow, They are nice , but you can grind down a dozen sockets and still save money, That's High, a 150 bucks
  • 2 0
 Blaaaah blaaaah blaaseh $150 sweet, SEARS HOME DEPOT CRAFTSMAN!
Your choice.
  • 1 0
 Well guys these are more shop quality tools. Like RC said on your own bike what ever but if some one is paying you to work on their fork you better do it professionally.
  • 1 0
 I just took a lathe to take the chamfer off some normal 6-point sockets. Now now I've got perfect fork top cap sockets for a few pounds.
  • 2 0
 canadian tire socket was like 6 bucks, I used a belt sander to make it flat. yes it was hot as hell,
  • 1 0
 next time ( if you have access to it ) use a bench vise and a sawzall with a metal blade ( or hacksaw ) and cut the bottom 1/8th of an inch off of any socket and you have a socket without bevel... you can also buy sockets that have no bevel, they usually cost about 1 - 2$ more
  • 2 0
 Been using a crescent wrench for years ..no damage .no markings ..they dont need to be that tight @all..
  • 1 0
 Tool porn... yes it's expensive, but fuck, If money wasn't in the equation I'd get them, that and their titanium hammer hahaha.
  • 1 0
 My marzocchi fork just uses a cassette lock ring tool to remove the top caps. Way more secure than the super low profile standard top caps on other forks out there.
  • 2 0
 Wow at 150$ us what a ripoff where is consumer protection when you need them. 50$ I buy no tax
  • 1 0
 Having just threaded the top cap on my revelation trying to add tokens and now being thoroughly pissed off I see the value in these tools
  • 1 0
 I'm on the hunt for the fabled 12mm recessed nut spanner/wrench/socket to work on those various Marzocchi's that had that annoyingly designed said recessed nut...
  • 1 0
 For a brief moment there I thought the introduction read 'If you work on your own forks and watch your penis'......
  • 2 0
 Six point socket turned down on school lathe-$30 for my collection.
  • 1 0
 Is that one of those weird copper bracelets that is supposed to give you more energy?
  • 1 0
 Or www.bitul.pl/Sklep/Kategorie/NarzedziaDoAmortyzatorw They'll ship to EU. Prices are in PLN. Thank you.
  • 1 0
 32mm impact socket, an angle grinder, and some elbow grease to flatten the edge to work on my Fox 40 is what I did
  • 1 0
 cut bottom 1/8th " off of any socket... same result.. less effort..
  • 1 0
 My LBS better be using these, it's not like I can just ride my bike with actual scratches on it. On the fork no less!
  • 1 0
 I glued mine to my Lyrik permanently. Not only does it look great, now I can add more shims as needed right on the trail.
  • 2 0
 Dude, got an adjustable wrench I can borrow? Free!
  • 2 0
 In my country, tools aren't made from aluminum....
  • 1 0
 @RC: send titanium hammer and crombie w/ chain whip, I will review at no cost to you. I promise.
  • 1 0
 Wait.... $150 when you can make the same thing by sanding the bevel flat on a craftsman socket for $8....
  • 1 0
 or just buy the ones that are not beveled ( forged alloy ones )
  • 1 0
 dear g.h.y. in renton, these might be a good addition to the shop.
  • 2 1
 I'd buy if they were made by Abi, our yoga godess...
  • 1 0
 Yay, no 36 for Dorado Frown Too expensive anyway.
  • 2 0
 XTR tools?
  • 2 0
 ****ing ridiculous
  • 1 0
 There is no reason for a 5 piece socket set to cost any more than $25 CAD.
  • 1 0
 X fusion are 27mm
  • 1 0
 The 34mm forks are most certainly 28mm.
  • 1 0
 My slants are 27mm





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