All In Multitool – Review

Jun 2, 2017
by Paul Aston  
All In Multi tool

The All In Multitool is part of the rapidly growing batch of tools that can be stored on or in your steed. This one makes use of the hollow space inside a crank axle — the magnetic tool attracts itself to the steel axle. It can store six standard drill bit drivers and a spare chain split link. 100% made in Italy, it's available in seven anodized colors and can be delivered to your door for €87.50.



All In Multi tool




All In Multitool Details
• Multi tool that can be stored in a hollow crank axle
• Six different tool bits
• Split link storage
• Six colors
• Weight: 113 grams
• Made in Italy
• MSRP: €87.50 / $98.20 USD
www.allinmultitool.co.uk


Construction

The All In tool has six driver bits as well a space to store a chain split link, 3, 4, 5, 6mm hex keys, plus a Phillips-head PS1 screwdriver and a Torx T25. The driver bits are similar to those found at the local hardware store, so you can swap out and customize the bits required for your bike.


All In Multi tool


Neodynium magnets retain the tool inside hollow crank axles with a 21mm or larger diameter. Attraction force depends on the crank arm and how much connection it has to steel; SRAM cranks and Shimano XT and SLX provided a good connection but you're out of luck with cranks that use aluminum axles like E13's TRS+ and DMR's Axe. In addition, the All In is too large to fit inside Shimano Zee cranks and their internally tapered axle, we assume Saint will suffer the same issue. In other words, it's best to confirm that your cranks are compatible with the tool before opening your wallet.

The chain link and the driver bits are also kept in place with magnets when they are stored, while another magnet holds the bit in place during use in the driver head. That magnet also holds the hinged head straight, but it can also be flipped either way up to 90º in order to gain more leverage.

The anodized portions of the tool are made from aluminum, and the driver and bits are steel. In wet weather, the bits could start to rust lightly if left installed, so All In recommends a light coat of water dispersing spray after cleaning your bike to keep things looking like new.


All In Multi tool
Are you a twelve speed-o-phile? SRAM's Eagle kidney shaped split link will need to be carried elsewhere, as it won't fit flush in the tool's recess.
All In Multi tool
It's not the lightest tool out there, but it has a quality feel to it.


Trailside

All In Multi tool
The All In Multitool offers plenty of leverage.


The All In tool is one of the better trailside tools on the market when it comes to function; in a straight line it's easy to rotate loose bolts quickly just like you'd use a screwdriver. You can hinge the tool to 90º to tighten things up, there's plenty of leverage in store and the tool can then be flipped 180º if bike parts get in the way. The tool feels like it will last forever, and probably will with interchangeable bits, and is another league from some of the flimsy, flippy-flappy folding tools out there.

Carrying a spare split link is great, but there's a good chance that any chain related mechanical issue will need a chain splitting tool, something the All In tool is lacking. We also found that most split links fit correctly, but SRAM Eagle kidney shaped connectors won't sit flush in the tool's recess, preventing it from fitting inside the crank axle.


All In Multi tool
The All In tool protrudes 7mm from the axle, but this is not enough to impede clearance.



Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesThe All In tool isn't going to be a favorite for weight and wallet weenies as it's not cheap and it's not light, but this high-quality tool should last a lifetime, functions well and is always going to be there when you need it. Paul Aston


Must Read This Week

152 Comments

  • + 213
 I'll just let my riding buddy buy it and be 'that guy'
  • + 79
 I'd buy it bro, but it won't fit in my square taper. Yeah, I'm that guy...
  • + 11
 @aoneal: One up for each you
  • + 4
 @nicolai12: One up for you too
  • + 2
 I started today with 10 ups and now four of them are given...
  • + 1
 @aoneal: Guess I'm "that guy" too then!
  • + 101
 $100? I like the idea, but for $30, I can put an equally capable, less heavy, multi tool in my pocket.
  • + 10
 More a 10% argument, I bought my multi tool for $11 on Amazon (chain tool, 8mm & 10mm etc.)
  • + 87
 what's the point of carrying an extra chain link if it has no chain tool?
  • + 9
 take a look at I9's "matchstick" that goes in the front axle... it's even more at like 160! I also wish in these articles it would list what cranks it would actually fit... don't think it'll work with any of the new raceface stuff
  • + 15
 @manchvegas: we need to know the compatibility. But don't worry, next year another axle or crank standard will be out that forces us to buy all new tools too!
  • + 8
 @manchvegas: Also, Raceface uses alloy for their spindles on the Turbine and Next lineups. Magnets have not found a way to attach to aluminum yet.
  • + 1
 But when you crash that tool will implanted in your quad......whereas the All in Multi Tool will just be the tick tick as your shoe hit it on every other revolution. I'm not sure what's worse Wink
  • + 3
 @rivercitycycles: just wrap it on your bike somehow?
  • + 6
 @gtill9000: You only have to wait 1/2 as long for that guy to show up with a chain tool. And your wallet is thinner so not as hard on your ass when sitting to wait for a chain tool.
  • + 2
 @manchvegas: it fits xt but the race face stuff is no go--I'll let you try it at next beer league

That guy
  • + 2
 How many times have you forgotten that tool though?
  • + 54
 useless, where's the chain break, spoke wrench, 8mm for pedals? ... a Philips bit for a bike, what am I building a fence?
  • + 37
 Plenty derailleurs still use some philips screw.
  • + 13
 Agreed. The quick links don't do much without a chain break tool.
  • + 12
 It seems like it uses standard bits, so you can take along whatever is suitable for your bike. Those running Shimano brakes with centerlock rotors probably won't be interested in T25 torx bits. But the modern carpenter will take T20 bits to build that fence (or wood structures on your trail).

But yeah, there is a lot to complain about this tool. I think a proper trail tool review should be done in the pissing rain, mud, frozen hands in wet riding gloves, maybe grumpy friends getting mad at you or instead, laughing at your misfortune. These are the conditions where a trail tool should shine, which is what I don't expect from this one.

Paul, of course I don't wish you bad luck Wink .
  • + 2
 @EnduroManiac: Plenty of good mechanics use a flathead
  • + 3
 @beetardfoozer: and there's no flat head and you won't need it for anything else so what's the difference ? Can double as bottle opener ? Like pretty much anything on earth ?
  • + 4
 @EnduroManiac: most use JIS not phillips.
  • + 9
 a flat head?! The only use for a flat head is opening tins of paint. There is zero place for a flat head in the work place, or bike place for that matter. Heathen tool. the adjustable spanner of the screwdriver world.
  • + 3
 @ilovedust: Now as a Canadian we can be proud of the Robertson square head screw, almost an allen but not quite, but bikes don't use them, they beat the shit out of flat head, phillips and for me torx fittings torx on small sizes are crap x10.

I guess phillips is good for drywall but I don't use much on my new ride.
  • + 2
 @lake-st: The L and H screws on my rear mech take phillips so that's pretty typical stuff to fiddle with while out on the trail (and having bent the mech hanger and/or rear mech). The cap for the cable entry of my gear shifter takes one too, I think.

I like the flat head. It is simple, easy to clean out and unlike many other designs, you can apply a large torque because it utilizes the full width of the bolt head. It may be a bit harder to align your tool with it, but then again many bolts on bicycles are recessed these days so that could help guide your tool. When I worked in a bike shop, people would sometimes come in to have their cleats for their click-type pedals replaced. Road type cleats would take a flat screwdriver and were easy to replace. Mountainbike type cleats take allen bolts which would be completely filled with dirt. There were considerably harder to clean so that I could unscrew them.

Robertson square head is indeed nice to work with. Triangular would be even nicer but I can imagine odd numbered polynomial shaped tool interfaces are probably much harder to create.

Personally I just prefer bolts with the external hexagonal (or square, why not). Cleaning isn't an issue, it is easy to apply a large torque. The reason they may not be too popular anymore may be that it is hard creating a light and compact tool for these.

I've got to be honest though. I run a Shimano octalink bottom bracket. There is no way I'm going to cramm one off these in there. And there is no 1/4" bit for the crank bolt, which takes a 10mm allen key.
  • + 1
 @EnduroManiac: #2 Phillips or JIS 2. Using a Phillips #1 is a good way to round out the head of the adjustment screws.
  • + 22
 I have a multi tool that can be stored IN MY CLOTHING! All you need are these little 'adapters' called pockets. Blows on-bike options out of the water with the range of tools that fit.
  • + 2
 On bike options are a great idea in theory, until you realize there's not enough room in the steer tube, or the bottom bracket to fit everything you'd want. I'm actually almost partial to the frame cubby at this point, as lame as they may seem, you could fit a spare tube, and pretty much anything spare you may need.
  • + 2
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs - Exactly, and clearly hollow bottom bracket axles are for storing Tootsie rolls. Nothing like riding along hungry and suddenly remembering you have candy stashed on your bike.
  • + 2
 These are tools for people with deep pockets.

My question: is there any amount of bone rattling riding that cause this thing to bust loose and get lost?
  • + 1
 @bholton: That would be a bummer. "This is why we can't have nice things!"
  • + 22
 I can think of another hole they can fill with this tool.
  • + 21
 Wallet weenies? You rich bro?
  • - 38
flag JoseBravo (Jun 2, 2017 at 8:34) (Below Threshold)
 The dicksucking on 29ers aint free
  • + 5
 @JoseBravo: are you running a high fever?
  • + 0
 @JoseBravo: I for one encourage more dicksuckling references on this site. Clearly lacking.
  • + 0
 I mean, pinkbike is drowning in money because they advertise products. Now the hottest shit is DH 29ers. It used to be 27.5 they tried with 27.5+,29+,e-bikes and fatbikes.
  • + 13
 The lack of chain breaker is a big deal. The one on my multi-tool is the only one I own, and gets used every time I install a chain.
  • + 11
 Looking at the rubbing on my cranks I am going to be knocking my foot on that all the time. Nice idea but there are better solutions out there currently
  • + 7
 Cost aside, this is a pretty cool idea. Do those magnets really keep if from shaking loose hammering through rock gardens? Add some kind of mechanical connection, chain breaker, and tire lever(s) and you have a winner.
  • + 5
 Here's the problem. Most of the higher end bikes I see these days run a RF Next or SixC carbon crank or similar. Definitely not hollow or steel. At the price they are asking I think this is a tough market to crack when you eliminate a huge chunk of them running the top end cranks.
  • + 3
 I don't know, as long as they fit sram cranks they have a ton of riders covered
  • + 9
 It will work great for when you're riding nude at Burning Man!!!
  • + 1
 Only if you tape it to your parts as sunscreen
  • + 3
 Feels too gimmicky for me. Plus no chain breaker, so chain links is pointless, unless you're handing them out to somebody who has a chain breaker on the trail but no links. My crank brothers 40$ multi tool will do pretty much everything on my bike, minus bb shell removal, but wtf would you be doing removing bb shell cups on the trail anyway?
  • + 2
 As "that guy in the group ride" who's presence had others ditching their tools when they saw I was at the meeting spot to start, knowing that I had everything needed to field strip and rebuild practically a whole bike in the middle of a bog, even I wouldn't bother with such a tool.

Lezyne makes a titanium, stainless and carbon multi-tool that has is pretty flat and compact and fits any shorts or jersey pocket. 82 grams for 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8mm Allen keys, a T25 & T30 Torx driver, a Phillips head driver, and a chain tool for assembling/breaking 9/10/11 speed chains.
  • + 1
 Pretty certain I carry one of those on the road bike and have been throwing one in my shorts for pack-less mtn bike rides for a while.
  • + 1
 Camelbak. Holds everything and doesn't get left on the other bike. Also doubles as armour in certain circumstances.
  • + 2
 I thought my Specialized EMT tool attached to my bottle cage was expensive...$45 for the tool and $20 for the cage, but the cage us useable and the tool has an 8mm! Throw in the chain tool for another $20 and you STILL are cheaper than this tool...and lighter!
  • + 1
 The tool is great to handle actually, our guide in Finale had one when I was "that guy". Very versatile by having the straight screwdriver layout or the angled option.

My standard multitool sucks when I'd like to adjust the headset on a doublecrown fork. The bolts of the upper crown of the 40 are just not easy to get access to with short allen wrenches attached to the rectangular body of a multi-tool. Something this tool here does a much better job with.

I'd buy it in a heartbeat, but here's some info for owners of SRAM X0 DH cranks: that hollow axle is tapered slightly, so the tool won't fit. Again, that's only the DH version of the X0 cranks, standard X0 works just like a charm.
  • + 1
 Because I store my bike with a Scorpion stand and would need to remove this to put my bike away, I can all but guarantee that I'd forget to bring it along for a ride, and Murphy's Law dictates that it would be the ride I needed tools the most. I think I'd be much less likely to forget the OneUp EDC at home.
  • + 5
 One Up EDC tool looks like a better value.
  • + 4
 Except with this one you don't have to self thread your BB spindle.
  • + 1
 The OneUp tool on its own is cheaper ($59US). However, once you add in the top cap ($25US) and the tool to tap your steer tube ($35US) you are at ~$120US. Thats alot of money for a multi tool that voids the warranty on your fork at the same time....
  • + 1
 @shoreboy1866: It voids the warranty? Is that an official call from Fox/RS? I've got an EDC on the way and was planning to use it in my Fox 36.
  • + 1
 @shoreboy1866: And you may even need a new fork crown/steerer tube would you f*ck up the installation. Plus I rarely have a cassette tool with me would I have to retighten it after something went wrong. I found the EDC great untill I saw how to install it. Now I'm less sure it's for me.
  • + 2
 @shoreboy1866: I call BS on the warranty issue. All forks used to be threaded.
  • + 1
 @DrPete: Most manufacturers have a "alteration or modification" clause in their warranty. I am guessing this would could easily fall under that category. I do not know if this is an official word from any of the manufacturers, but it would be something I would be asking their warranty department before I modified my fork.
  • + 5
 @EnduroManiac: You dont need a cassette tool to retighten it. Part of the EDC tool allows you to retighten the top cap should you need to on the trail.
  • + 1
 @bman33: Why does that apply here? All forks used to be externally threaded by the manufacturer. That doesnt mean its automatically OK for the consumer to internally modify/thread their steerer does it?
  • + 2
 @bman33: all forks used to have steel steerers with threads... the Canecreek ahead set allowed aluminum to be used since it didnt need threads, and then carbon.... aluminum was never used widely as a material for a threaded steerer... i have never heard of a threaded aluminum steerer, even on high end road bikes from the late 80's-early 90's (which is when they would have tried that)...
  • + 2
 @ckcost: There is the hand pump option as well with the EDC tool fitting neatly inside to dodge the steer tube theading. That is the route I am going.
  • + 2
 @eriksaun & @shoreboy1866 I am very familiar with threaded > threadless progression. I've been in and out of the industry and riding and wrenching since the early 90's. To your point, not sure if many aluminum ones were threaded back in the day.
That said, how will cutting the steerer tube with a tool like a hacksaw not void the warranty, but somehow treading it with a proper tool will void? Doesn't make sense. In no way does it affect structural integrity or functionality of the fork. Nor do the internal threads affect the clamping area. Until the major fork manufacturers publish a 'this voids the warranty' notice I won't buy that it does void it. That said, I am pretty sure the manufacturers were given a heads up by Oneup prior to them investing the resources to develop and market the tool. Especially considering the cost of most high end forks today.

I just sent an email to oneup asking about the warranty and any issues they discussed with the major fork players. I will post the responses here.
  • + 1
 @bman33: truth. It's also worth pointing out that threaded steerers were load bearing, they actually did the job that the stem clamp does now, holding the fork in the frame. threadless topcaps are not load bearing, all they do is preload the headset. even in the case of a stem moving in a crash, they aren't subjected to nearly the stress that an old school threaded steerer was.
  • + 1
 Has there been something showing how it is installed are are these assumptions on the threaded fork still?
  • + 2
 @mfoga: Mine is ordered. they ship June 10th (they did a limited release of the first 1000 for people on their email list.) from the order page: "TAP REQUIRED -- EDC Top cap requires you to thread your steerer: Add a tap to my order "
  • + 1
 @bman33: I'd be a little surprised if they say that threading a part that's designed to be sawed through is a warranty-voiding mod, but I appreciate you checking because stranger things have happened... looking forward to what you hear.
  • + 1
 @shoreboy1866: now you raised my interest again!
  • + 3
 @bman33: I misspoke in my first post and should have included 'possibly' voids warranty. I didnt want it to come across as a fact. My apologies. I too will be interested to see what OneUp has to say, as there is no information concerning it on it on their website.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: ahh thanks I am not on the newsletter so didn't know it had been put up for sale or more info had appeared. The website still seems devoid of any information.
  • + 1
 @mfoga: yea the order page was a private link, apparently. I was going to provide it as a reference, but I can't even get back to it.
  • - 3
 One Up tool is payed for, and landing next week, watch the video it's easy to tap your steerer, The twats complaining about tapping out and warranty, just keep moaning , your loss suckers !!!
  • + 1
 @bman33: On the outside done at the factory, I'm not saying it would affect structural integrity, but the factory has to draw the line on modifications somewhere, but hey fill your pants and thread the stem, I'm going to fill my pocket with a tool thats actually useful.
  • + 1
 @DrPete: there is a distinct difference between cutting a smooth bore tube to length and cutting threads in the bore creating a few dozen radial stress riser points in a material that work hardens. If they Engineered to have threads cut there would likely be a thicker wall or a different material.

That said, I can't recall a metal steerer tube failing inside the clamped area where the stem resides. (besides the old 'round wedge designs' that were hella overtightened and crushed into steerer!)
  • - 2
 @lake-st: I haven't bought one, probably won't. Just calling BS on the voiding warranty thing. Pretty sure I'm right. Once I find out , all the supreme beings here in Pinkbike can feel free to insult and name call all they want
  • + 2
 From the Fox 40 User Manual "If the steerer has any nicks or gouges, the crown/steerer assembly must be replaced. A nick or gouge can cause the steerer to fail prematurely, which can cause loss of control of the bicycle resulting in SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH." ... threading the steerer is essentially gouging it..... I am not sure why everyone wants to hear what OneUp has to say, they have nothing to do with your forks warranty... you would better off consulting your fork manufacturer.
  • + 1
 @cmcrawfo: lawyer speak but fair enough. "nicks or gauges" happen installing the Star nut. Zero problem with threads. That said of it says that I can't argue
  • + 1
 @shoreboy1866: I cut my steerer tube to the desired length. I wonder if that voids the warranty? Probably.
  • + 1
 @bman33: I wonder if the warranty is based upon testing of a fork with steerer tube of known material and wall thickness. Threading does remove some of the material.
  • + 2
 The EDC Tool needs you to thread 8mm internally of your steerer, And its not very deep, Im sure if there was an issue any were desperate to warranty it you'd be able to loose that 8mm if need be, I leave mine long anyway for re-sale value. + they are out of warranty now anyway!
  • + 2
 @pigman65: Pre ordered mine too!
  • + 2
 Lets be clear about this: It is very unlikely that properly threading your steerer with this tool will jeopardize the integrity. However, that is different than the lawyers/engineers at FOXRAMTOURSHOXCREEKDVO saying that the mod wont void the warranty. If they say it doesn't, and then something bad happens and they don't have any background testing proving their "it doesn't void the warranty stance"...that seems like a pretty damn big liability door to leave open as a fork mfg.

Disclaimer: Im not a lawyer and I didn't stay in a holiday inn express last night either.
  • + 1
 @bman33: Did you ever get an answer from OneUp? I pulled this disclaimer off the EDC page on their website:

'All compatibility and fit determinations have been made solely by OneUp. Use of this or any other aftermarket product may void any warranty you have with the original part manufacturer.'

Looks like its up to the fork manufacturer to decide as I thought.
  • + 1
 @shoreboy1866: Not yet.....but good find on your part. I know a few people at MRP personally. I am going to ask them as well for perspective from a fork manufacture.
  • + 2
 Received mine and it installs very easily. If you can wreck your steerer following the instructions in their video, you deserve to be out a CSU. Their tap guide also keeps you from cutting threads any deeper than necessary, so the threads generally end at the very top of the stem clamp area anyway.
  • + 2
 @DrPete: Agreed. My install was easy & drama free. threads are fairly shallow as well. I have no worries about having compromised the structure at all.
  • + 4
 For a little bit more $ why not get the Industry Nine Matchstick and have yourself covered in more situations?
  • + 1
 Well I got this pretty little All In Multi Tool as a gift about a year ago. It isn't worth what it costs $$$$$$$$$$. It is quality as far as the tools go. But staying in your crank is another story. If you ride some tame trails no problem. It has fallen out of by bike a couple of times. Today was the last time 01/05/2018. If your riding Dakota Ridge and Red Rocks Trail, it's out there somewhere.
Bottom line for that Price $$$$$ keep it in your pack.
  • + 3
 I don't get it, they have all tools to borrow at the base station of the lift?
  • + 1
 So far the only real life reviews I've heard on the trail is that this WILL come loose on rough sections. After yard sale-ling, pick up teeth then your All-in and then your bike.
  • + 1
 It's a cool direction. I tape a tube and co2/adapter to my top tube. I'd totally throw the co2/adapter into my axle if there was a container for it. Also a convenient way to smuggle illicit goods I suppose...
  • + 4
 Rusty, low quality bits included!
  • + 1
 id put it in my crank then in a time of need forget it was there and sit on the trail while I cussed up a storm about not having tools only to get back to my house and remember I actually had some with me
  • + 1
 Great idea but very expensive for something so simple. As for not accommodating the 12 spd chain link personally I could care less since I will never own 1x12 but I still think thats a dumb oversight by the manufacturer.
  • + 0
 Quality may be amazing, but at some point cranks are going to change again, and this one won't fit anymore.

Better Options - if light, and you want to deal with little bits that will get lost in the leaves:
1. the Presta Ratchet for $25
www.prestacycle.com/product/prestaratchet-multi-tool-kit-ratchet-wtire-lever-handle
2. Or Swapable Fix It Sticks for $30. Duct tape to saddle.
fixitsticks.com/replaceables

The real smart choice:
If you want a tool that will fix everything is all connected so you won't loose it in the leaves - and could fit in the space under your saddle for 50 grams more and $28 The Crank Brothers M17 is probably your best bet:
www.crankbrothers.com/tools_M17
  • + 3
 I trust no one here has "modified or altered" their fork by shortening the steerer!
  • + 1
 So, you attach your stem to the part of the fork you "altered" that way?
  • + 2
 Few month later all the trails will be full of lost multitools cause of magnet loose or the shaking root sections. Sooo, I'l just wait)
  • + 2
 I want to develop a tool like this that will hold all hex sizes, a chain link, a small pump, and a chain whip that will fit into the center hole of the upper pulley wheel.
  • + 2
 And then you realize all your tools, that are normally in your pack, are on your other bike.
  • + 1
 A descent multi tool fits in your pocket. Wait do shorts not come with pockets anymore. I know store in your bum crack jobs done
  • + 3
 Solving problems that don't exist. Small multitools aren't hard to carry.
  • + 2
 what happens if it walks out during pedaling and you hit it with your shin? That could lead to injury correct?
  • + 1
 My Specialized bike came standard with a tool, chain link, chain breaker, storage in my down tube, tube wraps, CO2 cartridge. Specialized sucks.
  • + 3
 @singletrackslayer I've got an enduro with an aluminum frame, might grab a hacksaw and sort my frame out myself, I'm jealous of your frame!
  • + 2
 For a lot less money and weight, you can buy yourself some nice fix it sticks.
  • + 2
 Wait a minute - if both Weight Weenies AND Wallet Weenies don't like it, who the heck is left?
  • + 4
 Great. I post this, THEN read macross87's post about riding nude at burning man. Now it all makes sense.
  • + 2
 @pinhead907: indeed....
  • + 4
 Only the pure weenies remain.
  • + 1
 €87.50... It's as crazy as the price of the new Reverb Remote Upgrade Kit. They must think we're stupid and money grows on trees.
  • + 2
 Multi tools without a chain breaker are just glorified paper weights.
  • + 2
 I have one. It's great. Excellent quality.
  • + 13
 Can i borrow it?
  • + 1
 two week ago I've seen this tool in Finale Ligure. Great, but the bit swre already rusty. The quality doesn0t convice me.
  • + 2
 Great idea and Design a little bit of a rapey price
  • + 1
 I have had one of these since they came out. They are really well made and the magnet keeps it secure in my crank spindle.
  • + 1
 yeah other than the storage space for quick links, i'm still good with my topeak multitool.
  • + 1
 I've got a topeak mini 20 and it beats everything else because it's got a chain hook. Quick links can be squashed down in the neoprene case.
  • + 2
 I may just duct tape my tool box to the bike.
  • + 2
 haha what people buy this?
  • + 2
 What's wrong with a backpack?
  • + 3
 On short chainstay bikes you can't wear a back pack, that little bit of rearward weight would just make you flip over backwards everywhere!
  • + 1
 @robertg620: Pity the fools with large rear ends
  • + 2
 @MCHardmanUK:
Seriously, some people think short sucks. If my bike didn't have a short rear end, along with it's long reach, it would be longer than my dirt bike. I'm sure that would turn awesome
  • + 1
 and made in Italy, lol should be 'Made in Italy'
  • + 1
 Nice idea but expenisive and not to many tools
  • + 1
 More 113g of rotational wheight?
I pass.
  • + 1
 How you would rotate this?
  • + 1
 I HAVE OCTALINK WAAAAUUUUGGHHHH Frown
  • + 1
 Any tool that doesn't have a chain breaker is worthless
  • + 1
 Anyone wants some burnt wieners?
  • + 1
 Nice idea, poor execution with a foolish price tag. NEXT
  • + 2
 All it needs is the shamwow guy
  • + 1
 Does it rattle when riding the bike?
  • + 1
 my shoe will be rubbing on it, so, nope. Oh wait, $100!! Hell no!
  • + 1
 shame this doesnt fizz zee cranks
  • + 1
 Cool idea.. :looks at pic of profile: Doesn't sit flush?!?! Nope
  • + 1
 No chain break, no deal.
  • + 1
 mmm no..
  • + 1
 Scam...
  • + 1
 1 word: rust
  • + 0
 pretty kick ass, I like it!!
  • + 0
 100 bucks for 6 rusty bits? Great effort bad price...
  • + 1
 enduro specific?
  • + 1
 wow so cheap boi
  • - 1
 I'm bored.

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2018. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.081439
Mobile Version of Website