Allite's New Super Magnesium Alloy is Lighter Than Aluminum, Less Expensive Than Carbon - Interbike 2018

Sep 19, 2018
by Mike Kazimer  
Interbike 2018

Back in the 1990s it seemed as if a new wonder material for frame construction was discovered every month. Carbon fiber wasn't as common as it is today, and manufacturers experimented with all sorts of exotic-sounding metals, everything from beryllium to scandium. It turns out beryllium is expensive and toxic, so that didn't really catch on, but scandium (actually an aluminum / scandium alloy) had a much more successful run.

Is is time for another alloy to hit the market? US-based Allite Inc. think so, and they're debuting Allite Super Magnesium, which they say is 33% lighter than aluminum with 20 times the shock absorbtion. Previously, the material had been used for top-secret military and aerospace projects, but it's now available for non-classified applications, whether that's building a robot, a rifle scope, or a bike frame.

Anyone who's ever lit a sparkler knows how hot and bright magnesium can burn, but Super Magnesium is supposed to melt, rather than burst into flames, when subjected to a 1200-degree F flame. Allite also say that Super Magnesium is as corrosion resistant as aluminum, due to the addition of rare earth elements and the purity of the magnesium.


Interbike 2018
Three identically sized pucks with three different weights. Steel: 1830 grams, aluminum: 646 grams, and Super Magnesium: 425 grams.

Allite has three different alloys, one that's designed to be welded, one that's best suited for casting, and another that's meant for forging. That means it could be used for rocker links, stems, or even a complete frame. Given the myriad of potential applications for Super Magnesium in the bike world it'll be interesting to see which, if any, manufacturers decide to give it a try.

The cost of a complete frame constructed from the material will be more expensive than aluminum, but still less expensive than carbon, and as an added bonus it can be recycled at the end of its lifespan. Of course, Allite aren't the first company to pursue the use of magnesium for bike frames - we'll have to wait and see if this alloy catches on.

Interbike 2018
Interbike 2018
Stems and dropouts are just two of the possible applications of Allite's Super Magnesium.



131 Comments

  • 111 1
 Not quite as exciting as lighter than carbon and less expensive than aluminum.
  • 199 0
 Or an unattended hot dog. I get more excited about unattended hot dogs than I can really explain here. I get very excited about them. I do.
  • 43 0
 a banana holder made it into the news feed.
  • 94 1
 @conv3rt: Will it also hold a hotdog? Unattended, specifically. Asking for a friend.
  • 18 8
 @IamTheDogEzra: I just smeared peanut butter all over my hot dog. Here, boy.
  • 3 3
 @Session603:
Ezra owes you a lick or two
  • 4 0
 @IamTheDogEzra: dude you killing me here! You must be as heart broken as I am that Costco got ride of the polish dog...
  • 3 0
 @IamTheDogEzra: It might hold two hotdogs together, you know, one in each loop
  • 2 0
 @IamTheDogEzra: Cannibalism much?
  • 1 0
 @PtDiddy: WTF? when did that happen?
  • 2 0
 @drunknride: they got rid of it about a month ago in my area, Northern California. Now there is a kale salad on the menu instead... It is becoming harder and harder to live in California.
  • 31 2
 Magnesium alloys have been around for a while in the bike world. A long long time ago I had a Russian magnesium frame from a company called Litech that was absolutely fantastic-- light, springy... until it cracked. Merida was also making high-end magnesium frames a while ago, and there are a couple of small frame builders that continue to make magnesium bikes (Paketa, Zinn).

How about giving us a little bit of this history and explaining why this alloy different from what's been used before?
  • 70 0
 Can't you read? This is SUPER magnesium!
  • 44 2
 @philipmcm: they should call it Boost magnesium, or super-boost magnesium.
  • 9 1
 I hear it’s tapered, for our pleasure.
  • 14 0
 @Ride406orDie: they could do that, or they could wait for us to all buy these frames, and then make them obsolete every 2 years with their Boost magnesium and super-boost magnesium and metric magnesium etc
  • 6 0
 @philipmcm: I heard it's enduro specific
  • 4 0
 As in every fashion industry, and let's not kid ourselves that's exactly what the bicycle industry is, what was old is new again.
  • 2 1
 RockShox used to cast their lower legs from Magnesium back in the day
  • 7 0
 @SonofBovril: as far as I know all dork lowers are still magnesium.
  • 3 0
 *fork haha dork!
  • 5 0
 @mikelee: dork lowers, Interbike 2019. Bank on it.
  • 1 2
 @mikelee: I think RS forks are alloy,that´s why they are cheaper than other brands.I think Marzocchi new forks are alloy too,but maybe I´m wrong about Marzocchi. Most people are talking shit about Mg and they are ridding Fox forks with Mg lowers,0 problem of corrosion or lack of long term reliability.
  • 1 2
 I thought Magnesium was used in lots of dork i mean fork lowers.
  • 2 0
 @homerjm: I'm sure you mean ALUMINUM alloy... alloy refers to a mix of different metals. The magnesium being discussed in this article is also an alloy.
  • 1 8
flag homerjm (Sep 20, 2018 at 11:22) (Below Threshold)
 @millsr4: If you say Aluminum in your hood in US good kills 20 little cats...I read Pinkbike for a while,just to know that in US/CAD English Aluminum is called "alloy", only old British people call it Aluminum. In my hood we call it aluminio.
  • 4 0
 @homerjm: Killing little cats?! I don't know what your on about but I'm no psychopath... Oh you read pinkbike? that definitely makes you an expert then... the people who say alloy referring to aluminum are most likely as uneducated in this subject as you are. As a professional in the metal manufacturing business I can assure you the proper terminology in north america is aluminum rather than aluminium in the UK. I'm not surprised you call it aluminio, that is what aluminum is called in Spanish after all... however, this doesn't take away from the fact that any way you look at it alloy is not a complete name for a metal, i.e an aluminum alloy.
  • 1 0
 Kirk - back in the early 90's did a cast magnesium frame, looked like something out of Alien, but was heavy and cracked I remember.
  • 2 0
 Spot on Durist, I remember how proud Merida was of its Mag program 20 odd years ago, but they (and others) could never master the incredibly precise heat treatment process to obtain safe and rideable product. I would very interested to know how this material performs against all ISO testing and ride testing.
  • 1 0
 @millsr4: Just search Pinbike+alloy plz . Alloy is a common word in this "bike world" but maybe we are all crazy & ignorant,or just wanna save a little time typing or Pinkbike is trolling me/us. Do you know what "tocapelotas" mean in Spanish? At the end of the day I just wanna learn something new.
  • 3 0
 @homerjm: Yes people in the bike world commonly use alloy interchangeably with aluminum and especially on pinkbike but it doesn't make it correct. Especially when you are commenting on an article that is specifically discussing a completely different type of alloy...

That being said I am a bit OCD and this does directly relate to my profession so I may be a bit more sensitive about it than I should be... lol.

I didn't know what a "tocapelotas" was before I google searched it but I'd say that is pretty accurate. I know my fiance would agree with you at least!

To be fair the main point of my original comment was to help you learn something new... Razz
  • 1 0
 @millsr4: yea, I learn a lot,maybe I write a book about that.
  • 1 0
 @homerjm: Quien es la tocapelota ahora...?
  • 24 1
 I wish RC had written this feature, he at least... was a frame builder, and was still building frames when beryllium first came on the bike scene.

"It turns out beryllium is expensive and toxic, so that didn't really catch on, but scandium (actually an aluminum / scandium alloy) had a much more successful run. "

It was ALWAYS know that beryllium was expensive and toxic. When American Bicycle Manufacturing made four Be frames... they had to use Be tubes bonded to oversized Al lugs, and even then the frames cost about $27,000 USD each... TWENTY FIVE YEARS AGO. And while the metal in a solid form isn't toxic...powdered Be is a both is toxic if inhaled, so even just machining it requires extensive air filters and ventilation setups to suck the dust away from the tooling operators.

Scandium enhanced aluminum was expensive also, which is why it fell out of favor with bicycle manufacturers (the tubesets cost so much that frames in carbon weren't that much more of a price hike).

As to Magnesium.... well... we've had casting suitable alloys for a long time... forks have been using it since the Rockshox Mag20...and it was used for wheels in the automotive and aerospace wheels long before then (the lancaster bombers used cast magnesium wheels). Kirk Precision was casting whole bike frames of magnesium in the mid 80s. Lodestar & Mg Litech were both using a russian magnesium alloy that was Tig weldable in the late 90s. I used to own one of those frames and powdercoat painted, it was 2 Ibs 11 oz for a 17 inch hardtail frame. And Easton had forged Mg stems only about 10 years ago that were great because Mg has better vibration damping characteristics than other structural metals.

HOWEVER... un-protected Mg... whether paint, powdercoat, or artificial annodizing...is probably the MOST prone to oxidation and corrosion of any metal after steel. Its especially bad when exposed to salt water... in this area...where the city uses a LOT of rock salt in the winter...its not unusual to see suspension forks on winter commuter bikes that have had the entire dropout area dissolved away in only a couple years. I have just such a fork in my basement right now. There's almost nothing left of the dropouts.
  • 2 0
 Pedals too.. all the rage a while back. Welgo MG's with Ti axles. Mag pedal casting about the same weight as modern plastic pedal casting. (is it still a casting if its plastic?) but,
lightest touch on a rock an you'll see why they fell out of favour
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla:

Thermoplastic composites are usually cast. All casting is, is injecting something as a heated liquid into a mold and allowing it to cool. Gun furniture and knife handles are often cast from zytel, which is a trademarked name for a glass fiber reinforced plastic family made by Dupont.
  • 20 0
 It’s great that it’s lighter than the others, but if you need more of it because it’s not at strong, the advantages are negated, based on the fact that steel is quadruple the weight as pictured (400g vs 1.8kg) in puck sizes it implies that a super duper mag frame would weigh 1/4 as much, which is unlikely
  • 31 2
 Exactly. I very much support research into new frame materials, but this display made me laugh. I'd love to add a puck of my own - "aluminum foil-wrapped styrofoam, 20g". The clear winner!
  • 6 5
 why would a new manufacturer preach the lightness of their new material without stating the weight of their final product? umm..maybe they have to use so much of it to make it rideable and durable enough that it ends up weighing more than the others? Hmmm..I am guessing that if that frame was as light, or lighter than the others that they would be screaming it's weight. Maybe they are just being humble...Oh yeah, how much cheaper? No stated price range either. bummer.
I dig PinkBike, but it seems more honest that these press releases without insight/questions should be noted as "advertisements."
  • 11 0
 @bradg8: Or like the article says, they supply the material, they aren't a frame manufacturer so how do expect them to give you a frame weight?

Read below a little slower

"Allite has three different alloys, one that's designed to be welded, one that's best suited for casting, and another that's meant for forging. That means it could be used for rocker links, stems, or even a complete frame. Given the myriad of potential applications for Super Magnesium in the bike world it'll be interesting to see which, if any, manufacturers decide to give it a try."
  • 2 0
 Hahaha!
  • 2 0
 Ultimately, they didn’t compare the “strength” of Aluminum to Magical Magnesium.
So what is it? Anyone here very smart?
  • 7 0
 @powaymatt: Not very smart, but I checked their homepage and it says that it is 21% stronger than AL 6061.

No you can check which 6061, T4 or T6... and the different ones from Allite.
An Example: Choosing the one that is good for welding (AE81) it has a yield strength of 240MPa. The one for forging (ZE62) has a yield strength of 310 MPa. And Aluminum for example 6061 T6 (often used for frames) has a yield of around 240MPa.

So I guess it is interesting!
alliteinc.com/super-magnesium

Why is pinkbike not double checking this? ;-)
  • 5 3
 @BuddyBuddy: it's all about strength to weight ratio and that is getting left out entirely. This metal puck stuff is a load of crap.

Let's look at a welded frame using their AE81. Magnesium is on the brittle side of things as far as metals go so it's more comparable to a 7075 frame than 6061. The strength to weight ratio relative to yield is 132 kNm/kg for AE81 and 179 kNm/kg for 7075-T6. Simply put, a 7075-T6 frame should be lighter than an AE81 frame that is the exact same strength. Carbon blows both out of the water in terms of strength to weight though.

Take that marketing BS elsewhere.
  • 4 0
 @taquitos:

Seems like marketing trick mostly, but I think it would be correct to compare 7075-T6 to the ZE62 alloy which has similar properties(can't weld, good for forging & machining), and AE81 should be compared to 6061(can be welded) which share similar properties...

Otherwise the comparison is technically same as if you compare 6061 with 7075...
  • 4 0
 This new magnesium is said to have 20 times the shock absorption of whatever aluminum they are comparing against. That's pretty rad. We forget that while yes carbon is lighter, it is also more damp than aluminum which results in a more forgiving ride quality. Even on a long travel bike this is noticeable. If we can get a carbon-like ride quality out of this magnesium and be lighter than aluminum, cheaper than carbon, and be recyclable, then this sounds rather interesting.
  • 1 0
 @taquitos: True but how many bike frames are made of 7075 T6 ? Apart from the Pole that uses it and yet has to provide final weights, nobody uses that so it would still be interesting as it would be better tan any 6061.
  • 2 1
 What you do can't take getting slapped in the face with a little engineering?

@Balgaroth: the last aluminum dj bike I had was 7075. Doesn't matter how many there are though because we talking about using exotic alloys with bike frames.

@Vertti83: you can weld 7075. You can't weld ZE62. Last I checked you can't forge a bike frame... And we're taking about fancy alloys here. No use in comparing 6061 from that point of view either.

I have a bone to pick with their shock absorption claim too. How a frame deals with vibrations is largely driven by the cross section of the tubes they use. Steal frames feel very damp because they use tubes with a smaller OD since it's so much stronger and doesn't fatigue. Magnesium would necessitate larger tube ODs and that would negate the damping properties the material might have.
  • 1 0
 One slight revision to that. Steel does fatigue, but it has an endurance limit so you can design stuff to not fatigue by being above that limit.
  • 1 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: They own the material, they know enough about the material to have a good idea how much it would take to make a worthy frame. That is in the research of the viability of any given product, and fairly accurate estimates of what these parts or frames would weigh. If the weight loss was significant, they would not pass on the opportunity to brag about it (rather than brag about it's puck weight). Regardless of, or for each of the alloys used.
@Bluefire nailed it "aluminum foil-wrapped styrofoam" makes for a light puck, but is not related to functional use of the material and how much of it that would be needed.
There's a frame right there in their hot little hands, weigh it and report the findings in the article, that it how I expect them to give a frame weight. No disrespect @TheOriginalTwoTone, but why do you suggest that it would be difficult or inaccurate to weigh that frame? and thanks for your sage advice, but reading it slower didn't clarify anything, it just stole some of my precious time Smile
  • 1 0
 @bradg8: What the hell would be the point of giving a weight comparison if they aren't the manufacturer.

Are you thinking this through? I can see it now. Our fictitious frame with our material ways X compared to Specialized Frame ______.

See how worthless that is?
  • 1 0
 @taquitos:

Well, technically, you CAN weld 7075 ...but the weld joint will not last very well(high probability of failure due to micro craking). I assume that the reasons behind ZE62 being "unweldable" are somewhat similar. If you search with google, all articles state that welding 7075 is a bad idea(like this one from ESAB, maker of welding machines). If it would be weldable(without some crazy expensive methods), I believe there would be some info about it commonly available.

If you have some better insight on welding 7075 successfully, would be nice to have some source for that. I'm happy to change my opinion, if some reliable evidence is provided.

I doubt that your DJ frame was 7075, more likely 7005(which is weldable)...
  • 1 0
 @Vertti83: Okay I'll admit I was maybe a little worked up about the metal pucks marketing crap this morning and stretched how weldable 7075 is haha. It can be welded, but it's a little sketchy. My frame was actually 7075 unless they lied about that. I distinctly remember seeing it labeled 7075 and thinking it was odd. That was back in the day when frames were way over built so stresses were relatively low.
  • 1 0
 @taquitos: what frame was it? Maybe they get the stickers printed up wrong?
  • 1 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: I am glad that you are stoked on the article and feel that it was excellent reporting. I just disagree and am moving on.. Good luck.
  • 1 0
 @BuddyBuddy: 6061-T6 has a TYS of 271Mpa so AE81 is 12% lower TYS. (ASM standards sheet) or Matweb will shine light on this. Sadly Pinkbike echo's what promotional guys say far too often. The biggest issue I find with this is that sticking to the truth these alloys are quite interesting for a variety of reasons, once you slip a lie or exaggeration in here or there truth dies and credibility with it.
I know these three alloy well, and they are well suited to the task provided the maker can process these materials with far higher controls than 6061.
  • 1 0
 @taquitos: 6061-T6 offers 12% elongation, while the AE81 stated elongation is 15% so I can say this is not brittle if it is true. Additionally, many magnesium alloys have been thought to be brittle but this is far from the truth, most have higher ductility than most aluminum alloys. 7075-T6 is 11% so it is lower than 6061-T6 but far lower than claimed elongation of AE81.
  • 1 0
 @ka-brap: I am unsure how they calculate 20x higher as most scientific papers do not have aluminum containing magnesium alloys as more than about 3-4 times higher damping. But this being said it is true magnesium is a superb material from a comfort standpoint.
  • 1 0
 @taquitos: ZE62 is weldable, equally as weldable as 7075, both need special care to manage the shrinkage and hot tears. Damping quite right this is small but noticeable difference but requires specific considerations in frame design.
  • 1 0
 @taquitos: What brand was the frame, some 7075 frames existed, but none that were welded. Some may have been sold as 7075.
  • 12 0
 Aren’t our fork lowers made from magnesium?
  • 5 0
 Ah the usual 'experts' are all here to explain how they all know better than the people who actually make the stuff because they had a magnesium bike aeons ago made from a completely different form of magnesium and it wasn't good so this must suck too.
  • 2 0
 I saw a mag wheel crack in a desert race 15 years ago, obviously it's a junk material.
  • 4 0
 Anyon getting flashbacks to Mag Alloy xc bikes circa 2002-ish? They were uh, exciting to ride, yeah, real cracking bikes. You Pinkbike fellas have to get one on test, see if it's finally time to give Mag frames a second chance.
  • 2 0
 Is the "Cracking" A pun?
  • 1 0
 Yup, I had a Saracen Kili Flyer...
It cracked at BB/Chain stay.
  • 1 0
 @gilesF: It certainly was.
  • 5 1
 Sparklers are made from iron filings.
The big question or questions:
How easy is it to weld.
Can Al. Tig welders learn how to weld these tubes ?
Can you heat treat the material?
How about some actual tensile strength numbers?
What is this stuff actually called other than a magnesium alloy because this isn't something new.
  • 1 0
 You're telling me I got jipped on my sparklers?!?
  • 4 0
 My only concern with magnesium alloys would be fatigue, as that was a big issue with magnesium part in motorsports 20 yrs ago.. however, it they have addressed that issue with this material... I think its a great idea.

Although i would be worried whether the people out there making the frames are capable of welding such a material and whether or not it is welded to such a spec that controls the heat inputs, etc and whether or not it can be heat treated afterwards. I have worked with alloys with high molly contents and are very susceptible to heat inputs, to the point where they can crack themselves with no external forces required.

Part of the reason that Orange bikes last for so long, despite the horrible welds is that the whole frame is then correctly heat treated, resetting the crystalline structure of the alloy and removing any in-built stresses due to the welds.

as for corrosion, I wouldnt be too worried as magnesium (like aluminium) oxidizes so fast, that it creates a ceramic coating that effectively protects the parent material.
  • 1 0
 Magnesium oxide is soft and non adherent, and offers very little protection. Some magnesium alloys have endurance strengths higher than most aluminium (the exception being AL6069 which is the best). Most of these mag alloys do not respond to heat treatment like complex aluminium alloys (strength can increase 4-6x) with magnesium you might get a 10% bump at the expense of ductility.
  • 1 0
 @rimbro: more heat treatment in terms of removing stresses caused by the weld than trying to temper the material...
  • 6 1
 Depleted uranium is also a military grade metal but doesn't mean its any good for bike frames that weigh less than 80kg, I hate that line of reasoning without any backing
  • 2 0
 that shit is SUPER heavy though
  • 1 0
 @TylerG96: Exactly. Uranium is a very dense metal.
  • 1 0
 None of this stuff is military grade.
  • 6 1
 Judging by the pic it must be difficult to weld. Not the prettiest beads I’ve ever seen by a long shot, especially for marketing purposes ...
  • 2 0
 It is. I visited the Segal factory a few years ago that made magnesium frames (they make aluminium and magnesium bits for heavy industry, but set up a small workshop for bikes). Very... industrial-looking bikes. Personally I'm fond of #weldporn but Magnesium isn't it - not like titanium or even quality aluminium. They still make fixed-gear track/city bikes for a local shop called MiddlEasta:

www.gordon-bennett.co.il/middleasta

It's tough to weld and a pretty big fire hazard. The factory walls were literally lined with extinguishers, and any leftover dust had to be constantly vacuumed.

(by the way, the bikes were roughly the same weight as aluminium in those days)
  • 1 0
 @tessar: Welding Mag is not more difficult than aluminium and presents no greater risk. Cutting it can be risky. Tigwelding was invented for magnesium (not aluminum). Some welders get quite adept at welding mag. check these out.
drive.google.com/file/d/1ysJkJiVrmV74KHGBNogDRFDwCoigWLBT/view?usp=sharing
drive.google.com/file/d/11SwBK-AI2PowhNR3DYNHxdG5mjK52cJ3/view?usp=sharing
  • 7 0
 "but still less expensive than carbon"
Bike industry: "Hold my +beer"
  • 2 0
 Interesting article as an opener but it would be good to get more info on specific use cases to illustrate how it is used today and what loading/environments it can survive.

Perhaps even an interview could be made with a company planning to use it in a frame to understand design drivers and what factors have been considered.
  • 5 0
 how readily will it explode/combust?
  • 1 0
 @loganskis: see vids in link below....it doesn't explode, but trying to put out burning magnesium with water only makes things worse, as water is two parts oxygenWink

www.youtube.com/results?search_query=burning+VW+magnesium+engine+cases
  • 1 0
 Well,for me the question is easy,how Fox and other brands would use this to make lighter forks?Cos all people is talking shit about mag but many bikes trust in Mg parts today. I din´t saw in my life a broken fox lowers made from Mg but I put a hole in an old RS Boxxer wc (alloy lowers) with a stone. My first photo upload in Pinkbike was that broken forks. it was repaired and I sold the bike and the guy never ever knows what happened there. If the people still buying Mg frames today, I think this new alloy would sell more frames.
  • 2 1
 It's cute having the weights of three identical sized pucks of steel, aluminum (pure?) and "super magnesium", would also be nice to see carbon and one of the more commonly used titanium alloys (for bike frames)
  • 10 0
 not a good real world test as it only provides densities without their strength
  • 1 0
 @vtracer: but marketing
  • 3 1
 @Bluefire 's aluminum foil-wrapped styrofoam frames sound cool, gonna get me one of them!
  • 1 0
 @onemind123 The aluminum puck is labeled 6061
  • 1 0
 Owned a shop once back in the day (2000?), and I got a free magnesium frame from some forgotten company trying to promote their product and gave it to a XC racer to try. It broke. Quicker than Al.
  • 2 0
 Probably 14% silicon carbide in a metal matrix.
Specialized has a similar tubeset using aluminum.
Secrets out now.
  • 1 0
 No SiC in this stuff it is small amounts of yttrium and aluminum.
  • 4 1
 So what would happen if I lit the bike on fire. A bike show!!
  • 2 0
 Humm, maybe Pole bicycles should try this. Maybe it’s already in their plans?
  • 1 0
 The most AMAZING thing (that wasn't mentioned) is the epic fire you can have once this frame has lived out its useful life! Mag fires are awesome Big Grin
  • 1 0
 Still running my 2010 Scandium Kona with Magnesium rocker and linkage and Magnesium fork lowers. Frame weight with two shocks and headset was 3.5 kg for a 160mm travel bike.
  • 1 0
 What would a Pole Machine cost if you machined it out of SMA (super mag alloy). Magnesium is also flammable, crashing in a rock garden might be an issue?
  • 1 0
 As an avid hard tail fan, anything that can improve the performance of a hard tail is a bonus for me. Hopefully the vibration damping characteristics are good.
  • 2 0
 Wonder how it will handle a crash?
  • 2 0
 Merida's 90s era Magnesium frames had a very short life
  • 2 0
 But what I want to know is can you light it on fire?
  • 2 0
 That frame will make a great sparkler at the next 4th of July. !!!!!
  • 2 0
 Forged cranks. That is all.
  • 1 0
 No word of the environmental impact. Sure it's recyclable, but at what cost ? This has to be considered.
  • 2 0
 "I'm buying anything with super in the name"
  • 1 0
 Trvia question...Marzocchi's BAM stood for????

Beyond Aerospace Material
  • 5 0
 Actually, I think it was "Bomber Aerospace Material"
  • 1 0
 Ah memories of the Kirk Precision circa 1989 Smile
  • 1 0
 Glad someone mentioned those. I wanted one of those so much. Most industrial-looking frame ever. Looked like it came from a Donkey Kong screen shot.

EDIT: Just had a quick google for images - yep, it still looks badass. Give it modern geometry (and performance) and I'm there.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: untill it cracks
  • 1 0
 Anyone remember Lodestar? Someone should do an article on that debacle.
  • 2 0
 is that you mike pence?
  • 1 1
 Mmm... all the magnesium frames done in the past had cracking issues. However i have seen magnesium stems lasting decades.
  • 1 2
 Magnesium should only be used as fork lowers. You would need to make a frame with very thick walls to make it quite robust. Lighter isn’t always better
  • 1 0
 Its magnesium. It will burn a pretty bright white light.
  • 1 0
 magnesium oxide
  • 1 0
 Just waiting for a frame made out of graphene.
  • 1 0
 Hagan Titanal ftw (yes that was the actual -cracking- name)
  • 1 0
 Remember the beryllium frame not that long ago? Only cost 25,000.00 !!
  • 1 0
 So....no mention of how this compares to titanium at all? Fail.
  • 1 0
 SWEET ! you first ....
  • 1 0
 I like aluminium
  • 3 4
 It can be recycled. Better than Ocean fill
  • 3 5
 Mag is super corrosive so......umm
  • 1 0
 Prob powder coat / paint it
  • 18 0
 So is Iron. But when you add alloying elements like chromium, it becomes stainless steel....
  • 13 0
 This is addressed in the article: "(super) Magnesium is as corrosion resistant as aluminum, due to the addition of rare earth elements and the purity of the magnesium."

And of course you know that mag is not corrosive, it does not cause other substances to corrode. It is easily corroded, mainly by oxidation
  • 3 0
 @pasales: Yeah, I wonder if it will oxidize easily if you live in a coastal zone, or if you don't see sweat droplets on the frame. My sweat is so salty it has galled zippers on my hydration pack shut!
  • 1 0
 @atrokz: shhhhh. Facknit my next project is that metal yup heavy but bombproof
  • 1 0
 I use 99.99% pure Mg all the time (for science!) and it oxidizes like crazy.

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