Ancillotti Scarab Evo Prototype

Jan 31, 2017
by Paul Aston  
Ancillotti Scarab Prototype


Ancillotti is a small brand steeped in racing history that goes all the way back to the beginning of the 20th century when the family became acquainted with early motorcycles. A huge chronicle of racing and tweaking motorized two-wheelers culminated in many wins and world records.

Fast forward to 1980 and Alberto Ancillotti invented the 'Pull Shock' linkage that's now found on nearly every single motocross bike of the last four decades. After a spell of building motos and around the time of the incoming Japanese invasion, mountain biking was growing. Alberto's young son, Tomaso, wanted a mountain bike as they were fast becoming the latest must-have.

After crafting various bikes, including the claimed first full carbon downhill mountain bike in the world, Tomaso took the lead of the company, and in 2009 they earned the rainbow stripes thanks to the success of Brook MacDonald's Junior World Championship win in Canberra. Read more about their story here.
Ancillotti Scarab Prototype
Ancillotti motocross bike circa 1980, and a mini-shredder Pull Shock machine for the newest addition to the family's lineage.

Alberto, now seventy years old, still cuts and jigs the frames in Florence, Italy, before a welder puts them together. The other half of the company has moved to Ivrea, and their local test track is now the infamous Pila course. Tomaso, in his modest workshop, designs, assembles and finishes the bikes, as well as builds their own shocks.

The small company has no grandiose plans for making it to the big time, content with crafting around fifty frames per year and supporting small race teams. Their focus lies in building some of what I believe are the most beautiful high-performance frames in the world, in true Italian style.


Ancillotti Scarab Prototype


This latest incarnation, the new Scarab Evo, takes its name from the open-winged beetle on their emblem and was the name gifted to their earliest motorcycle. It has been on downhill bikes of past but is now found on this all-mountain chassis. The DHY downhill bike is still available, and the long-travel 180mm Enduro FRY race destroyer is also still in the lineup.

Scarab Evo Details

• Intended use: enduro / all-mountain
• Wheel size: 27.5" or 29"
• Rear wheel travel: 160mm
• Custom geometry, linkage and shock
• Adjustable geometry
• Handmade to order
• MSRP: €2900 frame only
www.ancillotti.com
Frame Details and Geometry

The geometry is customized and decided by the consumer and Tomaso together, and prospective buyers are invited to visit Ancillotti so they can try out various demo bikes and sizes as needed to help make a decision. Every single bike is made to order, however, and most numbers can be tweaked, along with the linkage ratios and shock tune.


Ancillotti Scarab Prototype
The open-winged Scarab beetle adorns the head tube of all of Ancillotti's bikes

Ancillotti Scarab Prototype
Ancillotti Scarab Prototype


The frames are spectacular in the flesh, with a highly polished raw alloy finish, swooping tubes and machined and turned junctions. Every Ancillotti will be slightly different as there are no standard tubes or off-the-shelf shapes.

The frame pictured here is a benchmark large size. The seat angle is around 75-degrees, the reach measurement is around 460mm, and it has a 435mm chainstay length and a 1215mm wheelbase.


Ancillotti Scarab Prototype


While Ancillotti's other bikes see the shock positioned behind the bottom bracket shell, the new Scarab Evo has its shock moved forward to sit in front of the bottom bracket. This update has been done to allow the bike's chainstay length to stay within size range when using 29'' wheels.


Ancillotti Scarab Prototype
Ancillotti Scarab Prototype
Unbolt the front part of the linkage and then rotate it to let the threaded tube fine-tune your geometry and balance.

This particular prototype's head angle can be adjusted between 65 and 63.5-degrees, which also changes the bottom bracket height between 350 and 335mm. The linkage is very similar to the adjuster found on their early motocross bikes, and riders have close to infinite adjustment through the given range.



Why a Pull Shock?

First, we should clear something up. Ancillotti using the phrase ''Pull Shock'' may confuse some, especially given that the bike compresses its shock as per normal and that there have been previous designs, like one iteration of the older Yeti/Schwinn Lawwill bike, which have used a pull shock. What Ancillotti is actually referring to is how a section of their linkage pulls on the rocker link that activates the shock. Yes, it is pulling, but the shock itself is being compressed. In other words, Ancillotti's design uses a conventional shock, but it is the swingarm that pulls the linkage to drive the shock.


Ancillotti Scarab Prototype


Ancillotti states two claimed benefits about their design: the linkage's geometry can be easily tweaked to change travel or rates, and the linkage will tend to stay in a straight and true line through the travel. Any system that is being pushed towards the shock will be trying to move laterally due to the forces from the rear wheel, which will rarely be in a perfectly straight line with the frame.

Tomaso isn't a fan of current air-sprung suspension, with him believing that air is great for the masses and for bikes that need easy setup or balance, but not for true on-the-trail performance. He also agrees they can save weight but denies this could be a benefit over the loss of performance and grip.

Each Ancillotti coil-sprung shock is handmade and tuned to suit the rider and bike. If you're not happy with it, re-tuning of the shock is included for life. The shock also has basic external rebound adjustment and a low-speed compression lever to firm the damping for climbing.


Ancillotti Scarab Prototype
All Ancillotti shocks are handmade to suit each bike and rider.


For riders who are desperate to change the damper to their preferred shock, the Scarab does leave space for most available shocks. Ancillotti's other bikes have aways needed their own shock with the reversed piggy-back for clearance.


Ancillotti Scarab Prototype
Tomaso is a real tuner and tinkerer; he lightly machined the outside of this coil spring down to reduce its rate ever so slightly.



162 Comments

  • 64 4
 I like it. Unfortunately if I owed one my OCD, would cause me to spend too much time worrying about finger prints and buffing it rather than actually riding the thing. lol
  • 337 8
 I hope your OCD does not see the commas you use in your sentences or you, might get a stroke.
  • 84 4
 @jts-nemo: L, OL
  • 18 30
flag fercho25 (Feb 1, 2017 at 5:54) (Below Threshold)
 you like any human being find patterns and neatly organized things pleasing. Us folks with actually diagnosed obsessive disorders do not enjoy people thinking OCD is some kind of cool shit.
  • 8 1
 @fercho25: I feel ya but try to look at it as ignorance. Ignorance is bliss, they're just trying to have fun. Embrace it. I have TBI (traumatic brain injury), sometimes I'll mess with people who know nothing more about me than TBI and I'll bark like a dog or talk in accents, just to fu*k with 'em when I meet them for the first time. I wish everyday that I was an ignorant dumb-ass, but it is very interesting coming back from the dead to this place humans know as their world. They say when I was in n out of my coma that I was claiming to be a married man. When they'd ask where I was, they say I was naming various places throughout Europe. I don't remember anything like that. I barely feel attached to the memories supposedly of this life.
  • 7 4
 I also had a stroke secondary to a dissected internal carotid artery in the same accident, fractured T5, Maxilla. I saw the other comment up there ignorantly mentioning stroke with all the up-votes, but it's all good. Can't blame an ignorant dumb-ass for being an ignorant dumb-ass.
  • 8 1
 @wildwood: man I've had loads of stuff over the years, covered head to toe in burns and have a hand that looks like a claw from it. When "dumb ass" people make "jokes" do you know what I do. Laugh with them. Who cares mate! You're lucky to still be above ground, why be so miserable. Also the "dumb asses" you see are just people that just haven't yet had the chance to be educated. So use the opportunity to speak to them about it. Maybe make new friends in the process. You calling them thick is no better than you not trying to assist them.
  • 5 1
 @jts-nemo: Well looks like we have a commaedian....
lol
  • 13 0
 @fercho25: Fellow diagnosed here. I would much prefer people think it cool than uncool. Perhaps you try thinking of it as a superpower instead of a disability. For example, OCD makes me very good at my job (data) and therefore I can afford a new carbon wonderbike every year. That's totally worth the embarrassment my wife has to suffer as I straighten pictures and doormats in restaurants.
  • 3 0
 @wildwood plz post sth else bout it, in love with your posts
  • 2 4
 @cunning-linguist: You have obviously missed my point and apparently are ignorant to the meaning of the word. I pretty much said I do what you're saying I should do. Take care. I was trying to tell that guy not to care about it. I don't owe anyone any help. You really think you would have your life essentially taken from you and feel lucky? Please. People telling someone in dire straits they are "lucky" is the biggest crock of bs for people like me to hear. Having died doing what I love, then I would have been lucky.

www.brainline.org
  • 2 2
 @wildwood: keep on the Prozac then mate...
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: Very enlightened way to go about it. Cheers, mate!
  • 36 2
 Nice that we still get to see aluminum hyper bikes. Always have been fond of the machine work. Carbon's great and I love the organic nature of it, but holy hell raw aluminum has some appeal.
  • 32 12
 That beast is far from ugly. I love the high polish and the flowy lines of the tubing as well as the apparent low center of gravity. I have a hard time coping with the "approximate" geometry though. If these bikes aren't custom, why are the frame jigs not set for exact geometry? Imagine cracking your front triangle and having your bike ride differently after replacement. Whaaaa?
  • 14 1
 Seriously one of the sleekest sexiest bike I've seen in a long time! Saw pictures on Instagram a few weeks back and have been waiting to see this again with some info! Will they be avalible in the United states?
  • 6 18
flag chyu (Jan 31, 2017 at 22:03) (Below Threshold)
 Looks like an evil.
  • 15 0
 @chyu: Considering the Ancillotti design predates the Evil by six years, I'd say it was the other way around.
  • 4 8
flag Sontator (Feb 1, 2017 at 0:59) (Below Threshold)
 Looks like an alu Evil, seriously. Linkage, pivot swingarm, seat tube. Not about who was first, more like convergent solutions.
  • 16 0
 i'm not sure where you got the bikes aren't custom from, it specifically says each one is built to the customer so you choose your geometry that's why each one isn't the same. i'm sure if you needed a replacement they would set it up to give you the same geometry again, or you might even want a change or update to your geometry anyway.
  • 2 0
 This bikes COG is just... perfect. Doesn't remember anything with a similar shock position, maybe DeVinci and Antidote, but not in this kind of bike-, i mean not supaenduro, but a downhill bike.
  • 2 0
 @dzenyy: all the recent evils
  • 19 1
 Beautiful bike. Very intrigued to hear more about the shock and some on the trail performance.
  • 21 3
 "...the reach around 460mm..." For that cost I'm glad they throw in a decent reach around.
  • 7 1
 The author probably lost a bet, and had to figure a way to work "reach around" into his text.
  • 3 2
 You can customize geometry as you prefer
  • 18 3
 People keep saying it looks like a 90s bike or the looks of the frame are ugly. Read the title. It says prototype. A company doesnt go drop a ton of money for a paint job to be put on a prototype.
  • 19 24
flag naptime (Jan 31, 2017 at 18:47) (Below Threshold)
 I would hope that's a prototype, those welds look shady
  • 12 1
 i kinda like that it looks straight outta the 90s. mainly because i'm old, but that robo-bike look with the GT/mongoose style decals from back in the day are legit.
  • 7 5
 @nojzilla: That is a new welding style. It is called blobtastic.
  • 9 1
 Nothing wrong with the 90s look at all. Reminds me of the GT Zaskar LEs and Mountain Cycle San Andreas I used to drool over and makes me want to find my Oakley RazorBlades.
  • 2 1
 @nojzilla: you know nothing nojzilla snow
  • 4 6
 @Fattylocks: at work we call it bird shit!
  • 3 2
 @nojzilla: they are beautiful compared to the welds on the orange stage 6!!!
  • 3 0
 Ancillotti bikes are usually raw/polished/chrome anyway.
  • 4 1
 @nojzilla: based on....nothing?
  • 1 4
 @benjiancillotti: how aboot the bottom photo in this article, with the missing weld? fine for a prototype but i would'nt buy a bike with welds missing
for a start
  • 4 1
 @nojzilla: Where's the missing weld?
  • 2 2
 @nojzilla: first thing I saw. I hope that's because it's a proto!
  • 5 1
 @nojzilla:


I can't spot any missing welds. I'm no engineer, but gussets should never be welded on all sides, this causes too much stress build up in a certain area and causes cracks, leaving an open side allow some movement. The top seat tube gusset is an example.
  • 1 4
 @paulaston: wrong photo
  • 3 0
 @nojzilla: Is'not a weld missing !it is apposite and denote a big esperience on frame building ,Ancillotti early in motorcycles and after in mtb has a half century !,the gusset must held the tube byside not all around, to prevent crack
  • 2 0
 @paulaston: a graduate engineer could not explain it better than you!
  • 2 3
 @gualtiero46: a graduate engineer would be looking at the right photo
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla: bottom of the seat tube, the welds are only on the sides.
  • 2 0
 @sandwich: ep1.pinkbike.org/p6pb14358809/p5pb14358809.jpg

Zoom in, you can see the weld bead along the front side.
  • 13 0
 I don't understand the hate for single pivot designs.. If they're so bad, why do majority of motocross bikes still use them to this day? If I'm going to buy a new bike in the future, it'll likely be one from these guys as I've been dying to find a bike with a suspension feel as nice as my KDX (this has an almost identical linkage). People need to stop hating on stuff just because something is different than what they're used to, the only way to possibly move forward is to be accepting of things you may not like.
  • 26 3
 Because you don't pedal a motocross bike. The main reason that other suspension designs have been used is that they are trying to find better compromise when pedalling forces are incorporated Into a bike.
  • 4 1
 @ratedgg13: what you said. Generally we want bike rear suspension to stiffen to prevent bobbing. Motorcycles want the suspension fully active under power since that's pretty much all they're doing.
  • 2 0
 I didn't see any hate here for single pivot designs. Especially single pivot designs with a linkage driven shock as what we have here is quite common and popular. Also on the race circuit. Apparently pedal efficiency is on par with a linkage with a floating rear axle. And of course nowadays excessive suspension movement is kept at bay using platform shocks.
  • 4 1
 @krisrayner: This design will stiffen under power, just like any design with the main pivot above the chainline.
The main selling point for four bar design á la FSR have been Specialized's exaggerated claims about how we will all die from brake jack on single pivots. Just ask the guys at Guerilla Gravity who will openly admit that they only added a horst link to their bikes because the consumers thinks it makes a huge difference even though the actual change in performance is minuscule.
  • 4 1
 @ratedgg13: First: suspension must work and single pivot is the best to do it! after the pedaling efficency depend from much other parameters of the project , swing arm pivot height,frame and swing arm rigidy,work angle, lenght,ecc, sagrify the suspension efficency for pedaling is an 90 years, philosophy
  • 2 1
 @gualtiero46: I think Santa Cruz, Intense, Giant, Pivot, Yeti and quite a few more companies would argue with you on your "single pivot theory" lol
  • 3 0
 @mhoshal: you'd be wrong, at least with Santa Cruz: www.santacruzbicycles.com/en-US/news/344

You forget they were one of the biggest champions of single pivot for a very long time. Lack of sales (& older single pivots from many brands that were indeed terrible coloring people's perception) probably killed off their single pivot bikes far more than the advantages of VPP.

At the end of the day, a lot of the advantages of pivot linkages disappear when you can tune the pivot placement to one chainring instead of 2 or three. Devinci, Salsa, Evil, Kona, are all making single pivot bikes, & they all ride great.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter: Its true! Most of all modern "new entry" dh frames are single pivot, De Vinci have also a Pull Shock suspension system! Motorcycles esperience "docet",not one other system tan this :single pivot& pull suspension system!
  • 1 0
 @gualtiero46: Nah, I wouldn't say that. Most of these German brands like their linkages with a "floating" rear wheel axle. But both systems are there and both are doing well on the circuit. Yes Gwin has been winning the WC series on bikes with a floating rear axle, but Rachel Atherton did so on a bike with a circular axle path.
  • 1 1
 @groghunter: I understand that single pivot bikes ride great but from what you're saying single pivot is the only way to go which is completely false I stopped riding single pivot bikes after my rmx because the brake jack was too noticeable through steep rooty terrain. Switched to meastro and haven't looked back. My point here is that we all have a personal preference. I'm not gonna come on here saying dw, meastro or vpp are the best applications for the job. Use whatever you like and everyone else will use what they enjoy!!!
  • 1 0
 @mhoshal: First, I never even remotely suggested that single pivot is the only way to go. My own personal bike history has more horst-link & VPP designs than anything else.

Second, you don't know what you're talking about. brake jack isn't due to linkage type, it's due to anti-rise & anti-squat characteristics. Which are tunable with main pivot placement & a simple control link(meaning, a link that affects the way leverage is applied to the shock, rather than one that changes wheel path. Which is the point SC's designer is making with the quip "axle path don't matter no mo.")

Go watch some of @Andrextr 's videos on youtube. He explains what's happening in great detail.
  • 5 0
 @groghunter: Hello! Smile I didn't read all the discussion, but I will make a future video about the myths of single pivot bikes Smile All I can say for now is that single pivot bikes can pedal very well when the main pivot is placed correctly (just on top of chainring). Disadvantage of pure singlepivot bikes is that you don't have much room to create a progressive suspension (usually the best you can get is a slightly progressive one). With a linkage in the shock you can easily tune the leverage rate / progressivity. EVIL bikes, or Scott bikes are examples of singlepivot bikes with shock linkage. Typically in all these cases the anti-rise is higher than in most horst-link designs, because on horst-link you can get a lower virtual pivot (instant center) position, thus the brake caliper rotates less around the disc during suspension travel. This is specially true on bikes like Rocky Mountain Slayer or Transition Patrol, where the rocker link pivots are almost parallel to the chainstay. Bye
  • 1 0
 @andrextr: thanks. Could you explain more your last comments regarding anti squat and and rise for SP and Horst 4 bar, DW parallel links. Also how does LR and progression affect brake jack/ pedal feedback. Sincerely, Mark
  • 1 1
 @groghunter: brake Jack has everything to do with suspension design. A low set single pivot basically locks up the back end when braking. I know the high pivot singles have alot less brake jack but its still worse then Vpp meastro and dw that all have a straighter axle path which is really what it all comes down to the staighter the axle path the more lively the suspension will be because the wheel doesn't have to rotate for the suspension to stay active.
  • 2 0
 Geez, talk about beating a dead horse
  • 15 0
 That the resemblance to the Nico-era Sunn has not been mentioned yet is sad.
  • 2 0
 Yes, the system is the same but Ancillotti patended the Pull Shock im 1980!!! and Sunn swing arm pivot was different ridicolous height!,
  • 14 0
 Damn, that linkage adjustment is clever. Wonder if it works as well in practice as in theory.
  • 2 1
 It's basically a rod end with a jam nut,used widely in industrial applications.Can't see any issues with it.
  • 1 4
 its very similar to the devinci DH bike
  • 1 0
 @rideonjon: Just meant that I wonder whether the "infinite" range of geometry adjustment will be as useful in practice as it sounds. Most bikes have fixed geometry adjustment settings which makes flipping between a few preferred settings relatively simple. The user always knows the geometry achieved by each setting and can consistently switch between them depending on preference, trail, etc...

That consistency might be difficult to achieve if the geometry is "infinitely" adjusted by twisting the linkage. The user could be left asking, 'how many twists did I do the last time I rode this trail?'

It's a cool idea to allow infinite fine tuning of geometry but I wonder whether it's worth losing the certainty that fixed geometry settings provide.
  • 2 0
 @rideonjon is correct. the rod end concept is also used in every car on the planet that utilizes a rack and pinion style steering system.
  • 2 0
 @R-P-S: All you would need to do is measure how much of the shaft is exposed to figure out your base setting.

I'd expect that they will give you tips on different settings when you buy the bike too, or would at least be able to advise you if you contacted them.
  • 1 0
 @dingus: Ya true. Maybe they could employ an audible click to help count rotations like a rebound or compression knob does. Ex. 1 click for each half degree of head angle change.
  • 14 0
 I love that ancilloti are still making bikes. What a machine this is.
  • 12 2
 Much want. Very bike. Wow.
  • 6 0
 It's an older meme Sir, but it checks out.
  • 6 1
 I love Ancillotti, great to see a new bike from them!

@paulaston: You must meet some great photographers, please try to get some feedback on your work. I'm not saying it is bad, but when photographing a bike you must kind of treat it like portait photography. I've got two pointers for you which may help you improve.

1. Don't shoot wide angle. Focal length for this picture is 18mm, same with that ARBR. It makes the picture look deformed and I attribute much of the hate (in the comments sections) that went towards that ARBR to the way that picture was taken. Compare it to the work of your colleagues. Most of those pictures were shot with a focal length of around 50mm, which (for the full frame cameras these professional photographers use) gives a picture similar to the way we see things. The Intense bike here was shot at 100mm, makes it even flatter. Good as well. You may not have a full frame camera body so you may rather dial the focal length to 35mm or so. Your lens allows for that, use it.

2. Shoot at (rear) axle height. Due to perspective, there are always components going appear misaligned. A larger focal length (and as a consequence a larger distance to still see the complete bike) as mentioned in point 1 is going to help, but still. Worst thing to have misaligned for a bike is the wheel. It must appear round and the hub, cassette, rotor and rim have to be aligned. This went wrong with that ARBR bike as well as with this Ancillotti. Again, look at how other bikes are shot for catalogs, press releases etc when they're shot straight from the side.

Other than that, I think your work is great Smile .
  • 1 1
 What if there was no room to move further back? What if @paulaston only brought a 11-18mm lens. I think the pictures are better than 99% of the bike pictures shown in the photo section of PB. Yes, ideally you shoot with 50 or 100mm, but do you know the circumstances?
  • 1 0
 @zonoskar:
"What if there was no room to move further back?"
I think it is up to the photographer to decide on the setting and gear where and how to take a product photo. Indeed if he can't move further back, this is what you end up with. Then you decide, do you really want to take the product photo here.


"What if @paulaston only brought a 11-18mm lens."
If you click the picture, you can see the metadata in the right column. It says he used a 18-55mm lens and that he set it to 18mm. So I'll go with that. I don't know all these camera types by heart so I don't know if he has used a full frame SLR or the consumer grade gear. 18-55 is typically the kit lens for consumer grade gear so he could aim for 35mm. If it was a full frame SLR he could try the 50mm region.

"I think the pictures are better than 99% of the bike pictures shown in the photo section of PB. Yes, ideally you shoot with 50 or 100mm, but do you know the circumstances?"
I don't know much more than what I see on this page. A while ago Paul published an article on a new bike by ARBR. He was impressed and thought it looked and worked great. The article received loads of negative (and not quite constructive) comments. I didn't comment there. It upset Paul so much that he dedicated another article to it. Again loads of negative comments. And as I mentioned here, I attibute part of the negativity on the deformation in the picture. So I wrote some constructive criticism in the comment section there, similar to what I wrote here. He may not have read it back then, so that's why I put it here again. I thought he'd care. See, I'm no pro either so I welcome anyone to chime in.
  • 4 0
 I hope they are as good as their old DH bikes. I had a couple back in the day. Loads of grip and feel. Weight down low so even like me if you are not great in the air you will land rubber side down. No cracks or linkage issue. the shock are reall great and did not need service for a couple of seasons. very nice. Check it out: www.pinkbike.com/photo/1353131
  • 4 0
 Lots of professional engineers/fabricators on this site hating on the unfinished appearance of a prototype... this bike is a test mule, not a showroom piece. That car you drive? It started out as a hunk of clay, and the first couple versions had hideous mashups of other makes & models gear just to function. That's how it works. These guys probably knocked this frameset out on a Friday after some Lemoncello and it still looks 90% amazing.

By the way, if you have any experience with Italian anything they build from passion and not cold efficiency. Italian machines have personality and charm and usually some quirks that you come to love instead of disdain because the entire package is just so cool. I could've had a Honda that runs forever with no issues but got a Ducati instead, I'd rather grin like a maniac for short bursts than yawn over a lifetime.
  • 3 0
 One hell of a good looking machine, I would get new decals cut for sure. Polish and black=timeless. Memories of my childhood when chrome was the preferred choice, still is if you ask me. Wink
  • 2 0
 One of the most beautiful bikes i've seen.
Low COG, nice linkage (however i prefer four-bar systems, but this is really cool), made to suit a person, not masses, just.. a beautiful aluminium tubes, crafted to make a bike, that suits a Person. It's not common nowadays. Dunno 'bout their shock, but I'm impressed.
Ability to fine tune geo in incremental, low as possible, stages is awesome, and should be common. Just pure genius (dunno 'bout reliability, but it shouldn't be a problem in this particular case).
Not less, than with this 16'(?) high-pivot-whatthafck-awesome-linkage bike,
  • 5 0
 A shorter travel 4X/DJ/Slopestyle version would be sweet too IMO.
  • 5 0
 This bike def deserves a proper ht badge!
  • 5 0
 The 'mini shedder' is sic too...
  • 2 0
 Damn right! I for one want a full review/bike check of the Mimi shredder!!!
  • 2 0
 This bike is stunning, love the looks and craftsmanship, love the design layout and pull shock, love that you can customize it to order and if i had 2,900 eur i think id be placing an order
  • 4 0
 What a beauty with sophistication to boot!
  • 4 4
 The graphics really pulled my attention away from the bike. Old stickers lying around the shop I would guess. I still really like the look of welded aluminum. You know a real craftsman put the bike together. Not saying that carbon layup does not have it's art, but welds add a kind of history to a bike you don't see with carbon. Its not surprising that my current bike does not look a whole lot different...raw aluminum, few stickers. It'd give it a go.
  • 4 0
 Will someone PLEASE pull the protective sticker off of that XO rear der?
  • 2 0
 I like it a lot , looks like a design that will fit a water bottle in the frame as well , hell yeah on another aggressive 29" design, looks like a fun ride .
  • 3 2
 That thing would look far better without decals at all or a headtube ornament. Should've named it the T-1000. Chug chug chug, chugchug
  • 1 1
 So is this a single pivot design? That's what I see, single pivot with a really sophisticated linkage to drive the shock. But it's so unusual, I'm still getting my head around it. Neat bike.
  • 2 0
 I'm not a huge fan of the decals, but boy am I a sucker for massive welds and a nice polished aluminum frame like this one.
  • 1 2
 Sexy bike, but that main pivot looks a bit small and feeble, epsecially for a single pivot design. I know the linkage will add stiffness, but you are not supposed to twist pivots and linkages if you can avoid it. Ah well, it IS a prototype.
  • 6 0
 I had 2 Ancillotti Scarab for 10 years, never happen to have gap on the bearing, never happen to feel bendind under load, never done maintenance. Believe me, pivot is stiff enough!
  • 1 0
 So many people leave the blue plastic on the SRAM derailleurs that when they were first released I thought they were that color.
  • 3 0
 When function sneaks out the win over form. Pretty sweet bike!
  • 3 2
 Umm......as welder I ashamed for their welder for those weld. Will say though kind of loving the finish though. Reminds me of my first zaskar.
  • 2 3
 If your welding is as good as your grammar, forgive us if your suggestion that you could do better holds about about as much weight as your cranium, particularly as you have seemingly ignored multiple instances of the word "prototype" from the article and the comments just to get your pathetic self agrandising comment in.
  • 1 0
 It looks like there is some contamination in the weld around the seat tube but other than that the welds seem solid. What makes you think the welds are so bad?
  • 1 0
 looks awesome. it has some similarities with evil. however that frame finish doesnt look very scratch resistant to me. this goes to the cool stuff list nonetheless.
  • 2 0
 This is great, but where are the ride impressions and review? I wonder how much it weighs? I want one anyway.
  • 1 0
 yo pinkbike, learn how to take a left side bike pictures. No one cares what sram looks like, we want to know about link structure damn it
  • 2 0
 Totally 90s graphics but I'd totally buy it.
  • 2 0
 Very cool. I remember seeing these in the WC videos of the early 2000's.
  • 2 0
 That bike looks Rad!!!! Smile I really like that frame design!!!
  • 3 1
 Welding from the gods, makes Orange look like SC
  • 1 0
 Looks like a racing machine. Not meant to look good on a shop floor, but totally at home on the course, covered with mud.
  • 2 0
 It looks very much like a motocross bike frame.
  • 2 0
 Damn this bike is gorgeous ! o.O
  • 1 0
 Reverse pull shock is what it should be called.
Where is the protection for the lever from rocks and roots?
  • 1 0
 I really wish I didn't like it as polished has never been my thing, but that looks the badgers badgers!
  • 1 0
 It's just...so...beautiful Proper Italian flair. It shouldn't be attractive but it's STUNNING
  • 1 0
 Good lookin bike, but stickers suck
  • 1 0
 yup on this frame they just stand out and look really awkward, I think... maybe these ones make it look more exotic lol
  • 1 0
 Want to read more bout this, it looks good. Wonder if it creaks a lot?
  • 1 1
 Frame looks awesome, decals not so much. I'd love to have one made to measure
  • 1 0
 need a video / gif of how the suspension operates!
  • 1 0
 Doesn't look like a Session! Aluminium, hand crafted beauty.
  • 1 0
 Looks weak and those welds..
  • 1 0
 Be cool if it was made from steel????
  • 1 0
 Wow that's what you call raw !.
  • 1 0
 oh i would love one of these
  • 1 0
 How much for the mini shredder?
  • 2 4
 There's something endearing about the look. Can probably chalk it up to 90s nostalgia. Granted, there's probably a good reason we abandoned that style.
  • 1 0
 We?
  • 2 3
 I'm sure i've seen that bike before... KASTLE!! Oh yeah, the 9000 DH model...
  • 3 0
 Kaestle bike was projected and realized by Ancillotti,and 1993 World Champion with Bonazzi
  • 1 0
 I think it looks alright
  • 1 0
 Super cool racing bike
  • 1 0
 What fork is that?
  • 1 0
 Formula 35 probably
  • 2 0
 Yep - Formula 35. Just got one - awesome fork. Replaced a 36 RC2.
  • 2 2
 looks like it was built 10 years ago...
  • 1 1
 Looks like one of those old Sunn DH bikes...
  • 1 1
 It's like a children of my Banshee Legend. Very nice !
  • 1 0
 super bike ;-)
  • 1 1
 Walmart has just reported a silver bike as stolen
  • 1 0
 Gun & Rose
  • 5 7
 Hey look! It's 1997!
  • 2 0
 The first Scarab was 1990 they have all the same basyc, modern,project of today, no other builder did it!
  • 6 0
 @gualtiero46:
yes, when Cannondale and others did 70° stem angle, Ancillotti did 66° !
Another feature common now is the low gravity center, now for everybody, 25 years ago only few manufacturers...
  • 2 2
 Wait, my bad! This is the greatest new bike in the history of great new bikes!
  • 1 3
 Looks like a demo
  • 5 8
 Still a turd bman
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