Are You Willing to Buy Your Next Bike Online? - Pinkbike Poll

Feb 10, 2017
by Vernon Felton  
We’ve written about direct-to-consumer bike companies before. It’s a trend that’s proven impossible to ignore. In Europe, bike brands that’ll take your credit card digits online and deliver a bike to your doorstep have been growing by leaps and bounds for more than a decade now. It’s been a slower transition in the United States, though there are at least 20 brands in the states that bypass the traditional bike shop. The imminent arrival of direct-to-consumer behemoth Canyon is a telling sign of where things are headed. Even the largest “IBD” (independent bicycle dealer) brands are acknowledging that the old model, in which a consumer started and finished the bike-buying process inside their local bike shop, is, well, just that….an old model.
Inside Canyon
Inside Canyon's HQ...the only brick-and-mortar part of this business equation, since their bikes show up on your doorstep and not inside your bike shop.
Trek and Giant have hybrid-online sales models in the states: You can now order one of their bikes online and pick it up at your nearest Trek or Giant dealer.

In short, the bike business is slowly, but surely, following in the footsteps of nearly every other market. But at this point, I’m curious—is this a change you find yourself currently embracing or struggling with?

Let me put it this way: Will you buy your next bike online, from a direct-to-consumer brand?

Are you willing to buy your next bike online, from a direct-to-consumer brand?

In Europe, bike brands that’ll take your credit card digits oline and deliver a bike to your doorstep have been growing by leaps and bounds for more than a decade now. It’s been a slower transition in the United States, but the writing is on the wall...the bike business is slowly, but surely, following in the footsteps of nearly every other market. But at this point, I’m curious—is this a change you find yourself currently embracing or struggling with?






MENTIONS: @vernonfelton



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304 Comments

  • + 167
 Being the bottom feeder I am I almost always buy a bike that is used. Usually from some shop rat who goes through them every year, or some schmuck with money to burn. So basically I have always bought online, and if I was going to buy new I don't see any reason I wouldn't continue. Do your research into what you think will be best, and really you can't go wrong with the crop of bikes out there these days. My 2 cents.
  • - 40
flag rocky-mtn-gman (Feb 10, 2017 at 14:31) (Below Threshold)
 @pinkbicycle: unicorns and asparagus both make my pee stink
  • - 28
flag goflowz (Feb 10, 2017 at 14:37) (Below Threshold)
 True. THE customer is always right they say.
  • + 28
 i scour CL for good deals all the time. the yuppies in my area are constantly dumping pricey full suspension bikes that have never touched dirt and have only been used for light beach cruising on the strand. patience is key!
  • + 8
 Your spending good money, you need to see the bike in person first. Seeing one on a computer screen doesn't even come close to seeing, touching, and appreciating a bike in person. Also you can check for any scratches and minor manufacturing defects before you choose to buy. I don't understand how people can even buy clothes online. You have to try it on first before buying it. You want to feel the material, looks good on screen, but in person you see that the quality is sub par.
  • + 31
 Valid perspective. My success rate for online purchases of any kind has been over 90% easy. Only a couple times have I been forced to return something. Almost every case the return service was as good or better than local shops. Clothes, shoes, bikes, whatever Is pretty low risk these days. Meaning you can nearly always undo the mistake. Pick a reputable vendor and they will take good care of you
  • - 27
flag Matt115lamb (Feb 10, 2017 at 15:23) (Below Threshold)
 @rocky-mtn-gman: fruit make my sxxxk taste nice , so she says !
  • + 5
 Agreed. Bought my 2016 Cannondale Habit SE for almost half price from a shop worker. It was in pretty much perfect condition.
  • + 8
 @pinkbicycle: bottom feeder or not, I've been able to sample 4-5 high end bikes in the last 2 years with minimal investment and re-sell what doesn't suit me.
  • + 10
 I ordered my Canfield online. The riot is an awesome bike. I will probably order another Canfield when the time comes. Their idea of a fun bike happens to be my idea of a fun bike.
  • + 4
 @Rocky-Urban: I sold my 2012 Anthem when I upgraded to a 2017 Trance the other day and I had to just about force the guy to get on it and ride it around. I was really surprised that people won't take the time to check it out first before they drop their cash.
  • + 3
 That's what I was gonna say. Just you said it much better than I was going to.
  • + 3
 @sk133872: I have had my high end custom bike for years now. It still suits me. I am happy that I am the issue and not the bike Smile
  • + 1
 @betsie: exactly. If you can find what suits you for a fraction of the cost, everybody wins.
  • + 2
 @Lastpikd: great company and hopefully we'll see some more carbon from them...id love to try their dh rig
  • + 2
 @Rocky-Urban: Couldn't agree more. How someone can buy a bike without riding it first is beyond me.
  • + 5
 All of the bikes I've owned have been used. Last year I got a 2015 bike that was half the price of what it was still being sold for in stores, the seller even took the X1 drivetrain off and used his own XTR stuff so the drivetrain was basically new. Theres always a risk buying used because theres no warranty but when you save so much who cares about warranty, I could have snapped the frame in half and bought a new frame and still come out even. Another bonus of buying used is that you can always just sell it again if you dont like it for around the same price you paid for it (or if you get a great deal you can make a profit), once you take a new bike home it loses a massive amount of value thanks to warranty.
  • + 1
 @aharris: and to that end most mfg have a crash replacement warranty. Id talk to the seller of said used bike and see if you could use their name for a claim if needed. Not gna hurt the original buyer at all-unless they got a industry deal they cant discuss etc
  • + 1
 What are these bike shops you speak of????
  • + 1
 I 100% agree but if there is a radical change like a gearbox, which I am 100% for, i would like to try i first. .......then buy online......
  • + 70
 I like my LBS, but damn, I just paid $40 for a chain that I could have bought online for literally half that price. I worked in a shop through college, so I feel kinda obligated, but comparing a YT Jeffsy to a Trek Fuel EX, you save like a grand - even on the low end bikes! So it's hard not to think about it.
  • - 42
flag abzillah (Feb 10, 2017 at 14:40) (Below Threshold)
 There are ways to save money, and going to a bike shop and talking to a person likely will save you more.
I usually buy parts and build the bike myself. Working with a bike shop to order all of the parts, I end up saving more than buying direct. I can save $500-$1000 on the frame, and $300-$400 on the fork. I end up saving about 30%-40% over buying direct online. I also get the exact parts I want too.
  • - 5
flag abzillah (Feb 10, 2017 at 14:53) (Below Threshold)
 @pinkbicycle: But that's where my experience says otherwise; I end up saving more by building the bike myself vs buying complete or buying direct.
  • + 10
 @abzillah: Correct. I have a long-standing mutual loving relationship with my LBS. And I looked at similarly specced Canyons and YTs and they ain't as cheap as a good deal from a good shop. Save a grand? Easy. Find the right LBS and treat them right. And I'm getting the latest model, not end-of-year-sellout stuff.
  • + 10
 @iamamodel:

Best "bro" deals I've been able to get are 10-15%. I buy a lot of stuff and people know me by name. Still cheaper to get that jeffsy online.

I did buy a demo nomad from them, though. That's when the good deals happen.
  • + 17
 @UtahBikeMike: I buy a new bike every year with retail prices around $5k. You do that a few times and you'll be getting better than 15%. You sell the bike when it is still current and the turnover cost can be a few hundred dollars. No need to buy parts. Plus I get other bonuses (friends, advice, assistance at races, being part of a team etc). I've used social media to get customers into the shop, and the shop knows I'm working for them. Virtuous circle. Try that online
  • - 1
 @pinkbicycle: Read it again. My NET cost for a new bike every year can be as low as several hundred dollars. I certainly cannot afford $5k a year. My main point is that I doubt you can end up with such a low cost buying online.
  • + 14
 @iamamodel:

Going to be honest, I'm too lazy to try to turn around a new bike every few months. I also don't want to have to ride the fashionable bikes of the month to receive top dollar.

I bought my '15 nomad after demoing 15-20 bikes, it was the one for me. I've had it for close to 2 years. I feel like bikes now are pretty similar and I don't feel like the new stuff coming out is worth the money they're asking. My bike is more capable than i am and i plan on keeping it for a while.

I send people to the store, they know I send them in. I also make it a point to buy high margin items like consumables. 15% is more than half their margin on a lot of stuff. If you're getting as good of a deal that you say you are then you're getting pretty close to cost.
  • + 13
 I think depending on where you live, and depending on which shop, this experience can change a lot. I have known many shops to be like this, but many are not. Many shops are friendly with the local riders and will match online prices for their frequent, more "enthusiast" (i.e. not the college kid who needs a tire on his commuter) customers who are purchasing high end parts. They will let you wrench in the back, and you will bring them beer and snacks in return. They will help their loyal customers secure deals on last years bikes, and cut you a good enough deal for parts that you usually won't go online. I had a bike shop like this in my hometown and have one where I live now. Many friends of mine have had the same experience.

If you live somewhere where all the shops are overpriced and not willing to help out the "core" bike community in the area, then go online. They don't need your business to survive. If they did, they would do what it takes to get it.
  • + 6
 @pinkbicycle: Neither. "I am a model." is a quote from Kelly Bundy.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=xXEeNt04wng
  • + 3
 @iamamodel: Exactly! Canyon do a Spectral 6.0 with the same specs as a Giant Trance 2 for the same price. I went into my LBS and asked what price they could do the Trance for and got $300 off plus half price flats. And I got to have a go before I dropped over $3k on a new bike.
  • + 3
 @abzillah: same experience and you have he satisfaction of building it yourself and you get exactly what you want
  • + 0
 @iamamodel: do you do your little dance on the catwalk
  • + 2
 @UtahBikeMike: wow.. thats a crappy discount in my opinion.. I love my local LBS, they hook me up.. but then again we buy a couple bikes every year or two from them (family of 4).. but I would be pissed if it was only 15% off..
  • + 4
 @UtahBikeMike: are you serious about demoing that many bikes? You say you're lazy, but you went to the effort to ride 15 to 20 bikes? That's impressive.
  • + 7
 I don't understand how can anyone feel an obligation towards a shop. It's a business, not a charity, do you think they're not trying to minimize their costs wherever possible?

Also, let's say I have a $5000 budget to buy a bike. The bigger part the shop gets, the less the manufacturer gets.
Now who deserves my money more - the manufacturer who will re-invest it to R&D to make a better model for the next season, or the shop that's been operating the same way for the last 30 years because there's nothing to invent there?
  • + 4
 @RichPune:

I'm not lazy, I ride bikes as a hobby. I just don't have the freetime and patience to buy and sell a bike every 3-6 months. If i had to part it out I'd go crazy.

Yes, i rode that many bikes. I looked up what brands had demo days on what day and where and I'd head out.

For example, the SC demo i was able to demo a Tallboy, 5010, bronson and a nomad. The yeti demo i was able to ride a SB6 and SB5. Kona, i did a process 4" and 5" specialized i did a fuse, stumpjumper 6fattie, and an enduro. Guerrilla gravity van was empty so i rode a few bikes (can't remember their names), plus trek, pivot, and giant and some others I'm sure I'm forgetting.

I did a 6 mile with 2k feet of vert lap on trails I know like the back of my hand on each bike. I was able to ride 4-5 bikes on some saturdays when multiple demos were setup.

It took work and planning, but my wife was super cool about it and watched the kids and let me go ride bikes until i found the one i wanted.
  • + 2
 @Extremmist: It is actually the opposite of that, the shop get the smaller margin and the manufacturer get the most.
  • + 2
 @CosmicCycles:

I don't think you understand his point. His point was that with a direct brand, they make more money than a big brand wholesaling to a shop. With the direct brand getting more money per bike they're able to put more money back into their bikes.

I'd be willing to bet, though, the big 3 brands make way more money than direct sale brands. They have manufacturing in numbers on their side, as well as much more volume. I'd be willing to be profits per bike are actually pretty close to each other.
  • + 2
 @CosmicCycles: And where did I say the opposite? I said "The bigger part the shop gets, the less the manufacturer gets." I didn't say "The shop gets the bigger part, the manufacturer gets less."
I also asked "Now who deserves my money more", not "who deserves more money".

Moreover, if I buy from the manufacturer, the shop gets nothing and the manufacturer gets all the money, which was my original point I was trying to make.
  • + 1
 @iamamodel: why do you doubt it? The scheme you described of selling current gen models and buying new can be repeated in its entirety online.
  • + 1
 @WaterBear: I don't think it will work for online sales because who wants to pay $3700 for a year old YT that you can buy new online for $4400 when you could pay $3700 for a Trek/Spesh/Pivot/whatever that had a retail price of $5500. No-one.
  • + 1
 @UtahBikeMike:
Thats awesome, always wanted to do that but never seen it out properly. An incredible way of coming to the conclusion that the SC nomad is a fantastic bike!
My hat goes off to you, wise man
  • + 1
 @abzillah: it's rare that a bike shop employee is actually that knowledgeable about the bikes they have vs the other bikes on the market. Bike shops are only for morons and rich people.

I have bought all of my bikes online or used in the last 10 years with minimal issue.
  • + 49
 My YT just arrived the other day. It was delayed in shipping for a few weeks so the Canadian rep drove it right to my house. Drove himself in from Squamish during the snowstorm. Can't beat that service. To be honest I have had some rough experiences with bike shops resulting in several weeks to months without a bike to ride. I'm still going to head to a LBS for regular service, maintenance, and repairs anyways. So they're going to get my money regardless.
  • + 57
 The YT Rep living in Squamish. THAT is a job.
  • + 10
 @Pmac1893: Haha, totally. Living the dream! Makes sense that Commencal has set up shop there too.
  • + 6
 He's awesome. I've been dealing with him for warranty issues on a Monarch plus shock. He's been extremely helpful and accommodating.
  • + 1
 I would buy a YT or a Commencal as they've setup shop in BC now. The good thing about Direct Sales is they also do demo events to get their bikes shown to the public. At Crankworx each year the demo tents are a good place to check. I've been able to get a full on ride with both a Capra and Jeffsey from YT, and the Commencal Meta AM V4.2 from their demo tents.
  • + 9
 I love my YT its a great bike and is an unbeatable value. Ordered it on a monday and got it the following thursday. Awesome company to deal with and was able to build it up in 30 minutes from opening the box. I had a deposit down at my LBS but after 3 1/2 months of the manufacturer promising the bike would be in soon (it was supposed to only take a month), I couldn't go without a trail bike any longer. I got my deposit back and I took the YT plunge after checking out a friends. I haven't regretted it since.
  • + 1
 Damn. That does sound like good service.
  • + 1
 Good point. I don't understand why the argument about direct sales is there. Any bike shop owner I've talked to tells me that their profit is tied to maintenance and selling parts, clothing, etc. The actual profits from bike sales is a small piece of the pie. When I buy my next bike direct from manufacturer (hopefully a Canyon!) I'll still get it serviced by my LBS and buy all my spares, etc from the shop.
  • + 2
 Republic bikes in squamish will also deliver bikes from their showroom floor in squamish to the city. They even have their stock online. They are trying to offer the service
  • + 1
 @onemind123: republic is a great shop. And next to that coffee shop? God damn what a nice setup. Anyways yes I heard they were doing that. Must have to in order to compete with yt and commencal who are now in town (and probably Canyon eventually?). I had a few quotes from them before eventually settling on my yt. I was able to demo a Jeffsy for 3 hours. Couldn't do that with any republic bikes in my size. It wasn't the full reason I went the yt route, but it was part of it. I wouldn't hesitate having them service my bike though. I'm happy to pay for that.
  • + 1
 @onemind123: Checked out Republic when I was in squamish last summer, seemed like a really good shop. Some shops can feel clique to people not familiar with them. I didn't get that feeling at all from them.
  • + 48
 bought my evil and canfield straight from the brands. neither was available in a shop. i buy frame only and build up.
  • + 5
 Didn't mean to downvote you. Regardless, used or online is the way to go
  • + 3
 I want an Evil so bad!! Those bikes look so badass. I'm probably gonna save up and then build up a custom build.
  • + 1
 Same here with the Curtis bikes (built to order only). Yet for the majority of parts it was straight to the local shops who support our local racing clubs. Afterall the local kids who want to get involved cant trial a bike that's a picture on a screen.
  • + 2
 @torilovesweed: I had the uprising (the 26 inch all mountain) I think evil still had some learning to do. It was awesome but still more trail bike than all mountain. It felt under gunned at resorts. The canfield balance I am on now is much more up to the task and a notably cheaper frame.
  • + 1
 @adrennan: that could be the carbon vs alloy price difference
  • + 41
 it can't be any worse than my mail order bride...she's stuck eatin' kfc at la guardia cause she can't get through
  • + 4
 I didn't know Iran had mail order brides
  • + 8
 @LuvAZ:

You need to pay with goats
Totally worth the hassle.
  • + 4
 @pinkbicycle: Nope, Capra means Goat. NNEEEHAAHAHEHHEHEHNNENAAA
  • + 20
 I have ordered 3 Mondraker's from Europe and I do not regret it at all.

It is not that LBS here in Canada, it is the distributors that cause the issue. My buddy runs a store, if I want an XT rear derailleur it would cost $150. Cost on it is around 110. However you can pick it up online for about 90 Canadian. That is the issue in this country, plus our crap dollar.
  • + 12
 I'm with you. I feel awful guilt every time I get something online but I can literally save nearly 50% from ordering parts from a place like CRC. My LBS gives a list of reasons to buy local on their website, listing things like " It may look like a good deal but by the time you pay duties / taxes and shipping the price is nearly the same!" I have to say I've never bought anything I would class as a big ticket item but shipping is always under 15 bucks and I've never paid duty on anything. So, I can't pay 40-50% more just to be a nice guy. I hate myself for a few moments but I get over it fast Smile
  • + 13
 @greener1 @downhere67 @greener1 @downhere67 You guys nailed it. I've worked in shops for 8 years now. Our *cost* on a Shimano brake is $93, you can buy them online for $90. Shimano has always been awful about that stuff, but other brands are starting to do the same. What can a bike shop do? Well, we sell a lot more Sram brakes now, haha..because it is the only way to turn any sort of margin (as slim as it already is).

It's an interesting dynamic--it impacts the LBS, but it is so much larger than that. I don't think anyone 'owes' their LBS any business simply for existing, but I'll be curious to see what life is like in 20 years when everyone goes to their local Amazon Corner Store to try it on and then have it drone delivered in 3-5 days. Someday, when there is no more competition, we'll all be at the mercy of the giants like Amazon and Google perhaps. I hope to be shredding singletrack in the sky before that time comes Wink
  • + 24
 Where's the 'my lbs is crap' option?
  • + 1
 Rotterdam represent, 'aight?
  • + 1
 @Sontator: Yeah. Have to say Bikers' best is quite decent but Bike2Build (where I used to go) completely went to shit and became a Cube concept store.
  • + 1
 @bonkywonky: curious what you go to bikersbest for? I resorted to doing everything myself bar lacing wheels and keep ministock of essential spares to not miss a ride for a broken chain or such. Rest can be had online in a day usually, no?
  • + 1
 @Sontator: buying tubes and cables, I can do pretty much everything myself as well. They do know their stuff though, when I started mtbiking ages ago I didn't know anything and they kept my bike in great shape, despite me basically using it (02 Scott Expert Racing) as a freeride bike..
  • + 1
 @bonkywonky: haha! I agree they are nice and in the beginning i also had them fix my stuff and even bought a bike there. Now i cannot justify buing expensive stuff there, sometimes i ho look for sales. We should still go for a ride sometime.
  • + 20
 Times are changing. New services I've seen are mechanics that previously toiled away in the back as an employee, now renting spaces out and starting up their own businesses as a dedicated spot for strictly mechanics, no retail. Bicyclehub on the North Shore springs to mind. Seems to be doing a treat. Super fast turnaround because they don't get bogged down talking for 3 hrs about a pump to some punter on the floor.
  • + 3
 Same thing here theres shop near me thats killing it and there working out of a basic but well located industrial unit. Dont even have so much as a poster on the wall. They have amazing service and super fast turnaround.
  • + 21
 where's the "i used to work at shop and got so used to paying wholesale for bike stuff that now I can't imagine paying retail for anything bike related ever again" option.
  • + 1
 When I worked at a shop the owner expected us to pay him 10% above wholesale for parts & bikes...so I was still buying online...
  • + 17
 Absolutely no reservations what so ever.

For the value alone I KNOW my next bike will be a direct sales brand. There is no chance I'm dropping 3.5k on a sub par big player when I can get a Fox Factory YT for the same money. I'll take the chance that a medium will fit, just like every other medium bike I've ever owned has fit.

Educate yourself. Invest some of the money you save on a decent tool kit. You don't need a bike shop to do routine maintenance.

When you take your broken bike to a bricks and mortar shop all you're doing is letting the shop staff handle a warranty claim that you can easily do yourself with the manufacturer, and 9 times out of 10 it's quicker to do it yourself anyway.

Source: bike mechanic and former shop manager.
  • + 2
 Hmmmmmm , YT's are a tab small !
  • + 17
 It's not LBS that are the problem; it's the suppliers. My YT Tues CF Pro was less than a Santa Cruz dealer pays for the $8700 V10.
  • + 6
 Finally! Someone that gets what markup is.
  • + 17
 now that we are talking about this, I don't use e-mail in order to support the post office
  • + 4
 Underrated comment
  • + 13
 I have bought used bikes and some components threw PB, but I also do my very best to buy everything I can (even most times at a 30% increase in price) from my local shop. I have been dealing with them for 15 years (the whole time I have lived here), I ride with them, I consider them my friends! I give them as much business as I can, including shop work (although I am almost 100% self supported mechanically speaking). I believe in local economies and take pride in being a part of it.

I'm not shitting on the customer direct by any means and actually appreciate it with small companies such as custom frame and component manufacturers. But I don't like supporting the guys who sell stuff for less than a local shop can buy it for. The major companies like Shimano should be ashamed for allowing it. And I'm the one in the end who has to pay more for the products but I know I'm supporting a good thing with my local shop.
  • + 13
 I've bought online in the past and it sucks for warranty, but this was an Intense from Dunbar, and the pivots needed replacement very quickly.... sometimes you learn the hard way. I now buy all my bikes from my local shop who does most of my service that is beyond my capabilities or I'm just feeling lazy. I do buy parts online though and my shop has had trouble finding the parts they need from their distributor and gotten me to buy it through Chainreaction and have them install it. but from the warranty perspective my local shop is worth the extra you pay upfront for it.
  • + 4
 Same train I'm on.
  • + 1
 Why not buy the bike online and get necessary service locally? I imagine your LBS would replace the pivot bearings on yiur dunbar purchase.
  • + 3
 @WaterBear: Once one of the bike shops in my town became an intense dealer (they dropped Intense the next year) , they were able to help me out, but I'd rather have the convenience of having that right off the start. For the bikes I ride, which is mostly Giant right now, price wise, my shop is competitive with online prices. If the bike breaks, I take it to the shop I bought it at and I'm usually up and running ASAP, I'm willing to pay for that, losing days if not weeks of riding is not worth it to me.
  • + 2
 @brownstone: ..."If the bike breaks, I take it to the shop I bought it at and I'm usually up and running ASAP, I'm willing to pay for that, losing days if not weeks of riding is not worth it to me"....Bullet Train, we're on it Smile
  • + 13
 Isn't the more profound question "Are you willing to buy your next bike at a shop?" I know of about a dozen people who just recently bought bikes, and they're all online. Man, I miss the small local bike and guitar shops.
  • + 11
 I personally like going to my LBS and other LBS too. I like to actually talk to the fellas/ladies, have a beer possibly and talk shop. IF all you are doing at a bike shop is buying a bike then you are doing something wrong. Its just a cool place to hang out for a bit before or after a ride? I truly hope the owner is making a living off his shop and I trust what he has to say about my purchases. The LBS is about relationships and that is the MOST IMPORTANT PART. The LBS needs to survive so we all have place to go besides PB I think? You don't have to agree, I just like the idea of walking into a shop and knowing the folks that work in there and make a living doing it.
  • + 4
 Totally agree. For me the LBS is definitely a part of the biking community. Placed an order for new ride just yesterday and It was almost like a celebration in the shop. Good guidance from the team, possibility to make some changes on the bike in the near future if needed, free complete maintenance and check in a couple months.. I just moved to where I live now, never bought anything in that shop before and everybody that was there seemed happy for me, ended up with a couple beers with the owners and other customers and now I have directions for new trails and an appointment for a group ride the following weekend. Best offer I could find !
  • + 10
 I just don't know. So far there is not much online that really grabs me right now and I live in a place littered with good LBS's. The online bike would have to be pretty special, but then you have the warranty problem. Is the dropper/shock/fork going to make through the warranty period? The online retailer isn't going to loan me a replacement like my LBS did.
  • + 2
 yup. what he said.
  • + 1
 Do you really need a replacement? Serious quesion. I am wondering if you were leaving a part with a shop for them to do a repair that could be done at home or potentially while-you-wait.
  • + 1
 @WaterBear:

My brand new KS LEV Integra was sagging and my shop loaned me one for the 4 months it took to fix it. They loaned my friend a fork while his was away for warranty. Being in Canada you can't expect a speedy return on warranty service.
  • + 8
 I own a niner, bought from a shop without being able to test. I own a few specialized love them all. I recently bought a YT Capra, read a million reviews, looked at specs for weeks. Pulled the trigger and its a sweet ride. And great costomer service while I was shopping. Over all online = win with local shop for repairs, fun parts and upgrades.
  • + 7
 I looked at my amazon, ebay and paypal accounts, all opened about 1999. Cannot believe I have been buying online for 17 years now.....I got a loan, car, and insurance during my lunch break online in the late 90's for heck sake.......the fact that this question of do you feel comfortable buying online is even asked is mindboggling to me.........Cars, boats, paper towels, coffee, wine, clothes, electronics, plane tix, hotel rooms, insurance, investments, college educations, dish soap, dog food, prescription glasses.......what can't one buy online with certainty.....?
  • + 7
 Here's a quick summary of common statements and rebuttals, because that's how I roll. The list could surely be expanded.

1) I like having local support from bike shops for service.
1a) You can buy a mountain bike online and still get service at your local shop.

2) I like being able to buy small parts when I need them.
2a) This article is about buying bikes from stores vs. online. Are you telling me it's worth it to you to pay hundreds to thousands in markup buying your bike so you can keep a store in business so you can buy a $5 tube when you forget it?

3) My bike shop cuts me a better deal than I get online.
3a) I frankly don't believe you. I think you tell yourself that.

4) Seriously dude, I know all the guys there.
4a) Your dealer is never your friend. They pretend to like you. Try coming back unemployed.

5) My LBS supports my local community with trail work time.
5a) An LBS is not necessary for this. The kind people who donate trail work time at your LBS can do that even if they don't work for an LBS.

6) MY LBS supports my local community with donations.
6a) Your community can donate money directly. In my region most money for trail projects comes from private donors and grants, not LBS money.
  • + 7
 Once again Pinkbike throwing responsibility on the reader/consumer. I love bike shops and I would love to see them succeed. Nothing sweeter than grabbing a post ride IPA and hitting up a cool bike shop in my downtown (hint hint... combine the two concepts bike shop owners). However, when I go in there and experience horrible customer service by some BMX'er with a piss poor attitude. A pissed off owner because I tried to negotiate price or ask for a price match; I just simply smile, node, walk out and jump online to make my purchase. The industry needs to fix it, not leave it up to the consumer.

Message to bike shops; Be cool, understand the market and get creative. There are plenty of things we cant purchase online.
  • + 9
 My Capra was on the second shipment ever to YT-USA, and the last 2 years have been the best paying, riding, and CS experience I've had in 20+ years of MTB'n. Hells Yeah!
  • + 1
 @pinkbicycle: I don't know why they dvoted u so I hooked u back to +1
  • + 7
 Personally, I can't loom a LBS salesmen in the eye after they ask for £55+ a tyre when I can get it for £35 online. Let alone £3k for a bike YT are selling for £1800. Enoughs enough.
  • + 9
 @pinkbicycle: ok, funniest comment you've made on this article, but, mostly, I suspect, because I don't get your other references...
  • + 8
 Let's be honest.
Most bike shops don't do a good enough job to expect us to buy really expensive things from them if there's a more cost effective option do they?
  • + 6
 I don't buy mountainbikes. I only expect to replace my frame in the near future. Test riding is not an option. You can't borrow a frame, build it up, ride it and go back "can I try the other one for next weekend please?" You just judge the geometry relative to what you have and in what direction you want to go, just hope you got it right. And then it doesn't quite matter whether you ask your lbs to order the frame for you or that you just do that yourself. In fact, it feels more real to deal with the actual company instead of talk to the middle(wo)man in the shop. Of course, if I could actually meet up with the people from the company, that would be ideal (which is for instance possible with Rose bikes or the shop where I worked where we welded up custom geometry frames). But as that isn't always possible, having e-mail contact with the company still feels more direct and honest than to communicate through a dealer.
  • + 6
 Here in Spain I was able to finance my bike buying it at my local bike shop through Confidis with 0% interest. Something that is currently not an option when buying online and it was the only way I could pull off getting the bike I wanted and walk out with it on the same day. Even if I could buy online I just couldn't get myself to do it without being able to get on it and feel it. I tested several different brands before settling on my bike.
  • + 3
 new credit cards usually have 12-18 months interest free credit on them in the uk. can spend that anywhere
  • + 5
 Im on the fence about it. I would strongly prefer to buy from my LBS, because i like them and they always take really good care of me. They give me a competitive price on anything I order, and they are always super helpful with any problems I have. That said, i bought a fatbike online last fall, because my LBS doesnt carry and brands that make a reasonably priced fatbike, and im ok with it.
  • + 5
 I've bought 2 yts and couldn't be happier, great customer service and cheap as hell. I'm sure Canyon will make a great addition to the direct sales lineup in the U S of A as well!
  • + 4
 I bought a YT Capra last year and the experience was great. I admit I was impatient and decided to drive three hours to Reno and pick it up rather than wait for the shipping but I still would have purchased it even if driving there was not an option. I do have to say that I went to demo events and rode a lot of bikes before deciding on the "type" and geometry of a bike that I wanted to purchase. Once I narrowed that down the Capra fit the bill and ordered it in the size that I would have ordered any other bike in. I would have been more hesitant had I not ridden other bikes very similar to that of the Capra.
  • + 4
 I'm all in on a YT Tues. When I started riding in the '90's technology and riding styles were still being carved out (pun intended). You had to try before you buy, because there were some beauties, and some donkeys. We were guinea pigs. Now its so competitive, the information online is so detailed, the R&D so thorough, I feel confident in buying online, no problem.
  • + 4
 Our prices, and brands prices (Transition, Yeti, Pivot, Rocky Mountain, and Marin) will never beat Amazon, Ebay, or brands like YT. So we have to find a way to MAKE people want to come in. FREE BEER & FREE COFFEE!

We have free GOOD beer from our kegerators (for those of age) from local breweries. We also offer free shit coffee from costco in our K-CUP machine. You don't have to buy a membership to have a cold or hot one, Just walk in our door! You also don't have to buy anything...It's not how can I/we help you when you walk in our shop, it's can I get you a beer or coffee?!

As a LBS; you just have to have fun, be different, and don't be a dick! Make people want to come in and all is good!
Did I mention we offer free beer?! haha
  • + 4
 I bought my Canyon a few years back, and they were great. Until I had to send my bike back to them for a warranty claim. They had my bike for 8 months, and rarely responded to my emails. By far the worst CS I've ever experienced. The bike is great, and is way more bike than I could've afforded from my LBS. But if you find yourself having to deal with a direct order company down the line, it's a nightmare. People need to realise that CS has a value too. Next time I'll be buying from a shop.
  • + 1
 I heard a lot of similar stories involving a LBS. BTW at least Rose, YT and CRC have a lot better C's than Canyon
  • + 1
 @giopk70: Yeah I can totally confirm on Rose, I had a bad weld with a hair crack in the chainstay, sent them some pictures, they picked the box up, repaired and sent it back in a week. No questions asked, they even changed the shock bushings
  • + 4
 Bought my last 3 bikes online, 2 Radon one Cube. Got them all from Bike-discount.de - they were awesome in all cases and when I had a warranty issue they had an upgraded part to me within 48 hours. Late last year I also bought an ex-rental DH bike online too - again, no issues. I've Ileana bought from my LBS in a the past, but now use them for servicing, replacing parts etc... they even told me to go online and have he parts fitted there in most cases if they know they don't carry items in stock etc
  • + 3
 Sorry my post makes no sense - was typing on my phone and can't edit it. Hopefully you get the point :/
  • + 2
 @Marc2211: Yup, I still go to my LBS for parts and servicing (of my bike, not me). But I don't appreciate people who think we OWE the LBS our business.
  • + 5
 I'm on my second Canfield Brothers frame and can't recommend them enough. Their service is top notch, and they are a company owned by riders that designs bikes for other riders.
  • + 1
 I am strongly considering building up a Riot soon. Glad to hear another positive review of thr company. I don't think I've heard a bad one yet!
  • + 4
 I buy what I can from a couple of shops nearby. I'm not brand loyal and don't like a lot of the 'house brand' bikes and accessories even though I like the shop and people. I do give tips to the mechanics for being given priority so some of the shop guys benefit directly. There are ways to make up for disloyalty.
  • + 3
 Good shop or bad shop, we have all been there. Main reasons for feeling like the shop was great was we were heard or accepted, or on the reverse end of not heard and mis-treated. As a recovering shop employee, I've met and still have customers who had the best experience and to this day call to have me wrench on their bikes, and also have those people whom I am sure that I damaged for life to never step back into a LBS again. The online sales market is a great place for people because they can feel heard and their opion counts, as well as is reaffirmed. We love being relavent, swayed to what we are already thinking, supported by those who have the same ideas as us... which is why the internet is such a great thing. On the internet, we have that buddy friend group who all ride the same frame, fork, helmet... makes us feel accepted. We are, human in fact, and want the reassurance that what we are riding is good. Bicycling magazines did that for us back in the day, review boards did that for us a few years back(to present), no "brotherhoods" of online frame/bike purchases are formed and reassures us that we are riding a great product. This is a great thing for humans... so where does that leave the free-thinking bike shop employee/owner... to be honest, I'd probably still be riding a steel Lemond Zurich, a 9900 OCLV team issue hardtail, if a shop owner didn't give me crap and have me try out different bikes. Sure, I was riding and enjoying myself(thinking that I had two great bikes, at least that's what magazines had to say) I've since owned too many road and mountain bikes, each with a distinct characteristic to them, each proving why there are so many designs and "copies" out there because each is an idea that some can relate to, to "feel" better on. I've learned that I don't ride what others ride, I've experienced the VPP trend (hated it), the DW link trend(again not my cup of tea), experimented with "extended head tubes on my road frames" back in 2000(have since gone back to "racer boy" drop, wide rims(before they were cool back in 1999). Who was there to bounce ideas off of? The local bike shop. Now yes, a lot of owners today push and sell what they carry because they have to in order to make a living, but this industry has to stop trying to find the "Holy-Grail" of bike frames, trying to invent new(reinvented old) standards, finding ways to make people want the next wheel size, and just get people out riding and using their bikes. Because if people use their bikes enough, parts will break, service will be needed, and the LBS will be relavent. But when a culture is so brainwashed into newer is better, then, yes, there is no need for a LBS because newer will always be more available and cheaper online. When did we become ok with, if I can't keep up, I just need a new bike? Is the only way strava can be beaten with a new bike? Most of us don't spend 8 hours a day dialing in our bikes. So how can we say we've exhausted our machines that we need another because this one can't be ridden how we want it to ride? I'm not just throwing this out there, because I fall prey to this concept too. When have I out-ridden my bike? Price wouldn't be an issue for me for my next bike because I knew that this bike would be under me for the next 4-5 years... haven't kept a bike longer than 1 year lately. Looking through all the comments above, the only people really coming out ahead on this whole issue are the "smart" used bike market people. They are the benificiaries of our waste. But again, how many of these used riders really use the bike till it's "dead"? How about we all start treating bicycles like the older generation did, with a bit of respect and care. They spent one or two paychecks on a bicycle, we spend 6-10 paychecks on these machines. Ride the crap out of the thing, service it(or take it in to a LBS if you cannot), replace drivetrain parts (like the oil in your cars), wear out tires before you toss them in a pile(pile of...didn't have enough traction) and before you know it, your bike will be the best riding bike you've ever owned, you'll want to keep it running, counting the hours when you can pick it up proudly from the LBS, and tell them you'll be back next time because they took care of YOUR ride. Idealistic, yes, but for a culture who used to embrace riding more than conceptual riding(linkages, plus size, offset, tread patterns, and online sales) get out and ride that bike that is hanging in your garage. Learn and put the work in to master each section of that trail system. Become a rider who can ride their bike, not a person who rides that bike. Drive the industry to let you ride, don't let the industry drive you to ride what they want. Be confident enough in your ridding and life, that a bicycle will not define you. Learn to master the bike, not let the bicycle master your life. Online sales YES! LBS bicycle sales YES! But just ride because you feel great getting out to ride, not because you are riding what others are riding. It's cycling people, not this rat race of life.
  • + 1
 Thanks for this. Nice to see others care enough about cycling to spend time articulating it. Also good to see some people can still see through the industries desire to make us all sheep Smile
  • + 3
 Thing is my DH rig is from YT and my Enduro from Rocky Mountain. Guess who delivers the better support and who has better manufacturing quality (judging by problems/optical mistakes on the bike).
Rocky Mountain let me down on this i got tears in my paint job the flip chip destroyed the paint job when flipping it and rear axle was broken when i piocked it up (got replaced but took longer than yt took to send a piece i broke and still they sent it for free because it was a minor)
So next bikes gonna be online bikes although i really wanted to support the local bike shop. They should´ve put more effort in :/
  • + 3
 I was very tempted to get a Capra CF for £2900, went and had a word with my LBS who are Nukeproof dealers, ended up being offered the 2017 Mega 290 race for the same price! Was pleaseantly surprised to say the least as the Mega was my first choice anyway after being personally underwhelmed by some of YT's spec choices this year but £3400(RRP) was a little too much to justify. Now, I know not all shops may not be able to offer such competitive prices but dont be so hasty to write your shop off when it comes to buying a complete bike, no harm in going for a chat!
  • + 3
 I think this is a question that has multiple answers. Sure most LBS suck because of the inflated prices compared to buying online, but what happens when you're riding and brake something, or on the way to hit the trails and forget something. You go to the nearest shop if you don't have any means of resolving the issue with spare parts/stuff that you carry or that a bud can loan you. I'm all for reducing the cost of the sport that we all love, however I'm a little hesitant to say I'd only buy online. Especially a bike. I'm of the opinion that like a car how do you know what you want unless you've had a chance to give er a go. Sure you can't get a full feel for how a bike rides in the parking lot of a shop, but at least you know that bike x runs smaller so you need a larger frame, or bike y just doesn't feel right so you might want to consider another option. There is only so much research and forum reading you can do before making a purchase and at the end of the day wouldn't you rather be able to pedal around on the damn thing a bit first?
  • + 2
 I bent a 15mm front wheel in the bike park Bardonecchia three years ago, there are 5 bike parks in a 50km area. I couldn't find any LBS round there that could either repair it or that stocked such a "strange" wheel, only qr. I hand to drive to France, in Briancon, to find a shop that could rebuild my wheel.
  • + 1
 @dhgabe demo day or go pedal around on it at an LBS and buy online...

Sorry bud, but I got a top tier nomad build online for +/-$1500 less than my LBS's bottom line, there simply is no way to ignore savings of that magnitude
  • + 1
 @nvranka: I'm not saying don't buy online. My point was that yes you can save a bunch of money buying online but sometimes you don't get a chance to test something out before buying when you go online only. Hence why I said this question has multiple answers. Buying online is awesome but sometimes you still need the lbs. Trust me I still buy most of my stuff online to save money but sometimes I will hit the lbs to do a little recon and every once in a while they are willing to price match.
  • + 3
 I have never walked out of a local bike store without feeling like it cost a fortune for very little done. Our local charged my old man $180 the other day to replace a slx Freehub. I could have got a new one online for 30 bucks. I have no idea what the margins are like for a bike shop but I simply can't justify or afford their cost. Plus they only allow you to test the bike in their car park. Can't tell squat from that sort of ride. Maybe I'm having a rant but I don't think I'm the only one who feels that direct to market is a more realistic option.
  • + 3
 I am really interested in seeing who is truly going to be effected by this... We have seen several consumer direct companies come in that were going to shut down all the bike shops... While we have lost shops that don't want to evolve with the times, there are still shops out there.. I think the mail order guys may feel the pinch more... The potential customers Canyon and YT are going for are people who have enough knowledge to know what they want or need and have most likely already bailed on the bike shop... However, there's a lot of noise to filter through and for a lot of people, it's hard to know where to look and what to look for... Some people find it easier to walk into a shop and have a person hand them what they need and even install it for them... Interesting times ahead...
  • + 3
 The "I worked at a shop..." comments: not every shop operates in the same market, I guarantee large shops make the majority of their profits from sales, not service. That said I beleive that the future of brick and mortar is on service based operations - the problem is that shops are too scared to charge what they're really worth, that's inline with the lack of a real mechanic certification outside of ones that don't matter.

Online sales? Let's see, Evil sells their flagship frame set for 2900 US, Trek wants 3800, Specialized wants $3500. If you're a savy consumer with any aptitude and you're building from the frame up, is there a question?

So, shops face component pricing that they'll never be able to compete with, an increase in savy customers willing to do at least basic DIY service, a base that thinks a LBS should cut them a deal because they podium a local race, suppliers cutting even more margin through a hybrid online buying program, expectations from the same companies to buy in more preseason stock only to later discount it because of the relentless pursuit of "model year freshness" - you have to really really want to be a bike shop right now. I feel for those warriors who are doing it well enough to survive but the industry needs to start being honest with its dealers, that or let's move the entire conversation online, to which I echo another users concerns about Amazon warehousing and the loss of the LBS culture. But for real, you gotta really want to spend your money locally too to justify paying the margins to keep the lights on and the mechanics collecting their pentance.
  • + 3
 No. Stick with your LBS. Find a shop that suits you and build a relationship. In the long term you'll find that it's worth it in terms of customer care, servicing, building, ordering and pricing. They'll have to do a bunch of things for you anyway. They know the tricks and you can order frames, components or complete bikes in prices that were unthinkable for you in the beginning e.g. previous year models, components from warehouses and so on.
  • + 2
 Online retailers like canyon and YT are really good to deal with and answer emails almost immediately. . . Right up to the point where they have your money, then suddenly everything takes weeks if not months and some parts of their bikes don't even exist. And don't forget the joys of a 4 month turn around should you break one of the frames. Cheap frames covered blingy but unreliable parts just don't do it for me.
  • + 2
 I did a frame up part by part build on a new bike this fall. Saved myself about 2k over a LBS, at least. When they lowered the price on the frame, they refunded me the difference! When I had mechanical issues after unboxing they offered to pay for the repair! (I fixed it myself.)

I will never ever buy anything but emergency items from a LBS again. Even in those situations they often don't have the part stocked and I'm forced to go online. I'm trying to do most repairs myself these days, and when I don't I have options for free lance mobile repair guys at a lower rate and higher quality than the LBS.

Most online bike shops have a store front somewhere and they are run by people. I've been able to build that same relationship and rapport with my online bike shop, and I've found it preferable in every way.
  • + 2
 Sure, why is this even a question, we've been doing this in the US for decades now.

Seriously, anyone who's even slightly above or below average height pretty much has always had to buy bikes sight-unseen forever, and if the high school dropout nosepickers that your LBS calls mechanics can figure out how to work on a bike, surely you can too.

not to mention the fact I get better service from YT than the last LBS I bought a bike from (which was also sight unseen special order - I've never seen a bike my size on a bike shop floor in nearly 30 years).
  • + 2
 We recently bought two bikes from canyon and while the bikes themselves were great and arrived in an acceptable time that's when in canyons eyes the relationship stopped!!! We have had no support or communication regarding suspension problems with one bike. I know they spoke about this as an issue before that they were addressing but that was over a year ago and there still seems to be no improvement. I bought the bike from you my contract of sale was with you, don't send me to the individual OEM suppliers when things go wrong with the bike. I want you to facilitate it. Stand by your products!!!
  • + 2
 The owner from one of my local shops takes the local groms out for a ride every Tuesday, gives them training info, race tips, ect. The owner of another shop in town is the volunteer race director for a few of our major local races. YT doesn't do that.
  • + 2
 I am kind of half and half on this idea. Recently my brother and I both bought bikes online. Going this rout saves a lot of money. In the United States, Commencal definitely provides great bikes for insane prices. There is really no beating the spec for price. But on the other hand, I really like supporting my local bike shop. Not only do they sell stuff, but they are also loaded with info and knowledge that helps you mountain biking experience grow. Local shops are definitely key in the industry, but its hard to pass up the direct sale bikes online.
  • + 6
 Already there, bought a YT, very happy.
  • + 2
 For sure I will buy a bike online. I split a sidewall on a tire the other day, went into a shop for the replacement tire. Online manufacturer price was $60, the shop had marked it up to $64.99. Mistake at the shop? Nope. On a freaking tire. You can buy a car tire for $60 that has a heck of a lot more rubber than I bike tire. It's about price now. I'm going for the lowest price. If the industry can't figure out how to solve the thing I hear at shops "we can't even buy it for that price," I don't even care anymore.
  • + 2
 I'm 6'5, no shop is going to have a bike in stock that fits me to test anyway. Last time I ordered through a shop they messed up checking the inventory and I had to wait 3 months for the bike... since then I've bought 3 bikes from Commencal and just got my new Radon Swoop on closeout all online, all delivered within a week in perfect condition, brakes bled properly, dropper set... just straighten the bars, add the front wheel and you're ready to go. When I'd last ordered from my local shop I had to go in to build it as there just aren't any mechanics around here with a lot of knowledge on DH bikes (Netherlands is flat!). Contrast that with the online bikes where they are built in large batches by factory trained mechanics who know exactly how to work with the parts and equipment on a given build.

Then there is the fact that in all there are about 3 or 4 bikes on the market at a time that fit me in a specific type and have the geometry I'm after for that application. I know the measurements I want and go searching to find the frames that match that then sort which has the build kit I'm after. In that regard the online guys seem to be a lot better and my past experience is they have a wider selection of build kits and frame sizes to work with the outliers like myself. So before I even get to the price they've already earned my business.
  • + 2
 That the whole bike purchase deal is changin, is no question. I bought a jeffsy with full xt, Pike rct blabla. I also was interested in the new trek remedy. For the same money I would have not gotten anything. I think the main way for a Bikeshop to hold up against the internet is when they bios a community. Group rides, get together with the city and organize trail maintenance events (or if possible build new trails), organize a skill clinic... Bottom line, create relationships, get people to come together... whatever the reason may be (as long as it's focused on two wheels and community... at least that's what I would do if I'd own a shop. And I've seen it work at a friends shop while I was living overseas. I haven't seen much of that here in Germany. But also haven't been here that long...
  • + 2
 My last 3 bikes were bought used and while they have all been awesome bikes I decided my next bike was going to be new. And I wanted to make the jump from downhill to enduro so I could ride in more locations then my DH sled can. And with price being the over riding factor I decided to buy a 2016 YT Industries Capra AL Comp 1. It was $4440 with pedals and shipping. The sales rep delivered it to my door himself. The Canadian rep is now based out of Squamish so I can drop my bike off if I have an issue. My dealings with YT so far have been awesome and I'm sure the Good Times will continue. Oh, the rep even allowed me to put a deposit on the bike, even though it was on sale, and pay the rest the following payday.
  • + 2
 I want to see local shops survive. But honestly, my favorite shop didn't even carry the brands I most want. They can only stock so much. I think eventually they'll do better on parts, service, and demos. (Maybe contracting with brands for demos and warranties?) I don't even know how much of their livelihood is still sales of full bikes. They all quit selling used long ago. Online is the future, but it needs room for demos. Real on mountain demos... not around the parking lot twiddles.
  • + 0
 "my favorite shop didn't even carry the brands I most want"

Often enough, not even my country.
  • + 2
 Honestly I demo then order, or I'm aware of what i am, I use to work at a shop and I understand that there are alot of clueless people out there that NEED the assistance of a educated sales person in which case online would be difficult for these people, but I would love to just get what I want without having to leave the house, its kind of a hassle dealing with the LBS at times if I know what I want, so I guess we need both.
  • + 2
 I had a canyon, that came late and I encountered issues with it, that took weeks to rectify.
I then had a Titus from Planet X, which is only a few miles from me and still had issues with it, and found the customer service/after sales to be less than brilliant.
And I now have a YT that came on time, and customer service has been excellent.
So just by what you want from where you want, but you get way more for your money buying outside.
  • + 1
 I bought my first ever brand new bike (after a run of 4-5 second hand bikes) direct from Canyon. Could not have had any easier experience, the only concerning thing about the whole process was USPS leaving the friggen bike on my front door step without anyone signing for it!

The lads down in Melbourne in the Canyon office actually called me after ordering the bike to run me through the process and have been great to chat to on advice for various things since.

That said I bought the Canyon Strive because I liked the bike (shape shifter) and the price was awesome for what I got, whether you could match that in store I couldn't find anything that compared.
  • + 3
 I've been mail ordering bikes since late 90's think my first was a gt sts from leisure lakes then a santacruz super 8 from stiff, a transition double from USA..
  • + 1
 I ride Kingdom and had to buy the frame online without testing based on the great advice and stearling customer service you get with that brand! Still bought loads of components on the lbs (Evans through their Price Match option...usually matched to CRC)! But at least you are doing something for your local shop!
  • + 1
 I'm not usually willing to buy much of anything for less than 30% off. Got my Covert 29 for 60% off online with free shipping and no tax. There is no way an LBS will ever beat that, but if they do I'll be happy to give them the sale. I use the LBS for suspension service, wheel building, and odd's and ends like shifter cables, sealant, and brake pads. Other than that I only use the LBS when I need something right away.
  • + 1
 If I didn't race and need support I would buy anything and everything online. I get a discount for being an advocate of the shop. Many times you cant order what you need when you need it today. That instant gratification is priceless. However Many bike destinations have the service model in place. They only do parts, crap tee shirts jerseys - (Ohemm Moab bike shops) maintenance and rent- then sell rental fleets. I dont see any new bikes for sale and who would buy one. I wouldn't want to own a bike shop right now... Very tricky few years ahead where they end up selling bikes for online pricing anyways bc they stay on the shelf all summer.
  • + 1
 The problem with the 'but I’m not comfortable buying a bike that I haven’t actually ridden' argument is: riding a bike around the carpark at the LBS doesn't count for anything and riding a bike at a demo day isn't a heck of a lot better because you can't really ride a demo bike like you would your bike due to setup differences.

That being said I have recently bought a bike and I looked the online options (esp. YT Capra) but ended up getting a bike (Giant Reign) from by LBS at a good price, configured how I like and with no wait times.
  • + 1
 The fact is that all business models evolve in the attempt to grow their market and ultimately their fortune. I honestly think that a majority of the Pink Bike users are savy experienced cyclists that understand geometry selection/sizing. This business model will most likely receive business from more remote areas and less experienced cyclist where their selection is medocre or the LBS just is not friendly. The other factor is Canyon and how well they do with inventing new products and enticing the customer. Question is; Will they prove to be a highly sought after bike for the targeted disciplines? We will see!
  • + 1
 I would like to see more people go to LBS and TRY?....if you can come close to a deal you want. If not, you tried and we should support LBS's. Conversely, If your really into riding build your own. It's a wonderful thing and in long run save TONS of $ and always get just what you want and set up the way you like. Aaaaand trust me when I say NO ONE is going to make time to get it , just right, like you would your own.Take time to learn about your suspension and the difference it can make in the quality of ride/experience. You get that "new ride feeling" all the time.
  • + 1
 Online is the future, no doubt about that. What these companies can do is put money into good demo tours that cover a good portion of the country where people buy bikes. I've bought all my frames here but I demoed the bikes beforehand on my local trails thanks to the demo tours put on by that manufacturer. I'm more than willing to support a brand if they show that they care by showcasing their bikes where I actually ride or somewhere reasonably close. I would think a demo tour is much cheaper than putting up dedicated brick-and-mortar shops and that you make your money back quick by the number of people who buy your bike because they got a chance to ride it at a demo.
  • + 1
 Why would a direct sales bike be any worse than a one bought from LBS? Many of them put at least as much R&D in as the other competitor who sell thru your LBS. And why would the customer service line be any worse than your local bike shop? In fact, since you get direct contact with the company, there's a bigger chance to really get things dealt the proper way. For these companies their reputation is everything, so they'll go a long way to keep it intact. Don't get me wrong, I really like bike shops, I used to work in one. But not all of them are good and not all of them are gonna serve you right. No need to feel obligated towards them. If you're tight on cash but still want a bike with a decent enought specs for the price, why not go for the direct sales?
  • + 3
 My LBS doesn't stock Reigns... So when i buy one from them thats the only way to get one in store. Is that not effectively buying online anyway
  • + 1
 I bought a Whyte T-129 from the US dealer back in July. I don't regret it one bit! The bike is amazing and the customer service has been outstanding. They paid for several maintenance issues my bike had, and also made sure I was able to get new brakes, rear derailleur, and shock from SRAM under warranty. I love my LBS but Whyte has been awesome!
  • + 1
 I don't have any problem with online sale, but when I buy a bike she (yes, she) has to attract me a lot and of course I don't want to spend 10000 euros for a bike lol (mainly I can't). So, if an online brand offers a bike that I like a lot, I'll buy it, otherwise I'll go to a lbs.. for example I've bought two commencals and a giant and I hope my next bike could be a Pole or an Ancillotti, so, no reservations
  • + 2
 When you live in Florida most guys riding $3000 full suspension bike don't get off the seat for anything, so a used full suspension is usually in good shape after the roadies have their fun in the dirt
  • + 1
 working in e-commerce consulting in one of major vendors of such solutions and year by year people are buying more and more online. we are not talking about bikes quite honestly as it is obvious. we are talking now more with cars and industrial machinery producers - how they could sell this kind of things online. no doubt that we as a audience are going to buy bikes online in next 5 years and those who are first present online will be the leaders. myself considering ordering of NZ-made bike frame to Moscow. how could I do it in more responsive way as placing order online and taking then further by tracking number?
  • + 4
 another day, another poll on pollbike....anyone else tired of this "how do you feel about this today" predictive bullshit?
  • + 7
 I'm guessing PB does it to sell the data.
  • + 1
 My LBS rocks, I buy all my bikes there and always get great prices. When I buy a bike there I know that will help the owners daughter go to college. I hang out there before rides, after rides and when I am too busted up to ride. They have my back.
  • + 1
 Bought off-line, sold on-line...At our recent company launch, the remarks from the local shop folk whom we've known for years, basically all wrote us off. Worse part is, we do not sell anything that any surrounding shops even bring to the table. Just another reason, why we are pursuing our dream. However, it's the physical "Touch & Feel or Kick the tires" concept" we have seen finalizes most sales. Now, to just get enough revenue to bring demo's for that fact.

The last charge, however is the fact that you can't ever replace the best bike mechanics in the shops abroad. The average person does not, nor desires to do complete fork service, cable replacements, etc...Somethings Youtube will never replace!
  • + 1
 I am close to buying a canyon for sheer bang for buck. If anyone from canyon is listening maybe a mobile canyon rep could tour countries/states where we could test ride your bikes? I'm sure you have thought of it but as a potential customer it is the only thing stopping me sending you my last four pay checks!
  • + 1
 I'm an online sail rail warror, my new DH frame... Half price 2015 model. The top of the line DH fork I bought in 2015 under half price 2014 model.

I can see it becoming like the car industry where you go to a demo day or lbs/showroom an try the bike for size, order it online. The bike is then sent to the lbs as a dealerahip that assembles an services it. An looks after an advises any upgrades the rider makes to keep in warrenty
For newbs anyway.....

I just buy cheap stuff online, fit it to my bike an smashitup
  • + 1
 I remember when I used to have to call Danscomp on the phone to order my bike/parts. The internet is much better than that.
I do wish the LBS was more competitive though, and had better customer service. I would prefer to buy local but most of the shops arent even trying.
  • + 4
 I haven't needed to walk into a shop since '98 and too cheap to pay LBS prices.
  • + 2
 Came close, but mates Capra cracked and they wouldn't replace, my local bike shop did a great deal on a Nukeprooof Pulse, not quite as good spec but metal bikes make me happy.
  • + 1
 With the costs of bikes going up, carbon becoming more and more popular you're looking at at least $5k new for a legit bike that will still probably need an upgrade or two. Buying from factory direct companies allows you to save more, but it does hurt your local shop. Some people live an area that just to drive to a LBS to get pads and such would cost more in gas than to order online. Buying locally isn't always a viable option. I don't feel like ordering completes online are taking away business from you let local shop because the bike range you're looking at factory direct would be completely out budget going through a local shop. With that said you should try to make a conscious decision to support your local scene in any way you can. Even if you don't get the bike from them, get your random stuff there. They're in business to make money and feed their families, but the reason why you open a shop is for the love of bikes.
  • + 1
 I've already been buying used and new bikes online since 2002. My Giant AC1 in 2002 was the last LBS bike purchase I made. My 6 other bikes have all been purchased online (4 used, 2 new), all through pictures and email only. All my spare parts come from online. Everytime I walk into a LBS, I come away disappointed; either because of lack of employee knowledge, high prices, bad repairs, no inventory or just poor customer service. Basically, I can do it all myself, cheaper and better. So I do.

I think the good guys, are the solo mechanics that don't have big storefronts, and cater to the high-end bike crowd, and support local races, etc. Those guys are probably the shops of the future. There will probably always be shops to sell mid/low tech bikes to the Walmart masses.
  • + 1
 At this moment in time, the ONLY lever direct to market brands have is price. They have no showrooms, no sales staff to pester and ask questions or advice of, and no overheads. You can't go to their shop, "showroom" some shoes, gloves, clothing and then go buy it online at a discount. They can easily beat any LBS price with a similar spec, as they don't need to make the same amount of money per bike to cover their costs. They also offer shitty levels of after care because let's be honest, you can't rock up in the shop and make things uncomfortable for them in front of their other customers.


(Deliberate use of caps...)

IF YOU THINK THIS PRICE WILL REMAIN LOW ONCE THE LBS ARE GONE, AND WE HAVE NOTHING BUT BIG BRAND CONCEPT STORES (spesh,trek,giant) AND DIRECT TO MARKET BRANDS. YOU ARE CRAZY.


I wanted this to be here for posterity....I will refer to this in the future, when pricing is uncompetitive, warranty is a thing of the past, and the LBS are long gone. We won't miss them until they're gone, and that will be too late.

I appreciate we can all probably point at a LBS that offers shitty service, crap deals and doesn't know it's arse from its elbow...that's true. But that shop has no future anyway...so I ain't worried about them. That shop would never get dealership of a good brand, IF we support the good LBS and don't try to cut corners and scrimp with every purchase. I know it's hard to see the long game, and see value in paying a bit more now for the benefit of our own future. But the alternative to me looks like a future sport increasingly controlled by multi national companies, with limited opportunity for smaller brands to innovate and push boundaries.

My 2c
  • + 1
 I don't really get this poll, I've never bought a complete build bike and don't think I would. I always build a bike out of the parts I want and never seem to see that in a complete build and then up spec frames/ forks as I go.

I'm surprised so many people will settle for a factory build.
  • + 1
 There are all those smaller bike builders who need to count their nickels. They all seem happy to take your call. The OE kit is needed for the demo anyway so why not just send the whole bike to your house.
Shops who excel at service will be fine after they rent the showroom to a phone store. Perhaps service agreements with manufacturers?
  • + 1
 NO NO NO. I just went thought though getting a bike off line from a sermon germon bike company that work of buying off line. The bike felt amazing to ride but the frame was made like cheese never again sorry for the rant I just went back to getting a transition tr500 and love it won't get a bike from a online retailer again the other thing is when the frame snaps,bends or craks it takes what feels like 100 years. Nope won't do it again.
  • + 1
 I'm finding it hard to justify going to my local shop. Trying to convince myself it'll work out the same in the long run. Clincher was wanting to charge $100 to convert a new bike brought from them to tubeless and $100 to convert to 1x . I'm not riding no where near as much as i used to and funds are lacking so might be buying a jeffsey
  • + 3
 Bought a commencal online. Meets all my expectations and doesn't seem any cheaper than my mates specialized. Next up a YT and old happily do it again and again!
  • + 1
 I like the idea of buying online and having a bike built at my local shop, helps everyone involved. Has anyone else heard of Cima Cycles (cimacycles.com) ....? My buddy has one, says they are super small gig out of Colorado. Anyone ever heard of the, ride them?
  • + 1
 I'm torn on this one. I've always gotten outstanding service from LBS's that I've had good relationships with, and rode with as well. I bought my last bike from a shop - that bike isn't sold online anyway. If you know the bike you want and can save significant amount of money purchasing online (even with shipping figured in - which, I think is factored into bike you buy in the store anyway?) then go for it. I think the LBS's make more money on service anyway, but again, am not sure about this. Most shops seem fine servicing bikes not purchased there or installing parts and stuff purchased online, but I don't think they like it, obviously.
  • + 1
 Buying online is understandable giving there are bikes being sold at times dramatically less than your LBS. But does your LBS offer services that cannot be offered online and try to keep you in store if you are a loyal customer? If they do, stay local. LBS's support the trails where you ride your bike. Their tax dollars help support recreation in your area. What does your local community get from you buying online? YT and Canyon have crap tons of money that just buys them another house.
  • + 1
 I've never bought a bike from an LBS as online builds have always been significantly less expensive...no idea why anyone would.

On another note, I've almost always had my LBS do various service for me, even for things as simple as bleeding brakes, but lately they have really been jacking up their prices...$40/brake for a bleed...are you kidding me. Bike Shops in general have shot up in service price, at least where I live in socal...

I guess they need to look out for their bottom line, but it has certainly converted me and most of my friends into decent bike mechanics as we were no longer willing to pay what they were charging for routine/minor items.
  • + 1
 You know I see all the consumer direct brands at the trail heads on the weekends, on the bike racks on the freeway... I understand they offer a sweet product for a reasonable price, and even I am tempted to buy an EVIL or YT, but I make a living working on bikes. When the weather is good and the trails are ripping, I am stuck at a bench fixing your Reverb. When you buy online whether its a bike, or components, it affects the guys and ladies who have dedicated their life to the industry, only to have it turn around and bone them. Shop local.
  • + 1
 I can not imagine any better buying expierence, than i had with my Propain Tyee.
Yes, another german direct sales manufacturer, but:
Testriding - no problem. There is that Propain-Friends network. You can get in touch with people, owning the bike you are looking for, in the size you want to try riding. I did so and found my size.
Then you can configure YOUR bike online, with so many different parts... well, it can get even hard to make a final decision.
After all, the price is still a very good one.
How should a LBS compete with that?
  • + 1
 I'm currently waiting for a new computer I bought on line from its manufacturer. It wasn't available in stores. What a shitty experience. Cancelled my order twice. Had to get Visa ,Lenovo and myself in a conference call to get the damn order processed. Then they took three days to ship it. F*&%kers!

I support my local RC shop and community by buying local from small business whenever possible. I don't care if I pay more because they are there to help me when I need it.

I hate on line bullshit. Having said that changes to the IBD are inevitable. I work at a shop that deals in used sporting goods. Used and service/repair is the future for IBDs and I'm happy to be a part of that.
  • + 1
 Nothing wrong buying online. Bike stores will still be in business. Surprisingly the amount of riders that can't turn a wrench to save thier life. Some say they wouldn't buy a bike without riding it. Well, riding circles in the store parking lot, won't tell you a whole lot either.
  • + 1
 I did last time. The new Nomad had just been released and no shops around me had one in stock (or carried a decent selection of SC anyhow). I had a Heckler at the time, knew I liked the brand, knew it would be a massive upgrade, had read every article I could about the bike, and just took the leap of faith. Yes, I ordered through my LBS, but the effect was the same - buying a bike I'd never sat on. Ironically, I was more comfortable doing it with an expensive bike than I would have been with a cheaper one - the price (and reviews) implied an expected quality. I expect online purchase to be most prevalent in the low- and high-end price points.
  • + 1
 I will support my semi LBS. (It's in an adjacent city but worth the 15 minute drive).

They gave me an amazing deal on a brand new 2016 bike at the beginning of 2016. Not only that, I purchased new bar, stem, grips and pedals and they all came within $3 CAD each compared to ordering it online from CRC. After that, I purchased a brand new Thule T2 Pro for a way cheaper price than anywhere else I could find it.

This bike shop works for me and I will support them as best I can as long as they keep this up. I've already had one friend buy a bike and accessories from them and working on getting two other friends to have them buy their bike from this shop too.
  • + 1
 My Cousin owns a bike shop here in ontario and i still bought my Commencal from their webstore because i know that bikes shops dont make alot of money of bikes. A bike shop makes most of its money from servicing bikes, parts and clothing sales as those have the largest markup prices ( the amount the seller charges for a product) and this is because they can get clothing alot cheaper from company's and sells it for alot more than they would a bike. so if you wanna save the money on a bike purchase it from a online webstore, it wont really hurt the shop your working at they make most of their income from small sales and cheaper low end bikes. so if you really wanna support your local shop take your bike their for servicing and buy your kit from them.
  • + 1
 Having paid full retail for bikes and recently buying one online I'm pretty certain I'll continue to buy online. The money I saved plus the quality of bike I bought was enough to convince me. I think the direct sale model is the way to go and I am curious to see how the big bike companies will change their business models to stay competitive. I figured I saved at least $1000.00 to $1400.00 buying online.
  • + 3
 I'll go direct once the big guns head that way until then I'm happy at my lbs, great service & support
  • + 1
 Considering i can get a pretty much same speced canyon for half the price of a intense tracer bloody oath i will be and with the money i save hello canda for a months riding trip
  • + 2
 Thats a whacky coincidence, I literally just did, yesterday ! There are several 2016 Canyon Sender's in the outlet for about 20% off right now which seemed like a good deal.
  • + 1
 shops will be needed for those getting into the game, but for those of us who have been around for a while, and know what we actually want, it doesnt matter where you get it, but how much you pay for it.
  • + 2
 The LBS I bought my last bike runs a shop, a bikepark and has a online store. All in all good service, test rides at the park and almost online prices.
  • + 1
 Give us the name!
  • + 1
 I purchased my first frame online and it is defective, been chasing a replacement frame for a month now with no luck. I'd still happily buy online again. Just not an On One again. Fuck You On One.
  • + 2
 I wood buy my bikes from shop it is much better for me and I work in a bike shop in glyncorrwg and I clean bikes for the shop .
  • + 4
 PINKBIKE BUY AND SELL SECTION IS MY LOCAL LBS HOW BOUT DAH!
  • + 4
 Why are answers 1,2 and 4 really just 'yes'?
  • + 2
 Online bike retailers should have a demo van traveling year round. I guarantee sales go way up...or down if their bikes are crap.
  • + 2
 I just look online to find the slackest head angle, because that way I know it will be the most confidence inspiring quiver killer mini downhill xc bike.
  • + 2
 I sort of did both. I bought my frame online because I needed to replace it. But I'm supporting my local shop by having them transfer the components over
  • + 1
 My LBS never has parts I'm looking for in stock anyway, so i either pay 50% more for them to order it online, or order or myself and save the money.

Not a difficult decision.
  • + 1
 Got the best of both worlds. Demoed a Bird Zero (for an entire weekend) Bought online from Bird Cycleworks and then went and picked it up from their HQ. They are based in the village next to mine though!!
  • + 1
 I probably wouldn't buy online, being someone 6' 5" I am on the far spectrum of bike sizing and have not really been to happy with sizing that I even find in stores. If I was a 5' 10" midget... Yeah I would buy online.
  • + 1
 I truly want to support my local shop. But the bike industry thinks so incredibly highly of there products that I have no choice but to buy online. It's the only way i can afford to keep my bike going and keep riding.
  • + 1
 I will date myself here with this tidbit: My second bike back in the day was mail order from SuperGo! It was all steel with a rigid fork. I loved that bike. Fluorescent yellow.
  • + 1
 How do warranties stand on bikes bought online as most in the manufactures terms says has to be built up by a qualified mechanic or do the companies not care ad warranty everything anyway.
  • + 2
 Ofcourse! Just received my new Propain Tyee, straight from the factory in Germany Smile Much cheaper also, compared to a retailer who needs their own share.
  • + 3
 I'm still trying to figure out how to afford a new bike without selling my car to pay for it.
  • + 1
 Sell body parts or blood???? Smile
  • + 0
 Don't worry, America is gonna be great again soon!
A lot of jobs will be created for people who already have 2 or 3 of them :p
  • + 5
 @mazze: American underground music always blows up when we have an idiot president so there's that.
  • + 1
 @endlessblockades: I love the American underground music. Immortal Technique for the win, man.
Unfortunately I can't say the same thing about German underground music haha... although Merkel is giving all the opportunities you could ever ask for to make the best critical lyrics ever lol.
  • + 3
 I like bike shops, it's fun to just go to them, and especially if you're buying one, wouldn't trade it for anything.
  • + 3
 We also have some pretty amazing bike shops in the city, maybe if your only option was one bad bike shop the Internet would seem pretty great.
  • + 1
 @Kramz: this is a great point. We have several fancy pants lbs here, but only one that really cares. They encourage buying used-from the fancy pants customers that trade up every year, and then bring it in for conversation and maybe a part or two.
  • + 3
 Gotta keep the LBS in business cuz who is gonna rebuild your wheel after you killed it on aline!
  • + 1
 As a former shop rat, I've been buying frames & building up what I like since my first ride in the late 1980's. Built plenty for friends. If you have the skill set and the tool set - why not?
  • + 4
 Ridin' the YT like I stole it.
  • + 1
 Bought a Ghost AMR through CRC 3 years ago. We do have MEC which carries Ghost but they didnt have the bike that i was looking for and the discount to boot.
  • + 2
 I do both. Online and instore. To save myself money and to help out local businesses. Everyone is a winner.
  • + 1
 I got my YT Tues for the price of a used bike. I still purchase stuff from my LBS but even they could not argue with the savings
  • + 1
 No used option on the poll? i'm not planning on ever buying a 'new' bike but i had to select the third option as cheaper new = cheaper used.
  • - 1
 Bicycle shops will be a thing of the past. Too much overhead. This means 2000% mark ups. And the bike shop does nothing for you accept create headaches. Learn how to fix your own shit...if you plan to ride for 70 years it will be well worth it. I honestly hope they all close down...a bike shop is a risky investment. As the generations progress forward...bike shops will serve no purpose accept to steal your hard earned money. RIP
  • + 2
 I will buy which ever bike I want, and that may or may not be a consumer direct bike.
  • + 2
 @pinkbicycle: My money my choice, so I think I can.
  • + 3
 Yep switched from Specialized to YT, Capra arrived today!
  • + 3
 Should probably have a buy used option too. Who would buy a new bike?
  • + 1
 Good point!
  • + 1
 I prefer to build a bike rather than buy in full. Not that I don't trust others - it's just an enjoyment of fitting expensive components that I actually want.
  • + 0
 Demo fleets for trying bikes and online for buying..makes sense to me, if it helps with pricing...that doesn't mean I won't go to my bike shop ..I go to my shop for parts and repairs...
  • + 1
 It really depends on your local shop and your wallet. My local shop sucks, and my wallet is thin. So hell yes, I'm buying a YT or Commencal for my next bike.
  • + 1
 Forget about willing to. Every lBS lbs in town now has limited to no dh/freeride bikes for sale. They don't want my money. I am happy to spend it on-line
  • + 2
 Non issue, my most recent bike was bought site unseen and having never ridden one before.
  • + 1
 Bought one of those Airborne Takas a few years back. It was discontinued with absolutely no replacement parts before the 5 year warranty was up.
  • + 1
 Middlemen are a waste of time, money, space & all resources they consume. Let 'em burn.
  • + 0
 I did a ton of research before I bought my YT Capra. Would do it again in a second. Love my YT. It's exactly what they said it would be and better.
  • + 1
 buy used bikes! they're a margin of the price and work fine if you know how to maintain it.
  • + 1
 If I got enough money, I'll go to the Trek Bicycle Store. Else, I might buy online from YT or Canyon indeed !
  • + 2
 The internet can't fix your bike.
  • + 0
 Times are changing. I would imagine its do or die if you don't sell your frames/bikes online within the next couple of years.
  • + 0
 Its a global market and I'm sworn to fun and loyal to none u are a buffoon to buy a complete bike from a local bike shop.....
  • + 1
 I only buy bikes online. I refuse to deal with the attitudes at local shops.
  • + 1
 what about buying the one you like, online, after you've tested it at a demo day?
  • + 2
 Is buying a zerode taniwha class as online?
  • + 1
 Hey "Pinkbike", can you stop "trolling" now?... thank you.
  • + 2
 I really wish YT had a frame only option!
  • + 1
 Yeah I'm not going to drop thousands of dollars on a bike without being able to check out the sizing in person
  • + 1
 Measuring tape and some intuition pal.
  • + 1
 I buy almost everything else online so I welcome the opportunity to purchase bikes online if it means reduced cost.
  • - 1
 If I wasn't in the Industry I would exclusively buy online, consumer direct brands such as YT and Canyon offer you way more bang for your buck than your LBS who's looking to rip you off buy driving up there bike costs.
  • + 2
 "YT and Canyon offer you way more bang for your buck (but long delays and lack of communication when you break something on your MTB) than your RUBBISH LBS"

Fixed that for you.
  • + 1
 @Bustacrimes: Being in the industry I've fortunately never had to buy a buy bike from a LBS I've always bought direct (BMC, Santa Cruz, Specialized and, Scott) So I've never had personal experience. But for me I'd take my money where it's going to buy me the best bike and 5900 for a top of the line build from YT I'd take that any day then spending 10k on something that's the same just to support a LBS.
  • + 2
 Couldn't be happier with my Strive CF and the whole buying process.
  • - 2
 I'm open to buying frames online for the savings, especially with Canyon coming over here. Though I'm going to my LBS for building up the bike. I like the option of choosing where my $ goes into different parts/suspension/wheels, and direct-sales don't offer that.
  • + 1
 The precursor to this survey question should have been;

Is your LBS totally worthless? Do they even ride MTB?
  • + 0
 support your local bike shops and local small town economy. sure the prices are a little higher, but damn keep them in buis.....
  • + 1
 Should say they cancelled my order twice and took till next day to notify me both times.
  • + 2
 LBS=Full Retail, haggling, and full taxes.
  • + 1
 LBS equals loyalty discount for REGULAR customers, cup of tea while having a chat about the purchase, and FULL dealer support WHEN something goes wrong. Alternative FACTS
  • + 1
 I buy mine of pinkbike oi oii
  • + 1
 Aren't answer 1) 2) and 3) the same thing?!
  • + 1
 I've bought 2 bikes online already, why is this even a poll?
  • + 1
 Yes, because it's going to be another Moots...
  • + 1
 Price is the bottom line. Competition is beautiful
  • + 0
 If it saves me money no doubt! I can still support the bike shops with my poor mechanic skills.
  • - 2
 I've bought 6 new bike, all from a Direct-Sale Brand, and no real problems. So why not save money that you can spend on trips?! And all other matters go to my local shop that is suport. So we are all happy.
  • + 1
 Unfortunately most bikes break so a valid warranty is a must.
  • - 1
 My lbs takes my old bikes on trade, saves me the hassle of trying to sell them on here. I also have no interest in anything Yt or Canyon offers
  • + 1
 If the geometry numbers, the spec, and the price are right then why not?
  • + 1
 Been buying online from Canfield brothers for years...
  • + 1
 Those bikes are so good! It helps make buying online easier when you know that you are ordering from people like them.
  • + 1
 Capra vs tracer! Compare price and specs!!
  • + 1
 we've been doing this in America for years too...???
  • + 0
 Bought two on line myself and I'll buy a third. I love saving $ and having it elsewhere to put into what I love.
  • + 1
 So you don't love cycling? Puzzled?
  • + 1
 @Bustacrimes: Well yes - it puts more $ in my pocket for DH tickets, part upgrades, etc. I don't know why I got neg proped.
  • - 1
 man I only buy my used bikes here on pb! 1 yr old save 3000 buks come on 4real! the only reason you buy a new bike is because your rich and don't know any better!
  • + 1
 or because you work/worked hard and can afford to....
  • + 0
 I'd say the market has spoken.
  • + 1
 buy from a shop
  • + 0
 We don't all have good shops. I've been ripped off more by shops than online. I'm happy for you if you have a good shop. It's a rarity these days.
  • + 1
 @njparider: I am sales rep in the bike industry. I look after 300 accounts. The majority are good people, trying to make a living in an increasingly competitive environment. Most are second or third generation family business's and have been around servicing cycling before it became the popular sport that massive companies want to invest in to make money. They are not the minority, at least not yet.

But if the sway to online continues, we are all signing the death warrant for these shops. And the legacy that brings may not be as rosy and consumer lead as some want to believe Smile
  • + 1
 Good shops are super hard to find. Most are just large scale outdoor stores anymore. So do what my family did, open an actually service orientated bike shop. These big bike stores may go away, but a good service shop will always have a place
  • + 0
 if it's the best place to get what i want yes.
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