Ask Pinkbike: Swapping Parts, Relocating for Winter, and Commencal's Supreme SX

Oct 3, 2017
by Pinkbike Staff  
Ask Pinkbike Header

Here at Pinkbike we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul-searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand-picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.





Old Parts on a New Frame?

Question: Ehatcher105 wrote in the All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country forum: I'm currently saving up to purchase a new bike for next season. I'm looking at the Santa Cruz Hightower LT as I want a 29er and would like to participate in some enduro races. I'm trying to decide if it's better for me to buy the entire bike (CS to be exact) or to just purchase the frame only option and swap over applicable parts from my current bike (2017 Kona BigHonzo) like drivetrain, stem, handlebars etc. and purchase the other parts needed.

From where I look at it I can get a better frame in the CC, better shock (FOX Float Factory DPX vs. FOX Float Performance DPS), buy a better fork than what's on the CS model and get some good brakes, and all other necessary bits needed to complete the bike. Later on down the line, I can get better parts to replace the parts from my old bike and put them back to rebuild the Honzo.

Doing some rough calculations on prices, it's not going to be a huge difference and I get a better bike. I just want to get some opinions from the crowd here and see if what I'm thinking is a viable option or if there's a better way of going about this?



bigquotesIf you are serious about racing enduro, and you can afford the additional expense of building up your Hightower LT from the frame up, that would be the best choice. The reasoning here is (as you mentioned), you'll probably want to customize the wheels and suspension to suit your purpose and save some money in the short term. Switching your old parts over to a new bike, however, is not always the money-saver that many believe it will be. I did a quick check on the specifications of both bikes and found two mismatches: the Kona has a BB92 pressfit bottom bracket, and an external headset, while the Santa Cruz uses a threaded BB and an internal headset arrangement. Both would be affordable fixes.

Fortunately, the KS LEV dropper post is a match, although, you will probably want a 150-millimeter stroke post for racing, and one with no set-back. Both bikes are the Boost 148 axle standard, so the crankset will line up. If you can push a big gear uphill, your Kona's 11-speed drivetrain will work fine, because you're going to have to bump that 30-tooth chainring to a 32 or 34. Upgrading to a 12-speed drivetrain, or a wide-range e*thirteen cassette however, would give you the top speed you'll want to race enduro, along with a low gear for the transitions. Your assumption that you'd need good brakes is also correct, but you might get away with switching to a larger, 180-millimeter rotor in the rear to compensate for the 29-inch wheel.

Building up a bike from a frame is a hugely satisfying experience, but the cheap cost that bike makers pay for OEM components most often means that you get much more for your money when you buy a complete bike - and the resale value is usually higher. I suggest you make a detailed list of the key components that you'll ultimately need for your dream bike, price them out and then cross-check that result with the higher-end Hightower models. 
RC


Mark Scott s Santa Cruz Hightower
Mark Scott's Santa Cruz Hightower, photographed in the EWS pits.





Relocating for Winter

Question: Pinkbike user @DJ-B-Whip asked this question in the Freeride & Slopestyle forum: I live in Breckenridge, Colorado, but it's about to snow and I want to ride my bike more in the winter. I'm free to go anywhere, but don't have a clue where progressing dirt jumps and etc. are located during the winter. So I'm reaching out to you guys – where to go?

bigquotesAnywhere? If that's really the case, I'd recommend packing your bags and heading down to New Zealand for the winter. There are a huge variety of riding options, everything from dirt jumping to downhill, as well as plenty of non-bike related activities to keep you entertained for months.

If New Zealand is too far away, Southern California will probably be your best bet for winter riding. There's a reason so many pros end up down there in the off-season – sunshine, surf, and dry trails start looking pretty appealing when your local spot is covered by a blanket of snow. The best dirt jump spots aren't going to be found by searching on the internet – you'll need to go into a local bike shop or find some friendly locals in order to locate the goods. Offer to lend a hand digging, or at the very least buy the trail boss some burritos and beer and you'll likely be able to get in on some fun winter time jump sessions.
Mike Kazimer

at the Gorge Road Dirt Jumps near Queenstown New Zealand. Photo Sterling Lorence
If I was looking to escape winter's rain and snow, New Zealand would be at the top of my list.





Commencal Supreme SX?

Question: Pinkbike user @tricyclerider asked this question in the All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country: Has anyone ridden the new Commencal Supreme SX yet? And honestly, if I were to do a few enduro races and maybe one DH race a year on it would I hate the extra weight and the burliness of it? I ride a lot of trail stuff in my area, but I ride the bike park probably 10-15 times a year (mostly Sunpeaks, but I also go to Whistler for a few days a year and Silverstar). I currently ride a Reign with a Vivid coil in the back so it's by no means a super efficient bike, but would the SX just be too much?

bigquotesFunny you should ask, as I have just completed my third ride on the Supreme SX, and it's off to a flying start.

So far the bike built with Schwalbe Super Gravity tires weighs around 33lbs, which is respectable for an alloy framed, 180mm travel bike, especially one that costs a measly $3699 USD with a build kit where I wouldn't change a thing.

The first couple of rides made me question why you would make a hardcore bike with 160mm travel when the Supreme SX seems to move along the terrain just fine with 180mm front and rear. For charging through gnar, the high pivot is fantastic, especially for flat pedal riders who want to smash through braking bumps - it feels as if your feet are planted at all times. I don't know how severe your trail riding gets, but you won't regret the Supreme SX when you jump off the bike park lift.

So my first impressions are a great build, great price, great sizing and expected weight, and it's also very quiet with massive straight-line speed. There are a number of areas where this bike needs some in-depth testing, like the anti-squat and anti-rise with such a high pivot and idler wheel system, and how the rearward axle path will affect weight distribution when you need to find grip. Expect a full review this fall.
Paul Aston


Commencal Supreme SX




Have some unresolved tech questions? Jump in the Pinkbike Forum and we'll look to answer it for next time.


121 Comments

  • + 142
 For f*ucks sake you don't need a 12 speed tranny to race an Enduro. Just ride yo bike hombre
  • + 37
 Don't you remember the dark days when people had to push their bikes to the top of hills because of the pitiful 10-42 gear range? When you had to shift the chain with your fingers because the glorious Sram Eagle had not yet been bestowed upon the earth?
  • + 18
 @bridgermurray: I might throw the old 11-36 on next time just out of spite
  • + 14
 Man thank you. Came down here to post just the same. Still stick on my 1x10 myself
  • + 22
 @Jimmy0: how about 11-32 1x9 with 26" wheels and still cleaning everything
  • + 12
 @slimjim4: might be a bit much, but you do you slim
  • + 7
 @Jimmy0: I totally agree. Just raced the southeastern enduro series at windrock this past weekend with a 36 front ring and a 11-36 rear. On a 7" travel bike that weighs 37 pounds.
  • + 11
 @cploren31, that sounds miserable. Did you win?
  • + 3
 @cploren31: rung whatcha brung
  • + 2
 especially when half the cost of transmission is in wear parts...like he said he plans to do: just upgrade the next time you need a new ring, cassette, and chain. For probably less than 50 bucks that Honzo can probably become a fun singlespeed while it waits to get it's gears back. That's what my Chameleon is doing (although it probably won't ever get the gears back).
  • + 7
 @slimjim4: before I robbed its gears my 26" Chameleon (hardtail) raced Enduro blind. Not saying I'm good. In fact, I didn't clean everything, took a few B-lines, and nearly passed out on the second climb, but I didn't get hurt too bad and I've probably never had so much fun on a bike before that. Point is, you hardly need anything to race enduro and have fun. Basically two wheels (they should be kind of strong though...mine got messed up) and a helmet.
  • + 1
 @ecologist: right on. Are you really an ecologist?
  • + 1
 @Jimmy0: kinda sorta. more or less trained as one and did research for a few years but now practitioner (do what the ecologists tell me to).
  • + 3
 @ecologist: gotcha, I'm a wildlife field tech, so I do what the people the ecologist tells what to do tell me to do. Maybe I'll work for you someday and we can chat about our old bikes
  • + 4
 @slimjim4: happy to run 28 front, 11-36 rear, then it's all pumps and aero tucks
  • + 2
 And here I am still running a 34t ring with an 11-36 cassette
  • + 1
 Hahaha my thoughts exactly, what kind of kickback do they get for throwing in the 12 speed suggestion? My 1x11 is plenty and walking the steepest hills isn't the worst thing.
  • + 1
 @RideTahoe707: >>walking the steepest hills isn't the worst thing.

A thousand egos just cried out in despair.
  • + 2
 @Jimmy0: awesome...I'm on the veg side, forestry tech. I like it better...the real ecologists are only allowed outside a couple times a year. Plus if I made any more money I might wind up doing something dumb like getting a new bike...
  • + 2
 @Jimmy0: like you said, run what you brung. But that said, i sold the 26" yeti to a friend, got a used Patrol, and now also have a Selma singlespeed. Both bikes are fun and scary in their own way, they both bring the hurt, and I couldn't be happier.
  • + 1
 @slimjim4: greetings fellow jim
  • + 1
 @Jimmy0: Hello fellow person. My name's actually Jon, and apparently I'm a fraudulent Jim.
  • + 1
 @slimjim4: I guess slonjohn4 doesn't really roll off the tongue as well?
  • + 54
 Looking forward the SX review, @paulaston!
  • + 3
 Even just an initial review would be sweet! There is almost no information out there on how it rides!!!
  • + 2
 @tricyclerider: well...you just got it!
  • + 1
 @Rubberelli: It was abvious that it rides down like a daemon, but the real question is how it pedals uphill. Or in other words - is it uber-enduro or a small downhill bike with "I only ride park" attitude.
  • + 1
 @lkubica: I think it's about handling as well. It's only a cm more travel than say a Capra so the main difference is the high pivot point and how this will feel when trying to pop off things, manual etc. I know a really skilled rider who got the DH version and ditched it within months, saying it was a beast on the straights but he thought it handled like a tugboat in those situations.
  • + 48
 Is there a bike in that last pic? All I see is chain.
  • + 3
 Yes, and a very long one indeed.
  • + 44
 What job do I need to just go anywhere when it's winter out?
  • + 41
 Unemployment checks
  • + 7
 @NoDHinKentucky Server/bartender. If you have some experience and know what you're doing you can find work in just about any town you want. I've had a few friends who have had success doing that. A bonus is that the industry expects higher turnover, so they're not pissed when you quick after 6 months. I've had friends who move around a bit that way.

I became a chemist, thinking it would be interesting work with decent pay. I make about the same amount of money, have a pretty boring job, and have pretty limited options on what cities I can live in to find work.

You know what they say about hindsight...
  • + 7
 @JaredHarzan: thing is, the money you make is largely in part to how good looking and/or personable you are. I know a lot of bartenders/servers, and the only ones that make any amount of money are hot ladies.
  • - 4
flag scottzg (Oct 3, 2017 at 15:15) (Below Threshold)
 @PHeller: I've heard that a bunch, but i've never really paid attention to how attractive my server is when i tip. I can't be the only one...?
  • + 6
 @scottzg: my servers tip completely depends on how long my drink glass sits empty on the table. The next thing would be if there's a screw up how the server handles the situation. I've never based my tip off of looks either.
  • + 10
 Trustafarian
  • + 2
 software developer/most jobs related to programming
  • + 1
 @PHeller: tippings not really a thing in NZ so can’t rely on looks! You’ll get paid for your hours and maybe a little bit more....
  • + 11
 Job?!

You're doing it wrong. I married a doctor.
  • + 1
 Trust fund baby.
  • + 4
 @livewosleep: I'm doing it wrong, I married a Canadian.

I get to spend most of December and January in Halifax.....
  • + 1
 @PHeller: I went to a fancy restaurant on honeymoon that had proper professional career waitstaff. Some middle-aged, average-looking (I would guess) guy, who did the most amazingly outstanding job, added tremendously to the whole experience; I tipped well enough that if average for him, he makes more than I ever will. So the personable thing could really take you places. IIRC that restaurant was seasonal so he had about 4 months off in winter.

Wildfire, drawbacks being that depending on the year you might never get to ride during fire season and your body will be shot by about 40, but lack of personality might be an asset.

Plenty of people just work meager seasonal jobs and live simply in the off-time and enjoy the lifestyle enough to make it work.

Summer help in the trades and service industries (especially landscaping, carpentry, painting and the like) in resort communities can pay pretty good, in my experience up to 2-3 times the wage you'd earn in your typical town. Bonus: rich old ladies sometimes tip for this kind of work, buy/make you lunch, and don't even expect you to do much while yapping about how thankful they are for all the work you're doing.
  • + 1
 oh...sometimes electricians and plumbers. Get your license, and get a gig where you only do new construction, no house calls (too messy, frustrating, require too many tools). Work 9-3 for $100 an hour for six or eight months a year.
  • + 2
 I do IT contract work, dont earn a fortune, but no kids, cheap mortgage, 2 flat,mates..I can have extended time off..visited Vegas and surrounding areas in winter and summer season in Morzine, French Alps..life is good..doesnt cost a fortune...no need to work whilst out there.
  • + 15
 On the whole "buy a frame thing..."
It sure seems like to me when you just go and buy a "newer-used" complete bike... say a 2016... that you get way more for your money than buying just a frame. (Of course a new frame is $$$)
  • - 1
 Thats what I thought until I broke my frame 3 times in a summer and the warranty was denied
  • + 24
 @mollow:
curious, how did you fix the frame every time?
  • + 1
 @lifted-d: Daddy buy me a new bike
  • + 0
 @lifted-d: carbon frames can be repaired by fiberglass specialists. They usually do kayaks but they can do bikes and carbon wheels.
  • + 0
 I had it fixed 2 times and one time I had to buy a new chain stay because its aluminium. Expensive summer
  • + 2
 @mollow: Can they be repaired properly? If so why did you have to have it repaired multiple times? im not trying to be rude its a serious question.
  • + 11
 @loganflores: No worries, happy to give you the details. It was actually 2 different spots, one time it was the seatstay and the other time in the seattube. The seatstay one he just layed more layers of carbon aroung the crack and told me it would be stronger than it was before, the repair is guaranteed so if it breaks again at the same spot he will fix it for free. For the seat tube, my bike has a sort of insert inside that is essentially where the whole front triangle is built around. Because he couldnt take the insert off the frame, he just injected some "super expensive glue" to make it tight and then laid multiple layers of carbon around. This repair was more of an experiment, and although he is confident it will last, the work is not guaranteed. S/O to all my downvoters
  • + 1
 @mollow: Was this your Trek? How does it ride after the repairs?
  • + 2
 There's so many crazy discounts out there that it is, in my opinion, entirely possible to buy a bike in parts and build it yourself for the same or less than a full build. Plus you get to build your bike!
  • + 1
 @kwapik: still rides like a dream! Though pretty much every parts are worn out now lol
  • + 1
 @mollow: I know that carbon can be repaired, the op doesn't describe the original damage or remedy.
were the issues crash/rock damage? I suppose its a moot point though as it was used...
  • + 2
 @lifted-d: @lifted-d: No, they were stress cracks that, as my op suggested, would've been covered by the manufacturer warranty had I bought the frame new. Sorry that I misunderstood you, English isn't my first language as you can see and sometimes I get mixed up in the details.
  • + 7
 "....but the cheap cost that bike makers pay for OEM components most often means that you get much more for your money when you buy a complete bike...." but most of the manufacturers put crap components on good frames and charge top dollar for the complete bike.
  • + 7
 Florida has great winter riding. There are plenty of dirt jumps at the vortex and Santos. There are 80 plus miles of single-track throughout the trail system. We also have Alafaya State Park. There is grapefruit Trail in Palm Bay dirt jumping heaven. There are small Trail systems everywhere like Mount Dora, Graham swamp, malacompra, Chuck Lennon Sports Complex, and Doris Leeper Spruce Creek Preserve. All will give your body a thorough physical workout with some pristine single-track Trail. Don't forget your shorts and suntan lotion.
  • + 2
 Really? I had no idea. I need to pick your brain before my next vacation to FL.
  • + 1
 @Warburrito: I've spent the last 20 years riding mountain bikes all over this country. Florida definitely gets a bum rap when it comes to mountain biking. Some of the fastest Riders I've ever ridden with I find in the woods of Florida.
  • + 1
 I just wanted to chime in about Santos, which is about an hour away from me. I get out there once a week usually just to get some more technical riding than my local trails. It's a great place to ride and there are some really great trails out there as well as some solid dirt jumps. Alafia is great as well, I've made my way to those trails quite a few times.
  • + 4
 @neologisticzand: don't forget about the Magic Touch of Ray from Ray's indoor (Ohio) sprinkling his magic all over the vortex jump park.
  • - 2
 The nau's are the best
  • + 1
 @properp: I actually have to agree with you on this. I've ridden in a bunch of states (GA, FL, DC, NJ, AZ, etc.) and still am happy to come home and have a trail system like Santos relatively near by. It has a lot to offer. Alafia too. And places like Markham Park and Virginia Key do a good job making the best from what they have.

I think an advantage to FL is that because of the lack of long descents, you have to pedal a lot if you want to be going fast as a lot of trails undulate frequently.
  • + 3
 @properp: YES! Great point. Some trails at Santos/Vortex really benefited from Ray's involvement.
  • + 15
 Come to the UK, it rains all year round and we have the stickiest mud there is.
  • + 1
 I'd say Florida's biggest dig against it's trails are there relative remoteness from major population centers. Ocala is the probably the closest town to most of Santos, Orlando being second, but it's still, what, an hour away? That's a hard after-work ride time-wise. Alafia is a bit closer to Tampa, but I'd hate to sit in traffic after work hoping to sneak in a ride. The trail surrounding Tallahassee are probably best suited for the ride to work/ride to trails mix, most of them being easily accessible from downtown without a car. Wish other cities in Florida would emulate Tallahassee's "green belt".
  • + 1
 @fartymarty: in Florida we ride in the rain. You let your bike set and when it dries you take high pressure air or a dry paintbrush and sweep the dry sand off of it. Life is rough here. We have 364 days of sunshine.
  • + 1
 @neologisticzand: Florida Riders get what they earned.
  • + 8
 I'm glad you like it, but a 345' maximum elevation wouldn't do it for me.
  • + 5
 but alligators
  • + 2
 isn't Florida flatter than a plank?
  • + 1
 Plus: next to no climbing!
  • + 5
 @properp: That's BS. I lived in Florida for 22 years and it's one of the cloudiest places ever. Like clock work everyday, seabreazes blow moisture inland, land mass heats up, makes clouds. Sunshine state my ass.
  • + 1
 @codypup: It doesn't always do it for me. I try to get out of state to ride in the mountains when I can.
  • + 2
 Per Strava statistics FL was rated the flattest state of them all.
  • + 0
 @deserat: you're entitled to your opinion even if it is wrong. Sounds like you're describing Portland Oregon to me. Not Florida. I live on the coast and I don't have a clue what you're talking about.
  • + 0
 @properp: Ok, you're right, there are no clouds in Florida. I only lived there for half my life. What do I know? And funny you mention Portland. A quick google search shows that Portland receives about 37" of rain per year. And Florida.....49". Rain comes from clouds. And for what it's worth, the weather patterns that create rain in Portland vs Florida are entirely different. Also, Florida is a peninsula, surrounded by relatively warm water, it's a humid place, and warm, all these things make water condense in the atmosphere and form clouds, and then create rain. Do I need to continue?
  • + 1
 @deserat: I guess that's why it's called the Sunshine State. Because it's cloudy and rainy all the time huh
  • + 5
 I relocated from Sweden to New Zealand from October 2014 to May 2015. Stayed in Queenstown for 3 months, riding at Gorge Road(pictured) almost every day.
There is also a nice gondola accessed bike park there, and some superb trails that can be accessed by shuttle.
Not to forget Wynyard Dream Track, though I ended my time in Queenstown with a OTB there, keeping me off the bike for a few months.
Also great trail/dh riding in Rotorua's Redwood forest(whakarewarewa), just amazing. Was not that impressed by the gondola accessed park.
And there is apparently a new gondola accessed park in Christchurch too.
I'll have to go back soon... Smile
  • + 3
 FYI The bike park here in Christchurch is still being rebuilt after huge forest fires. Give it a year to build up again before planning a visit. Vic park DH tracks are pretty good though and there are often shuttles running on weekends during the summer.
  • + 2
 @karatechris: That sounds bad... I read something about it but thought it was undamaged as i didn't hear any more about it.
Thanks for the info.
  • + 1
 RE the Gondola at Rotorua. Back in 2015 it was still new so the tracks were limited back then - but they are a bit better now (Mr Black, The Fuzz, BYO). Obviously the area that the Gondola services isn't that big - so it is never going to be a Whistler.
  • + 4
 @Ehatcher105 I swap frames all the time and really like it. I wouldn't waste your time trying to figure out whether it will save you money. Instead, I'd look at your current components. If you like your current components, then frame swap. If your current components are just ok, then by a complete build.
  • + 4
 I built my kona process 153 with all the parts from my hardtail. Started missing the hardtail and now have to build that one back. I will never use parts from another bike again to build up another.
  • + 3
 So... just put them back on the other frame? Grab a beer and put on some tunes, it’ll be done before you know it!
  • + 1
 @maxlombardy: n+1 found out I need both in my life. Bought a fork yesterday
and a wheelset come payday. Will be real close, then a cold beer and some tunes. When its all done life will be even better.
  • + 4
 @brncr6: ah yes, n+1! How silly of me...
  • + 6
 When do we get to watch the rest of the EWS Finale Ligure race?
  • + 1
 I know! I keep checking for the coverage; I don't think it usually takes this long. Does it?
  • + 2
 especially one that costs a measly $3699 USD....what the hell...are we made of $$$ pinkbike? Hey kids, your bike is junk, and it was only a measly 3699,,,my bike cost 5k and its made of futuristic plastic and holds a waterbottle
  • + 1
 Don’t listen to RC
He’s in the 90’s about what’s extremely satisfying.
Back when you had to build your bike custom so it wasn’t a heap of American long stemmed cross country trash.
What is extremely satisfying is realizing you’re better off buying a few extra rrsp’s than deciding that you have some super special needs that won’t be served by a totally rad, off the shelf build.
  • + 2
 Alafia...where else can you share the trails with big gators. If you hit Alafia, and really want a test of Fl Phosphate Pit riding, go straight to Moonscape, Gravitron, and Gatorback.
  • + 1
 You don't need a carbon frame to race enduro, Get the aluminum frame and put on the best suspension and brakes you can afford (I'd go with a DH brakes myself) an 11 speed tranny is plenty of gears, running a 30 tooth is fine too, here's a shocker, its not your top speed holding you back, its your cornering, trust me. Good luck with your races, they are a ton of fun, just remember to not take it too serious.
  • + 2
 Anyone else notice the prototype supreme sx has a huge triangle between the seatpost and top tube compared to the production model being sold?
  • + 3
 It is probably a size L or XL. Commencal always use size M frames for the photos on their site.
I got really surprised when i received my meta 55 in size XL, looked like a different bike than on their site, well almost. Smile
  • + 2
 @Startgas: Correct. My Supreme SX pictured is the production version in XL size. The seat tube triangle does look massive as the top tube swoops so low – perfect for storing three innertubes on race day.
  • + 2
 @Startgas: Good to know. I love the look of the frame either way, I think the exaggeration looks very good on the XL frames.
  • + 2
 @paulaston: it's a gorgeous bike, both in principal and appearance. I really like the orange color too.
  • + 1
 @paulaston: XL, wow, so probably the L will be ok for 5'11 guy with standard arms length?
  • + 4
 Austin tx has a sick dj scene! All around pretty healthy bike scene.
  • + 2
 definitely look at IL, cold, no mountains, and light snow. you can even ride the bike path! (and freeze your tits off with the 40 mile an hour wind!)
  • + 2
 Whats that thing above the SX's shocks reservoir? Looks like a zip tied bottle cage. Nifty hack if that is what it is.
  • + 3
 @nehuen93: You're probably right. Though I liked it better when I thought it was a bottle cage strapped to the shock reservoir
  • + 0
 I'm really curious about that SX review. The regular commencal already has a super-high main pivot:

www.pinkbike.com/photo/15235369
  • + 1
 Every commy I've owned/ridden has peddled like a rocket
  • + 2
 That supreme SX is drop dead gorgeous Drool
  • + 1
 @paulaston
What is the chainstay length at 28 & 33% sag?
  • + 1
 Get a big wheeled bike and ride all winter long...
  • + 1
 wiki’s comment permanently hidden?
  • - 2
 Dear Pinkbike, ever since I bought my first carbon frame, I live in constant fear of God and the fate of eternal damnation. How can I repent myself?
  • + 6
 I am sure you will be damned anyway, so enjoy Wink
  • + 13
 go to rampage, attempt a line, and release yourself to gods will
  • + 6
 get a steel frame and never look back.
  • + 16
 Waki, you are definitely going to hell for some of the things you've posted on here, it's got naff all to do with a carbon frame!
  • + 16
 Throw it back in the sea, where it belongs
  • + 1
 May all your carbon fiber burn in hell you ocean polluters
  • + 2
 I learnt about carbon corrosion last night, didn’t sleep a wink.

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