Ask Pinkbike: Tire Sealant, Trunnion Shocks, Spoke Lengths, Fork Steerers & Insect Repellent

Aug 26, 2020
by Dan Roberts  

Here at Pinkbike, we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul-searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand-picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.







Removing Tire Sealant For Racing

Question: @Travis-hutt24 asks in the Downhill Forum: Is it possible to seal a enduro tire with sealant and then use an injector to remove it for your race run (weight savings)?


bigquotesWell, simply put, yes. You can for sure seat and seal the tire, leaving it overnight to make sure any possible air exits are sealed. Then remove the excess sealant to have some weight gainz, with those being at the outermost reaches of the wheel, where their effect would be more profound. While this is all physically possible, it's probably not advisable. I can understand the direction you're coming from with the focus on racing, and that if you have a run ending tire failure then that's it. But the sealant will also help fix any smaller punctures and issues along the race run that would otherwise then have more potential to end your race run prematurely if you choose to forgo the sealant.

For 60ml, or 2 fl oz, of a good quality sealant like Peaty's Tubeless Sealant, you're looking at 65g. Depending on your wheel size and preferred amount of sealant you could be looking at around a 130g weight saving per wheel, which isn't insignificant.

All in all though, the benefits of the saved weight of no sealant don't really outweigh the down sides of not having anything in your tire to fix mini punctures while on your race run.

Milkit
Removing tire sealant for a race run would save some weight, but the risk of having a run ending puncture might increase.







Trunnion Shock Fitment

Question: @Levani56 asks in the Downhill Forum: Will a 225mm trunnion shock fit a Giant Glory? Right now I'm using 222mm shock, 3mm isn't a problem but don't know anything about trunnion upper eyelet.


bigquotesShort answer, no.

Long answer, nope. The trunnion mount is a different style of shock fitment compared to the standard eyelets. A standard eyelet uses a bolt that goes through the whole eyelet, pivoting on the bushing. A trunnion mount uses two separate bolts that thread directly into the shock, which still makes me wince every time I tighten those bolts

And while the eye to eye measurement might be close, the stroke of the two different shocks is also not compatible. The 225 trunnion mount shocks have a stroke of 75mm, while your 222mm long shock has a stroke of 70mm.

Standard Eyelet vs Trunnion
A trunnion mount shock, right, uses a completely different way to mount to the bike than the standard eyelet, left. The two are incompatible, although some people have made some sneaky conversion pieces to run non-trunnion shocks in trunnion specific bikes.







Spoke Lengths

Question: @haktor004 asks in the All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country Forum: I have recently wrecked my rear wheel and have to rebuild it with new spokes, rim and spoke nipples. The old rim has an ERD of 605 and the new 591, the old spoke length is 296mm. Is it right that the new spokes must be 7mm shorter?


bigquotesFirst off, the DT Swiss Spoke Calculator is a good go to for wheel building. You can use their library of DT Swiss parts, which will auto fill out all the dimensions, or input your own. The output will be the exact spoke length and recommended one to use, as sometimes the exact spoke length is a fraction of a millimeter.

For your specific case, moving from a 605mm ERD to a 591mm and as long as all other parts are the same (like your hub, nipples, spoke count and lacing pattern) then, yes, you'd need a 7mm shorter spoke. ERD being the Effective Rim Diameter.

A reputable wheel builder, be it in a shop or at home, would measure the actual ERD of the rim. Taking the ERD stated by the manufacturer is a good start, but the manufacturing tolerances can often lead to some differences in the real ERD. So maybe it's best to take a look at some of the home setups for measuring ERD just to make sure you get the right spoke length for your exact setup.

The wheel hangover from Fort William continues down in the Saracen pits.
Rebuilding wheels is a nice skill to have, and lots of people find the wheel building process less of a chore and more therapeutic. ERD, or Effective Rim Diameter, measurements are usually readily available, but measuring the actual rim yourself can make sure you get the right spoke length for your specific setup.







Replacing Fork Steerers

Question: @CN422 asks in the Mechanics' Lounge Forum: I just bought a new take off RockShox Lyrik and the steering tube is too short. Can it be pressed out and a new longer one pressed in?


bigquotesBefore we get onto pressing out the steerer, it would also be an option to buy a new steerer crown unit. Then you'd have a completely fresh and uncut steerer and the bonus is that your fork would get a rebuild with fresh oil to boot. You can find the SCUs online at many different outlets, or even sometimes in the Pinkbike BuySell for a bit cheaper, but it's definitely possible to get hold of a new one through your local RockShox dealer. And if you're curious, you can also use the SCU to play around with a different fork offset if that's something that takes your fancy. Prices do vary where you look, but you're looking at around $370.

So then, onto pressing. While I'm certain none of the fork manufacturers will tell you it's the way to go, it is possible and there are companies out there offering this service. RSF Suspension in the UK, Honey Suspension in Barcelona, CJ Suspension and Shockcraft Suspension in New Zealand are at least some of the places I've seen this being done. ND Tuned are a Portugese company making aftermarket steerer tubes, and they could be a good point of call for finding a suspension shop close to you that could offer this service. Or perhaps people in the comments can help with American suspension shops that would offer this service.

Each method is going to have a price associated with it, and once you've got an idea of how much each one costs then you can make a decision on the best route to go for changing your steerer tube.








Insect Repellent

Question: @Beav asks in the Fitness, Training and Health Forum: Anyone use those bands to repel insects/insect bites? Seem to be getting bitten like crazy and i'm currently doing a bike 250 mile for charity challenge.


bigquotesUnfortunately I'm only seeing this a month after your post, so I really hope you didn't get featured on too much by the little biting buggers, and that your charity ride went well. A tip of the cap for doing something like that.

Coming from the UK, I know your troubles trying to find an effective insect repellent. I've been up to the west coast of Scotland many times and been turning the air blue while fixing a puncture up in the damp, midge ridden hills. Similar experiences in Wales and New Zealand too with more midges, mosquitos and sand flies. At some point you've been bitten so much that you're just a bit numb to the bastards.

But one product I've used a lot is Avon Skin So Soft, and given that you're from the UK you'll know all about Avon. Legend has it that the skin moisturiser was discovered by the British Army to be one of the most effective insect repellents available, and one that they use when on training missions up in those midge ridden Scotish hills. How much truth is in the legend, I don’t know. But it’s a good story and I can definitely attest to its powers of repelling.

I've also used Jungle Formula, which was also pretty effective. But then your skin wasn't quite as soft afterwards compared to the Avon stuff.

Another option suggested by @Will1848 was to look into Permethrin, which you treat your clothes with and by all accounts stops bugs from even coming anywhere near you.

Every year you hear photogs and racers bitch about the midges. Most years they really aren t too bad. But an exceptionally mild winter saw them out in clouds on the tracksides particularly down low. Long sleeves long pants and a midgie net were the only ways to stay sane.
Peaty and Minnaar know all too well about the midges here in Fort William. The Santa Cruz pit got the shaft on location with their tents located in midge central.
Anyone who's visited Fort William, Scotland, will know about the midges - some of the ways to deter them get creative. Lots of products are available on the market ranging from creams to sprays and even treatments for your clothes.



136 Comments

  • 172 3
 "of a good quality sealant like Peaty's Tubeless Sealant" excuse me Dan Roberts, have you ever used the stuff? It's had universally poor reviews, and my own anecdotal experience indicates that stuff doesnt work at all. C'mon - its not quality stuff. Its also not common. Why not just say Stans like a normal human?
  • 30 1
 Came here to say this, it's absolutely useless. Doesn't even seal the smallest of holes. And it leaves glitter everywhere! Haven't used it for a year and I'm still finding glitter around the garage.
  • 74 7
 Orange Seal for the win.
  • 14 0
 I too like my tires to have air in them and Peaty's does not achieve this basic task. Stans Race or Orange seal.
  • 23 1
 Sadly I am in agreement. Peatys sealant is not very good and just ejeculates in a rather limp way. The glitter is horrific and whilst I am sure someone will tell me otherwise, its a unnecessary microPlastic. It will never grace my tyres again. Sorry Steve.
  • 11 3
 @ilovedust: FYI, the glitter is made of eucalyptus plants and is biodegradable. As is the glitter in some other sealants. Sparkly bits doesnt always mean bad for the planet
  • 11 1
 One more downvote for Peaty's. Wow that stuff was incredibly bad. Consistency reminded me of yogurt and probably sealed worse than yogurt would have. Muc Off and Slime were equally bad and had the same glitter stuff in em. While I have no proof I wouldn't be surprised if they're all just re-labled mass produced crap. Always find myself returning to Stans Original.
  • 2 0
 Works well for me. Weird.
  • 6 3
 @privateer-wheels:OS hands down best sealant on the market. If you know, you know.
  • 3 0
 Once you’ve had peatys sealant in your tyres they will never be the same. The stuff dries out in a day and is absolutely impossible to clean. #peatyspishsealant
  • 6 0
 Here you go - test of many sealants - www.youtube.com/watch?v=a3tb8L5o1OU
Peatys - look at 6:58
To save your time - It has the same effect as yoghurt - zero effect Big Grin
  • 1 0
 another that tried Peaty's and wont touch it again, awful stuff. Stans is all I will use. its not worth the risk of trying something else.
  • 2 0
 @privateer-wheels: most definitely. Used Stand normal for years when working in the shop, now a punter Orange seal is the boy. But don't be tempted by their rim tape... Is shears or splinters/tears when trying to pull it tight onto the rim. Try another brand for tape
  • 1 1
 we all come to same point, stans. It never let me down in 3 years
  • 3 0
 @privateer-wheels: Even better, Navy Seals.
  • 2 0
 @onyxss: I ought to try some yogurt
  • 1 0
 @Trudeez: while i haven't had experience with slime or peaty's my friend uses muc off sealant in his tire and it works quite well for him, although i just use stans since it's cheaper and easier to find
  • 94 3
 There is a product specifically made for running tires without sealant for race runs:

www.chainreactioncycles.com/is/en/maxxis-dh-mtb-tube/rp-prod5418
  • 75 0
 Oh weird, like an insert that takes air!
  • 1 0
 LOL
  • 3 0
 And that product weights 48 lbs. Haha
  • 2 0
 I run these in my commuter 26in bike. Never had a flat and the extra weight keeps me in shape! I think I bought those tubes in 2007 and they are still going.
  • 20 0
 Be careful with the bug repellents, or at least reading the label and act accordingly. Many of them slowly melt plastics, including the synthetic fabrics in your clothing, helmet straps, helmet material, sunglasses and carbon fiber everything. Sometimes you can't avoid using bug repellent, when you do, be careful of what it touches, wash thoroughly when you get home, and retire suspect looking parts.
  • 5 0
 DEET, a plasticizer, can cause damage to other plastics, including synthetic or treated fabrics. (It won't damage natural fibers, like cotton or wool.)
  • 5 5
 Lol if bug repelent melts carbon and plastic, id rather just get bit by mosquitos and contract malaria. It's probably healthier
  • 4 0
 Yup, Deet melted my helmet. There is something used by the military in my country to repel insects that is safe for clothing, that you are directed to spray on clothes. I’m being purposely vague because you must use it correctly because it will kill aquatic life if used improperly. If you care enough to find it I’m hoping you care enough to read the instructions on how to use it and to also follow them.
  • 4 0
 An alternative to the DEET-based products is lemon ecalyptus. REPEL makes a reputable version that does well in tests, both short term and long term (up to six hours). The pump version is compact and doesn't have any aerosols. I use it every ride, mostly as a deterrent for ticks, but it helps with mosquitos as well.
  • 2 0
 I have quit using DEET after it melted the laquer finish on my brother's kitchen table from a lightly sprayed shirt that sat there a while after riding.Have been liking Picaridin, won't melt synthetic stuff, smells way better, and seems to work as well at least for mosquitoes.
  • 1 0
 @dsmdan18: I've never had success with that stuff. I once worked with a guy who (apparently doesn't read directions) sprayed the stuff right on like DEET, arms and all. Wonder how he's doing...

The REPEL stuff does work pretty well but not for six hours. For two or three it's nearly as good as DEET. But the pump is the most garbage dispensing mechanism I've ever met. Every bottle I've used, and everyone I've ever seen use the stuff, takes the cap off and applies it like cologne.

Going to have to check out this Picaridin stuff. Never heard of it.
  • 5 0
 Picaridin repellent is good. Not nearly as toxic as deet
  • 1 0
 I'll add to this warning list. Deet worked well for me in Fort Bill, but I also accidentally ruined the paint work on my top tube by using it on the trail. Don't spray it too close to your bike!
  • 3 0
 Citronella oil mixed with water into a spray is definitely my go-to repellent - and won't melt your face off like the poor guy in robocop
  • 2 0
 We use the Avon product, 'Skin So Soft', and as it suggests it makes your skin oh so soft. Keeps the midges at bay but it can quite literally dissolve a flip flop in front of your eyes if you get too much on them. What the hell's in it?
  • 4 0
 If anyone hasn't, try Permethrin - spray on clothes, let dry, and away you go. It's highly effective, and also is only recommended for use in a non-skin application for those with sensitive skin. Minnesota is similarly extremely buggy for the entirety of our riding season. Most insecticides will have a toxic effect on aquatic life in a given concentration. Most/all should producers should be able to provide a WET(Whole Effluent Toxicity) report for both a chronic(5 day) and acute(2 day) test result for those truly interested in a value considered to be environmentally toxic. As I recall DEET was developed by the USDA in conjunction with the military. Some pretty cool studies & white papers have come out in the last decade about it.
  • 1 0
 @isaacschmidt: Yep, stuff works wonders. Cannot stress the "let dry" part enough. I earned an itchy, red chest from applying the stuff last minute and expecting it to dry immediately.
  • 1 0
 @Monsterman156: THIS! Picaridin is the stuff. Doesn't melt plastic, actually and empirically works, and you can get it with almost no scent. One thing, it doesn't last as long as DEET based repellants, so if you need to re-apply, you can get wipe packets. I live in the US Northeast, we know about mosquitoes and deer flies.
  • 20 1
 Here's a question Pinkbike: Am I an idiot for having almost no mountain bike maintenance knowledge and purchasing Formula brakes, screwing up the brake bleed on them three times, and now wanting to purchase a Selva fork that I will never push the potential of to match my fancy foreign brakes all while having almost no brand product support in the US and screwing up the geometry of my bike with the fork offset?
  • 25 0
 No
  • 9 0
 its all about the 'bling, baby! GO FOR IT
  • 20 5
 Have your local bike shop put the stuff on for you, dentist. At least they shouldn't break anything.
  • 31 0
 @peleton7: not gonna lie, that dentist remark cut deeper than I care to admit
  • 7 0
 @flatlander22: fill your hoses with Novocaine and you won't care about admission
  • 3 0
 sounds pretty sensible to me?
  • 3 0
 Formulas are honestly a bitch to set up...the bleed has to be spot on or else the levers will pump up to a mile away from the bars; probably has something to do with the massive piston sizes that can cause crazy pressure fluctuations when they swell.
  • 5 0
 @Aesthethica: And yet when they are sorted properly I have NEVER used a better brake. Such great power for such a light unit and that lever feel... Drool
  • 8 1
 @peleton7: @flatlander22 better yet. Have your LBS buy and install the parts for you. That way they'll be able to help with warranty and service if things ever go south. And, you'll be supporting a small business owner in the process.
  • 2 0
 All about dem Purp lowers.
  • 2 0
 I bought a set of Curas in March and finally, after dozens of bleeds, got them to work. Try facebook messenger, I received very prompt replies, keeping in mind the timezone.
  • 1 0
 Formula has great US support. I believe they are based I the Carolinas and I had very quick turn around when I needed my year old R01's rebuilt.
  • 1 0
 @Skootur: LOVE MY ro FORMULAS..........NEVER FAILED NEVER BLED!!! 4 YEARS GOIN STRONG
  • 3 0
 @Bird-Man: WHY ARE WE YELLING!?!?
  • 1 0
 @Trudeez: WHAT DID YOU SAY? I CAN'T HEAR YOU YOU'RE TOO FAR AWAY AND WEARING A FACE MASK
  • 1 0
 @hamncheez: WHAT? I CAN'T HEAR YOU? I HEARD SOMETHING ABOUT MASK BUT NOW I JUST DON'T KNOW...
  • 15 0
 Are you really that fast that you need to worry about pulling sealant from your wheels? I'm mean even when the pro DH and Enduro guys puncture you can see that shit spraying everywhere like Peter North on a good day which suggests they keep a fair bit in there.
  • 7 0
 +1
Am I to believe that there is a racer out there who's breakthrough moment is just a race run away sans tire sealant?
  • 3 0
 #marginalgains
  • 3 2
 for some theres a mental advantage
"My bike is special so ill go fast"
  • 4 0
 Runs dh casing tyres with inserts, removes sealant to save weight. /facepalm
  • 1 0
 Haha, I bet most of the readers are googling PN now...
  • 1 0
 ditto, but with slightly less glitter in the goo
  • 1 0
 well no, but this way when I flat, I will be able to say I was definitely going to podium if that blackberry thorn didnt end my run!
  • 1 0
 @conoat: well that explains everything and makes tons of sense, now to remove the sealant from my tire...
  • 12 0
 Regarding Spoke Length, since the spokes are not completely oriented in the radial direction, the actual spoke length difference will be less than the ((Difference in ERD)/2). Correct? So it would be more like a 6mm difference in spoke length in this case? So yeah, use the spoke calculator!
  • 3 0
 If the difference isn't too big, half of the ERD difference is also the spoke lenght difference, but also have a look at how far the spokes reach into the original nipples. If they're on the shorter side allready, you might want to add a millimeter or subtract one if they are a bit on the long side. But as said before, using a spoke calculator is the safest way to get it right.
  • 2 11
flag mtb-sf (Aug 26, 2020 at 15:22) (Below Threshold)
 @NickBosshard: I've built about 6 wheels now so I'm no pro, but can get it done.

I have always used the calculator on prowheelbuilder.com and if the spokes on each side of a wheel are within 3mm or so I just pick an average length and it has worked fine. There is a range of adjustment within the nipple so as long as it is fairly close, it works. The minor difference in the angle @mammal pointed to should not matter.

I was super paranoid to get it all perfect on my first wheelset, but now I know that you actually have a pretty decent margin of error.
  • 14 0
 @mtb-sf: errrrr. no. just no to the motherf*cking nope.

+1/-1 is acceptable. anything over that and you need to reevaluate. part of what makes a sturdy wheelbuild is having spokes that pass all the way through a nipple. otherwise, you have a hollow nipple, with no structure, at the interface with the rim. you will, in short order, sheer those right off.
  • 5 0
 @mtb-sf:
Too bad there is not a way to flag comments like this. This is bad advice and a prime example why 'normal' folks say 'dont listen to strangers on the internet.'
  • 2 0
 @conoat: @thedirtyburritto I think you misunderstood. By 3mm difference each side I meant that each spoke was within 1.5mm of what the calculator indicated, pretty much same as you said. If your spokes are 3mm off that would definitely cause issues. My point was that the angular difference (which is almost certainly less than half a mm) shouldn't be an issue.

Then again, like I said I'm no pro and maybe the wheels I've built are all just a moment away from sheering loose. Been pretty hard on them though and good so far!
  • 2 0
 @mtb-sf: 1.5 is definitely not good if it's 1.5 too short. I really don't build with any spokes too short, but will go +1. also, the angular difference is more or less than what you're thinking, depending on lacing pattern, flange diameter, flange offset, wheel ERD and like 3 otherthings I am lazily skipping over. lol

A good rule of thumb is to follow either QBP's or DT's calculator, then round all your lengths up to the next full mm if it's >x.25mm and down if X.25mm. from here, if you need to use a 1mm longer spoke, fine. but really try not to use a -1mm spoke.
  • 11 0
 Insect Repellent, there is only one. Picaridin products, developed in the UK and in US now iirc. Sawyers is the common brand on Amazon selling it. It doesn't wreck plastic, was proven by Consumer Reports testing to repel insects bites better than Deet...and more importantly it is nearly scent-less (literally). I'm badly allergic to Mosquito bites and this stuff is a godsend. It apparently isnt as effective on ticks as Deet but other than that it's nothing short or incredible. I really like the spray on bottle version. Whomever developed this needs a Noble prize, stat.
  • 1 0
 Nice..I will check them out!
  • 2 0
 This^. My main concern is the hordes of mosquitoes on my local mountain. I have quite using DEET, only have used Picaridin this year. I really do think it works better, can lift my treated shirt sleeve towards one and watch them f*ck off.
  • 1 0
 can't wait to try this stuff. Thanks!
  • 2 0
 Second this! I've been using Smidge, developed in Scotland, for about 3 years. It's very, very good at what it does, it's 20% Picaridin.
  • 11 0
 SCU? No one says that. CSU.
  • 9 0
 Smidge is great. Has the added advantage it won’t rot your kit like deet based products
  • 5 0
 I've never used it but Smidge is supposed to be pretty good for Midge repellent.
  • 5 1
 Smudge is the dogs bollocks when it comes to insect repellant. I lived in fort William and its the only thing that works Trust me
  • 2 0
 @felimocl: aye, Smidge is fantastic stuff.
  • 10 8
 Can I do something really dumb to try to save a little weight? How about doing something really dumb to save a little money?? Keep going to your local bike shops kids. You'll save money paying MSRP for parts, having a mechanic install them correctly, and buying your local wrench a sixer.
  • 4 0
 For some jobs and parts, it makes sense, but there is a lot of good info out there, so look at that and if you aren't sure, then go to a shop. Looking back I have done some dumb stuff, where a shop could have saved me money and time, but all in all, with a bit of common sense and good research, a lot can be done without going to a shop.
  • 5 0
 @NickBosshard: hah, on the other hand, I’ve had shops do some dumb stuff, and cost me money, too!
  • 4 0
 I like to think of the cost of first-timer mistakes as tuition, once paid I know how to do it properly from then on. How do you think the mechanic learned?
  • 2 0
 @skelldify: exactly...not all bike mechanics are equal.
Some are brilliant...others, not so much
  • 2 0
 "you can also use the SCU to play around with a different fork offset if that's something that takes your fancy. "

Huh for some reason I had assumed that they were building the offset mainly into the lowers not the crown. Learn something new every day.
  • 1 0
 FAUX builds offset into CSU. That’s how we ended up where we are today. Unsure what other companies doing. Easier/cheaper to cast one set of lowers per wheel size.
  • 2 0
 Honestly, I think Avon Skin So Soft is a pretty poor insect repellent, particularly for midges. I don't know why it always gets touted as some sort of semi-secret "hack" in the UK. It only seems to provide protection by virtue of the fact that the little buggers slide and/or drown in it, on your skin (for the spray on stuff anyway).

I appear to be a fairly tasty specimen for them, but I find Smidge works well (saltidiin / icaridan). As others have said, I've melted plastics with DEET, so not that keen to use it unless I'm stuck.
  • 1 0
 I've found that Skin So Soft drastically reduces the amount of bites you get, but doesn't stop them clouding around and landing on you, which can be just as annoying as being bitten IMO
  • 1 0
 Its just Avon marketing. SSS is absolute trash, it isn't even a decent moisturizer.
  • 3 0
 Permethrin based insect repellants kick ass. They’ve been banned in canada so I stock up when I go to the states. Nothing more effective.
  • 7 0
 psst.....hey....I got your permethrin right here. I've got a whole case of it with your name on it. Just need to sneak me across the border for a day at Whistler.
  • 1 0
 Can't stand deet so I've been using repellents made with icardin (picardin) with decent results. Had a quart of 10% permethrin shipped from the US a few years ago. Dilute it to 0.5%, spray it onto my clothes and it's good for few washes.
  • 6 0
 funny...I've never felt like permethrin does anything. I started with the spray can, followed instructions...nothing. Multiple times. Nothing. Bought a shirt that supposedly has it applied at the factory (InsectShield, I believe). Never once felt like there were fewer blood suckers swarming me.

For biking I just ride faster and don't stop for breaks...mosquitoes are the best training partners.
  • 1 0
 @ecologist: the first time I used it was for the jungle in Nicaragua. We didn’t get a bite but everyone else got ravaged. I will admit that batches since then have had mixed results.
  • 1 0
 @ecologist: I've found it is only 100% effective if you treat your gear from head to toe. Wouldn't spray a helmet, but when backpacking the exterior of my shoes, hat, pants, shirt, and pack all get a spray down.
  • 1 0
 I don't think the reasoning given prevents you from using a trunnion shock on the Glory. Providing that you can match the spacing with standard eye spacers and use bolts long enough that mesh with the recession on the pivot, I dont see why this couldnt work. The Glory's frame pieces require large spacers anyway. If the the stroke/eye to eye is close, why wouldn't this work?
  • 3 0
 just loved working on one of Bike Mag's early Bike Bibles when someone put the wrong eye to eye shock on a not to be named DH rig and buzzed all the paint off the seat tube in half a run...
  • 3 0
 Does the Glory use bearings on the upper shock mount? That's the real issue: trunnion needs bearings, eyelet has the bushing, to allow movement.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: The Glory probably does, as the Trances from back in 2014 even had bearings in the upper link.
  • 1 0
 Removing 130g worth of sealant isnt going to make much of a noticable differance in your bikes perfomance and handling for race day. It could however lead to a catastrophic failure and end your race prematurely. One of the more absurd weight weenie ideas I've heard. Right up there with drilling a bunch of holes in your frame and components to save weight.
  • 2 0
 Yep. On more than one occasion I've cleaned my bike after a race only to notice sealant sprayed all over the seat tube etc. Didn't even know I'd had a puncture. End of race if I took the sealant out.
  • 5 0
 A generous amount of lube on your rotors is the key to better results.
  • 1 0
 Nobody here use oleum cajuput (minyak kayu putih) as insect repellent? Readily available on most convenience stores in Indonesia. When applied generously it will provide cover up to 2 hours (or until your sweat wash it out). Very effective against mosquitos in habitats ranging from mangrove to low land tropical jungle.
  • 4 0
 Fox 3u csu are quite difficult to find and you can't just buy them.
  • 1 0
 They normally don't even get sold to shops, only the official service center gets them and they are only allowed to use them for repairs themselfs. So most of the time the only way to get one canged with an original part is via a shop which has to send in the whole fork and will charge you a pretty penny.
  • 1 0
 Then how did I buy a CSU for a 2012 Factory 32? They are definitely available direct from Fox, in all the sizes, at least for products up to 7 years old. (Getting a 2012 part now is a roll of the dice, but 2014+ should be fine.)
  • 1 0
 @just6979: The bike shop by me, you know the shitty one, said it will cost me over $500 just for the csu and Fox needs to install it. Maybe, probably im jaded by that. Plus l can never, ever find a 36 29 csu in the buy/sell area on pb or vital..
  • 2 0
 I just purchased a 2019 Fox 36 CSU directly from Fox and got it in 3 days to Washington state. Not sure what you meant by "3u" maybe you're talking about something else.

That doesn't necessarily mean I"m happy as the old one was creaking like crazy. I was just barely still in the 18 month warranty period but I wasn't about to send in the whole fork in the middle of the season so I just sucked it up.
  • 1 0
 @preston67: lol.. it was suppose to say 36. I wish pb had an editing feature
  • 1 0
 @Thirty3: They are wrong. I got a 32 CSU (and not for creaking, even though it was at the time a 150mm 32, which one would expect to be the creakiest, but because steerer tube was too short for new bike) for ~$200 straight from Fox (maybe bigger forks are more, but not $500), and it's no more complex than a lower leg and air spring service, definitely not something that only Fox or a dealer has to do.
  • 2 0
 is it possible to make a bushing for a normal shock so that it fits on a trunnion mount? I feel like there's something else i'm missing but would it work in theory?
  • 1 0
 My tire sealant secret: add Stans, forget until you hear the dried up Stans rolling around the inside of the tire, or it all weeps out the sidewalls, which also indicates it it time for new tires.
  • 1 0
 Fork steerer guy- if its too short by a few mm, find a headset with a lower stack and buy the DMR stem, it has an ultra low stack height and is perfect for what you need. 31mm stack height.
  • 1 0
 I've replaced a streerer tube like that DIY once and it worked fine. It was 20 years ago and 1.125". I can see the liability issues with doing that on a commercial level.
  • 2 0
 Where the heck can I get that drill attachment for DT Swiss squorx nipples??
  • 2 0
 Any DT retailer should be able to get one for you. DT still makes them. I prefer double square to Squorx. Drill bits for those are even harder to find! DT used to make one, but discontinued them. But if you need one, search out Arkane Wheels on Insta, he makes double square ones, which I have bought from him.
  • 2 1
 I made one from a aluminium torx bolt. Put the bolt in a drill and hit it and file down until it goes through the hole in the rim bed.
  • 1 1
 Size 5 torx socket. Got mine in a set at harbor freight for less than $10.
  • 3 1
 @iamamodel: @livlief: not the same thing. The ones made for the drill have an adjustable pronge that runs up the center. As you screw the nipple in, it contacts the spoke and backs the bit off. The purpose is to be able to use the drill to start the build quick, and be able to hit each spoke with the same amount of turns so that when you are done with the drill, before you even take a spoke key to the wheel, it's already got a small amount of tension and spins true off the bat. Huge time saver!
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: thanks for the info! wish i had known about this sooner, could have saved a lot of time.

for anyone wondering, the name of these seems to be "DT Swiss Squorx Nipple Driver"

looks like they come in different lengths. are the longer ones just for deep rims or something? I only build mountain wheels so i'm assuming i can just use a shorter one
  • 2 0
 @xeren: no problem.

I actually prefer longer, because I use a fairly small/short Bosch electric driver with 3/8 bit end. But if you have a longer drill perhaps you would prefer the shortest one. And yes, I imagine they make the long one for deeper rims more specifically. You can also put them on a screen driver handle with a 3/8 mount - I have a long one also on a Wera driver handle.

I tend to use double square nips more than squorx though, so I have the Arkane versions for 3.2 DSN mounted up most often. Same style bit. They are extremely handy!
  • 1 0
 @privateer-wheels: thanks for the info! yeah i prefer square bits in general, pretty much no slipping whatsoever
  • 1 0
 SuspensionLab in Belgium is also doing those fork steerer replacement, with some ND Tuned www.suspensionlab.be/fr/31-nd-tuned
  • 2 0
 long shock is the way to go, #youknowyouwantmore
  • 2 0
 Smidge is the answer for the Scottish midge problem these days
  • 1 1
 Native to the Southern US, I can second the Avon Skin So Soft insect repellent. One of the best approaches AND your skin is silky smooth!
  • 1 0
 Another good insect repellent is real ginger, tea, beer Wink
Worked for me at Fort Bill
  • 2 0
 No "just ride faster" comments on the bug spray?
  • 1 0
 Wow, 60ml? Anyone here putting in less then 100ml in real life?
  • 2 0
 Yes.
  • 2 0
 Tip the Stans bottle. Glug glug glug. Looks about right. Finish seating tyre, inflate and ride for 6 months Wink
  • 1 0
 I run 65ml.
  • 2 0
 @sourmix: then shralp turns until you're down to the recommended 60 ml (thumbs up emoji)
  • 1 0
 So whats everyones favorite color glitter for tyre sealant guys

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