Ask Pinkbike: Replacement Wheels, Front vs Rear Brake, Everything About Tubeless

Jan 27, 2015
by Pinkbike Staff  
Ask Pinkbike Header

Here at Pinkbike we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.



Tubeless Conversion

Question: Pinkbike user C-los asked this question in the downhill forum: I own an Azonic Outlaw wheelset and would like to convert them to tubeless. Does anyone out there have a simple solution to recommend?

bigquotesSetting up your wheels and tires to be run without tubes is one of the best things that you can do to improve reliability and performance, and it's also something that you can to do at home and for very little money. First, here's what you'll need: some alcohol spray to clean your rim bed, a roll of thin width Gorilla Tape from the hardware store, a knife, a set of tubeless valve stems, and any brand of tire sealant from your bike shop. The grand total should be under $40 USD, and the job shouldn't take more than an hour, even if you only have one arm.

Step 1. Remove the old rim strips and use the alcohol spray and a clean rag to wipe down the rim bed. Make sure you get any of the old dirt and gunk that may be in or around the spoke holes, with the idea being to allow the Gorilla Tape to stick to the rim as best as it can.

Step 2. Hold the roll of Gorilla Tape up to the rim to see how wide it needs to be, and then start a short tear at the correct width - it should span the entire inner width of the rim, but not extend up either sidewall. Mounting the wheel in your frame or fork with the bike upside down will make the next part much easier... Start about six inches away from the valve hole and apply the tape to the rim bed, making sure that it's straight and not up on the sidewalls, and pull tight enough that it stretches slightly as you apply it. Go all the way around until you pass the valve hole again and the tape is overlapped by eight or ten inches. Now use a knife or scissors to make a clean cut.

Step 3. Inspect your tape job for anywhere it might have not been aligned properly, and use your thumbs to press out any places where it didn't completely stick. Now you're ready to install the valve stem by using a knife to make a small 'X' directly above the valve hole, and then pushing each valve through. Screw down the locknut tightly.

Step 4. Mount up one bead of your tire as you usually would, but please don't use tire levers as you risk poking through your new air-tight rim strip. Pour in the recommended amount of sealant (it will say on the bottle) and then install the other tire bead - no levers!

Step 5. The big moment! Getting your newly tubeless'd tires to seat and be air-tight often comes down to how tight the tires fit onto the rim - the tighter the fit, the easier they'll pop into place. And remember, it's all about getting as much air into the tire as quickly as possible, so a compressor can really make life easy at this point. Not seating up? If your valve stems have removable cores (some do, you just need a tiny wrench), unscrew them in order to allow the air to enter faster, and you can also spray both sides of the rim and tire bead with soapy water to help the situation. Still no luck? That likely means that your tire fits onto the rim too loose, and that you'll have to add a turn or two of Gorilla Tape in order to build up the rim bed height and make a tighter fit. Start by adding just one extra wrap and see if it works. Too much tape and the tire will fit so tight that you'll have a hard time getting on or off.

It may take a few rides until your tubeless setup doesn't leak air, either from the tire's sidewall if they're not intended to be run without tubes, or possibly from around the valve. It can help to take the wheel out of your bike and hold it so the sealant runs to the problem area. Also, because a recently tubeless'd wheel needs to have the sealant spread around the tire, you might find that you're losing air if you don't ride your bike often enough... just use this excuse to ride your bike more. This will fix all of your problems with your wheels and everything else in life.
- Mike Levy

Genuine Innovations Tubeless Ready Kit-reviewed-2014

Some Gorilla Tape and sealant will have you forgetting about tubes, although you should always carry one as a spare regardless. This is also one job that can be messy, so best not to do it in the kitchen.






Front Brake vs Rear Brake

Question: Mickmart asks: in the All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country forum: I recently got back into riding again. For the last seven years, I was racing motorcycles (road racing). Front brake application was 90-percent of braking at speed and we used the rear brake very minimally. Dirt is obviously a different discipline and art - sliding the rear is a welcomed feeling. Not so much with road racing. I'm wondering, when do you apply the front brake versus the rear brake on the dirt? I'm very wary and cautious when the rear slides and I'm having a hard time getting used to that feeling.

bigquotesBreaching the subject of when and how much to use the front brake on the dirt is guaranteed to light a fire in the comment section. I can skip the cautionary mumbo jumbo because as a moto road racer, you have mastered the front bake and the art of modulation. The rules are the same: the front brake stops, the rear brake skids, and the front brake must be released as the bike is leaned onto a turn. Both brakes are almost always used in combination, but there are a handful of situations where the rear brake is used solo. The three main situations where rear braking is the only effective and sane method to slow the bike are:

First: When descending wet roots or slick rocks, use the Sam Hill technique - Get your body position low and towards the rear of the bike, lower your heels below the pedal axles and bend your wrists below the handlebar grips to help drive the rear tire into the ground. Modulate the rear brake using maximum braking where traction is available, while releasing the lever momentarily where death awaits on off-camber or diagonal faces.

Second: Descending or entering corners where a deep parallel rut dictates your path is another good reason to keep your fingers off the front brake. Skidding or not, the rear wheel will follow the rut as long as you are giving the rear lever a significant squeeze, and as such, you can use the rut to establish your line. Use the rut to your advantage and then simply release the rear brake when you need to roll out of it.

Third: The last reason to use only the rear brake for slowing is for controlling speed or changing direction when the soil is soft, deep, or unstable - like six inches of shifting gravel. In those situations, the risk is that the front tire will plow deep into the soft stuff or refuse to plane over the top of the gravel and start to wander uncontrollably.

The rest of the time, the front brake is used for slowing the bike, while the rear brake is used judiciously as both additional stopping force, and to encourage the rear wheel to 'trail,' or to follow the front wheel when the bike is bouncing around under hard braking - exactly as you would brake on your road racer. 'Trail braking,' lightly dragging the rear brake into and around turns - is commonly used in moto racing to maintain the lean angle of the bike, so there is a minimal transition between braking and acceleration at the apex of a smooth turn. This is useful for entering and exiting fast, bermed corners, but generally, trail braking is not used effectively as a tool by mountain bikers. We rarely power out of turns from the apex, because the pedals would rub, so it makes more sense to choose a lean angle that allows you to coast around most of the turn. If you over-cook your entry, drop the inside foot, increase the bike's lean angle by bending at the hips, and drift both wheels (without brakes) to scrub off speed. The key to braking and going fast is to read the terrain and to use the brakes in short, powerful intervals wherever traction and the trail surface provide low-risk opportunities to burn off speed, and then roll the turns and technical parts without much or any braking application in order to maximize control where you need it most.

Finally, there are often situations, especially when picking your way around tight corners at slower speeds, where a quick skid can help swing the rear wheel around the turn and help set the bike up for a straighter exit. Squaring off every corner with a rear-wheel skid, however, is lazy and destructive, and in most cases, it's the slower way around. Many off-road riders (moto and mountain bike) claim that using the rear brake for everything and only applying the front when absolutely necessary is the secret to speed - and some of those guys ride pretty fast - but they are wrong. Without exception, the best moto and mountain bike racers master the use of both brakes and their front brakes play the dominant role. - RC


Taking it conservatively For Jared Graves that means an 8th a 2nd and two 7ths today. He sits in fourth tonight 40 seconds ahead of the 22nd place man he needs to meet.

Jared Graves's finger is lifted well clear of his front brake lever as he passes the apex of a tricky corner. That illustrates how conscious top racers are of their brakes and alludes to the precision with which they use those tools.






Replacement Wheels?

Question: Qui3tman asks in the Bikes, Parts, and Gear Forum: The hub of my 650b Mavic Crossride front wheel appears to have developed a fault, and it's going to take at least 3 weeks turnaround before they can get the wheel back to me from warranty. I have an enduro race in a month so I don't really want to be without the bike for that long. My option at the moment is to buy another Crossride from my LBS for about £80, or look at replacing both wheels. Only thing is I can't find any info on whether the Crossride are a decent set of wheels - given I've had this pair for 6 months and it's developed a fault when I've not really been riding it that hard I'm concerned. What would you do? Stick with the Crossrides or go for a new build of wheels? (and if a new build, what would you go for?)

bigquotesThe Mavic Crossride is by no means a 'bad' wheelset, but it is on the more affordable, budget oriented side of the spectrum. It's also a little heavier, and the rims are narrower than other slightly pricier options out there. In this case, since the wheel is covered under warranty, have you considered asking the shop if they have a loaner wheel, or maybe a used one you could buy for cheap that would hold you over for the next few weeks while you wait? If not, purchasing another Crossride front wheel will still probably be your least expensive option.

On the other hand, you mention that you're getting into enduro racing, in which case having a spare wheelset is a very good idea - there's nothing worse than having a weekend ruined by blowing up a rim or toasting a freehub body and not having a replacement. I'm not sure what type of budget you had envisioned for a new set of hoops, but if you can part with around $600 USD, Spank's Oozy Trail 295 wheelset would be good option, or you could go the handbuilt route, and have a local wheelmaster put together exactly what you'd like. For rims, I'd suggest either Stan's FlowEX or WTB's Frequency i25 - both options strike a good balance of weight, strength, and price. Pair those with the nicest set of hubs your budget allows and you should be set for a good long while. - Mike Kazimer


Spank OOZY Trail 295 wheelset review test

Spank's Oozy 295 is a good option for riders looking to upgrade their stock wheelset.






Have some unresolved tech questions? Jump in the Pinkbike Forum and we'll look to answer it for next time.


123 Comments

  • 107 0
 You mention the tubeless conversion is easy if you have one arm.

I have two arms, so am I still able to use this method? Or is there a specific bi-armed method I am unaware of
  • 63 3
 I think they meant "onebless", not "twobless".

That was far-fetched.
  • 14 1
 ^That was the best pun I've seen on PinkBike. It actually had me laughing aloud for a bit.
  • 9 0
 I have one arm and this technique works for me.
  • 51 0
 Is it a problem that I got my dick caught in the ceiling fan after step 2?
  • 48 0
 All I want to say about tubeless is that I haven't had a flat in over a year... *sips tea
  • 10 0
 Knock on wood*
  • 5 0
 I run tubes and I got a flat at the end of last season for the first time in over two years
  • 6 0
 Tubes for four years. First flat,last week. 27psi DH
  • 3 2
 Standard tubes on the DH bike for 13 years... I can count my flats on one hand. Tubeless is overrated on dual ply tires.
  • 5 0
 The only thing I know about tubes vs. tubeless:You will flat either eventually. The more often you ride flow trails the less likely you are to flat. The nastier the trail the more likely you are to flat. This being said...I don't care If you ride tubes or tubeless, if you are making an argument for one or the other, it doesn't mean shit without context. Hell I run 20PSI w/ tubes and have not flatted once in the last 5 years....on my commute to work.
  • 2 0
 Tubeless for 2 days before I put a hole in my tire too big for sealent
  • 2 0
 I definately put my bike through its paces to say the least...
  • 1 0
 Now we're talking! The only reason I say this is because I am salty about flats and want to get to the bottom of it! I've had luck with both tubes and no tubes. The argument will never be just black and white and we all have to accept that. Things to consider being: weight, application, conditions, rider aggressiveness etc. Currently, it is impossible for me to say definitively that one is better than the other because there are so many variables from ride to ride, and I do switch from time to time throughout the year.
  • 1 0
 Theres way more factors than just tubes or tubless. Tire pressure, rim choice, spring/shock setup etc...
  • 1 0
 You're right about all of that @downhilladdict. My tubed success can be attributed to a lot of things: No stupid low pressures where both tires and rims are damaged (24 front, 26 rear on Schwalbe SGs right now), 25mm internal width rims, good line choices, etc. But it's not like I ride all flow trails either...Northstar and my local canyon are famous for their wheel eating terrain. Most of my flats over the years were a direct result of me experimenting with lower pressures to see what I could get away with. The truth is, if riders are running pressures low enough to pinch flat, they are also dinging up thier rims and that doesn't bode well for a tubeless set up either. Dual ply tires, run at reasonable pressures for your terrain and speed are surprisingly good at avoiding flats. I totally get tubeless for single ply, but in my opinion, going tubeless on a dual ply dh set up should be done for reasons other than avoiding flats. Gwin's run where he pulled his tubeless set up off in a hard turn is great evidence of that.
  • 42 0
 Hands down the best description of front vs rear braking.
  • 18 0
 My favourite bits was "Squaring off every corner with a rear-wheel skid, however, is lazy and destructive, and in most cases, it's the slower way around." I said this in a comment only yesterday.
  • 5 0
 That part of the article is gold, there is so much useful information in there.
  • 15 1
 Skids are for your pants, not for corners
  • 7 10
 If you're in race mode, you're skidding. Let's be realistic
  • 7 1
 When I'm in race mode I make an extra effort to ride cleanly and maintain exit speed. Maybe that's why I never win though Razz
  • 5 0
 Rear brake only? Most trackstands in my case (just prefer to use the rear brake only, if I use the brake, strangely with the front brake I'm not that good).
Wheelies and manuals, cover the rear brake. The front wheels seems to have very little traction in those situations... The opposite goes for endo's then its front brake only, and the rear wheel lacks traction.
Ice and compacted snow on the roads, rear brake too.

But nice write up, Mastering Mountainbike Skills has a nice chapter about this too.
  • 5 0
 Also if you have carried too much speed into a turn and realise half way through, the safest way to stand yourself up and slow down in my experience is rear brake - front brake screws up your handling so badly that you crash before you can slow down.
  • 1 0
 Go easy on yourself. If your dick's getting caught in the ceiling fan, I'd still call that a win.
  • 2 0
 I' ve been plateau'd on increasing speed and this article really helped. Went out today and while instinctively wanting to scrub off speed when hauling into corners, I kept off the front break and used just the rear break. That helped to modulate without slowing nearly so much. Also, kept in mind that I can scrub off speed by leaning and drifting instead of breaking. This is of course all very obvious, but it does help to read it as Pink Bike advice. Thanks for the good tips RC.
  • 25 1
 i have 1 arm, and 2 penises. works like a charm every time
  • 16 2
 bragging about your BF's?
  • 3 0
 yes i am
  • 18 1
 Absolutely love these articles. Thanks again Pinkbike.
  • 9 0
 If it's just the front hub gone wonky on the Mavics, get a Nukeproof generator hub for $50, then any rim you want, and get em laced up at a shop. Total cost shouldn't be more than $175, and you'll end up with a nice new wheel. On a side note, how does a company screw up a front hub?
  • 3 0
 i know right , just make it spin :p
  • 6 0
 Just ask Easton.
  • 2 0
 The Nukeproof Generator hub is solid, it stands up to park riding. I agree with mnorris. Custom is the way to go
  • 2 0
 How to screw a front hub? easy, 3 piece glued construction. Cheaper and... cheaper... and cheap, that's all.
  • 8 0
 Training my five year olds on the use of brakes. I weakened the fronts enough that, though they can stop it takes a harder pull than the back. Then I said pull both and try not to skid tires. So far so good. I will explain about slick surfaces and turning when the thaw is complete and we get on dirt again. The girls go fast enough that this is a legitimate concern. I don't want them reliant on just the back tire, but explaining nuanced braking to a little kid is tricky.
  • 7 0
 I have set up Outlaws in exactly the way described as well as other rims. Be aware that if you are a light rider or not all that aggressive in turns all should be okay if the tire fits tight (a tubeless ready tire is HIGHLY recommended). However, if you are heavier, corner hard, land sideways, or wish to avoid the unpleasant experience of peeling a tire off the rim at high speed, I would recommend either the split tube/Stans Strip method or just go a proper UST tire/rim set up. Just putting tape and sealant on to make a tubeless set up is sketchy at best without some kind of bead security. People need to be aware that the tube is normally an integral part in securing the tire to the rim and without it you run a major risk of burping.. or much worse. I really wish PB would mention this in articles instead of just "tape, sealant, and go".
  • 8 0
 After you put the tubeless rim tape on you should mount the tire with a tube in it and leave it at max pressure for at least an hour. It will make the tape seal much better.
  • 10 2
 you actually only need a front brake , have u seen bernerd kerr?
  • 6 0
 Nice answers on everything from the braking techniques, to the wheel recommendation.
  • 3 0
 Great article! The points about the rear brake are thought provoking. For me its always been when u need to slow/stop the front does most of it and yeah the rear can help. It also blows my mind that the majority of people I know still insist that tubeless isnt worth the trouble. Nukin Futz.
  • 2 0
 i dont think about my braking anymore , i also never let my finger leave the lever unless for tricks... my bike pops out of turns nicely so i rlly push the bike into the corner , pretty sure i skid up the first few degrees of turning in high speed shit
  • 1 0
 I've went tubeless on 5+ set ups and it rides amazing but every pair has given me issues.
  • 4 0
 Do we know that Jared Graves does not run his brakes moto style as is common in Aus. and NZ? If so, it would be his rear brake he had the finger way off of.
  • 8 0
 No moto style for Graves - his front brake is on the left side. www.pinkbike.com/photo/11216800
  • 1 0
 Then he is braking his rear hard (looking at the photo) at the apex, which is exactly the opposite advice given in the article.
  • 6 1
 If you're not sure that the rim and the tire are going to play nice adding sealant should be the last step.
  • 1 0
 (It can be added thru the valve with the core removed or unseat a few inches of one bead and pour it in through that opening)
  • 1 0
 Agreed. When mounting a new tire i use just a little bit of sealant to lubricate the rim and bead. I don't use the full amount of sealant until I am sure that I can air it up. If I don't have a removeable valve stem I just pup the smallest amount of the bead off of the rim, while trying to keep the rest seated. Even having just one side seated helps a lot.
  • 2 0
 Best way to go tubeless...First you should prep the tire bead, I found that setting the tire up with a tube overnight ( or longer) to help it form to the rim. It is easier to seal. Not much luck unfolding a new tire and having it hold air while pumping. An air compressor makes it easier but my Leznze pump works well. Use Gorilla grip duck tape, use a punch to poke hole, not a knife. I also use automotive stems instead of the presta. Use Simple green any soak both sides and install on rim. The simple green helps the rubber stick to rim when it dries. Pump tire until it seats. Now deflate and add Stan`s , then reinflate tire. Ride
,
  • 1 0
 @skinnyjeans , what automotive stems are you using specifically?? I've never seen anything suitable and would love to have schrader tubeless! Prestas are a pain!
  • 2 0
 949 racing valve stems. I did cut the threaded nut that secures the valve to rim with a dremel tool.
  • 2 0
 Tubeless = Hockey tape to build up the bed + Stans rim strips.

No burping, the tire seals to the Stans rim tape better than simply to the rim
The hockey tape doesn't create a goo when combined with the sealant
You can put two or three layers of hockey tape to build up the bed, making inflating the tire easier ( you can inflate with a hand pump with the right amount of tape.

This works for any tire on any rim requiring a tube.
  • 1 0
 @enduroelite , good plan, are you using cloth hockey tape or the clear stuff?
  • 1 0
 Cloth tape. You can reuse it if you ever need to take it off. Since not all tires companies have the same bead you can raise the bed to the suitable height for the tire to easily installed removed and inflated.
  • 5 2
 Well, you're asking him to make a big jump from an $80 investment to a $600 dollar investment. Still, lots of nice wheels out there for 600 bucks...
  • 7 2
 it seems that everywhere i look, websites are just tossing around this complete set of spank wheels. vital and pinkbike. i dont know why. SO many options under $600. Hell...you can go on chainreactioncycles and buy a set of Hope hub wheels for the same price. Ill take hope hubs over spank hubs all day.
  • 7 0
 @ccolagio - It's because the Spanks have a good balance of weight, strength, and rim width that some others in this category lack. It's definitely not the only option as far as complete wheelsets go, but it is one we've spent a fair bit of time on, and I wouldn't want to recommend something that we hadn't evaluated. But you are right that it's hard to go wrong with a set of Hope hubs and some nice rims, which is what I was getting at in the second part of my answer to Qui3tman.
  • 1 0
 Which kind of answers his question, so I see no issue there.
  • 2 5
 80 euros , 600 us , thats a dfference aswell ...
  • 1 1
 Im with Mike, the wheels are probably one of the best blends of weight, strength, cost that are available. look sweet too
  • 1 0
 It's a good call. You cannot go wrong with spank rims. For a real budget option to tide you over, you could go for a discounted spank rim/shimano hub combo. Some say the bearings are no good but you could ask the Dh world champ, world cup champ and ews champ about that. Or go superstar. Or pinkbike classifieds.
  • 1 0
 @davidsimons to be fair, it was 80GBP, around 105 euro, you can find oozys for 430 euro, still a big difference but not that big like 600/80$... hope tech enduro cost around the same. If I was in the market for a budget enduro wheelset I'd go for superstar tech4 ds25 anyways, for the price, 250 euro, but also for spare part availability.
  • 1 0
 Sorry, missed that it was GBP not dollars. Wonder why the response quotes dollar prices when the question mentions £'s though?...
  • 1 0
 In regards to the tubless questions. I also have an outlaw wheel set and want to go tubless, but I was considering another method which involves stretching a 24 inch tube over a 26 wheel. The question is does anyone have any input as to the preference of the tube stretch vs gorilla tape?
  • 2 1
 Great thinking there, but there is no way stretching a tube would provide the airtight seal that gorilla tape would... Still, I would be interested to see the results of people that have tried it!
  • 4 2
 thats a whole lot thicker than a layer of tape....
  • 2 0
 i did it this way before when i had some ellsworth wheels. it worked well, but you have to trim up excess tube that hangs out after you set up your tire. and as for adding sealant, use tubes with valves that the core can come out of. once the tube is trimemd it can slip in the rim, and not seal up well, at least it was that way for me!
  • 2 0
 I've done both (on personal bikes) and I've found the Gorilla tape method to work much better. Using a slightly smaller tube doesn't quite make a good enough seal, and it makes it very difficult/impossible to re-use the rim (should you need use a tube due to slicing a sidewall) without having to slice up another tube. One wrap of gorilla tape + sealant + valve stems is all you need.
  • 5 0
 I use 20 inch tube(26 wheels) over standard rim tape, baby powder on the outside of tube, cut open and use soapy water on the inside(heavy on the soap) mount tires with stan's sealant (any tire except Kenda) pump up with floor pump, dont trim the tubes off for at least a week to make sure they seal up. that's it
  • 2 1
 not evan with a 23 inch tube ? :p
  • 1 0
 Thanks for the input guys. Sorry @wuzupjosh meant to +1 you not -1.
  • 2 0
 I've heard of people having problems with outlaws sealing with gorilla tape due to them being pinned instead of welded. That being said, I've found the gorilla tape(actually polypropylene tape) method to be a lot easier than the split tube method.
  • 2 0
 I actually have a set of Outlaws that I did a tubeless conversion on using the exact method above. Only things with the outlaws are they are quite wide inner dimension, so the 1" wide tape isn't wide enough to cover from bead to bead. Second, save yourself having to unseat the tire a second time; do a double wrap of tape from the start (unless your tires are very tight on the rim to start).
  • 3 0
 gorilla tape is great , works on carbon super well ,if you over lap the tape about 5-6 holes on both rims it ussually works , outlaws shouldnt be that much different ...
  • 4 0
 @DHGabe If you are going this route, I would suggest a 20" tube. My friend and I have both used this set up, and it is actually more advantagous to use than gorilla tape, if your rim is not tubeless ready/compatible. This is because if you are using a rim that is not tubeless compatible, where the rim is joined, it is usually pinned and not welded. This creates tiny holes that sit outside the reach of the gorilla tape sometimes.

Otherwise its more of a hassle to setup than with gorilla tape. If those rims are tubeless compatible, I would use gorilla tape.
  • 1 0
 I like the split tube method. Faster, easier and holds air much much better. I rarely ever put any air into my tires. 20" type for 26" wheel.
  • 4 1
 One question about the photo of Jared Graves.... Isn't he an Aussie? don't most Aussies ride with left hand rear brake? Making the caption all wrong.
  • 2 0
 Graves rides with backwards brakes, not sure why though
  • 3 0
 @rollchal: Graves' front brake is on the left side of his handlebar: www.pinkbike.com/photo/11216800
  • 1 0
 He ride with rear brake in right side of handlebar. just look at the cables
  • 1 0
 Thanks for clearing that up.
  • 1 0
 I've used automotive sealant before in a difficult tire mount. When you first spray it in the tire, it expands like foam and puffs up the tire a bit to help it seal really fast. Then after a few hours it becomes liquid latex like the other sealants. It costs about the same and weighs about the same too. I prefer Orange seal though if I can get it.
  • 2 1
 Tubeless is amazing! I have 8 holes in my front tire and even though the liquid slowly seeps out of them they stay full inflated! before I would be puncturing every 2 rides with a long walk of shame back to the car. TUBELESS FOR LIFE!!!!! Big Grin
  • 2 2
 the one other thing i have to say about braking and traction , you have the most traaction when your bike is under zero braking tolerance , so in my opinion there is a set "trail speed" on alot of stuff , youll find it will actually be easier to take the harder line sometimes if you dont have to brake anyway , that being said people will debate that with your sag , wheel path , etc. "a vertical wheel path holds speed on rough shit alot better than some...
  • 5 0
 Who cares how you brake when conditions are tack or the trail's bermed out and has plenty of run outs. Pretty much anything will work. The braking question should be what do you do when you don't know how much traction you're going to have on the wet roots, or rocks. If the trail is steep and slick, rear brake first will let you feel out how much traction there is while your front wheel picks the line. Then you can choose the appropriate amount of front braking knowing how much traction there is. Every bit you brake with the front on a slick surface, the less traction you have, increasing the chances the next slick root will push the front off line. If you already know the traction of a trail, like in a race where you've preridden the course, braking with both slows you down the hardest allowing you to brake later and get a faster time. When it comes to riding the unknown, rear brake bias is the safest.
  • 2 1
 @wuzupjosh come again?
  • 2 0
 those specialized roval plastic rimstrips work really good if width matches. they come in two widths and all the diameters. quick,painless and reusable
  • 3 0
 "... job that can be messy, so best not to do it in the kitchen...".. The kitchen is the original workshop !! c'mon
  • 2 0
 On the tubeless conversion front, I find using a holepunch to make the hole in the gorilla tape is incredibly effective, and I haven't had any sealing issues!
  • 1 1
 Tubeless don't know never tried can swap a tube in five if you flat in a race you lose either way, but braking issues not a bad write up but come on it depends on so many variables ,style bike terrain temperature tyre choice but mainly whatever feels comfortable !
  • 1 0
 I have another question related to tubeless. My one tire goes flat overnight, whats going on? I can ride it with no problems, but I have to inflate before every ride.
  • 1 0
 What is your rim, tire, rim strip combo and sealant too?
  • 1 0
 lalena, get a water spray bottle and put some water and detergent in it. Spray it all over the rim and tire and bubbles will form where the leak is. Or, where the leaks are. Diagnosis is the first step.
  • 1 0
 @brule I am using Stans Flow with High Roller 2 and Stans sealant. I'm not sure what the tape is.

@iamamodel I will do that tomorrow and see where the leak is.

Thanks for the replies!
  • 2 0
 Lalena - take the wheel off and sit it on it's side over a bucket, which will spread the sealant on the sidewalls. Wait overnight and switch sides. Oh, and keep resting up!
  • 1 0
 Probably a leak at the valve-stem. Remove the valve and dip the rubber bit in Stans, then reassemble. Sometimes it pays to push the valve through the rim-hole as you tighten the nut.
  • 1 0
 Haha @katmai. I figure I might as well give my bikes some TLC while I'm banged up; they sure need it.
  • 1 0
 @lalena - go find stans old video on YouTube on how to seal your tubeless setup. Involves a shake/rotation + laying it on its side and soapy water to find air leaks. Works every time.
  • 2 0
 Not all sealant is equal... that green Botranger stuff is absolutely worthless.
  • 2 0
 @RichardCunningham many thanks for the feedback regarding the brakes. Exactly what I was looking for. Cheers!
  • 1 0
 A question for people.

I want to go tubless but i fly with my bike alot, and deflateing tyres with tubes is just easy. does anyone travel with a tubless tyre? any problems?
  • 2 0
 The cargo hold is pressurized but even without that the relative pressure increase is not huge. If you're concerned about your Stan's oozing out at the higher relative pressure then for piece of mind drop them to around 20psi which is as easy with tubless as it is with tubes...job done. Tubes are for backpacks and scientists.
  • 1 0
 Uptill now, I flew once with my bike, but have been using a tubeless setup for years now, it was no problem. Indeed the airline makes you deflate your tires (security meassure thingy, not that the pressure(differential) is great enough, but its no big deal to deflate them a bit). My tires stayed on the rim perfectly, but they are TLR, so they have a beadnip and really grab onto the bead of the tire. I've used a tubeless conversion kit in the past too and the seal there wasnt so strong, maybe in that case dont defalte em all the way.
Whilst inflating the front came up to pressure perfectly, the rear tire needed a bit more encourageing, leaked a bit of sealant round the rim, but I set mine up with a floorpump, if you can get hold on one of those you're okay.
  • 1 0
 Not sure if it goes under "trail braking" but I use my rear break to make fine adjustments to the balance and lateral possition on the bike in many situations.
  • 2 0
 Ask Joe Barnes about rear braking and rear wheel steering.
  • 1 0
 I went tubeless about 6 years ago and have not had a flat since.(unless the sealant dries up)tubeless ruuuuuules!
  • 1 0
 Agree...set up all my tubeless this way. ...and all good so far!
  • 3 1
 *lights a fire
  • 2 0
 MORE ASK PINKBIKE!!!
  • 1 0
 whether the sealant does not dissolve the adhesive on the gorilla tape ??
  • 2 0
 i've had this problem using electrical tape in the past. tape slid off to the side, leaked air through spoke hole... had a little lie down on a tight berm... then popped 2 tubes on the valve holes before i realised the problem. had to call my mum to pick me up, so now i only use stans yellow tape.
  • 1 0
 Directions unclear, penis is stuck in the ceiling fan...
  • 4 5
 Everytime I see tubeless I see 'Boobless'....I am so going to burn for this -_-
  • 1 0
 neg props incoming Frown
  • 1 0
 tubeless rules!!!
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