Ask Pinkbike - Out of Control Rear Derailleur, Flat-Pedal Rider Switching to Clips, and a 24-Inch Wheel Question

Jul 29, 2014
by Pinkbike Staff  
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Here at Pinkbike we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.



What the Shift?

Question: Pinkbike user DudeofWV asked this question in the Mechanic's Lounge forum: I'm not a mechanic and I have very little experience working on my bike, but I went ahead and replaced the rear derailleur on my Cannondale F29 and am now having some issues getting it to shift properly. The problem is that I seem to have an extra click in the shifter that does nothing when shifting up, and although it does go into the largest cog, I have to shift twice in order to move the chain to a smaller cog. The upper pulley wheel lines up with each cog, but it doesn't seem to shift decently regardless of how much I play with the barrel adjuster at the shifter. Help!

bigquotesTwo things can cause the issues that you're describing: incorrect cable tension or too much friction between the cable and housing caused by contamination. Did you replace your shift cable and housing when you installed the new derailleur? If the cable can't move freely in the housing, either from grime, rust, or damage, it can actually keep the derailleur from being able to move freely. One shift cable and some lengths of housing are relatively inexpensive compared to a new derailleur, so it's always good to replace those bits as well when you're going to do such a job.

The other culprit could be simply that you have too much cable tension in the system, which allows you to shift to an easier gear just fine but makes it slow to come back down the cassette. This is easy to spot by putting the bike in a repair stand or flipping it upside down and shifting to the smallest cog - does it stop at the second smallest, or does it drop down all the way? It it stops before shifting to the smallest cog, and you can see that it isn't the limit screw that's keeping it from reaching it, then you have too much tension. Take a look at this Tech Tuesday that shows you how to get the job done from scratch.
- Mike Levy


Getting your derailleur to shift correctly requires that you get both the cable tension and limit screw adjustments correct.




Flat Pedal Rider Wants to Clip In

Question: Mshopik writes in the All-Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country forum: I have a Trek Remedy and this year I decided to try out SPD-type pedals. I usually ride flats with Five Ten Freeriders, which works just fine, but I figure maybe it's time to clip in for the climbs - the whole earn your turn bit and all that. I picked up a set of Crankbrothers Candy-2 pedals. Now I'm trying to decide between some Five Ten Maltese Falcons or Specialized Rime shoes. It's a tough call. I'm leaning toward the lighter, stiffer Rimes, since I can always switch back to the Freeriders and flats.

bigquotesMinimize the variables when you start riding clipped in and you will get up to speed much more quickly. I suggest you buy a pair of Five Ten Maltese Falcon shoes to start with, as you are already familiar with the fit and feel of their flat-pedal DH shoes and that will simplify your learning curve to clipping into and unclipping from the pedal mechs. The Specialized Rime shoes feel closer to an XC shoe and while a stiffer, more ergonomically profiled enduro-style shoe may ultimately be the perfect solution for you in the future, I'll bet you will ride the Five Tens with much greater confidence on both the ups and downs. Your choice of pedals is a good one. I would have recommended Crankbrothers platform-style Mallet pedals instead of the more minimal Candy-2, but the key benefits to the Crankbrothers pedal are the same in both cases: You can enter the pedal mech' forward or backwards in a pinch - which is the main reason that the Mallet is the pedal of choice for DH pros. Also, the Crankbrothers mech' allows the foot to move around a little without disengaging, which benefits maneuverability. - RC


Clipless shoes and pedals

Five Ten Maltese Falcon shoe

Two iconic staples of gravity and enduro racing: the Crankbrothers Mallet pedal and Five Ten's Maltese Falcon shoe. The trail-oriented Crankbrothers Mallet MK3 pedal (left) and the Mallet DH pedal to the right famously easy to engage. Riders coming off of flat pedals for a first crack at clipped in pedaling should probably stick with flat-soled gravity-style shoes to minimize the learing curve.





Which 24" Downhill Rims?

Question: Pinkbike user Jordandozier31 asked this question in the Downhill forum: I just picked up a 2005 Specialized Big Hit DH, and the wheels needs to be rebuilt. It's the 24" rear, and 26" front, and need a good recommendation for rims to lace up. I know it's the older rim size to run but, that's what I prefer. Any help is much appreciated, thank you.



bigquotesThere aren't quite as many option these days in the 24" wheel size, but don't worry, you're not completely out of luck. I'd recommend checking out Sun Ringle's MTX series of rims - either the MTX31 or the MTX33 would be good options for your Big Hit, especially since they're available in both 26" and 24" versions. The MTX rims are plenty wide for DH usage (the 31 or 33 refers to the outer rim dimensions), and have a welded seam to help prevent them from separating. I've had good luck building them into reliable wheelsets that are capable of withstanding a solid beating in the bike park. Plus, at around $50 per rim they're not terribly expensive either. One thing to keep in mind during your wheel build is that your bike has an asymmetrical rear end, which means the rear wheel needs to be dished 6mm to the non-drive side. Specialized designed the bike this way to create a zero dish rear wheel, a setup that allows all of the spokes to be under an even amount of tension. - Mike Kazimer






85 Comments

  • 67 5
 I have a question:
Can I ride park naked?
  • 19 0
 Full aero.
  • 3 11
flag LawsonRaider (Jul 29, 2014 at 7:10) (Below Threshold)
 You can ride naked but the question is does anyone really want to see you ride naked? Put some clothes on sonny! Big Grin
  • 2 1
 Come to Chicago for world naked bike ride
  • 7 0
 riding naked must be a real ballache though. surely the fun is quickly killed by a combination of chaffe and slap?
  • 2 0
 !!)
  • 22 3
 Having made the switch to clips I would prbably not recommend Crank Brothers pedals, also for the poor bearing quality but not only. I have tried the mallets and found so difficult to disengage that it did not bring me in the best conditions of confindence when approaching a techy zone. Since then I'm on Shimano XT trail ones. Surely too small for DH riding but with enough real estate to feel good even when failing to reengage the clips. But surely these things are more a question of taste or "feel" so you better try it out yourself Mshopik.
  • 7 0
 Totally agree. I have ridden a lot of clip pedal styles, and Shimano is in my experience the most durable, consistent, and smooth mechanism. Non-independent dual entry mechanisms like Crank Bros means if the bottom of your pedal strikes a rock, the mechanism on top might disengage and you'll lose your footing in the gnarly rocks! The steel cleats don't wear out quickly either, if you're doing a lot of hiking, compared to some other manufacturer's brass cleats. Plus the SLX level pedals are only 31 dollars on Jenson or similar websites, and they work just as well as the higher models!
  • 8 0
 I ride Shimano XT Trail pedals most of the time, but Mallets, even though they have a spotty history for reliability, are still the easiest to use and to learn on. Hopefully, the Mavic/Time pedal will evolve to offer a better alternative to CB.
  • 6 0
 Shimano pedals here

SPD-SL on my road bikes and SPD on the mountain bike

cheapest Shimano 520 SPD pedals seem to work great for trail riding, super reliable and super cheap around £25, the small size works great here in the muddy UK as there is no platform to clog out
  • 2 1
 Been on Mavic (Time) pedals for over a year now. Done 4000 km trail riding on them plus 5 days on lift assisted bike parks. NO problems with them so far, AND they are great in muddy conditions. Never going back to CB.
  • 3 1
 Time pedals have performed flawlessly for me year after year!
  • 2 0
 Hi to all
I always ride clips for xc,enduro or dh. My first set of clips was spd,for xc and trail rides are ok,but i have a few problems....when you take out your feet it´s a little bit difficult to clip in when it gets wild (steep sections or bad conditions like mud or snow)than cbros. It easy to clip out and i have a few bad crashes by accidentally clip out when jumping...I test cbros Mallet for dh and candy for enduro and xc and i think they are better. In the Mallet I only adjust 3 or pins to stay in contact with the shoe (2 front,external and internal pins, 1 rear internal pin) to easy/fast clip out .In bad moments you can put the shoe on the pedal easy than in spd with a good feedback. It´s totally true that the cbros bearings are sit,but those pedals are easy to service and you don´t need any special tool. Candy pedals are better for long rides than spd, I never had knee pain with cbros pedals. spd pedals are cheaper but not so easy to service (parts are not easy to found). I am very happy with crank brothers pedals.
  • 2 0
 Seconding the Shimano pedal/cleat system. Absolutely love it, and never had to worry about reliability in the 5 years I've had them, both on my CX and mountain bikes. My advice on the shoe would have been different too; I really love having a stiffer, lighter shoe. Really makes a big difference when you're putting in a lot of miles, and I can't say I've ever had a problem with maneuverability (but I don't ride much DH/park either).

I've always been curious though... for those of you on pedals like the mallets/candy-2s, with cleats and pins, is it harder to get out of the binding with the platform and pins there? How big a difference in control does it make over just the regular non-platform SPDs? Tried the Shimano DX pedals once and wasn't a fan, but I also ride a really stiff XC-ish shoe so maybe it just wasn't a good combo.
  • 5 3
 Stat far far far away from crank bros candy, real piece of crap
  • 8 2
 Quadrupling the anti-crank brothers sentiment here: I've personally not found a single crank brothers product to be reliable (pedals, seatpost, wheels, you name it). The pros run them because they can just throw them away after a couple races.

That said however, having ridden extensively with Shimano including 520's (great value, bullet proof), XT and XTR (standard and trail) I would stay away from the XTR's. I've had to have them warrantied several times due to premature bearing wear/failure. This is a common issue that needs to be addressed. Although Shimano is great about exchanging it is still a hassle. The XT's have a much better track record. They could be the most reliable pedal (tied with time atacs) on the market.
  • 6 1
 Clank Brothers.
  • 7 0
 I rode a pair of Shimano M747's for almost 20 years. Beat the absolute shit out them before they finally totally crapped out. When Shimano gets it right, they get it *extremely* right...
  • 2 0
 I'm the exact opposite. I had (and really liked) Shimano's XTR pedals, but here in the Pacific NW the Fall/Winter/Spring/a good chuck of the Summer mud would turn them into mud clogged platforms in about two minutes. I switched to latest generation of Candy's and have no complaints. Yes they need to be rebuilt form time to time, but the kits are inexpensive and the pedals are easy to take apart. Don't get me wrong, the SPD's are bomb proof and if they didn't clog so easily I'd still have them.

Also, I run Eggbeaters on my Cyclocross/Road bikes and it's nice to just have one pair of shoes between three bikes.
  • 3 0
 Times are super easy to engage and disengage and I never get accidental releases. You can pretty much just stab the pedal with your shoe and that's about it. They work just as well when dry or muddy too. They also allow for a little foot pivoting which is very knee friendly, something that people often note is not the case with shimano. After 2 years of riding I opened them for a maintenance and everything still looked brand new and lubed in there. Can't fault them at all.
  • 1 0
 Switched from flats to times over 4 years ago...still have the same pedals lol. And i hammer my bike good. Fukn flawless.
  • 1 0
 yeah i agree
  • 1 0
 you use them for enduro or dh ?
  • 1 0
 Dh at the bike park. Durability > weight
  • 1 0
 I am not sure how available they are around the world but another pedal to consider is the Keywin DH. Basically the same mechanism as the Shimanos but a bigger platform with better mud clearing.
  • 11 0
 I've just dumped my Mallets after having to rebuild them twice in only a year's riding: bearing failure both times. They're great to ride with - terrible to live with...
  • 1 0
 Could we get a how to rebuild mallets article? I've had good luck with mine like two years on a pair of used ones before problems but last time I ordered a rebuild kit for them the shop handed me back non working pedals that they couldn't fix. I can't go back to gritty clogged shimano's.
  • 1 0
 Rebuilding Mallets article would be awesome. I don't know if Crank Bros still do this, but back on the Acid pedals they gave the wrong instructions for changing the bearings. They told you to hook a screwdriver into the side of the bearing's outer race and pull it out, which literally never worked. When you looked closely on the internet forums you'd find there was a way to push the bearing out from the other side of the pedal, which actually did work.
  • 1 0
 Enduro maniac dh mallet are excellent pedals. Your lack of confidence is not due to them but rather a lack of practice on your side or improper set up. Mallet are coming with shims to place under cleats also you could lower the pins on the pedals to create less grips, you have a 15 degree cleat and a 20 you need to find where you like the most to have them.
  • 10 0
 No love for the shimano dx clipless pedals? They are ugly but I love them!
  • 6 0
 love here.
  • 3 0
 Tons of love. Those pedals are fantastic.
  • 2 0
 And it s not ugly !
  • 4 1
 ok honestly as a shop sales guy i have to give my 2 cents to some of these joeys, if your looking to get into clips, and have ridden flats, get a big platform, like the mallets. My other suggestion would be the deore pedals cause you can pick up a pair for around 60 bucks so you wont be out more money if you hate em haha
  • 3 0
 I switched to SPD s this summer and bought the new Funn Mamba pedals and 5-10 Maltese shoes. This was a good pic because i chose the pedals with the clip in on one side. They work great for the undecided rider. The flat pedal side feels great with my shoes and the clip in side is awsome as well. I would suggest this pedal to anyone interested in getting into a clip in pedal.
  • 1 0
 Hey where did you buy the mamba, I'm trying to get a pair for the reason of being able to go flat incase its shitty condition or a new sketchy trail that I don't wanna be clipped in for.
  • 1 0
 I bought them from the Funn rep in the states. His name in Victor
  • 10 8
 Hey guys this forum of question asking is pretty sweet and the replys by qualified guys in the main thread is also awesome but as I scroll down the responses... If you are the one asking the questions please please please make sure you are taking advice from someone with some kind of qualification. Further to that if you have those qualifications and are posting in the replies and you are confident with your answers then back it up with a quick blurb of your title and experience. For example after 25 years of mountain biking I feel I'm confident in suggesting X brand or since working in X shop for five years we found this to work really well. This adds credibility to your response and different qualified points of view.

Cheers
Erik; 25 years xc/all mountain/dh racing (back in the beginning) trained at ubi as an advanced mechanic in 97 (see how my view could be different from someone who bought their first bike last year and rode it a lot)

Happy trails
  • 5 0
 You are getting neg propped because you are asking people to make sense Smile . A lot of people have no experience whatsoever, and they neg prop the knowledgeable people into oblivion. Its the biggest negative about this site.
  • 9 0
 Hey Erik, I understand what you are saying, but argument from authority (i.e., qualifications) is not a good way to prove the truth of what you are saying. Credentials are fine and all that, but no matter what your background is, you need to provide evidence for what you are saying. Whipping out our junk and duelling swords will just turn into a pissing match.

Obviously the plural of anecdote isn't data, but if a bunch of people say SPD pedals rule and Crank Brothers bearings keep failing, that is somewhat useful information. Why should I discount someone's opinion if they have only been biking for a year? I ride about 200 times a year, for example. A rider can learn a lot in a year. You can tell what kind of insight a person has by the way they present their information, not by the credentials they talk about.

TEMPLE
  • 6 0
 I'm a fan of debating with logic and reasoning rather than comparing credentials. There are a lot of misinformed opinions out there, including from alleged experts. This is especially true on the topic of pedal preference. There simply isn't an industry-wide agreement on what constitutes the "best" pedal.

Ironically, most of the time when someone makes an appeal to authority argument, I end up giving less weight to their opinions. True experts try to convince you with logic and evidence.
  • 1 0
 All valid points, I didn't necessarily want to discount a new rider or anyone since we are all part of this a same community after all. Maybe I'm just looking to see where guys are coming from when they post their opinions.
Bike park riders are going to like something's different than an Xc rider. Just like a road only rider has no place offering a free rider jumping advice. I won't or can't in good conscience offer my mechanical knowledge on here simply because I haven't been a wrench in 10+ years, but trail side I'll help anyone that appears to be struggling with what I see to be a simple fix, show them some tricks and get them rolling again.


Opinions are like a$$holes everyone's got one but some smell less than others when then make noise...
  • 1 0
 Blurb of your title and experience hahaha Thats a good one
  • 2 0
 Got love for both flats & clips. Hard to adjust your feet quickly sometimes when riding flats & your foot pops off the pedal and doesn't land back where you want it. My feet don't move in clips either but at least they're in the right place. Switch between the two fairly regularly depending where & what I'm riding.
  • 1 0
 Flat pedal rider: check the new Five Ten Impact VXi SPD version. They're light and still have that flat pedal feel.

gravityflowmtb.weebly.com/blog/gravity-flow-mtb-headquarters-just-arrived-five-ten-vxi-clipless

And don't shy away from Shimano XTR or XT trail pedals. They're easy to use and have a good neutral platform that works well.
  • 1 0
 TO the flat pedal riders hesitating switching to clips

I moved from DH to enduro last year. So I decided to switch from flats to clips.. Now it s just SOo rad! So much more control on the bike, and a feeling of security. I got Shimano DX pedals. (better than CB Mallet prrsonnaly) And now i m living the dream. Try it too you won t be
  • 2 0
 Disapointed
  • 1 0
 nice right up on 24'' wheels. I ride an '04 big hit with a 24 on back. had a local shop true my wheels once and didn't know about asymmetrical rear. got my bike back and chain rubbed on tire and was off center. dished it myself. running some old alex dh 32's
  • 1 0
 I have been using Shimano DX pedals for years if setup right you get the best of both worlds once your past the clipless learning curve. You and get out of them really quick but there are times where you are just screwed and you and the bike go for a really nice ride together or you turn into a human catapult launching your bike.
  • 1 0
 I'm not a DH rider at all, but there are some pretty tricky tech descents on the trails I ride. Because of that, I was originally riding flats out of feat I'd get hung up and not be able to dismount quickly enough. In part, its the occasionally unwieldy 29" wheel that is the problem here (yes I'll admit a smaller wheel allows for greater balance in slow speed tech) but once I felt comfortable on flats I switched to clip less. I routed the slots to allow for further back cleat placement and started with the pedals as loose as possible. Maybe 5 rides in I was comfortable enough to tighten the pedals. The control I've gained on the tricky descents not bobbing off the pedals along with better power up climbs is reason to never ride flats again for me. BUT I've never ridden true DH so I can't just say I wouldn't ride flats in that scenario. In fact i would probably approach DH with flats and appropriate shoes until i was comfortable on a beginner trail befote id consider clipless. The approach is the same despite the change of riding discipline. Pedal choice is more about riding style than simple preference. IMHO
  • 1 0
 Flatsoles with grabby rubber and spiked pedals are the most difficult combination possible when you want to disengage fast. Besides, the flatsole rests on top of the spring an stays far from the spikes of the pedal when you ride disengaged.
So if you use pedal like the mallet, I suggest the use of a shoe like the shimanos that have a concave part on the midsoles, because they are much more easy to disengage (the spikes don't stick to the sole so deep) and, when riding disengaged, the spring will have a place on the midsole so the front and bak of the sole can touch the spikes of the pedal.
  • 1 0
 I ran flats for awhile to get confidence on steep, loose and tech trails. Once my confidence was good, I got some DH Mallets and Maltese Falcons. Great combination coming from flats. CB pedals need maintenance, but they disengage and engage way easier than Shimano and the Mallets are beefy so you can get a good footing without clipping in. I might go to a more "trail" setup as it's a heavy combination and prone to pedal strikes on tight, rocky trails.
  • 1 0
 @Mike Levy, I would have said that the shifting problem sounds like the shifter wasn't at the end of range when the cable was installed. Assuming your limit screws are set properly, if you don't upshift all the way before clamping the cable then you'll effectively have only 8 (10 positions = 9 shifts) downshifts available and you'll have one cog left that you can't shift to. Going in the other direction you'll get back to the other end of the cassette and still have one upshift left on the shifter, but no more cogs and a mech that has hit it's limit screw. Then as he noted, he'll need to double shift to get back out of that gear.
Undo the cable, make sure you shift all the way to the limit of the shifter and then re-clamp the cable, it should be all good. This is a variation of the same basic principals that mean you can use a 3 position front shifter to operate a double chainring.
I hope my opinion conveyed the requisite impression of being qualified to comment.
  • 1 0
 I have a problem. I recently bought some 32 hole Hadley hubs and I can't work out which rims I should buy. So far I've narrowed the choice down to DT EX 471 or DT XM 401 in 650b. The wheels are to go on a Devinci Troy and will be used with High Roller 2 tyres 2.3 wide. I'm stuck because the 471 is wider and wide seems to be the flavour of the month, and I know the rim will be stiff and strong, yet from the material I've read, the 401 is adequate for moderately sized jumps and allegedly stiff enough for less weight but not as wide. With some companies backing narrower rims as racier, the increased weight of 650b rims, and other companies pushing wider, I don't know what to choose. Geared up I weigh 80kg, and my local trails are rocky with quite a few jumps and drops. Help?
  • 1 0
 I'm a flat pedal rider and I tried to switch to clipless.
I choose Time Atac DH pedals and I honestly liked the feeling of being clipped. I had a couple of crashes because I was not able to clip out at the right moment but that is part of the learning curve.
But... after maybe 6 rides I started to notice pain in my knee joints. I think it was because my feet are locked in on position and my knees can't do full lateral movements while riding. I went back to flats and joint pain disappear.
Any thoughts on this?
Cheers
  • 1 0
 Shimano DX pedal with Giro Chamber shoe til the end of days

My 510 shoes are POS that started falling apart after a month of mild riding
Maybe I got a bad pair, but the Giros are sooo much lighter, more comfortable, and well made
I'd pay $100 more for a pair of Giro shoes over 510
  • 2 0
 I'm building a small Yeti DJ frame right now for my son and using 24" wheels until he gets taller. 24" stuff is near impossible to find. Especially disc compatible stuff.
  • 1 0
 I ride atomlab 24". Bombproof.
  • 2 0
 Start looking at European stores. Chain reaction, for example, has a bunch of 24" rims from Alienation. 24" bikes for street riding are more popular there, hence the the better availability than in the states.
  • 1 0
 Halo USA sell 24" wheels (or just rims if you want to build yourself) and tyres in their online store. I'd recommend you stick to their lightweight stuff if you go Halo. While I've never actually seen their rims, they have a reputation for being overbuilt. I do have their Contra tyres, they have more in common with the tyre off a 450cc moto than any mountain bike tyre.
  • 1 0
 Tires were always the drama when I owned my Big Hit, but I feel like DH tires in 24" are far more available now, all the usual Maxxis suspects have 24" models. If he's going to be doing mostly DJ, it's hard to go wrong with the Kenda K-RAD: $20 bucks a piece on Amazon.

I'm running them, and if I build another 26" DJ, I'd probably pick them over Holy Rollers.
  • 1 1
 Useing 2014 5.10 SPD clipless shoes on flats and they work very well .They do take time to bed into the pedals and are a little stiff for hucking the rear end up . I've used the XT clipless pedal and I like them a lot hucking the rear up is very easy and you do feel you have more controll over the rear end and you get a bigger power increase . My main problem with cliping in is I hate that free flout side to side movement you get and I find you can get way way better grip cornering with flats . It's defo a hard one to choose from both are good
  • 3 0
 Various iterations of Time ATAC since 1999. Crank Bros are a dog turd imitation.
  • 4 1
 Hey Pinkbike team! Can you make your ads open in a new tab? You know the " target="_blank" " thingy.
  • 3 0
 Also check Halo or Alienation rims for 24", MTX's are $hit heavy!
  • 2 0
 Dartmoor do some lovely rims in both sizes, pretty good hubs too. The fortress rims are very tough.
  • 1 0
 AtomLab still makes 24" rims as well.
  • 3 0
 Why is pinkbike called pinkbike? Please explain.
  • 5 0
 a long long time ago in a galaxy far far away.... it was a joke that stuck on the midst of an epidemic of astro mega max to the power of fully sick uber extreme mtbiking websites
  • 1 0
 Well actually...
And Tyler I think will attest to this I think... While at United Bicycle Institute in Ashland Oregon 1997ish (a super sweet place to ride by the way!! You SHOULD go) they have or had a community bike program. The bikes were spray painted pink, if you wanted to go to the grocery store you took a pink bike, once at at the grocery store you could leave it unlocked in the rack for someone else to ride it across town and leave it at the theatre, when someone else came from the theatre they could take it and go home as long as they left the bike at a close by bike rack. It was pretty ingenious actually the bikes were generally worthless single speeds which were in various sizes, simple bikes. After our mechanic program ended and we all headed home the internet was emerging as a place where people discussed stuff including bikes. I can only presume that Tyler came up with the idea as a newsletter based on a community of bikes and their riders. Since the shirts all say "crushing it since '98" Badda bing there you have it...
  • 1 0
 Oh and Tyler drove my broke ass back to canada in his sick Toyota pickup with the Canadian flag painted on the tail gate! Dude is Canadian to the core!
  • 1 0
 Very plausible theory! Thanks!
  • 1 0
 If that dude with the derailleur problems is using a x01dh, it could be he doesn't have the end of the cable routed properly in the guide grooves on the derailleur
  • 1 0
 This. Most common mistake people make when trying to fit their own derailleur is having the cable routed and clamped wrong. Either that or the Hanger is bent causing the derailleur to over shift in the lower gears.
  • 1 0
 Arts cyclery has some good how-to videos on YouTube for derailleur adjustment
m.youtube.com/user/wwwartscyclerycom
  • 1 0
 How about improper lower limit screw adjustment for this Guy problem
  • 3 0
 the extra shifter click is what makes cable tension the most likely cause.
  • 1 0
 How convenient, I just purchased myself some shoes and CB candies earlier today!
  • 12 11
 to the guy switching to clips- Don't. #footoutflatout for life
  • 6 0
 It's not better, just different. It did feel far more efficient to me being clipped in, but I was a little less confident playing at the absolute limits of traction being unable to put a foot down as quickly. You can unclip in a surprisingly short time, and you will have next to no times where you fall as a result of not being unable to unclip (well, once you are used to them) but sometimes that half a second is not appreciated in an emergency!
I tend to ride flats 99% of the time, but would go straight to clips if I was doing a ride for the sake of distance rather than fun...
  • 5 0
 I found the biggiest benerfit of being clipped in is downhill just having my control over the bike and your feet not moving around
  • 1 0
 I saw a slo mo clip of Sam Hill at Fort William while he was ripping through the top rocky section. His bike fell away from his feet numerous times in what was probably a couple seconds. Pretty crazy to see.
  • 1 0
 I didn't find that they helped much on the climbs
  • 1 0
 Why do sealed drives derailleur's not exist better shifting for longer ?

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