Ask Pinkbike - Rookie Racing, Wheel Chatter, and Saint vs Zee

Jun 24, 2014
by Pinkbike Staff  
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Here at Pinkbike we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.



Rookie Racing Questions

Question: Pinkbike user PDWbike asked this question in the Beginners forum: Hello! I'm fifteen years old and very interested in getting started in downhill racing. I'm new to the sport, so I don't know how to start racing or how the rankings work, but I'm familiar with bikes and major events. It'd be great if you could help with the following questions:

• What's a good entry level bike?
• What are some good races to start with?
• How do I train?
• How much commitment does racing take?


bigquotesNot entirely tech related, but some good questions that deserve answering. Racing is what you make of it - it can be a ton of fun, or it can be a stressful weekend filled with jitters - but it's something that everyone should try at least a few times, and it's always great to see a young rider expressing interest in going against the clock. Lets start with your last question, which is the most important one in my mind: how much commitment does racing take? The bottom line is that the more you commit, the better you'll do in the long run. I'm talking about specific on and off the bike training, identifying your strengths and weaknesses, and proper bike setup. The other, even more bottom line is that, as you may find out, the more effort you put into your preparation, the more stressed out you might find yourself come race day. Some racers thrive on this, but many find that it takes all the fun out of it. Given that you're only fifteen, I'd recommend actually putting aside the notion of training and just go out and do a few races to find out if it's for you. Love it? Want to get faster? Consult some coaches to see if they can take you on, and I'm not just talking about fitness gurus, but also a skills coach who can fine tune your technique. This last point is one that's often thought of as unnecessary once you have some decent handling skills, but that isn't the case in a lot of major sports: most of the world's best Supercross racers, best golfers, and best drivers all keep their skills sharp by employing coaches who tell them what they're doing wrong despite the fact that they are making millions and millions of dollars or even dominating their discipline.

Now, what races to do and what bike to ride? Start local, start small, and bring some friends along to keep it light. You can race on whatever mountain bike you already own, so long as it's safe to ride, because you're only there to find out if you're a fan of staying between the tape. Many races even have a hardtail category that you can compete in if you don't have a full-suspension bike. If you're dead set on a new long-travel machine, Specialized's Status series or Airborne's reasonably priced lineup are two good places to start.
- Mike Levy

Charlie Sponsel

Does this look like fun to you? If so, racing is for you. Photo: Mike Lawless



Rear-Wheel Chatters While Braking


Question: Member boss808 asks in the Mechanic's Lounge: When I lock up my rear brake, the rear wheel will rattle and make a "tatatatat" sound, either on tarmac or dirt. This doesn't happen much in the mud. I am using Saint M810 brakes, with a SRAM G3 Clean Sweep rotor. The brake pads are in good condition and the tires are Kenda Nevegal Stick E 2.5's. My bike is a 2011 Giant Faith. Everything is bolted tightly. I have checked my rear axle and tightened that as well, and it still makes the skipping motion and sound. Any ideas as to why this happens?

bigquotesYour skipping could be caused by the mismatched Shimano brake and Avid rotor, but I doubt it, because the only time your rear wheel chatters is when the wheel is locked and the rotor isn't moving. Your chatter is caused by a flexible wheel, brake rotor, or frame component that winds up as the rear tire grips under braking and then springs back into place when the tire' traction is exceeded, and it momentarily skids and then grips again. Where there is adequate traction, the two opposing forces begin to oscillate and create the chatter that you are complaining about. This was once a common occurrence among lightweight XC bikes when disc brakes first appeared. Inadequate spoke tension or foolishly lightweight wheel builds are the number one causes of wheel chatter under braking, but if you have a 203-millimeter brake rotor that is installed in the reversed direction, it is remotely possible that braking forces will create the same wind-up effect in rotor's wimpy spokes. The third culprit would be a flexible frame member, but the fact that the Faith's triangulated swingarm is quite rigid rules that out. - RC
<i>Giant's Faith is a dedicated freeriding bike with a sturdy triangulated swingarm, so we suspect that the rear-wheel chatter that boss808 is experiencing under braking is caused by insufficient spoke tension.</i>

Giant's Faith is a dedicated freeriding bike with a sturdy triangulated swingarm, so we suspect that the rear-wheel chatter that boss808 is experiencing under braking is caused by insufficient spoke tension.





How Much Better is Saint Than Zee?

Question: PB user Bilalk 20 asked in the Downhill Forum:So I just bought a Saint M820 Shadow Plus derailleur and shifter for my new build. Cost quite a lot. However, I was going to go with Zee derailleur and matching shifter for about $100 less. Was it worth it to spend the extra cash? Both have the clutch, but I know the Saint shifter is supposed to be better...but how much better?

bigquotesShimano's Zee group of components has a price vs. performance ratio that can make it difficult to justify forking over the dough required for Saint level components, so it's reasonable that you might find yourself second guessing spending that extra $100. If I was in your shoes, I would have gone with the Saint shifter and saved some money by choosing a Zee derailleur to go with it. The Saint shifter has a better lever feel than the the Zee, and the multi-release function lets you downshift two gears at a time, a feature that I wish all shifters had; I'd say that alone makes it worth the extra money. In a blind test it would be hard to tell the difference between the two derailleurs, and by not going with the top of the line option you'll be a little less likely to cry if it gets bashed into a rock or ripped off by a tree branch. - Mike Kazimer

Shimano Zee Rear derailleur

Shimano's Zee derailleur has proven to be a reliable performer at a fair price.




Have some unresolved tech questions? Jump in the Pinkbike Forum and we'll look to answer it for next time.


94 Comments

  • 93 2
 I read so many complaints that companies don't give riders what they are asking for. Well, I think shimano listened to riders when they made zee. Quality, high performance, and affordable! Usually you only get to pick two, but Shimano stepped up with the golden trifecta. Thanks Shimano.
  • 53 3
 Zee and SLX are the shit. Anyone who complains about shimano not catering to our needs can just look at those two groups and shut up (in my opinion).
  • 10 0
 add One-Up parts to the mix and it's a no-brainer to go shimano 10sp. even on sale XT stuff is quite affordable. check out CRC right now to see what i mean.
  • 2 0
 Funny because Zee and SLX are closer to the same than Zee and Saint. Engineering wise the Saint is much different in design, but it sounds like in function there is much difference.
  • 13 2
 saint = DH xtr

zee= DH slx
  • 3 1
 fuglio is right. the shifters are hardly evan different in any of the specs . i ahev an xt shifter and a zee der. i think the only difference is about 50g right?
  • 11 2
 one day i tore the shifter off my DH rig and couldn't shift for the day. adjusted the chain so it was in the center of the cassette and actually made faster runs that day than i did for 2 weeks. shifting is over-rated.
  • 4 1
 My buddy had a similar experience and switched to a ss package and was a happy man. Cleaner bars and a lot less maintenance. Plus his rear wheel was a lot lighter.
  • 6 0
 may as well go full ridgid while your at it too haha
  • 1 0
 Kevin Aiello and the KHS DH team were testing a singlespeed setup awhile back, I don't think they kept it, but I remember Aiello saying he really liked it
  • 4 0
 Zee brakes, shifter and derailleur - best on the planet! Can't go wrong!
  • 22 1
 how about shark vs. bear vs. wolf vs. bald eagle with chainsaw feet?
  • 3 1
 Vs Mike Ditka vs Chuck Norris.
  • 4 0
 a single dinosaur would destroy all of those…
  • 11 0
 Mr. Norris might disagree with that statement, why do you think dinosaurs are extinct?
  • 1 0
 A Kodiak Bear with a Chainsaw, by far.
  • 13 0
 When you say chainsaw feet...

Do you mean actual chainsaws instead of feet
or
Stevie Smith's feet
or
Two miniaturised Stevie Smiths as feet?
  • 4 0
 you can't miniaturize Steve Smiths, you'd have to find a Bald Eagle with a 100 ft wingspan.
  • 1 0
 Honey Badger v Mr. Norris
  • 1 1
 Honey Badger don't give a shit
  • 2 0
 "Chainsaw feet." Hahaha! Nice.
  • 1 2
 Living in Alaska I can break one of your ideas: Bald Eagles are weak as hell, even Seagulls chase them.
My .02 cents
  • 3 3
 ^Somebody forgot to check reality at the door the minute he saw the words "bald eagle with chainsaw feet." I bet my dad can beat up his dad.
  • 17 1
 How about pike vs revelation, or fox 34 compared to 36
  • 13 0
 How about SLX vs. XT vs. XTR? What differences actually exist? Is it just a weight thing? Do they use better bearings in the pulley wheels?
  • 4 1
 From experience, the biggest difference seems to be in the shifters. I run XT shifters, which have a precise feel and the ability to upshift multiple gears at a time. In contrast, SLX derailleurs feel a bit less smooth and can only upshift one gear at a time. I went from XT to XTR derailleur with the same shifter and didn't notice a difference.

But I run a Deore derailleur with an Alivio shifter on my hardtail and while the shifting is less crisp than on my XTR/XT setup, it's pretty darn good and not something I ever think about on the trail.
  • 3 0
 The products perform better all the way up the stack but often the difference is marginal. XTR cranks are lighter but also stiffer. XTR pedals are lighter but also have a slightly lower profile XTR drivetrain shifts lighter and crisper But overall they are all pretty bomber and you'd be very satisfied with most of it for functionality
  • 2 0
 i would say SLX and XT are very similar in every way: weight, feel, performance. when you get to XTR is when you feel the difference. i would agree that the biggest difference is the feel in shifters, which makes sense because a derailleur is just a spring inside a linkage with two pulleys, whereas the shifter is where the indexing and feel comes from. even the xtr front shifter feels effortless and telepathic. XTR rear shifter has an easier smoother action than any other group. this is true of the old school early 90s xtr also.
  • 1 1
 And what about SRAM vs SHIMANO? For example a X9 against a Zee? Is there any big difference?
  • 5 0
 sram vs shimano is like asking democrat or republican - it's taboo and avoided in friendly conversations.
  • 3 0
 I've found SLX to be perfectly capable. Brakes are just as good as XT, though they have one less way to be adjusted. Derailleurs are good, especially the shadow+ rear. The cassette is a bit heavier than XT and pinned together, so cleaning can be a bit of a pain unless you want to try and tap the pins out (which I can't recommend you do, though I know people who have). The shifter is a little lacking, so it's worth it to go with the XT for the better feel and shifting options. Everything XT is just a little crisper and a little lighter, so it too is a solid choice if you can afford it. I just wouldn't splurge on it unless I really had extra cash to do it. XTR means XTRace. Lighter than XT and SLX, but price wise I think it's only worth it if you really do compete.
  • 1 0
 The difference between SLX is huge, relatively speaking. The new SLX components shift well and stay in the intended gear, but XTR shifting is so much faster and crisper. Much fewer missed shifts and no feathering to get it into gear. I’ve been running the XTR 10spd drivetrain (obviously with some cassette and chain changes) for 2 and 1/2 years with no deterioration in shifting performance. I can’t say the same about my 6 month old SLX get up. That being said, rocks on the side of the trail don’t care what kind of derailleur you’re running...
  • 3 0
 XT and XTR shifters are worth it, they feel amazing, but for the derailleurs ZEE or SLX are pretty much as good at XT/XTR. As for the pedals, XTR pedals are the only one's that have ever come into the shop with a warranty claim, where as all the other shimano pedals last forever
  • 9 0
 Love this segment, but what would make it even better is if every time this segment came out, you tracked down whether or not the suggestions you gave in the previous segment actually fixed the problem (when the questions relative to a mechanical problem). I'm thinking something like Car Talk's "Stump the Chumps" segment. You could even give those you might have lead astray a sticker pack as recompense.
  • 1 0
 I want a Bike Talk radio show.
  • 5 0
 I would add to the question about disc brake chatter, some riders experience this as "resonance" which can be felt as a pulsing / vibrating feeling and violent noise through the bike when braking hard

Certain bike brands' specific models just seem to generate a resonance when used with a particular brake system - have seen this on Devinici Wilson, Trek Session, Specialized Enduro Evo and others.

The explanation I have received is related to the brake system setting up a harmonic frequency which interacts with the frame structure or wheel in an unusual way, and is often experienced once bikes are released to the public where different brakes / wheels are used

The solution we received from SRAM for people using Avid brakes was a special undrilled rotor (effectively solid in the brake track) which seemed to cure the issue. Other riders tried using organic pads with good luck, as the sintered pads seemed to generate the resonance.

On some of my Specialized Enduro customers, we actually replaced the aluminium alloy swingarm with a carbon fibre piece from Specialized as nothing else could cure the issue (we tried different systems, rotors sizes, pads, etc.)
  • 1 1
 Might try placing some o-rings or gasket material where the rotor bolts to the hub (if 6-bolt) and on the washer stack where the caliper is mounted. May not kill the noise completely, but some vibration isolation material might damp the vibrations down from a howl to a squeak.
  • 2 0
 I get crazy vibration when I put too much pressure into rear tire, Giant Reign X, Elixir brakes. 35 psi or less, no vibration whatsoever. Sintered or organic pads make no difference.
  • 2 0
 ditto on the enduro evo howl. i tried two rotors and two brake systems, mixed all possible combos of rotors and brakes, replaced rear swing arm all to no avail. i just got used to the terrible noise, but can't get my riding buddies to stop complaining about my bike.
  • 8 0
 take your bike to a music shop and get it tuned properly
  • 1 0
 slx brakes and will never go back
  • 2 1
 @hampsteadbandit Special undrilled rotors? Man, those would build up heat like crazy! I remember one of avids earlier designs had only a few holes drilled it it and it would burn through pads like a mother. Also had a fair bit of fade. I would be wary of using anything without any sort of cooling system.
  • 1 0
 @void I also have a 2012 Giant Reign X and have been experiencing the same crazy vibration for months now! The crazy thing is that I only started having the vibration when I switched from my avid elixir brakes to shimano xt brakes. Running a 180mm ice tech rotor on the rear and a 203mm ice tech rotor on the front. I have tried damn near everything! I have basically replaced every braking component again with XT brakes. Nothing seemed to solve the vibration. Two days ago I was washing my bike and I noticed that I have a broken spoke on my rear wheel. Not sure how long it has been broken, but I am going to get the spoke fixed and see if that remedies the problem. I don't think that the spoke has been broken that long. I am not sure how I wouldn't have noticed a broken spoke for the last 4 months. Not sure if the spoke will be the root of the problem.
  • 7 1
 @trek17 I had a friend who got bloody shits a few years back, worried it was from drinking too much whiskey. Turned out he had switched to crunchy peanut butter and was eating too much of it. Smooth all the way.
  • 5 1
 Yo brake chatter!
You running a 185mm SRAM clean sweep rotor by chance?
.....with a Shimano adapter that is made for 180mm rotor?

Can cause weird noises/chatter as the pads are contacting the rotor lower than where they should be.

SRAM did not make a 180mm rotor until now (2014/2015).
Looks like the bike came stock w/ 180mm rotor in the rear.
  • 2 4
 let pff the brakes bru
  • 1 0
 If that were the case, his wheel wouldn't even spin. The top of the rotor would rub the brake caliper all the time, not just under lockout-force braking.
  • 3 0
 I'll echo Mike Kazimer on the Saint vs Zee. Up until last week actually I'd been running a Zee derailleur and SLX shifter. It worked decently, and got the job done, but after upgrading to a Saint shifter I've been blown away at how much quicker and smoother the shifting is. Of course I'd love a whole Saint setup, but the Zee derailleur and Saint shifter combo works fantastically. Highly recommended.
  • 2 0
 been running the same setup for 6 months, it's great. the relatively small price increase from an XT shifter, and essentially zero weight penalty, makes the saint shifter a no brainer, but the saint derailleur is really only worth it at pro level racing, as the differences between it and zee are mostly about weight. First Shimano stuff I've run since 8 speed, really enjoying doubleshift.

Goes back to an old axiom that we used to follow: shifters do the lion's share of work in a shifting system when it comes to things you can feel: ergonomics, positive gear changes, etc. most people can't tell the difference between any derailleur in a blind test, just buy the cheapest that you can, only spend more money if it gets you more durability(not really a big difference between derailleurs these days on that score, though.)

Only exception, is these days, spring for something with a clutch.
  • 1 0
 i just ordered a saint shifter because of you guys' posts. i am running an SLX shifter but i feel it's too stiff and i'd like the longer levers plus the two gear up shift. universalcycles and CRC currently sell the saint shifter for under $70.
  • 1 1
 Id say quite the opposite. Zee shifter because it shifts well enough and its cheaper, im not really bothered about lever feel when im running two year old gloves. Two gear upshifts? Ill just click it twice thanks. Then a saint mech because the zee has a pressed steel backplate to the saints forged (or cast maybe?) ali one. definite improvement when the thing IS going to hit some rocks at some point.
  • 1 1
 or xt ,zee little lighter and cheaper. i have a 11-26 7 spd shimano set up and it works great "slx cassete witht hte top 3 rings off "
  • 1 0
 @gabriel

For something that's going to get banged on, I'd argue steel is a better choice, since if it gets really bent, you can take it apart and bend it back, contrasted with a forged aluminum part that's going to snap. weight vs durability. The steel part is probably stamped because they can get the same level of stiffness out of steel without the more complicated process. I'd also argue that paying half or less the price to replace it with a brand new one is a big advantage for something that's regularly abused.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter. what you say is true to a certain extent, but the problem is the stamped steel backplate of the zee mech is FAR easier to bend out of shape in the first place. You would be hard pressed to bend the ali one on the Saint, and to be frank, you arent going to snap it unless you literally run it over with a truck. Its just not going to happen. The saint is at the same time lighter (I believe?) and more durable. That's the reason you don't get steel full sus frames or steel handlebars any more. Steel is easier to fix, and ten years ago was more durable, but now the tables have turned somewhat, and if you want something to last you make it out of a big chunk of ali, rather than a sliver of steel. I agree with the sentiment that the zee is half the price, but having experienced both I genuinely think the Saint will last twice as long in a high abuse situation. Sure if you never mistreat it, the zee will last nearly as long as the Saint, but when faced with regular abuse the Saint really does pay for itself.
  • 2 0
 @all

the advice of using a cheaper rear mech and higher end shifter is solid advice

for years we did this for SRAM and Shimano on all our customers' custom builds

something like X-0 shifter pods and X-7 rear mech or X-9 at the most - its gonna get trashed!

I've seen grown men cry on the trail when they have smashed their week old X-0 rear mech on a rock Wink
  • 3 0
 Looking for a new saddle for AM riding. I want to be able to pedal for long periods in the saddle comfortably, but have no idea what makes a saddle comfortable or not. I can't exactly try a saddle for a ride and then return it (can I?) so am looking for a bit of help here.
  • 4 0
 I was using the Chromag Lynx for a while, super good and comfort seat. Until my girlfriend took it for her bike.
  • 2 0
 Most shops should have a saddle demo program. especially if they stock a big name brand. i know some saddles even have a 30 day comfort guarantee
  • 1 0
 NMK187 After many uncomfortable mtb saddles (I've had the same fizik road saddle on five road bikes now, very comfy) I've found my current SDG Duster to be really comfortable, you can do long rides day after day no problem and compared to some other brands it's not expensive.
  • 2 0
 What makes a saddle an 'AM' saddle?

I tried several $30 to $60 saddles and returned each one (in perfect condition, each ridden only 1 or 2 times). Only 1 online store gave me a hassle, making me spend the return at their store, after I was honest that it had been ridden. So, you CAN return saddles.

2 yrs ago I bought a dropper, CB Joplin 4, and it has a matching saddle; CB Iodine 11. It cost $125 at the time, looks great, super light, replaceable rails, but was tricky to adjust. I thought I made a mistake, but kept adjusting, and now I love this thing. Other people try it, hate it, adjust it and then love it. It is perfect for climbing, for me.

There is a website in Montana that recently had them for $69.
  • 1 0
 sdg has good padding and the most important feature for a saddle you will sit on a a lot - v groove so your bollocks don't go numb

wtb "v" and "rocket v" also has good value/comfort/features. a lot of shops have a wtb demo saddle for just what you asked about
  • 1 1
 nothing really . saddles are shaped and fitted to you butt not to your riding style . dh saddles tho probly are slimmer on the sides with less sharp edges if your going to fall ... i just pretty much go by look and weight tho :p
  • 1 0
 spez phenom if u keen on flat surface..
  • 1 0
 Some people just aren't designed to sit on bike seats. With a good bike fit and a bit of time in the saddle I think eventually you will get comfortable. I love my Fizik Aliante, but Charge/Fabric saddles look like the best option for when it needs replacing.
  • 1 0
 @NMK187 I just recently bought a Charge Scoop saddle and the thing is awesome! I will be purchasing another one for my other bike and the saddle is very reasonably priced. You should check it out for sure! Very clean looking saddle as well.

www.chargebikes.com/parts-collection/scoop
  • 2 0
 I won a charge spoon tried it out and love it for enduro/ trail riding comfy but small enough to get out the way when needed, il probably try a scoop next time
  • 1 0
 Saddle is a matter of personal taste (and fit). So you have to find yourself what is the best combo for you: wide or narrow? long or short? channel or not?
Most saddle manufacturers ask to check the seating bones width to select saddle width., but in general matter, the larger the width is, the more comfy the saddle is.
Currently I have a wtb rocket V, and before an old selle italia flite, both are narrow (130mm), but the rocket V is much more comfy and MTB friendly (kevlar reinforcement). But some may hate it as the shape is more square on the edge. It is also shorter which allows better movement on the bike.
  • 2 0
 I am running a Saint shifter and ZEE RD, works like a charm!! I went with the Saint because from what I have read it uses ball bearings for the shift lever where I think ZEE does not. Also the fact I can drop 2 gears with one movement is nice to.
  • 1 0
 the lever designs are a little different, too. Saint is longer. also, no I-spec on ZEE.
  • 1 0
 I have yet to try the Zee derailleur, however I went for Saint with durability in mind. I've replaced my RD-M810 after 3 years of year-round abuse, 2 years in Whistler and Cypress, mostly following the rockiest trails around. After countless broken hangers, the derailleur was still shifting great, only recently I've noticed it's starting to develop a play in one of the paralellogram's pivots. Now considering the Saint's paralellogram is nearly twice as wide as the Zee or any other, I believe the critical pivot (which apparently isn't unique to my derailleur after a few years) would die off significantly faster if it wasn't that wide, so I guess it'll pay off for the price difference and last that much longer. Hope I'm not wrong and wont smash it on the next ride Smile

Apart from that, I believe there'll be no noticeable difference between Zee and Saint RD.
  • 1 0
 Re the brake chatter question, I would check the rear wheel for trueness and spoke tension. Sounds a lot like when a couple of my rear spokes got shaken loose. I started hearing lots of buzzing/shaking/clattering noises on braking or small chatter, then stopped to feel my rear spokes and found out two of them had gotten super loose. Trued the wheel up and it's been silent since.
  • 1 0
 With the wheel chatter issue, I'd check everything suggested in the article, but also check for worn bearings in the rear hub or swingarm linkages and worn shock bushings. Any small amount of play in any of these places can add up to quite a lot of play at the rear tyre, which can definately cause chatter when the wheel is skidding.
  • 1 0
 Not sure if it's been mentioned, but the Saint derailleur can be set up for either road or mountain cassette while I believe the zee can't. It's pretty handy for me since I take my only bike to the local bike park from time to time.
  • 1 0
 I run Zee after so many years running Sora on my DH rig well i would say Sora did well and was cheap not to worry about and when the mounting joint broke you put a washer and feels like Zee with lock on, and never fails, still got it in my spare parts.
Now Zee feels great so far never misses gears never couse any problems but consider the prise of it and if you crash badly feels like just few more tears to cry about, i cant imagine the Saint broken as i saw few of them going away on my friends bikes and a lot of tears after that...... Smile
  • 1 0
 That brake chatter - I get it on my hardtail too on steep rooty rocky trails where rear wheel is going back and forth between rolling and skidding - I think it's play between the brake pad retainer pin and the pads - the pads slam forward, then release back to neutral position.
  • 1 0
 I had an odd sound coming from the frame under harsh terrain/suspension movement. Thought it was the shock, but as it turned out, was a sticky type 2 clutch on my X9 derailleur. Just FWIW.
  • 2 6
flag wuzupjosh (Jun 24, 2014 at 19:23) (Below Threshold)
 sram suks bru
  • 2 0
 So does your spelling, "bro".
  • 4 0
 Crunchy peanut butter vs smooth.
  • 1 0
 crunchy is surprisingly good
  • 1 0
 When I was building my bike I went with the Zee derailleur/Saint shifter combo, and spent the price difference on a new cassette. Total win/win situation, would recommend that for anyone looking to update their drivetrain.
  • 1 0
 hello everyone,
Is there any inside difference between SLX (M675) and Zee lever? Cause I combined Zee caliper and SLX lever and i am missing the "power-stiff-lever" feeling as on my old Saint (M810) i have on the other bike.
  • 1 0
 most likely you have some air bubbles somewhere in the system. give it a good bleed and see if it fixes it.
  • 1 0
 Got the ZEE derailer, AWESOME- Have ZEE Brakes! AWESOME! Saint cranks...awesome! Love my zee components for the prices I paid, an function is awesome!!!!!!
  • 1 1
 xt shifter can be converted to dual shift by removing a pin of plastic from the inside of the bottom cover. same internals.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlXmoiCEpew
  • 1 0
 Do you know if you can disable the multi-release on the new m780 xt shifter. It is driving me insane.
  • 1 0
 Not discussed in the article but Zee brakes are the shiats and won't cost you an arm or leg.
  • 2 0
 Slx vs xt???
  • 2 0
 SKIDS OR WHEELIES?
  • 6 0
 don't you make me choose
  • 1 0
 Wheelies in my opinion..... Yes skids are great fun but i don't think you can beat a really good wheelie
  • 1 2
 Red Bull vs Monster
  • 2 0
 monster has artificial sweeteners in it
  • 1 0
 Red Rave...Costco...about a buck a can I think it is. Identical ingredients to Red Bull on the ones that matter. Taste is kinda lame...but it isn't a "refreshment" drink, it's an energy shot...shoot it and go...profit : )

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