Ask Pinkbike: Chain Guides for DH, CO2 Inflators, and Tire Recommendations

Apr 5, 2016
by Pinkbike Staff  
Ask Pinkbike Header

Here at Pinkbike we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.





DH Bikes Without a Chain Guide?

Question: Pinkbike user stevecous asked this question in the downhill forum: Has anyone run a narrow/wide chainring without a chain guide on their downhill bike? I have that setup on my other bike and have never dropped a chain, so I'm considering it for my downhill bike.

bigquotesSome guy named Cam Zink rode at some competition called the Red Bull Rampage on a YT Tues downhill bike that didn't have a chain guide bolted onto it, as did a handful of other freeriders, and he had no issues. He also back flipped and spun off of a cliff... Should you do that as well? Probably not. Clutch derailleurs and narrow/wide chainrings go a long way to keeping your chain put, especially on a mid-travel bike where you might be concerned about weight and drag that could come from a poorly set up or older chain guide, but it's an entirely different ballgame when talking about downhill bikes. A bunch more suspension travel means that chain tension can vary drastically on a downhill bike, not to mention that you're probably going quicker over rougher terrain than you would be on a lighter duty all-mountain bike, all things that mean a chain guide can come in handy.

This is especially true if you're racing. You see any World Cup guys not running chain guides? Nope, because they've traveled halfway around the globe to race for three minutes, and a silly dropped chain because they weren't running a guide would probably make them feel pretty stupid. Likewise, if I was spending a few hundred dollars over a race weekend, I'd argue all day that the insurance that a chain guide provides is vital.
- Mike Levy

Cam Zink YT Tues
Zink may not have used a chain guide at Rampage, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't use a chain guide.




Best CO2 Inflation Device

Question: Smashash asks in the All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country forum: I want to get a CO2 inflator, but I don't want to blow it. Anyone been through a few and have an opinion?


bigquotesI have used almost every type of inflator and by far, the most reliable and easy to operate CO2 inflation device is the Innovations in Cycling Microflate Nano. It costs 13 bucks and has no moving parts, the cartridge is simply threaded snugly to a stop, which pierces the end while sealing the gas from escaping. Unthreading the cartridge slightly releases the gas and allows the user to meter it from a seep to full flow - or to turn it off and save some pressurized CO2 for later. The angled head is a simple push-fit onto either Presta or Schrader valve stems.

I am currently using the SKS Airbuster, which has turned out to be quite good. The 20-dollar SKS also meters out gas, but uses a dial-type valve. Its head is also a push seal for both Shrader and Presta valve stems, and it has a bonus feature: a red tab extends into view when the CO2 cartridge has been pierced and is activated. There are a number of devices on the market, but the Microflate Nano is the proven winner. If you want a fancier one, try the SKS Airbuster. - RC

SKS Airbuster and Innovations in Cycling Microflate Nano Co2 inflation devices 2016
The SKS Airbuster (left) has a metering dial to regulate gas pressure and a handy red indicator (retracted in this photo) that lets you know if the cartridge has been activated. Innovations in Cycling's Microflate Nano (right) has no moving parts, but its brilliant seal design can regulate gas flow by twisting the threaded cartridge.




Maxxis Aggressor?

Question: Pinkbike user Minikeum asked this question in the All Mountain, Enduro & Cross Country Forum: Has anyone tried the new Maxxis Aggressor 2.30 ? How does it compare to an Ardent or a Minion? I would mount it as a rear tire, with a DHF or a DHR II at the front.


bigquotesThe Minion front / Aggressor rear tire combination is an excellent choice, especially when trail conditions are on the drier side of things. I have about a month of time on the Aggressor, and I've been impressed with its rolling speed and high level of cornering grip. It offers very predictable traction - there haven't been any unexpected slide-outs, and it has a very satisfying locked-in feel when you really get it on edge in the turns. In muddier conditions it can get a little overwhelmed, but that's when a tire with taller knobs like the Shorty or even the DHR II would be a better pick; for the rest of the time the Aggressor is a very worthy option for a rear tire.

What about using it in the front? Well, you could, but I'd recommend going with something a little wider and with a more directional tread pattern to keep the front end handling nice and quick. In regards to the Ardent, its cornering performance simply doesn't match that of the Aggressor - I'd suggest scratching it off your list.
- Mike Kazimer



Maxxis Aggressor
The Aggressor is a new addition to the Maxxis lineup, available in either 27.5 x 2.3" or 29 x 2.3" versions, with two casing options.





Have some unresolved tech questions? Jump in the Pinkbike Forum and we'll look to answer it for next time.


100 Comments

  • 86 3
 I've seen the Cam Zink rampage argument regading chainguide a bunch of times but in reality I don't think it's really relevant. And not just because he's Cam Zink and we are all terrible in comparison. But because Rampage just isn't all that rough. It's gnarly as hell in terms of steepness and the size of the jumps and drops, but last I checked there aren't any rock gardens in any riders runs. While the lines are completely massive and insane, the build crews spend days buffing that shit out. Rampage lines are actually pretty smooth relatively speaking.
  • 19 3
 Well said. Also, there's not a whole lot of pedaling going on. Some. But not as much as a DH race. Plus, I'd imagine that if a chain came off during rampage it really isn't a huge deal because while timed, it probably won't take that long to throw the chain back on, adjust your line choice, and/or continue.
  • 7 1
 I have ridden without a chainguide on some of the roughest Eastcoast Rockgardens etc. and it's not a matter of the chain staying on, which it did. But, it was very noisy and the chain slapped around much more than with a chainguide.
  • 5 0
 This is just my personal experience but myself and a good friend have both raced DH for 3 seasons without a chainguide and never dropped a chain once. I am sure this will work better for certain suspension designs than others but for me the adage of if its not broke don't fix it holds true. Also the added benefit of reduced frictional forces, although minimal and a near silent drivetrain are very nice.
  • 11 0
 Regardless of ruining a race run, when I switch from cruising to pedalling my arse off, I want tension in that chain so as I don't punch my knee into my stem or slip a pedal and slam my foot into the ground.
  • 2 0
 I get having the top chain guide on rowdy trail and DH bikes foo added security along with a N/W chain ring and clutch derailleur, but I'm looking at the bottom chain guide and thinking its superfluous and its just creating more drag/friction in the system...any thoughts?

I remember getting ticked off with a lower chainguide on a 2x10 Stumpy evo seizing all the time and so gambled on fitting one of the first clutch mechs and taking the roller off.........It worked a dream........why are we still fiting bikes with lower chain guides?
  • 2 0
 And you don't have unlimited supply of fresh chainrings. Cam and co. probably swap chainrings on its first drop.
  • 7 3
 @Travel66: With a good narrow wide chainring and a clutch deraileur you don't need a chainguide. If you race DH then you could run a top guide JUST IN CASE but a lower guide is completely unnescessary.
  • 1 0
 @SintraFreeride: cheers, that's what I'm thinking!
  • 4 0
 He was Also using KENDAS..hm..
  • 1 0
 @SintraFreeride: This is what I am doing this year. Top guide + bashguard.

I have several friends who have ridden freeride/DH without guides without problems, but none of them races DH, all of them uses some kind of bashguard. Because rock.

On my trailbike I just have a bashguard and have never dropped a chain since clutched derraileurs.
  • 2 0
 But a lower guard acts as a nice protection to the chainring in case of a big case, or a terrible line choice. Besides some trails have infamous rock gardens where it is easy to hit the rocks with your chainring, so the lower guide could prove useful as a bash guard.

Or just use a bash guard that bolts to the frame, makes more sense actually lol
  • 1 4
 @jmusuperman: Rampage isn't timed
  • 1 0
 @kjjohnson: rampage is timed I think they have like 4 mins to get down. Usually not a problem for most people
  • 1 0
 @megatryn: I've been running my DH bike with a narrow wide chainring, a Zee deraileur and a bashguard sans chainguide for a year now. Dropped the chain once. Before that I ran my bike with the same setup and a top guide for a year and never dropped a chain.FYI I ride in the Alps, so a mix of Bikeparks and rough terrain but I don't race.
  • 1 0
 Clutch derailers interfere with your suspension that's why I ride a chain guide with the clutch turned off. Also shifts better with the clutch turned off and when you might only get one full pedal stroke in it makes a big difference.
  • 1 1
 I mainly think the argument is weird that downhill bikes have more travel than Zinks YT Tues... ... Which is a downhill bike... The difference between freeride and downhill chain retention wise is that a freerider hardly pedals, while a downhill rider will pedal even through the most bumpiest parts of the trail. It's kind of like when you pull your chain a lot to the side with your hands, it won't fall off. But if you pull it to the side and start spinning your cranks, it will fall off your front ring if you don't have a guide.
  • 1 0
 @Lagr1980: we're both getting off topic, but I've been riding the H-Factor front and Excavator rear over the winter months here in the Southwest (scored them cheap on ProMotive) with no complaints regarding grip, tracking, etc. Weight and rolling speed however are high and low respectively. Also tore the Excavator sidewall riding Bootleg, but that place eats tires regardless of make/model.
  • 1 0
 I use a NW chainring with a clutch derailleur - no chainguide. I ride everywhere in Oregon, and never lost a chain, except for the Rainbow jump at Blackrock. Everytime I land, the chain always falls off! No clue what is happening there.
  • 1 0
 Ridden plenty of rocky downhill and a narrow wide chainring with a top guide with a clutch rear derailleur is all you need. Decreases the drag on the drive train by a lot and I've yet to drop a chain with that setup.
  • 17 0
 Curious to know pinkbikes, or any ones for that matter, opinion on shorty vs magic Mary for a front dh tire. Loose dry socal conditions with lots of rocks. Love mm but don't love the wear life on them
  • 2 1
 I can just say a lot of contact points with tough rubber. Wtbs Break out works really well for dry conditions.
  • 9 0
 I've used both back to back and have got to say the Magic Mary wins hands down! The shorty may be good when things get really loose and blown out but it lacks the all round grip and stability of the Schwalbe. Not to mention there is no tubeless option (dh) for the shorty while the MM can be run tubeless with minimal sealant and a track pump.
Hope this helps!
  • 4 8
flag rickaybobbay (Apr 5, 2016 at 18:31) (Below Threshold)
 Shorty fair alright. A magic mary will be gone in a couple months. Look for a DHF in a 60a if you can. Or HRII in 60a. The harder compounds will hold up better
  • 1 0
 When I was at bootleg this march AG was using a shorty front tire. idk if that helps.
  • 2 0
 I'd say to look into a Minion or High Roller. They tend to last quite awhile and don't have to break the bank. I think that the Mary is totally worth it, though. She never slips.
  • 4 0
 I have a WTB Vigilante in the softest compound both front and rear. I think that tire works great for my local SoCal dust.
  • 3 2
 Shorty are hands down th best tires have used in deep dust dry conditions they do well on rocks until it's super muddy
  • 1 0
 @DaRanger: who was using what tire?
  • 2 0
 As @wpplayer18 said the WTB Vigilante is a great tire
  • 9 1
 "Loose, dry social conditions"

Bastard
  • 3 0
 @chrisclifford: I wish you guys would shut up about the Vigilantes. I'm trying to keep them a secret dammit!
  • 1 0
 I'm curious too. I literally love the magic mary but east coast rocks chew them up so fast it hurts the soul.
  • 1 0
 @jenksy: ha ha ha ha ha
  • 2 1
 High rollers for everything.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: High rollers are great tires, but I think the Vigilante is more predictable. You really have to ride the High Roller aggressively to get it to bite
  • 11 0
 Seems like everyone is using n/w with clutch derailleurs these days, regardless whether or not they use a chain guide. What I'm more interested in is whether or not a clutch derailleur has a negative impact on the suspension over a non clutch one.
  • 2 1
 I have a clutch rder and a chainguide + nw chainring,(scott gambler) i don't notice the clutch, except the bike is much quieter very little chain slap. also chainguide has a bashguard built in saves money on bent chainrings!!
  • 9 1
 I don't think so man, i think the clutch isn't stiff enough to have an impact on the rear suspension's job... I mean, its doesn't even makes shifting difficult, which requires way less force than the needed to activate the suspension (or so i think).
  • 8 0
 Good question, never heard this before. I'd say they are minimaI, the forces invoIved in a suspension system are absoIutIy ridicuIous and the amount of Ieverage the suspension has on a chain is just as bad. So yes your cIutch has a negative effect that is quantifiabIe but that's onIy because we can caIcuIate these kind of forces rather easiIy, not because it's something you can feeI.
  • 1 0
 Honestly, like brakesnotincluded said, the forces are so minimal from the clutch derailleur compared to that exerted by suspension action that I don't think there would be a tangible difference to most average riders. However, as you move up more towards the pro level, and guys are looking for every small imperfection, I'm sure it makes just the smallest difference, but just about everyone on the WC runs a clutch, so I'm assuming it's not that big of a deal.

Also I personally have gone back and forth between a chainguide with a clutch derailleur and n/w and without a chianguide on the same setup. I have had zero issues with dropped chains on this setup riding full on DH runs. I'll probably get a bash guard to take the place of the one on the chainguide, but I don't necessarily see myself going back to the chianguide.
  • 2 1
 Depends on the suspension design and how stiff you set the clutch. If you have a bike with a lot of chain growth and set the clutch real stiff, the suspension will feel subtly different with the clutch on vs. clutch off. It's the kind of really small difference that you can't quite place, similar to adding one click on the shock or your tire pressure being off by 1-2psi.
  • 2 1
 @ethan991: Wyn didn't run a clutch on his bulls for precisely this reason. that bike had a lot of chain growth and the clutch negatively effected the suspension.
  • 1 1
 @aerius30: I think that the clutch can have an impact on the suspension. I have a bike with a lot of chain growth and while I can't say I can really notice it when riding, you can definitly feel the effect of the clutch if you cycle the suspension while standing still. It's small for sure, but it is there and I assume someone who is really in tune with thier bike would notice it. I remember seeing something about how Gee Atherton runs his clutch off because of the way it effected the suspension.
  • 3 1
 My clutch wasn't working so I adjusted it just enough to stop chainslap/lost chains. It took me a few days to work out why my rear suspension was feeling a bit rough. The difference is easily noticable.
  • 1 1
 Mentioned this earlier ill say it again...Clutch derailers interfere with your suspension that's why I ride a chain guide with the clutch turned off. Also shifts better with the clutch turned off and when you might only get one full pedal stroke in it makes a big difference.
  • 1 0
 The difference is said to be minimal, but I tried running a few laps without a chain at all, and I have to say the suspension is way more suppler.
  • 17 2
 No 26 option for the aggressor ):
  • 3 5
 Maybe if we complain enough they'll make one, just like they started making a 26" semi slick minion after the shitload of hate and complains they got on Pinkbike when they introduced it and said its only available in 27" and 29".

Yes I call 650B 27". Why. Because it is exactly 25mm / 1" taller than 26", and nearly 2" smaller than 29". It being exactly in the middle is marketing BS and a lie. It's nothing else than a 26" tyre that is just a tiny bit bigger, just enough to force you into buying new wheels, a new frame and a new fork.
  • 2 1
 @Mattin: You should get your ruler out, you will find that 26" wheels actually measure around 26.5" with the size of tyres these days, then you can be even more edgy going around forums calling 26" wheels 26.5" (coz they are only an inch smaller than 27.5 don't ya know).

Anyway, good luck looking for the bird in Sram's new cassette, and the fish in RS's fork!
  • 2 3
 @mbikes1: actually, 26" ETRTO is 559mm, 27.5" ETRTO is 584mm. Exactly 25mm / 1" bigger.

26" is supposed to be 26" with a 2.0" tyre, but it depends on the tyre as well as on the rim. In comparison, a 26x2.5" tyre is exactly as big as a 27.5x2.0 tyre. But that's not my point, the ETRTO on 27.5" is exactly 25mm bigger as on 26". Thereby I call it 27".
  • 2 1
 @Mattin: Where as the rest of us (if we actually cared to do so) would take a tape measure to our normal sized 27.5" tyre, on a normal width 27.5" rim, and see that it is infact 27.5" across.
  • 1 0
 @Mattin: 27" actually refers to an older road bike standard, which funnily enough is larger than 29"/700c rims. Deliberately calling the wheels size something else is just confusing to everybody. People who know about bikes will think about the old roadie wheels, and people who don't won't care Wink
  • 1 2
 @Mbikes1: that's the whole point, what do you describe as normal? Normal for XC is different than normal for enduro, which is different than normal for DH. And still they are all called the same wheel size. Why? Because the wheel size is based on the ETRTO, which is the only thing that stays equal in size, no matter what rim / tyre you use. That's why it is silly to grab a tape measure and measure vagueness when you can measure hard facts with the ETRTO.

The fact is that based on the ETRTO, 27.5" is one inch bigger than 26", and nearly 2" smaller than 29". So the marketing shit of "exactly in the middle of 26 and 29" is untrue.
  • 1 2
 @Xyphota: the whole system is confusing anyways.

26" is both a MTB wheel size as a road bike wheel size. But they are not actually the same wheel size. There are even 4 more (!) bicycle wheel sizes called 26", that all have a different ETRTO size. So there are 6 different wheel sizes, all called 26".

Also 28" can either be 635 or 622. But 622 is also 29" and 700c.

Also 24" can be 4 different wheel sizes.

And 20" can be 2 different wheel sizes.
  • 14 2
 What's a bike
  • 6 1
 I love lamp.
  • 8 2
 Just saying for the co2 inflator, I would highly recommend a small frame pump instead , because it's more than just a couple uses and I'd you get a good one they fill up quick. I recently switched and am super happy.
  • 1 0
 This. you can mount most small pumps to bottle cage mounts very securely if you don't want to carry it
  • 8 0
 Yes ! And you have less chance to leave the pump on the track when you are done with it... Unlike some dirty b*****d who are throwing the canisters in the nature ! They deserve having it stuck up their a**e as a good lesson !!!
  • 4 0
 The problem with small frame pumps is the need in some places to inflate a tyre as quickly as possible. In Scotland, from the moment you stop you're being eaten by swarms of midges. On the other hand I've heard that CO2 stops tubeless sealant from working properly. Does anyone know if that's true?
  • 1 0
 @DokonjoDaikon: yes, it's true. You shouldn't permanently inflate tubeless tires with CO2 but for an on the trail fix it'll work fine.
  • 1 0
 @DokonjoDaikon: it's mainly that pure CO2 is totally dry (no moisture) so it evaporates off the water and whatever other solvents are in there a lot faster than it normally would evaporate. If I have to use CO2 out on the trail, when I get home I let out the pressure, inject a few mL of water, and reinflate with a floor pump. Seems to work.

Or just add new Stan's a little more often. Either way, not a big deal. I like using CO2 inflators because they're fast and easy (especially if you have to re-seat a tire), and I can keep one saddle bag with inflator, CO2 canisters, multitool, tire lever, and patch kit and just swap it between my bikes. Little harder to do with a mini pump (I hate carrying a backpack).
  • 3 0
 Just get a Mountain Pipe. best of both worlds, pump and Co2 inflator in one, plus it's got a secret compartment to stash... patches yea that's it.
  • 2 0
 Sometimes you need the blast of a co2 inflator to get a tubeless tyre sealed up.
  • 4 0
 I've been running the Maxxis Aggressor front and rear now since November over our Southern summer. I've come off Minion DHR f/r, also Ikon 2.35 f/r and also the Minion/Ikon combo.

Cornering is more predictable than the DHF as a f/r combo with the Aggressor - when it breaks away its a 'drift then hook up' feeling with both wheels doing it at the same time. Braking traction on the rear is far superior than the Minion DHF as is rolling resistance.

Overall its a brilliant all round tyre and I can recommend it for the front end of your bike too. I heart Maxxis.
  • 1 0
 @metaBRZ

Great to hear some feedback. Can you say how well it lasts on abrasive higher speed rocky trails as a rear tyre?

I am trying to choose between a DHR2 and Aggressor.

I take it you found the Ikon just not tough enough for all mountain but good for smooth hardpack?
  • 1 0
 @Travel66: I cant sorry - my local trails are soft soil loamy goodness with some root and sandstone. About the opposite of what you seek advice on.

I was completely blown away at the Ikons performance. I run Derby 40mm rims and the volume is awesome. With the 3C compound they grip - even in the wet. I cant wait to put them back on actually - they are super fast and hold on but just give up a little on the braking traction and cornering in looser soils. But on hard-pack they are amazing
  • 1 0
 @metaBRZ: thanks for the reply ....its useful to know as I am likely to end up running 2 sets of wheels......one wider/stronger pair with gnarlier tyres to cope with abrasive rocks and my lighter/narrower pair with something more like the ikon for hard pack/smoother trails

the second set are likely to be Derby or Zelvy
  • 2 0
 @metaBRZ: Maxxis is coming out with a 2.35 Ardent Race, which should be even better. The 2.2 AR is really good, but lacks (obviously) the volume.
Same 3C compound, more tread, esp. better side knobs.
  • 2 0
 I've been running the Tomahawk in the rear and it's been great. Really light and fast rolling but still has good cornering support. I'm more interested in a Aggressor/Tomahawk comparison than comparing the Ardent
  • 1 0
 @Agleck7: I'm curious about this as well
  • 1 0
 @agleck7
Can the tomahawk handle abrasive rough rocks?
  • 1 0
 @Travel66: I've only been running it for a couple weeks and haven't been on sustained rough rocks yet.
  • 4 0
 I race downhill and after detonating a bunch of chain guides last year I gave up and now run a Narrow wide with a Saint derailur
  • 2 1
 (oops hit the wrong buttons on my phone) derailleur* but I have had no issues since then. I think however I'm going to get a stand alone bash guard just to protect the ring. Idk it seems to work for me though
  • 3 1
 Yes the lines at rampage are buffed but no one is taking into account the impact of landings. That is a LOT of suspension movement even when landing perfectly on all the transitions. Didn't see a chain drop on anybody at rampage. I ride my endure bike harder than my DH bike on average and don't have a chain guide on either and never have dropped a chain. In my opinion, SRAM has weaker clutch mechanisms which translate to more chain slap. Since I switched over to shimano, my bikes are whisper quiet. I think it's personal preference to run a guide but nowadays I don't think it's a necessity like it used to be.
  • 3 0
 Yes but pedaling through rowdy terrain is when a chain is most likely to derail. I agree that the chances are low, I run no guide on my trail bike, ride it hard, and I have lost the chain only a couple of times. But it's happened. With a guide it can not- so for racing- why take that chance? If it happens during a Dh race run I will be livid, so I choose to run a guide for that. The additional selling point for me is the plastic bash guard that ends up taking strikes on a regular basis.
  • 1 0
 I am very interested in the new Maxxis tyres with double down casings, but don't know whether to go for the Tomahawk or Aggresor... I ride mainly trail and dh (I refuse to say Enduro), my local trails vary from VERY rocky and rooty to loose-over-hardpack stuff, mainly dry but it does rain occasionally here too in Oz. I currently have an Ardent 2.4" on the rear and it just lacks grip on the centre knobs up the really steep and loose climbs, I also want something with the better sidewall casing in the double down tyres - Any good input from anyone? I'm leaning towards the Tomahawk at the moment...
  • 2 0
 Aggressor I're ridden in NZ and Aus for the past 3 months in all conditions and is my new favourite rear tyre. Conditions in Sydney I ride in are mostly dry, sandy, rocky and it provides good rolling but importantly much better side-knob traction than the ardent, and much better braking and pedalling performance than tyres like the minion ss
  • 2 0
 I've ridden both in the back paired with a DHR2 in the front. Have also ridden the Minion SS (which I love). The cornering and braking traction of the Aggressor is far superior to the Tomahawk. The Tomahawk center knobs wear really fast and then it gets to be worse than a semi slick. I do like how the Tomahawk corners on a lot of trail but it isn't nearly as good as the Aggressor or Minion SS when cornering on loose. I would go for the Aggressor based upon what you say about the trails that you ride. It rolls way faster than it looks like it would. Also, if you care about stuff like this Richie Rude won both of the EWS races with Aggressor DD in the rear: www.pinkbike.com/photo/13314487 www.pinkbike.com/photo/13340849
  • 2 0
 Cool thx guys, sounds like aggressor is the way to go!
  • 1 0
 Would the aggressor be closer to a Hans Dampf or the new Nobby Nic. Been running HD front/NN rear for a while now, and am satisfied, however socal trails seem to love Maxxis tires, and I'm really interested in putting a HRII up front with an Aggressor out back.
  • 3 0
 "I want to get a CO2 inflator, but I don't want to blow it."

I think you might be using it wrong.
  • 1 0
 I've been running my downhill bike since I built it last summer without a chainguide, just narrow wide and clutch, and have yet to drop a chain.
  • 3 0
 I'm not tyred of you lot not spelling tyre not proper.
  • 1 0
 Can anyone recommend the best hand pump? I've been looking at getting CO2 but I've never used them. Is CO2 better?
  • 1 0
 www.artscyclery.com/descpage-LZGDPV.html?gclid=CKiepaaK-csCFYqPfgod-lYOeQ
I have this and it's great. Fills quick, has a nifty Guage, mounts by the water bottle cage, and the it's a lot easier to inflate using the hose than directly attaching the pump to the valve
  • 4 0
 I bought a topeak mountain morph and although it's large, it's the frikken bomb. Tires go up fast and you don't wear your arms out due to the flip out footpeg. I won't go back to a standard minipump.
  • 2 0
 @AgrAde: Got one of these as well. It's so much better than a mini pump.
  • 2 0
 Lenzyne do this one too which is similar. When I pull this out everyone else says "I'm going to buy one of those right away", it really makes trail side repairs much easier and faster. The larger volume one is better for mountain bike tyres.

www.lezyne.com/product-hpumps-hv-microfldrhvg.php#.VwT7thJ95R4
  • 1 0
 a CO2 can recomended for 29ers? what's next, enduro-specific bling? oh, wait a second...
  • 1 0
 Yeah that's been an actual thing for a while, since your standard 16g canister isn't going to provide enough air to get a 29er tube/tire up to a decent pressure.
  • 2 0
 @sevensharpnine: dude i was joking Wink
  • 1 0
 @Bruccio: I'll go now...
  • 1 0
 29 X 2,30 Aggressor is not available in Canada yet. I tried to order one but I can't get it.
  • 1 0
 Narrow wide chainrings work great when they are new. But then they wear a little bit...
  • 2 1
 Maxxis has never let me down. Great product.
  • 1 0
 Yay! RC and I run the same inflator.
  • 1 0
 Looks like a Magic Mary

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