Ask Pinkbike: Climbing With a Coil Shock, Adjusting Bike Fit, & Is 120mm Enough for Enduro?

Jun 23, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  

Here at Pinkbike, we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul-searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand-picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.






Coil Shock Climbing Perfomance?

Question: @alaskarider89 asks in the All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country Forum: for people that have swapped from air to coil on an AM bike (140-160 rear travel), wondering how much it affected your bike's climbing and how hard it was to set up properly to maintain a good climb? Thanks!


bigquotes
The trade-off that usually accompanies making the switch to a coil shock is a little more suspension motion when you're grinding up a steep climb. The good news is that you'll also be gaining additional traction due to the increased sensitivity, which will make it easier to get through those chunky, technical climbs.

Many coil shocks have some sort of a climb switch, or at least a low-speed compression dial that you can use to firm things up for those long fire road grinds. How much motion there is while climbing will be dependent on your bike's suspension design, and on how much sag you're running. You may want to play with different spring rates to figure out which one gives you the feeling you're looking for while climbing and descending. I'd still aim for 25-30% sag, but you may find that you can run less sag with a coil shock than you did with air and still have plenty of comfort on the descents.

Yeti SB165 review
Yeti's SB165 climbs very well even with a coil shock, but that won't always be the case when going from an air to a coil shock.




Reducing Palm Pressure?

Question: @ovaltine1 asks in the All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country Forum: I recently bought a YT Jeffsy and was in-between sizes. I went for the larger one after recommendations from two YT employees (I called twice and they both recommended the larger size). I am super happy with the bike but I do feel ever so slightly stretched out, like there's too much pressure on my palms. It's not so much that I think its the wrong size bike but enough that I want to see what I can do about it. Any recommendations? My first thought was shorter stem and riser bars.


bigquotes
It sounds like you're on the right track – I'd start with a shorter stem and see if that helps. Even dropping from 50mm to a 40mm length can make a noticeable difference. You can also slide your seat forward in the rails to shorten up your cockpit a little more, and don't forget to check your stem spacer situation. If there are any spacers on top of the stem you can put them underneath to gain a little more height and reduce your reach.

Going with higher rise bars is a great idea too – I'm a fan of higher rise bars, even on trail bikes, and there are a bunch of really nice 30mm options currently on the market. That'll put you in a more upright position, and hopefully alleviate some of that hand pressure. 

Just a few spacers being added to a lot of cockpits to deal with the steepness of the track here in Andorra.
Here's an extreme example of stacking spacers to raise the bar height.




120mm Bike For Enduro?

Question: @ACurtin asks in the All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country Forum: I am wanting to try a couple of local enduro rounds (South West Kenda Enduro). But my only bike at the moment is a 120mm trail bike. So am worried I will be a bit underbiked for the trail, I much prefer the tech stuff and want to move more into that. But don't want to have to go out and buy a new bike before trying it? Would you recommend just giving it a shot? Or would it be too much for my bike?


bigquotes
All the footage I found of that enduro series looked extra-British – mud, rain, more mud, and some slippery, rooty tracks. I'd say that you'll be fine on your 120mm bike, especially if you're just testing the waters (no pun intended). I don't know what your current setup looks like, but at the very least I'd suggest putting on some aggressive tires to maximize the amount of grip and reduce the likelihood of getting a flat.

You may also want to think about increasing your fork travel if that's a possibility – a 120mm bike with a 140mm fork will give you a little more margin for error, along with giving you a slightly slacker head angle. With a Fox or RockShox fork an air spring is typically around $40, and the swap can easily be done by a semi-competent home mechanic. After you do a race or two you can re-evaluate your setup - seeing what other racers are using will give you an idea of what the ideal bike for your area might be. 


When it wasn t raining the mud caked the bikes and riders adding all kinds of weight and drag to wheels brakes and drive trains.
This is what I imagine the conditions are like at mid-summer UK enduro races.




Removing Float X2 Travel Spacer?

Question: @BillyBoy0519 asks in the Mechanic's Lounge: I’ve recently purchased a 230 x 60mm Fox Float X2 and plan on changing it to 65. I’ve heard that the only difference is a travel limiter located on the shaft. Does anyone have any photos or experiences that they could share? I’m afraid I will remove the wrong spacer and mess up the shock.


bigquotes
You're correct, on a Float X2 the only difference between the 60mm, 65mm, and 62.5mm stroke lengths is the size of the travel spacer. However, removing that spacer isn't all that easy, and it requires some tools that you may not have. In the video below, at 2:57 you can see where the travel spacer will be – it sits above the bottom out bumper and accessing it requires removing the eyelet.

If you have all the necessary tools to ensure you won't end up scratching or crushing the shock it's not that difficult of a procedure. However, if anything in the first couple minutes of that video is outside of your comfort zone, I’d recommend taking your shock to a local shop to have them do the removal for you. 






124 Comments

  • 150 0
 I’ve always wondered where the hole in the donut goes when you eat the donut....I mean.... where does it go??
There’s a hole, and then I eat the donut and the hole just vanishes...but I didn’t eat it!?

Is there a forum for real world questions on pinkbike?
  • 35 0
 You should study topology.
  • 16 0
 You can buy donut holes by the bag. Normally with no icing or extra treats but still tasty.
  • 13 0
 Damn, now I crave for a donut.
  • 72 0
 The hole in the donut goes to the same place your lap goes when you stand up.
  • 18 3
 I always wondered where the Grim donut went ... I mean, it´s there, there were pictures, a video, nobody seems to ride it so and then it just vanishes?!

Is there a forum for real bike questions on pinkbike?
  • 13 0
 Fact (and Tori Amos knew that years ago): You cannot gain weight from a donut hole.
And Linking Park replied: In the end, it doesn't even matter (if you eat it or not).

But:
Grim Donut: gone.
Slayer: gone
So there must be a substantial hole somewhere.
  • 4 0
 Cannibal Corpse: Eaten from Inside (so apparently the hole ate the donut)

@hmstuna : Topology doesn't cut it here. This is downright quantum mechanics.
  • 1 0
 @T-Bot: oddly enough in their creation a hole is made but in reality their donut balls
  • 1 2
 @hmstuna: underrated comment
  • 1 0
 @Waldon83, I'm pretty sure you ate the hole thing...
  • 1 0
 @hmstuna: paid answer ;-)
  • 1 0
 Yeah exactly. Where IS the Grim Donut???
  • 1 0
 @T-Bot: I LIKE donut holes. I can easily eat a bag of 'em.
They're the best part of the donut!
  • 42 0
 Some guys race enduro on hardtails, you'll manage...
  • 35 1
 To be fair, a hardtail with a 64-65HTA & a 150mm fork can be a lot more stable and comfortable than a (potentially) 2012 120mm trail bike.
  • 7 0
 @EnduRowan: Yeah, that's exactly my scenario. I started riding in 2012 on a Rockhopper HT, with 100mm travel and steep HA. I now ride a Chromag Stylus, with 150mm and slack HA. World of difference.
  • 25 2
 It's the wizard, not the wand
  • 3 0
 @EnduRowan: Agreed. With the right tyres there isn't much in England that can't be ridden on a good modern ht. It would be useful to know exactly what bike ACurtin has. The difference in capability between a 15 yr old 120mm trail bike and a modern one is HUGE.
  • 2 0
 @tremeer023: Agreed. My wife is on a 2008 Trek Fuel and I just got a 2020 Norco Fluid, it's not even fair to compare them.
  • 3 0
 I also get along much, much better on my 2018 BTR Ranger hardtail with a 120mm travel fork than on my 2007 Cannondale Prophet (140mm front and rear).
  • 1 0
 @honda50r: Hes the wiz, nobody beats him....
  • 1 0
 @deadflat: the things I’ve done on my 160mm crush my 2000 Kona chute would never have believed.
  • 3 0
 @honda50r: Ron Jeremy would disagree but I digress....
  • 3 0
 Absolutely, I did Ard Moors on my Stanton Sherpa, 120mm fork. It was a hoot ! Didnt place too bad either considering my bum was like a rabbits nose at some points...
  • 28 3
 Would it be okay to pressure wash my bike with salt water? I heard the Higher the pressure the cleaner it gets.
  • 41 0
 Yes, that is certainly ok. Make sure to spend extra time in and around your bearings, then let it air dry. The salty water will exfoliate your bike revealing its inner glow.
  • 14 0
 @nyhc00: Thank you. If that didn't work I was going to use the time tested technique of sand blasting.
  • 6 0
 @chimichury: when in doubt, sand blast it out.
  • 2 0
 @nyhc00: I have always loved that orange glow
  • 9 0
 @nyhc00: Don't let air dry, you silly!



Tumble dry.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Thank you for that, it'll save a lot of time in the future.
  • 16 27
flag rrolly (Jun 23, 2020 at 7:43) (Below Threshold)
 You're not serious, are you? Salt water will destroy your bike. So will pressurized water. Do NOT do this! Don't even wash your bike with water. Wipe it down instead. It's way better. Use 40 grit sandpaper.
  • 15 0
 The pressure may loosen pivot bolts so be sure to check them after. When tightening, remember that a cross thread is a tight thread!
  • 6 0
 @NukePNW: I like to put JB weld thread lock on all of my screws. I find the smaller the hex on the head, the more JB weld you need.

Also, I recently heard about slick honey for suspension. Everyone seems to recomend it. Just pick the honey at your supermarket that has the lowest viscosity, and then pour some in your air spring. I also like to lube my cables with it.

Oh and linseed oil is the best chain lube....
  • 4 0
 I find a coarse wire wool on suspension products works best
  • 4 0
 @chimichury: If you're going to do that, make sure the water is from the Dead Sea. Other salt water isn't salty enough.
  • 3 0
 Use a rock hammer to break off any hard dirt/mud before bringing out the pressure washer.
  • 1 0
 If the grass and leaves that got stuck in my drivetrain still looks fairly fresh, I have the goats eat that away. If it is overdue, usually the funghi and microbia take over and turn it into fresh hero dirt.
  • 18 0
 A wise man once said: Run what you brung.
  • 6 0
 Imagine a track of 3 equal parts, say 3km undulating road, 3km proper xc uphill, 3km proper downhill and it's the fastest combined time, what bike is going to be the fastest?

Just curious what you feel would be the fastest. Gravel? 120mm XC? 140mm trail?
  • 31 2
 Is this not basically an XC race? You lose more on climbs on a DH than you gain over an XC on the downs.
  • 7 6
 E-bike
  • 4 0
 You have to factor in the need to slide down on your derrière and the probability of mutilation on the proper downhill (are we talking Val Di Sole?).
  • 5 1
 120mm XC I think, you'd gain a lot more time over the first 6km than you'd lose to the 140mm bike on the downhill.
  • 3 0
 @riish: Unless you crash and die because your wheels blow up landing a 6ft drop into a rock garden.
  • 1 0
 Gravel with nino skills in the DH xD
  • 3 2
 @johnny2shoes: Not really. The downhill's on XC races aren't nearly close to "3km proper downhill", assuming "proper downhill" means something like Val Di Sole or Andorra WC tracks.
I'd say an enduro bike with fast-ish rolling tires, and lockout would be the winner.
  • 7 2
 @EnduRowan: maybe you weren't around when we were all smashing everything with rigid CroMo mountain bikes? I know bad things happen, but we used to get by with much less and I at least rode some sketchy jumps back then.
  • 4 0
 @Warburrito: it's certainly impressive what was ridden on rigid bikes, but dh tracks have progressed a huge amount since then. You wouldn't ride Hardline on a gravel bike.
  • 2 0
 Interesting thought experiment, XC and Gravel bike are not that far apart on the ups. Trail bike is not that much faster down than a XC bike. I think a XC bike w/120 fork and some lightweight trail tires like say a Knobby Nic....

It's essentially what the BC Bike Race is x 7, downcountry bikes killed it....
  • 1 0
 @PilchardTV: that's true, and all my bikes are full suspension now. Admittedly, my 115mm rear/140 front travel 4x bike can probably handle almost anything my larger travel bike can. I've ridden plenty of DH with it with great success...although I do live in Indiana and Kentucky DH trails are the roughest I've ridden. Anyway, if the frame is burly I wouldn't hesitate to take something like that downhill...and have. If the frame is ultra-lite and strictly meant for XC I wouldn't trust it. I think it more depends on how beefy it is than how much travel it has.
  • 3 0
 @Warburrito: I was there. The thing is almost nobody was smashing anything on those bikes except the bikes themselves. All about line choice and hanging on tight. Survival mode. really no purpose built mtb trails at least on the east coast. Doing a two foot drop was hardcore for weekend warriors. Gap jumps were for the bmx kids. You see beginners hitting jumps and drops now. The whole sport has evolved.
  • 5 1
 Coil shocks are fine for climbing if you have progressive rear suspension and most have a climbing lockout as mentioned. I run a Cane Creek coil on my BTR and live in the Sheffield UK area, which is Peak district riding with lots of steep climbs. I use the climb switch for the longer and steeper ramps. It doesn't actually lockout, but it does stiffen the first part of travel enough to remove bounce from the coil under pedalling lunges.
  • 5 0
 My trail bike with a CC Inline coil climbs great. Their climb switch is the real deal.
  • 4 0
 Climb switches instantly solve the problem and negate any need to debate over spring type. If the shock doesn't have a climb switch or the rider prefers to not bother, here's how I replied to this question in the forums:

There are misconceptions about climbing with a coil spring. Because a coil is (usually) linear, you would set up a coil with a little less sag than an air shock on the same bike with the same link. This does three things:

• The bike sits a bit higher with the coil, helping your ergonomics.
• By sitting higher in the travel, the suspension remains in a region of higher pedaling anti-squat.
• Less friction means the suspension is less likely to hang up on tiny impacts. It also means the bike is more likely to bob due to tiny forces. My perception is the two effects roughly cancel out.
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: is there anyway to tune out some of that feeling of getting held up on certain square edge hits or holes? On a couple trails I ride I find the read end gets stuck ever so slightly but it is definitely noticeable.
  • 5 0
 @gnarcissistictendency: Depends what's getting hung up: the wheel or the sensation of kickback.

• Wheel: You can reduce the force through reduced low-speed compression damping and lower tire pressure. You can also sit farther forward to reduce weight on the rear wheel.
• Kickback: Not a lot you can do. Larger chainring to reduce anti-squat.

The real solution is to go faster. The slower you go, the less efficient, which makes you slower yet. No one said this sport was easy or fair! When you travel very slowly, the chassis and your centre of mass track the ground, including every little rock and root. When you go quickly, only your tire tracks the ground while casing flex absorbs some roughness, meaning the wheel doesn't need to fully track the ground, and - most importantly - the chassis and your body (the primary masses) only need to track the general contours of the trail, not every little bit of roughness.

A related problem: at slow speeds, as your whole mass sinks into the contours of the trail, you need enough torque to climb up and over trail roughness. For example, if you go over a root slowly, you need enough torque to lift yourself over the momentarily steep profile of the root. If you're traveling quickly, you need only enough torque to maintain your speed - the tire and suspension will absorb the root without you having to lift yourself over it - plus restore the energy lost through tire flex and suspension damping.

The cruel reality is, for a given amount of leg force available, you have two possible speeds at which you can travel, with a gap between them that would require more force than is available. If you don't have quite enough force to sustain the higher speed, at which the suspension is saving you from a lot of unnecessary lifting, you have no option but to drop to the lower speed. It's a non-linear relationship in which a little more leg strength can produce a lot more speed. The best approach on rough terrain is to rest where it's smooth and really give it through the roughest sections.
  • 3 0
 @R-M-R: Totally. I actually found that my bike climbed better when I left the climb switch open.
  • 3 0
 @me2menow: Yes! It's a common misconception that climb switches always produce better efficiency.

Most, if not all, of us have experienced how a fully-rigid bike hangs up on everything and is much slower than a suspended chassis when passively coasting through rough terrain. We know suspension can be faster, so we ought to know that reducing suspension function via a climb switch can be slower than leaving the damper open. We also know fully-rigid bikes are more efficient on smooth terrain (ex. road bikes), so there must be specific conditions that trigger this tipping point.

The combination of speed, roughness, hardware (tires, suspension design, etc.), and rider inputs will determine whether the climb switch is helping or hurting efficiency.
  • 4 0
 I never use a "climb switch". Just leave the suspension in it's normal riding position.

You're only losing efficiency if you are bouncing up and down on the bike while pedaling. Just sit and spin, and look at how much your bike moves, it barely does. Maybe using 5mm of travel?

I'm on a coil sprung 170mm E29.

While I still prefer a hardtail for XC racing, which goes against popular opinion, the big bike keeps the suspension active, and definitely climbs tech better that way.
  • 3 0
 @R-M-R: good info! I'll see if i can dial that in today!
  • 3 0
 I ride a coil with no climb switch on a pretty linear design and have no issues. It climbs better than my air shock and hardtail. You don’t mash on the pedals anyway no matter what your riding so there’s no real downsides to running a coil apart from weight for the riding I do. You seem to have way less wheel spin so you hardly ever find yourself in situations where you’re out of the saddle mashing the pedals. You can just crawl up stuff.
  • 4 0
 @JSTootell: agreed. Only real reason to use one as far as I can see is if you are a stand up pedaler
  • 2 0
 @iantmcg: Yes, standing to pedal tips the balance in favour of a climb switch. Raising your centre of mass lowers the anti-squat and the biomechanics produces uneven forces with a lot of vertical force.
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: yeah, I only stand up to pedal when getting speed for a huck so it wouldn’t make sense to flip the climb switch, though my climb switch valve was rerouted when they tuned the shock so I don’t have one anyway. But I really notice the bob when stand up pedaling.
  • 1 0
 @iantmcg: Maybe there could be a push-and-hold climb switch for slopestyle (and similar) riders that's active only when held, then releases when you reposition your hand. Until then, yeah, it's probably best if you don't try to reach down and flick a tiny switch while setting up for a huck! Releasing it while airborne may count as a variation, though ...
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: yeah, I could see that being useful, there is already bat mounted lockouts for XC guys but not push and hold like you suggest. I wouldn’t want one though as it is just more cables to replace and the little speed I lose mashing for the next huck inconsequential to me.
  • 1 0
 @iantmcg: Yeah, I don't suppose it would be a huge improvement and it would be useful - if at all - to only a tiny number of riders. Just dreaming up ways to make it work for your specific hucking needs.

To give an idea of how much I value a climb switch, I opted for a shock without a switch, even though it was the same price and the switch would've been easily accessible on my bike.
  • 1 0
 @MikerJ: I too love the CC inline Coil. 150 on Knolly Warden. Way better than the DB Air honestly.
  • 1 0
 @me2menow: Agreed - on tech climbs and my MegNeg'd air shock. On the long smooth stuff, I'll flip it to mid setting.

As I've realised and well stated by R-M-R - speed is your friend. Speed, center weight light hands and heavy feet heals down and I go through much that used to stall me out. I would assume coil rear would be similar to the MegNeg with the climb switch on (off the top of ones travel).
  • 3 0
 My thoughts on the hand pressure thing, it's something I struggled with a bit a first when I got my most recent bike (Ibis Ripmo). The steep seat tubes put you higher and you are reaching down further putting more weight on your wrists. I guess this is the stack bit kicking in.... I agree the long low slack (steep ST) thing is good, but there are some ergonomic issues with it too if you spend lots of time riding up, across and down as most people do.

My suggestion as someone who spends a lot of time on the tools working with small machines, and also broken wrists in the past so has pain as well RSI, is get decent grips which will help with pressure points. My preference is ODI Pro, Ergon GE-1 is also nice, what I look for is palm support, a curve upwards (concave?) where your palm is rather than a flat grip helped a lot. For me anyways.
  • 2 0
 The GE-1 and GA-2 solved this issue for me. The upward curve in the middle, and the slightly thicker outer part of the grip I find distribute load much better than traditional grips. I now ride Ergon grips on pretty much every bike.

The shape of the grips is best described by “convex,” as concave is like a dent, where convex is like a bubble.
  • 1 0
 I'm sure I'm in the minority with this but the ergon ge1 have massively exacerbated the minimal amount of hand numbness I had. I thought they were more tapered, but realize now that bubble puts pressure right at the bottom of my hand. Have less than 10 rides on them and they are getting replaced immediately. Back to normal grips
  • 4 0
 My Reign climbed better with a Cane Creek DB Coil than with the original DPX air shock. My current Ibis Ripmo AF with Jade X coil climbs better than any other bike I've owned.
  • 2 0
 I have a Meta 29 with coil and almost stopped using the cs lever. So it really depends on bike geometry and suspension characteristics (especially if you have very progressive bike it sits in travel more thus more need for cs). Typically for coil you can go with a firmer setup, since it is linear (too soft = bottoming out regularly) and very sensitive at the beginning. I'd imagine that modern bikes with very steep STA have even less problems with coil when climbing.
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer i have read on a couple of other forums that in changing the travel of the float X2 by adding or removing the spacer that you also need to adjust the position of the IFP. Being a novice suspension tech at best I am struggling to figure out if this is true or not (and subsequently finding out if the IFP is in the same position on all float X2s). Any feedback for me? Thanks
  • 9 0
 It's true for Rockshox shocks, you need to change IFP position if you change travel, but if you take a look at service instructions for Fox here www.ridefox.com/fox17/help.php?m=bike&id=978 you'll see that the IFP depth is the same for all shock sizes which means you only need to remove the spacer go ride yer bike. Wink
  • 6 1
 My coil 180mm bike climbs brilliantly. And if I struggle I knock it into turbo.
  • 2 0
 What's the deal with weird seat post placement in bike photos like this? That yeti's seatpost is far from slammed down, and the exposed seat looks like it's maybe half put down? Photos just trying to show the saddle in line with handlebars? Even if that's not how it would look IRL?
  • 2 1
 Yes. Bike photos with the seat extended all the way up tend to look strange - we usually position the seat in line with the stem for symmetry.
  • 1 0
 I've not raced any enduro's but I've ridden some of the old EWS trails around Innerleithen/glentress and all the trails that featured in the ESS at Isaberg in Sweden, on my 120mm 2018 Camber. Totally fine, as others said some burly rubber upfront and something to match at the back. No stress, it's not fast granted but it will get you down the hill. An enduro bike would be faster and handle the rough stuff better/smoother but not really essential unless you plan on racing regularly or you want to get fast and loose.

That said, I am looking to fit a 130/140mm Pike just to make things a little smoother.
  • 1 0
 Cane creek inline coil+ climb switch is the buisness. To compare it to the usual air shock compression only climb/lockout guff from fox and rs is a insult. Night and day on my g1 process. Knocked mins of climbs and cleared stuff i coudnt before.
  • 1 0
 Yeah I’ve put a coil on my process also. Awesome.
  • 1 0
 My bike climbs so much better with a coil it's silly. Pole evolink 131, going to a CCBD INLINE COIL (jesus guys,) made for faster climbing (I go up a lot of chunky rocks that frequently roll out) that also tired me out less than the Monarch I replaced it with. I never realized how much energy I had to use keeping the bike, it's so worth the extra weight.
  • 2 0
 SO done the some of the SW series on a Bird120 forked at 140, ye sit will do it and you'll have a laugh. (You may need to back of a little if its steep, rough and dry)
  • 4 0
 I've raced a few Enduros on my 120 Scott Spark, I'm not gonna win but it's not the bike holding me back, I would't win on a £10K enduro bike either. It's all still fun and on pedally stages I come out the other end pretty fresh whilst those on 15-16 KG 160 travel bikes look totally spent!
  • 1 0
 I did the southern champs at Minehead, and a 120mm trail bike might have been quicker than my Mega. There were only a few steep sections with lots of tight and twisty through the trees, so as long as you've got a long enough dropper, a grippy front tyre and a sturdy rear tyre you'll be fine as long as you're not planning on standing on the podium. May be worth raising the stem as far as it'll go too.
  • 1 0
 At the last race I did the top guys in the hardtail category were placing high in the general standings
  • 1 0
 @abennett219: if you're fast, you're fast...
  • 3 0
 Could i race a Dh or a ews on a 29er 170 fox 38 and 150mm travel 210x55 fox x2 suspension set on a orange stage 6
  • 3 0
 What happened to the XC bike field test with the Supercaliber and Scalpel etc?
  • 1 0
 Have ridden a bike all winter with no maintenance, but why does no one want to use a sealed drive even though will be more efficient in muddy conditions?
Is it just that sponsored riders are not allowed too?
  • 5 3
 Forbidden Druid at 130mm can tackle pretty much everything you put in front of it, travel is only a number.
  • 2 0
 The Druid has more bump eating ability though because of the rearward axle path. Maybe it would help to have some kind of an accepted equivalency between conventional and high pivot bikes where, say, 130mm of vertical travel of a high pivot bike is equal to 150mm of travel of a conventional (non high pivot) bike.
Axle paths: www.pinkbike.com/photo/17036509
  • 2 1
 I just can't see that bike handling drops 12-15 feet too well. Never tried one though so there's that :/
  • 2 0
 @j-p-i: why is that? It's way more stable on landing as any other bike on full compression the wheelbase expand and it makes it so stable same in corner it's an awesome bike but people get stuck on numbers like bigger is always better.
  • 1 0
 @ybsurf: Yeah that's me to a T...I suppose I'll have to try one out! I'm currently on a 125mm Scout and am looking for something that can handle bigger stuff as I'm maxing this thing out way too often.
  • 1 0
 @j-p-i: yeah you should try one next year they gonna have their demo bike I'm on a mullet and it ride so good.
  • 1 0
 @j-p-i: i have a norco aurum hsp and it eats through rocks no problem and i'm running it with 19% sag cause i just got it and i haven't replaced the spring yet
  • 4 1
 My reign sx 2019 actually climb pretty well for a coil.
  • 2 0
 Yeah mine too. I run my rebound super slow and stiff anyway and it climbs just fine.
  • 3 0
 Reducing Palm pressure? Palm’ never felt no pressure Wink
  • 1 0
 I did an enduro series here, expert category, on my 125mm Scout. Placed 38th out of 172 at the end of the year. Totally do able.
  • 1 0
 I just find out that the travel of a fork can be changed hahaha, anyone knows where can I find parts of an old fox 32 fork(2016)
  • 1 0
 120mm on the rear and never failed me. Plus you got legs for extra travel. Mind rebuilding the fork from 130 to 140 very soon.
  • 2 0
 I mean Ali Clarkson has done a few enduros on an Orange 4
  • 5 0
 Good to keep in mind that the Orange Four has about five inches of travel, Orange Five has nearly six inches of travel and the Orange Alpine 6 is closer to seven inches than to six. So yeah, the Orange Four is kind of in line with what the person with the question is running. That said, you could argue that skills may be different.

But yeah, the bigger deal of course here is, just ride your damn bike! There have always been people riding the Megavalanche on hardtails, how would a whopping 120mm be insufficient for enduro racing? If you need to ride slower because of this, you only have longer to enjoy the ride Smile .
  • 1 1
 @vinay: Don't forget to include the lateral travel on the 4 Wink .
  • 2 0
 some days i wonder if 150mm is enough.........
  • 1 0
 120mm is way undergunned for the enduro races in my area. People running 170mm bikes.
  • 2 0
 I thought there was a nitrogen charge needed with a Fox Float X2 service.
  • 1 0
 Only if you pull everything apart just the air can is fine
  • 1 0
 @Bikerdude137: He did pull everything apart in the video...and then used air to fill up the reservoir (not the air can). Did you watch the Fox video?
  • 1 0
 @steveczech: the nitrogen charge is for the boost valve
  • 1 0
 @Bikerdude137: What in the world are you talking about...boost valve? Look at Step 12 in the instructions from Fox: "Release the nitrogen charge by depressing the Schrader valve within the reservoir." Then in Step 29, they fill it with air from a shock pump.

www.ridefox.com/fox17/help.php?m=bike&id=978
  • 2 0
 No, dunno, yes.
  • 1 0
 @ovaltine1 raise your bars. The longer you go, the higher you need to go
  • 1 0
 37 inch wheels and 120mm of travel.....EWS....here I come!
  • 1 3
 120 is enough for downhill! But don't race it, please
  • 1 0
 i would do rampage on it , jokes but u probs could race it dh up a new fork or raise travel to like 150 would be fine
  • 1 0
 @Alexenduro: yeah what i meant by that was that trail bike parts are normally not as strong as dh race parts
So if you build up a custom super burly 120mm travel bike race it!! Everyone at a dh race who sees a trail bike cheers them on like maniacs haha
  • 2 0
 @Bikerdude137: yh true but you can get quite a lot of decent enduro bikes for the cost of a 120mm bike such as the Privateer 161 bike tbf

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