Ask Pinkbike: Protect Your New Frame, One-By Drivetrain Conversions, Gravity Hydration Pack Alternatives

Feb 10, 2015
by Pinkbike Staff  
Ask Pinkbike Header

Here at Pinkbike we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.



Low Profile Pack for Park Riding?

Question: Pinkbike user riggadon asked this question in the Bikes, Parts, and Gear forum: I'm looking for a low profile/ slim hydration pack for riding DH at lift accessed trails. I need to be able to carry a tube, multi tool, CO2 cannisters, phone, keys.The bladder doesn't have to be more than 1L - I'll have no more than a few sips of water in it. So, a small amount of storage, no huge bladder, and slim profile that doesn't flap around whilst airborne. Any suggestions?

bigquotesNo one likes to makes the walk of shame at the bike park, that head down trudge back to the base area with your DH bike in tow simply because you couldn't be bothered to pack a spare tube and a pump. As liberating as it is to ride without a pack, carrying at least the bare essentials can make a day of downhilling go that much smoother. There are a few low profile options currently on the market, but two in particular caught my eye at last year's Interbike trade show. The first is Race Face's soon-to-be-released Stash Tank ($59.99), a light, breathable tank top that has pockets for a small hydration bladder and three separate pockets to hold the rest of the items you mentioned. The second possibility is Alpinestars' new Evolution jacket ($159.95), which offers back, chest, and removable shoulder protection, along with room for a hydration bladder on top of the back protector. Plus, there are a couple of smaller pockets in the kidney area that will accommodate your tube and tools. Both options will ensure you're not stuck by the side of the trail begging passing riders for tubes, and more than likely you'll end up being the one saving the day. - Mike Kazimer

Low profile hydration

Alpinestars' Evolution jacket and Race Face's Stash Tank are both low profile alternatives to a traditional hydration pack.






OneUp One-By Conversion for My Ten-Speed Drivetrain?

Question: Gmg454 asks:All Mountain and Cross-Country ForumI really wanted SRAM XO1 or XX1, in 1 x 11, but I didn't want to buy a whole setup (chainring, cassette, chain, derailleur and shifter = $$$$!). So, I ordered the OneUp 42-tooth cog ($100), and a 34-tooth Race Face chainring ($40). So, for $140, I'm hoping to have an 11 x 42 transmission, close to SRAM's 10 x 42. My fingers are crossed hoping this works. Is anyone running a similar setup? Or is it still too early? Am I missing anything?

bigquotesAt least two of us at Pinkbike are running a OneUp 11 x 42 one-by drivetrain and with good success, both in the shifting and durability departments. I started with the basic kit, like you are planning, with a 42-tooth cassette cog and a 34-tooth narrow-wide chainring. I have since upgraded to the optional 16-tooth cog, which neatly spans the big jump from the 15 to the 19 that is created by the need to remove the cassette's 17-tooth cog to make room for the addition of OneUp's 42. OneUp also makes a replacement cage plate that offsets the upper pulley, so that the standard rear mech' will more easily clear and shift to the larger, 42-tooth cog.

Both the addition of the 16-tooth replacement cog, and the Rad cage are not essential to your conversion, but they make it operate more smoothly throughout the range. OneUp sells the 42 and 16 as a pair for around 80 USD and the Rad cage runs between 55 and 35 USD, depending upon your mech. I assume that your Race Face chainring is a narrow-wide type, which should be considered an essential component to any one-by conversion.

Conversion kits like OneUp's make it practical for riders to enjoy the simplicity and lighter weight of a one-by drivetrain without shouldering the substantial expense of replacing every drivetrain component (including the freehub mech') with a SRAM 11-speed option. The only drawback of an 11 x 42 ten speed conversion is that you will not enjoy the extra top speed that is facilitated by SRAM's ten-tooth cog. - RC

OneUp Components RAD cage review

OneUp's Rad Cage and 16-tooth replacement cog were the missing links for riders who wished to convert to a one-by drivetrain by adding a 42-tooth cog to their existing ten-speed cassettes. We highly recommend them.





Best Protective Frame Tape?

Question: Pinkbike user hardyk asked this question in the Mechanics Lounge: Hey guys I was wondering what is the best tape you can use to protect a brand new frame? Cheers!


bigquotesThere are plenty of different clear tapes and vinyl's on the market, but as you mentioned further down the forum thread, you want to wrap a brand new frame entirely. I think InvisiFRAME could be your best option. UK residents can post their frames directly to Invisi and they will wrap your frame for you, or you can take it to a registered dealer and they will supply the kit and do it for you. If you reside elsewhere you can order the pre-cut frame kit for your bike direct from the InvisiFRAME website. There are plenty of kits for most bikes, but if they don't have the one you need they can supply a generic kit or design one specifically for you. They also do gloss or matte to keep your frame honest, depending on the original finish. I have had two frames covered previously with great success, the only place it can be visible is on the edges of the vinyl or around excessively awkward areas where there will be many cuts and angles. I never had any issues with discolorations or peeling, over time the matte vinyl will start to show up small scuffs and marks, but at least you know your frame is fresh underneath, the gloss vinyl can even be polished out to keep your steed sparkling. I can't comment on how difficult it is to apply the vinyl yourself, but I imagine with a clean workspace, patience and some spare time, achieving a decent finish should be easy. - Paul Aston

Santa Cruz Blur TR with InvisiFRAME protection

InvisiFRAME can be used to protect the majority of your paintwork.






Have some unresolved tech questions? Jump in the Pinkbike Forum and we'll look to answer it for next time.


150 Comments

  • 79 0
 I set my self up with a One-Up setup this year. It's flawless (Sram X9 clutch derailleur). Then, at Christmas, I got a strange package in the mail. In the package was a very nice pair of One-Up branded riding socks! So, these guys totally f**king rule.
  • 5 0
 Can a short cage be used? Or is a medium cage absolutely necessary? Am I correct in saying this only works with a ten speed?
  • 2 0
 You cam use a med/short cage if you have little to no chain growth. Your frame manufacturer will know this number and there is a recommendation on one-ups website.
  • 4 0
 Use the 40t cogs with short cage derailleurs. However, you can buy a RADr cage for any Shimano derailleur that will work with 42t.
  • 5 0
 I bought the OneUp 42t cog, RADr cage, and a 32T N/W chainring. They sent me a 30T chainring by mistake, so I e-mailed them back and asked whether I would still get the 32T. They sent me the 32T the next day, even though I haven't used the setup yet, I am very pleased with their customer service.
  • 3 0
 I'm riding a oneup this year too. It's beautiful. Great performance for a great price!
  • 2 0
 short cage will work. saw someone using one with a 42T ring. short cage zee
  • 1 0
 Ripped off one derailleur by making chain too short. Was shifting well on the stand but once we hit the mud it was not pretty so be careful with chain length. By that experience i would say short cage and 42 is risky.
  • 1 0
 I am running a Zee short cage with a 42T on my Nukeproof Mega TR with a 32T front. It works like a charm. You have to test the setup at full compression of rear suspension, otherwise you might get results like Sontator.
Even so I can tell you there might be difficulties depending on your setup: I ran a 34T chainring in the front before I got the 32 and the shifting performance to the big 42 just straight up sucked, if it even worked. So obviously the safe call is to go with 40T with a short cage if you are not 100% your setup works with a 42. Back when I first tried this, there were no 40T options so I went on a limb and got lucky. As I already said: I love my setup as is and it works without any failures.
  • 1 0
 I actually tested it at full compression! Maybe it is related with the oval chainring i am running but as i said it worked well on the stand even fully compressed. Maybe the mud added circumference to the cog and chainring. What I also noticed is that on some shifts the chain does not drop directly into the 'valleys' of the cog but rides on the points. An unexpected worst case combination and the cage went into the spokes while i was torquing up a muddy climb. I think short cage needs as much slack as you can get without being too long on the smallest cog.
  • 3 0
 what if you have a 1 x 9, some of us dont have the fancy 1 x 10 or 1 x 11, is there something for us. I use a 1 x 9 with a 34 front and chain retension system....any ideas
  • 7 0
 Bird-Man, there's an EBay seller named MTB Tools that lists 36, 38, and 41 cogs for 8-9-10 speed cassettes www.ebay.com/itm/MTB-Tools-41-Tooth-Cog-for-Mountain-Bike-Cassette-41t-Sprocket-/261664912556?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cec71b4ac). The cogs include appropriate spacers for the different cog count cassettes. I have his 36t cog, and it works perfectly on a 9 speed.
  • 4 0
 dude thanks!!!!!!!!!!!! I owe you a beer and a bud
  • 1 0
 For the record there are standard 12-36 from Shimano/Sram for 9-speed. They are easy to modify with stock items to fit your needs with a lower gear (11T instead of 12T) and bring reliable shifting performance. If you want to go higher though, you have to get other stuff like the things from bde. A friend of mine runs a 10-speed 40T cog on his modified (s.a.) 11-36 cassette which works just fine for him.
  • 1 0
 For the record: everybody who makes a range expander, recommends you go with a 40t if you've got a short cage der(In fact, some of them came out with a 40t specifically for that crowd.) That's what I went with, before the RAD cage was announced, as I have a ZEE. however, with the RAD or RADr cage, you can run a 42t without difficulty(go with the RADr cage though, as it includes the backplate that I had to source separately.)
  • 1 1
 The short cage is designed for the 11-36 range. From my expirence I really don't think it would work with even the 40 tooth unless you run a chain guide with a lower roller. That way if it gose slack at least it is held in place.
  • 1 0
 I ran it that way for over a year. It works fine. But the RAD cage makes it much better(especially in the higher gears that you compromise when you run the B tension out.)
  • 1 1
 Be careful with short cage. I use an 11-34 and while there was some tension on the again in the 11t cog, it wasn't enough to give me peace of mind. Sprinting down a bumpy lane flat out 60km/h without a guide or much tension on the again was an accident waiting to happen, so I got an amg guide and medium cage mech. The shifting improved too, going from zee to slx. It must be the cage length making the difference, given the two are almost identical otherwise.
  • 1 0
 it may or may not work the short cage with a 40 to 42T. I guess it depends on the suspension set up so testing is a must.

the setup i saw with a 42T with zee was on a ironhorse 7.7 or something or maybe less travel than that. so DW suspension. it worked like a charm for im but i guess it would heavily depend on chain length, growth and suspension movement. withthat in mind, anyone used the same on a single pivot or any mod of a the single pivot set up?
  • 1 0
 @jaame having ridden both: RAD cage>shimano GS length cage. The offset pulley really helps with chain wrap, & crisps up the shifting. I'd heavily suggest you pick one up, it rules.

There's always outliers when you're working with something like this, so yes, testing is a must. The vast majority of frames will work fine with a 40t & a ZEE, however. I've seen it in person quite a bit, as well as numerous examples online.
  • 1 0
 I've seen it too, just for me while it worked, it wasn't giving me peace of mind. I am planning to try the oneup at some point, but I'm probably going to wait for my new bike.
  • 31 2
 Has anyone ever fallen on their multi-tools!? F'in hurts and leaves quite a pretty yellowish greenish purplish bruise. Not sure I'd be putting my multi tool in either of those.
  • 49 1
 I once fell on one of my CO2 cartridges, and instead of hurting, it decided to engage and looked like a huge smoke bomb went off in my shirt...
  • 2 0
 I was just thinking along the same lines. The bib packs seem like a great idea, but damn falling on your back would be awfully painful. Also most of my park days are July and Aug when it's smoking hot, two layers is out of the question... and I'm certainly not brave enough to ride bib only. Shorts with deep side pockets, have worked for me without any major bruising. Trail riding kinda requires a pack for 2-3 liters water food and tools, so bib just doesn't really work except for maybe road?
  • 1 0
 check out geirgerig hydration , they make a vesst for under you jersey that holds 2l...
  • 4 0
 CO2 cartridge going off in your shirt?Cool!
  • 9 0
 friend of mine fell on a co2 canister for airsoft and the small nozzle went under the skin of his hand and he basically inflated his hand. It was seriously looking like when you blow up a rubber glove and the first minute or so it was emanating visible vapours. Didn't hurt much beyond the cut though ; )
  • 4 1
 @Sontator

Your friend is pretty lucky, like hella lucky. Compressed air in the blood will kill you, like one bubble. Apparently it screws thing up once is circulates round to the brain.

It's also why junkies in films always turn the needle upside down and tap it out
  • 1 0
 @redbaronmulisha
yes i think it did not go into any major blood vessel but just into the connective tissue. it took like 12 hours for the hand to return to its normal size and we were joking that he should not smoke with that hand as the gas in the airsoft canisters is flammable.
  • 3 0
 Falling on shit in your pockets blows... Tried a few different things, but towards the end of last summer I went to the taping of tube, tire lever, and co2 to the frame. Looks a little ghetto, but seemed to work well. Just have done it long enough to know how often I need to replace the tape...
  • 1 0
 I ride with an underseat bag on my DH bike (yeah, I know, hella ghey, but whatever) that carries a CO2, patch kit, multitool, levers and a few spare nuts and bolts. It cost about $15 at MEC and it's great for when I don't feel like carrying a pack. I never notice it when I ride.

For my DH pack, I have a Dakine Drafter that I bought from the Trek Dirt Series. It's a few years old now, and small (I'd guess 10-12L) but that thing's amazing. I can ride technical and fly off jumps all day, and never notice it's there.
  • 1 0
 Fell on my tool pack, which was floating around loose in my M.U.L.E. Cracked a vertebra. It really hurt.
  • 4 0
 You can also put your multitool in a padded case and then wrap the spare tube you're carrying around it - it shouldn't be too hard to avoid inflating yourself with CO2...
  • 24 3
 Running 1x10 is 98% as good as XX1 at half the cost.
  • 9 0
 With the RADr cage it shifts pretty much stock. If you have a 2x or 3x the one up is definitley your best option. As was said %98 of xx1 performance for way cheaper
  • 3 1
 Yeap ! People had to do it all the time... remember when 9sp was the cats meow ?

Idk if it's due to racing or riding road (just did a 106mile/12k ft of gain ride last week on 10 sp) other disciplines but 36 works perfectly for me on the mtb.

spin faster !
  • 4 1
 high cadence equals high power
  • 21 1
 I'm still waiting for enduro specific first aid kits.
  • 21 3
 theres an enduro specific first aid kit specific pocket on the enduro specific enduro sash
  • 4 0
 reading this lead me to think of enduro specific breakfast. maybe it's coz of the time right now.
  • 1 0
 Stans sealant and Co2 ?
  • 13 1
 "So invisiframe just bought a bunch of 3m scotchgard and is reselling it in shapes pre-cut for frames at a huge markup....."

Kite jumping, your statement above could not be more wrong/misguided. Lee at Invisiframe used to do what he is doing now but on high end super cars in the Automotive industry. His skill set and attention to detail is on another level when it comes to frame protection. Every single frame that comes through the door has its kit made to measure and is sculpted around every tube. If he has worked on a frame before it is a case of pulling the kit off the computer and plotter and then about an hour to fit, however if it is a new frame or a different size the labour required to make the kit usually ranges between 8-12 hours.

Once fitted it never peels like 3M tape and never discolours. People travel hundreds of miles to see him as the product is that good and he is such a stand up guy. Take a look at the website, see some of the many examples of his work and maybe try and see it for what it is which is a class, innovative product that massively protects your investment and aids resale. I am be a little biased as Lee has been one of my best mates for many years, but his 16hr days/7 days a week work ethic and many orders must mean that the product is being well received.
  • 3 12
flag Siphaeon (Feb 11, 2015 at 0:10) (Below Threshold)
 You do know that 3M has more than one kind of protective film? 3M's Scotchgard and Scotchgard pro are warrantied against yellowing while Ventureshield is not but obviously you don't know what you're talking about unless you specify to which tape you refer? ... Oh yeah, your mate is the only humanbeing on earth that can cut film in shapes and I guess even makes his own film since it's so much better than "3M craptape" so there goes the credibility.
  • 4 1
 +1 I concur. Used Invisiframe on my last two bikes, and it's gone on great, fits perfect, and is pretty cheap insurance compared to the alternatives (repainting, or wasting a bunch of time trying to bodge it myself).

The peace of mind you get (when shuttling, travelling etc) and the protected value of your precious frame quickly cover the initial investment.
Plus, application turned into a fun project for me and the wife to do together one evening, instead of vegging on the couch!
  • 1 0
 ...It says he's using 3M stuff right on the website(at least for gloss, for matte, it's XPEL) www.invisiframe.co.uk/BLANK-SHEETS-DOTS/BLANK-SHEET

Not disputing the amount of work that can go into custom cutting for weird frame shapes though, & his pricing seems quite reasonable taking that into account.
  • 1 2
 What I meant by my comment is that if we went out and bought a roll of 3M and just put it on, it tends to get mud behind it and peels/discolours. It's happened to me for years before Invisi was started. So yes your right Lee uses a 3M product but the way he designs and manipulates the kit is stops it from having these issues even after lots of mud and many washes.....
  • 4 2
 So there is only one guy on earth that can put protective film on things. And even worlds leading product needs to be manipulated to work because despite Scotchgard has guarantee against discoloring, it will get ruined without some magical manipulation by this on guy...
  • 16 1
 So basically the InvisiFRAME is just a giant condom for your bike...
  • 2 32
flag ibishreddin (Feb 10, 2015 at 20:34) (Below Threshold)
 Then that makes you gay if your are a male rider.
  • 11 1
 goldhecklerswag- Yep, about 15 yrs old. I guessed it. Not guna neg prop ya but learn quick.
  • 7 1
 He has swag in his name and rides a gold heckler. What did you expect? I mean have you seen his bike? Gold and blue don't really work together.
  • 1 10
flag ibishreddin (Feb 10, 2015 at 21:59) (Below Threshold)
 Honestly I hate my username. It gives way to stereotypical thoughts that people may have to the young crowd here on pinkbike. If only there is a way to change it. And I don't care what people say I love my heckler ;-)
  • 4 0
 Not saying it's a bad bike. Just needs to not be gold. Raw with a clear coat might look good. Try messaging a mod to see if you can get your name changed.
  • 7 0
 I would suggest that commenting "Then that makes you gay if your are a male rider" only reinforces said stereotypes.
  • 10 0
 PB - what's a good slim pack..... the EXACT same question the first person asked..... that's not a shirt, armor or coat thing? We want a pack that doesn't flop around and doesn't cover my entire back and sides with pockets I will never fill up, but something so that if you landed on your keys u don't have to get them surgically removed.
  • 1 0
 Theres loads, what you need to look for is a hydration pack and pick the slimmest one you think looks good :-S .......


www.chainreactioncycles.com/fox-racing-xc-race-hydration-pack/rp-prod60840
www.chainreactioncycles.com/shimano-unzen-2l-volume-hydration-pack/rp-prod128713
www.chainreactioncycles.com/camelbak-classic-2-0-litre-hydration-pack/rp-prod117289

I have 2013 Fox one, much less restrictive as body armour but like body armour your forget its there after the first run.
  • 9 0
 I'm more of a fan of wolf tooth's 42 tooth cog, but the rad cage is essential if your doing the setup on a shimano drive train. I tried mine without it at first and it shifted like shit. My shop has done several conversions on SRAM drive trains and they work flawlessly though.
  • 2 0
 Yah, I have a mid cage X0 derailleur and it shifts quite well, but they had issues with Shimano, hence the cage. I really dig their 16T cog as well.
  • 1 0
 42t giant cog on mine with Shimano & it works flawlessly. I didn't have to put a longer 'B' screw in either.
  • 1 0
 42WT on an XT drivetrain stock, no rad change needed.
  • 2 0
 The RAD cage makes it better, you should look into it @TheOriginalTwoTone. Mine worked well without it, but is just as good as a stock cassette with it.

You don't need it for SRAM as they already offset the pulley from the cage pivot. the RAD cage essentially makes a Shimano derailleur function like a SRAM one.
  • 1 1
 I don't really need to look into it. When I say mine works fine, it works as well as stock. I don't have any issues shifting onto or off the 42.
  • 2 0
 Its not the 42 tooth cog where the problems happen. Running the b limit so far out makes shifting in the high gears sluggish. Mine wouldn't even shift into the highest gear. If you feel like you don't need it don't get one, but pay attention to the high end of the cassette.
  • 7 0
 +1 for the Invisiframe recommendation, have it on all my bikes and wouldn't ride without it. A small price to pay to keep a bike worth thousands in mint condition. Highly recommended
  • 4 2
 Extra protection that'll helo resale value later.
  • 7 1
 And for cheap asses, Helicopter tapes works wonder too.
  • 2 0
 3M 2228 electrical tape
  • 13 2
 And for those with frames for 26" wheels (me included), don't bother with any 'cos they aren't worth anything anyway.....:-( hahahaha
  • 4 0
 My wife is entering her first race this year and I want to set her up with a oneup and single for reliability, but first I have to upgrade her from 9 to 10. Also I'll have to buy her a narrow/wide so I am thinking the whole upgrade should be around $250. Add to that my own oneup and I am looking at 350 for two top knotch drivetrains. I am pretty psyched about the whole thing. Especially when I consider how that green cog will look on my green and black remedy with a green narrow wide I already have installed.
  • 5 0
 Am I the only one that has noticed the the 1x10 thread was from January of last year?
  • 2 0
 A proper hydration pack thats low profile is Ospreys Zealot, get the smaller on the two its very low profile run what ever size bladder ya want, I use std 2l with less water if needed, the bladder keeps things even more low profile and sits on back best of any pack Ive used, great for carrying pads if needed helmets etc, truly great pack, stays cool too.
  • 12 9
 RC - at least two of PB employees using OneUp? - so biased! An ethical journalist would use at least 3 different options! Shame, shame, shame...
  • 4 21
flag spiderdonut007 (Feb 10, 2015 at 16:24) (Below Threshold)
 Dude... wtf
  • 13 2
 Dude... sarcasm
  • 6 4
 How is 1x10 lighter than 1x11? 1x11 forces you to buy top tier components.

XT 11-36 weighs within 5 grams of XTR 11-40 and SRAMs 10-42 cassettes are LIGHT, even with that extra big cog.
  • 15 0
 Im pretty sure he means 1x10 is a lighter setup than 2x10. Not that a one up conversion XT is lighter than SRAM 1x11
  • 2 9
flag peanutbuter (Feb 10, 2015 at 17:19) (Below Threshold)
 what about the swat bib shorts
  • 3 0
 You are doing it wrong @peanutbuter.
  • 1 3
 what do you mean doing it wrong they have storage for tubes muilti tool a pump and water
  • 6 0
 @peanutbuter here are just some internet basics. If you have a question about a particular topic, item, discussion, trend, etc. post that question under a new heading. For example- Your above question about the SWAT bibs would have perhaps not recieved any negative props, had you posted it as a stand-alone query, instead of adding it on to Alias530's post about an ENTIRELY different topic.
  • 2 6
flag peanutbuter (Feb 11, 2015 at 4:21) (Below Threshold)
 but it was at the top and more people see it
  • 2 1
 I invisiframed my SB66c (matte film over matte frame) and it couldn't have been easier.

It's supposed to be even easier with glossy paint jobs.

Overall, I'm very satisfied with the final result, it's durability, and the owner Lee's commitment to customer service and the quality of his product.
  • 8 7
 So invisiframe just bought a bunch of 3m scotchgard and is reselling it in shapes pre-cut for frames at a huge markup..... I got enough 14mil 3m scotchgard off ebay to do my frames for a fraction of the cost. I don't know the thickness invisiframe is selling but the 14mil stuff works awesome. Highly recommended if you run carbon cranks and way cheaper than buying from these other bike specific re-sellers.
  • 9 1
 There's value in not spending all your time doing it yourself and knowing you'll get a top quality product.
  • 2 0
 I have been using clear Gorilla tape from Home Depot works like a charm and is super durable
  • 11 6
 Kite lets see some pictures of your cuts. I seriously doubt they are anywhere as clean and neat as Invis or Frameskins.
That plus the time it takes to layout the shapes and make the stencils.
My time is worth more than that, but hey it's Pinkbike, everyone here is poor and makes $5 an hour so it is probably cheaper for you to make it yourself.
  • 1 0
 It is as long as you care about function over looks. But, if I had the money I'd take all my frame protector stuff off and get the invisiframe. It'll keep my frame matte and look like a professional job too.
  • 2 1
 Well, for my bike it would've been $150 for Frame Skins or whatever the British company is called that sells precut frame templates. So, I ordered a downtube shield from Ibis (for better protection from rock strikes, you should see my carbon cranks and aluminum frames!) and I have faith that I can cut fairly good with a sharp x-acto blade and handle. Not everyone can. Plus, some of us like to take pride in a job well done, and done by ourselves. There are definitely other times where the time and effort is not worth it, but if you buy a new bike during the winter, it becomes fun to tinker with it while you're waiting for the spring thaw. Also, Their kit was a little too much for what I'm used to seeing wear out. Does anybody know how much those full frame kits weigh? I know thick vinyl tape can get heavy in a large enough quantity.
  • 2 0
 I just used graph paper to make templates when I did mine. That way if I screwed up it was only paper.
  • 3 3
 FactoryJackson review that this articles pics are ripped off says Invisiframe is actually 3M Ventureshield which is inferior to Scotchgard and Scotchgard pro (unless Invisiframe has changed their material). If you don't believe me then check out 3M site (solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/3M-Automotive/Aftermarket/Our-Brands/Scotchgard-Pro-Series).

Also worth watching are the comparison videos of different protective films on YouTube.
  • 3 1
 Couldn't disagree more. I have had my bike invisFRAMED by the man himself and he does an amazing job. The fact that nearly everyone in the bike industry/race scene use him should be a massive recommendation in itself. His attention to detail is incredible. If you want to protect your investment properly then get out done it is worth every penny.
  • 4 7
 Yes, only one man cut protection film and everyone else can't do it. Also everyone that has done it by themselves are laughing stock on local trails and parks because they didn't buy precut product. No matter even if the film itself was of even better quality. And perhaps there are actual facts available that nearly everyone (how much is it? 95%? 99%) has Invisiframe but atleast I haven't seen any. Maybe you could help me out here, Matt? Also please enlighten me, is Invisiframe still made out of Ventureshield or have they switched to far superior Scotchgard or even Scotchgard pro? Or do they use something else these days? Since I strongly feel that there must be something I'm just not getting here... Oh yea, the fact that no one else can do amazing job.

Apparently I for one don't want to protect my investment properly because I want the best film and don't want to pay for something that I can easily do myself.
  • 4 0
 There's always one! ;-)
  • 1 1
 Go to any sign shop and see if they have any old rolls of clear vinyl. They typically have rolls that they can't use anymore because there is not enough material left to cover sign, but there is usually enough to do a couple of bikes. Just cut the vinyl into strips for what you need. It's super stretchy, conforms extremely well to bike frames, and is super durable. And it's free.
  • 1 0
 I'm sure the product is awesome but part of the fun of building a bike is doing stuff like this yourself. I could pay someone to lace up wheels but I enjoy doing a few once in a while. Also, it looks like they don't cover the welds.

Headtube: www.pinkbike.com/photo/11899858
Downtube: www.pinkbike.com/photo/11899856
rear cs: www.pinkbike.com/photo/11899853
cranks: www.pinkbike.com/photo/11899845

Really the only reason I bothered with it was to protect the sixc cranks with a full wrap snice crankskins at the time only covered the sides and was a thinner 12mil. After seeing how easy the stuff was to work with I did my frame with the extras.
  • 1 1
 I don't think it's fun to do any of that by myself. Oh well, to each his own. I choose to spend those free hours RIDING my bike. I don't have enough free time to spend on homemade invisiframe.
  • 2 0
 @ Kite, those are simple places on the bike, take a look at the framskins kit for the Ripley. I think you'll understand better than.
  • 1 0
 Totally agree. I've had demo bikes for 9-12 months that were rode more times than Sea Biscuit and looked brand new at the end. I'm not too fussed if he uses 3m, scotch guard, scotch tape or cling film! All I know is it works very well.
  • 1 0
 I upgraded the drivetrain on my Slash with the OneUp kit last year, and I couldn't be happier. Definitely makes climbing with a 1x setup easier. As for frame protection, I got my film through Frameskin, based in Australia. They have great customer service and their product is excellent. I applied the film myself and it's perfect with no bubbles or any silly stuff. It does help if you have someone around to help you, and even better if you're working with just the frame itself. I applied mine before I built up the bike.
  • 5 0
 Neat, my question got featured!
  • 3 0
 So how do you feel about the answer?
  • 3 0
 Congrats now we have to celebrate, beer is on you ! Smile
  • 3 0
 Ironically I decided about a week after creating the thread that I was going to ditch the hydration pack when riding park. But the answer is appreciated anyway
  • 2 1
 invisiframe kits are awesome i added one to my commencal supreme fr (purchased the supreme dh version as they didnt have a supreme fr version and the frames near identical) and it fitted a treat and the matte finish is awesome. I tried gorilla tape before buying this kit but it just didn't stick or shape as well as this or look as hidden as this and i tried loads of different types. i would highly recommend.
  • 2 0
 Invisiframe is like Ikea - if you can read & understand the instructions, have spare 2h and right tools for the job (Squeegee in this case) - you'll be fine. Otherwise let the pro to the job for you.
  • 1 0
 I hear keeping the film wet when you put it on is really important as well.
  • 1 0
 yes, this way it will allow you to re-position the film over frame part. Complete drying time 24h or instant with hairdryer. Don't use cloth as it'll loose tiny fiber and you end up with air pockets. Basically same process as applying protective film on mobile phone.
  • 1 0
 For those who's bikes don't come with a molded chainstay protector: I replaced my old neoprene lizard skins one with Rescue Tape, which is a self adhering silicone tape. So far, it's working well.

It comes in lots of colors too.
  • 1 0
 I went with the mid cage sram clutch derailleur, got the 42T one up with 16T filler kit, Put an MRP upper guide that bolted into the frame where my front derailleur went. I have a Giant reign with SLX crank and put a raceface NW 32T front ring and I absolutely love the setup! It is so much more freeing on the trail to not have to think about the left shifter anymore, no more dropping into the granny in a tight spot wondering if it might fail to get a crisp downshift!

www.pinkbike.com/photo/11740476
www.pinkbike.com/photo/11740477
  • 3 0
 While not suitable for most of your frame, I've found that this stuff is incredible for your chainstay: 3M 2228
  • 3 3
 I stopped to use Derailleur>>> my gearbox is more efficient, i've more ratio than an XX1 (390%...mine is 440%) and i have only 9speeds! I can change the speed without pedaling, which is just insane, i can preselect my speed, when i'm riding down, to be prepared for any technical climbing stuff (theres a lot here on the North Shores). No more noise, you can hear your suspensions working. ah yep...you wash your bike and you won't have to lube the chain...thats a drive BELT!!! Easy care...and no maintenance! a drive belt is 10times a chain lifetime..stop breaking derailleur!!! the whole system is 1.4kg including cranks>>>Effigear.com
  • 2 0
 Fitting invisiframe is a nightmare! Fitted a kit to my nomad, fitting is murder but thexresult is good, best get someone else to fit for you
  • 1 1
 Invisiframe is the best thing since sliced bread! I run a bike shop with multiple demo bikes and hire bikes and they have all been protected.

Tried lots of different methods of protection in the past and this is by far the best.

The kits are good value for money. If you have a £3000+ bike a £100 kit to keep it looking sweet is great value.

Big thumbs up from me!!
  • 2 0
 crankskins.com Is a cheaper option for us North Americans. I highly recommend them.
  • 2 0
 Bought crank skins for cranks and had peeling issues almost immediately despite thorough cleaning. Invisiframe on the same bike is still perfect. Very well designed kit.
  • 1 0
 I used window cleaner and a hairdryer with great success.
  • 2 0
 Front 34t rear 42t OR front 22t rear 36t, which one is better in term of climbing ?
  • 2 0
 The 22/36 would get more torque. But the 34/42 would take more to get the rear wheel to spin where the 22/36 would spin easier. I was thinking about this earlier. Big Grin Plus it depends on the terrain, but I'd go with the 34/42 and just stand up when you need to get a little more power to the ground.
  • 1 0
 Thanks bud. That is also what I think about this 34/42 set up. I used to spin alot in 22/36, I guess I will spin more with 34/42 Smile In trails where I used to ride we have many climbs and these gear combinations is very important for my ride.
  • 2 0
 You could always go 32/42 also. Take a look at what other people are running on your trails too.
  • 1 0
 2012 cannondale Jekyll. One up 42t on an Xt 11-36 cassette/Zee FR rear mech with RAD cage/Race Face narrow wide chainring= crisp and clean
  • 1 0
 The initial reader question did not state whether or not they had a derailer with a clutch.

Does the narrow-wide setup work at all without a clutch?
  • 1 0
 Personal expierience: I went 1x without a chainguide or a clutch, but with a narrow wide. I'm not the hardest charger, but went from dropping chains every couple rides to not having dropped a chain in a few years(though I have since moved to a clutch system.)

It worked well enough, that the new bike I'm building next week will get my old clutchless drivetrain, & a narrow-wide just to get up & running.
  • 2 0
 Why can't I use a one up with my 11-36 9 speed cassette?
  • 4 0
 Beacsue the spacing is different between nine and ten speed cassettes. Also going 1x without a clutch derailleur is very unwise, so your better off spending the 250$ to get a new 10 spd deore cassette, shifter and clutch derailleur, one up cogs and narrow wide chain ring. The Rad cage is unnecesarry in my experience.
  • 2 0
 I use a wolftooth 42 with a regular no-clutch X9 and it works just fine, no chainguide and I rarely drop a chain (2x this summer at bromont on very rough trails.)
  • 4 0
 You can run a nine speed cassette with a ten speed shimano zee clutch der and a nine speed sram shifter - shifts perfectly.
  • 1 0
 Gear spacing is already sketchy with 10sp, going 11-42 on 9sp will be worse. I really love my 11-42 10sp, but I dream of a 11-42 11sp (not 10-42 or 11-40).
  • 1 0
 So how is the gap between the 36 and 42? Fine or is the 40 worth considering instead?
  • 2 0
 Running 42/16 OneUp cogs with Race Face narrow/wide 30t. X9 non-clutch derailleur and never dropped a chain. Shifting is crisp and the jump from 36 to 42 feels the same as the previous jump of 32 to 36 as it's almost the same ratio percentage difference.
  • 1 1
 36 to 42 works well with Sram derailleur. For Shimano, it works a bit rough unless you get the RAD cage. Although results may vary. Not sure if that's just small variations in frame / chain line. If you're running 10 speed, it's a no brainer upgrade. You'll drop a good half pound from your bike. Not to mention just make things simpler.
  • 1 0
 works totally fine on Shimano without the RAD cage (for me) when shifting up and down the bigger cogs and the 36 to 42 gap is not noticed (unlike the 15 to 19 which was brutal until swapping the 15 for the 16)

My issue was shifting in the smaller cogs and lack of adequate chain wrap in same cogs. RAD cage fixed all that plus I can run the B tension screw about half way now. It shifts perfectly now.
  • 1 0
 42/36 shifting on XT is always good unless badly setup. RAD cage only helps with their 16T cog, I even think that's mandatory in fact when you use 16T.
Overall after around 1500 km on it, shifting is a little bit less smooth than stock shim 10sp, but still very good and dependable.
  • 1 0
 It should also be noted that the cage length of the derailleur, regardless of brand, will have an impact here. So, a long cage will obviously have less issues shifting when compared to a short cage on the same 11 - 42 cassette.
  • 2 0
 Can I get OneUp Components in Australia cause I can't find anything?
  • 1 0
 One Up for OneUp Big Grin I will definitely try it on my next bike if I finally get there..
  • 1 0
 Own a rockrider 9.1 cant find a headset to fit anyone know the exact size i need please??
  • 1 0
 is there any benefits in buying a 29er frame and then putting 26in wheels on it? would this still make you fast?
  • 1 0
 depends how many times you go OTB from catching pedals all the time, from your dangerously low BB. Don't do it.
  • 1 0
 The Alpinestars evolution jacket seems cool and all, but it's not available from Alpinestars yet…..
  • 2 4
 So you spend the extra money on a carbon frame to save weight then you go spend more money on a film that adds that weight you just spent an extra grand on right back on the bike!
  • 3 0
 Lol! I don't think the film is nearly heavy enough to negate the weight savings of carbon Smile
  • 1 0
 I luv my OneUp stuff for over a year. No dropped chain and great shifting.
  • 1 1
 What?? No trolling from AngryNipples on this thread yet? He must have crawled back under his rock, BRAVO!
  • 1 0
 What is an affordable neck brace? Leatt is out of my price range.
  • 1 0
 if that is your reason, I strongly urge you to reconsider dropping the cash. You are basically saying I dont want to spend a lot of money to protect my neck and ability to walk.
  • 1 0
 sbsbsbsbsbsbsbsb

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.046121
Mobile Version of Website