Ask Pinkbike: Fork Travel, Mini-DH Bikes, and Junior Racing

Oct 17, 2017
by Pinkbike Staff  
Ask Pinkbike Header

Here at Pinkbike we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul-searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand-picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.





More Travel = More Better?

Question: Pinkbike user Climb16 asked this question in the 29er forum: Is it worthwhile to switch the 100mm-travel SID on my Giant Anthem 29er to a Fox 32 with 120mm of stroke? Rear wheel travel is 100mm, and the stock head angle with the SID is 71.5-degrees. If I switched to the Fox fork, it'd be closer to a 70-degree head angle.

bigquotesIt's less about how much travel the fork has and more about what it's going to do to your bike's handling. As you correctly pointed out, the fork swap would slacken your Anthem but only by a bit less than 1-degree, a change that a lot of riders would call a very good thing. It'll come down to what you want from your bike, however, and I'd recommend the change if your Anthem feels too twitchy at speed, if the trails you're riding are rough and more travel will allow you to go quicker, or if you just want a change. That said, I'd tell you not to put on a longer travel fork if your trails are extremely smooth, or if you race cross-country often and have to face technical climbs while gassed.

More travel isn't always better, but it sure can be. Ask yourself this question: will I have more fun, or go faster, with more travel?
Mike Levy


Giant Anthem 29






Mini Downhill Bike?

Question: Milko3D asks in the All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country forum: I'm looking for a fun mini-DH rig. Something that won't be incredibly boring on the more mild runs, but will also be able to take park runs. I'm looking at RM Slayer, Pivot Firebird (when and alloy comes out), Radon Swoop 170, Nukeproof Mega, Intense Uzzi, or Santa Cruz Nomad 4 would be cool, but these are way too expensive. My dilemma is as much as it is on which bike as it is: should I get a 140/150mm trail ripper and a secondhand DH rig, or should I stick to the mini-DH plan?

I've got a Cube Fritzz 180, changed the Float X to X2 with 3 spacers which made a massive difference, but it's still a bit boring on easier local trails and the suspension is a little mushy, absorbs stuff but can't pop too well. I'm an average rider, I do drops and tables, but don't ride at Mach 5 and don't hit the crazy big features. It's got to be 27.5. I'm based in the Alps, there are bike parks around, but I also like hike-a-bike and riding down some not-too-hardcore Alpine stuff.



bigquotesYou suffer a common dilemma. Many gravity riders are feeling confined to shuttles and up-lifts and are now searching for more versatile mounts. As you point out, there are a number of enduro-specific designs that would handily fit your specifications. Of all your choices, the Pivot Firebird would be my first pick. It was designed as a gravity play bike, not as an enduro racer. It pedals exceptionally well, it's noticeably lighter than anything you'll find in the mini-DH category, and its downhill performance is capable of handling anything you'll find in a bike park. As a "one bike," I spent a good amount of time riding one on some of the tougher backcountry trails in the Pacific Northwest and at home, and it was quite fun, even on the milder sections. Pivot sells them from $5,000 to $10,000 USD.

If you are searching to save money, however, you may be better served to buy a good secondhand DH bike for your park days and ride a trail bike everywhere else. For starters, check out the Giant Glory. It is one of the more playful DH bikes I've ridden and its World Cup results speak to its capability. There are a lot of them in circulation, so you should be able to pick up one for a song on the used market.
RC


2017 Pivot Cycles Firebird
Pivot's Firebird has 170 millimeters of wheel travel, DH numbers, and it pedals like a trail bike




Junior Racing
Question: Pinkbike user @MalleCommencal asked this question in the Downhill and 4X forum: Hi guys, I am wondering about some part of the UCI regulations, I know, pretty boring. But can you tell me if it is mandatory to race two years as a junior, 17 and 18, before moving to Elite, or could you skip one year?

bigquotesAccording to the UCI's Rules and Regulations, riders must compete in their age category. When you buy your UCI license through your cycling federation, the category will be marked on your card and you must race according to your license.

Unless you have already smoked the competition, the bigger question is "why would you want to race elite?" A wise man once told me that you shouldn't try racing in a harder category, or a more competitive race series unless you have won your current one. If you can't win that then there's much less chance of glory in the next one. I didn't listen to him, and I didn't get very far.

Some non-UCI race organizations will allow riders to move up a category if they are competitive. Adrien Dailly did follow the advice of his mentor, Nicolas Vouilloz, to stay a second year in Juniors for the 2016 EWS season after he won his first year in this category. Which paid dividends as he built confidence, skills and matured, taking a consecutive win, then moving up to Elite this year, he challenged Sam Hill to the bitter end, taking the challenges in his stride
Paul Aston






Have some unresolved tech questions? Jump in the Pinkbike Forum and we'll look to answer it for next time.


132 Comments

  • 140 4
 Get the right tool for the job.

Trail bike & cheaper DH bike. You'll enjoy the trails more and you'll enjoy the DH more.
  • 13 1
 Truth
  • 46 1
 Look at you bike budget. By a fancy pedal bike and a second hand big bike. You will ride the pedal bike more but the big bike will be your fave. AM bixe are awesome but there is nothing like smashing the gnar on a big rig.
  • 12 0
 @Gasket-Jeff: and nothing but the truth.
  • 10 1
 this !!... My best purchase to date was a Banshee darkside, built with 26 wheels... Boxxer 2014 R2C2, bombproof spank wheels, magura Mt5 (love it or hate it, but they have been great)... Zee drivetrain... Only thing I ditched the horrible kendas for some magic marys... 3300 usd back in '15... with 27.5 dropouts I have converted it to enduro cheater for some races or as the elusive mini-DH.. you can pedal that bike up, just at 180mm travel you know it is a pig... or you can even throw your trail bike's shock and reduce travel to ~160mm..
  • 5 0
 A good solid DH bike for the parks, mines even singlespeeded. I''ll be more forgiving and less tiring and let you lap day in day out for little cost/repairs/servicing. That'll let you keep a trail bike good for what its meant to do.
  • 4 0
 @OzMike Sigh, I guess two bikes it is then...
There's a Tues and a Summum in my size at an okay price...hmmm
  • 41 1
 Yea buy a tues and a jeffsy for the price of a firebird....
  • 1 0
 What exactly is a cheaper DH bike? You mean a used one?
  • 6 0
 @Gasket-Jeff: also the deals on 26" DH bikes these days are very good. For riding it 5-10x a year its good cheap fun.
  • 6 0
 @twozerosix: Never mind that you can still go fast enough to kill yourself on a 26" bike, there's no reason not to get a used DH bike if you still want one.

My DH rig is based around a 2011 Operator and I'm frankly too busy #stillhavingfunon26 to upgrade.
  • 1 0
 Yep. As long as you are taking a lift up, get a real DH bike. They are made to handle the abuse. If a DH rig seems overkill for your park riding, consider just running not so burly tires - something like Maxxis DD, or Schwalbe's Supergravity tires. The DH rig will roll fast and be more playful.
  • 3 2
 Or the other way lol. If you prefer dh/shuttle more and want to pedal sometimes. I know I would prefer a more expensive dh bike (ergo lighter) and a slightly but only very slightly less expensive trail bike. I like my finer things in life lol.
  • 1 0
 @BDKR: yeah used or a glory
  • 4 0
 @AJ420: disagree...weight savings are always more valuable on your trail/AM bike...

Slightly more expensive DH bike has got to be component driven...if you're doing it for the weight, you're doing it wrong
  • 6 0
 Used Kona Process 167
  • 3 0
 @Milko3D: you could put a dual crown on your cube 180 and voila park bike! then go and buy an aggressive 140-150 mm bike.
  • 2 0
 @nvranka: I just so happen to get both outa my dh. I picked up an Aurum c7.1 for this year and switched brakes to saints. I am all about components and with a higher end bike you get the better comp. which in turn makes for a lighter bike. My "trailbike" build that I'll do next will be gravity driven with the option of up hill. Think spartan but sub out all the comp to shimano and fox. (Will also be really light).
  • 1 0
 @Lagr1980: same here. got mine with 36s and a coil rear set up 26". so fun for the wannabe remy metallier-ing I do haha
  • 1 0
 @Milko3D: You’re based in the alps? You need a DH bike!!

If I lived in mountains with ski lifts I’d probably have an alloy DH bike (commencal furious, Tues AL, used 26er) for the abuse, and a lightish 160-180mm enduro bike (with DH brakes) too (capra, jeffsy, swoop)...why don’t I live in the alps?
  • 2 0
 @Milko3D I went through this last August. I used to think that having one bike to do it all was the way to go. Then my wife got a DH bike and loved it. It really helped her progress and be more aggressive. It also gave my friends ammunition to tease me - a lot! So late one night I ordered a Tues. I had never ridden a DH bike before. I was about 30 seconds into my first lap at a bike park when I realized having a DH bike is awesome. Getting a DH bike also increased the fun on my local trails because I swapped out my long-travel trail bike frame for a shorter travel bike. It's been a year and half and I have zero regrets about going with two bikes. Yeah - it has cost me a bit more money, but it has been worth it.
  • 2 0
 @RichPune: I agree - have tried the "quiver killer" 160mm approach for years, and its just too slow on the trails, and too scary in the park no matter what wheels, tires, shocks or brakes are mounted. Two bikes, minimal overlap in capability is the way to go.
  • 1 0
 I don't know @Milko3D my Rocky mountain altitude c50 does the job really well even the guys at my lbs went to altitude from their slayer of course if you do whistler steep gnarly shit yes dh rigs but only drops and tables a good 7" or even 6" trail bike with a 65° head angle do the job just fine (even maybe better) might put a 170 fork on my altitude and just got a float x2. I only do aggressive trail riding and bike park flow trails with tables and drops.
  • 1 0
 @Milko3D Richie rude ride a 6" bike with 180 fork ibis team on their hd4 and most Rocky mountain on their altitude and they ride so faster and steeper stuff than most people do
  • 1 0
 Thanks a lot people! Really appreciate the input!

@Altron Haha, I thought it's more cost effective and more versatile and so on, but yeah, you make a good point.

@RichPune Sweet, I hope my experience goes the same way!

@ybsurf That also makes a lot of sense, and it's been my logic so far (hence the Fritzz, not the sexiest bike, but it was good price when I got it). How's the durability of the Attitude? Do you do your own maintenance?
  • 1 0
 @Milko3D: I have only 1000km on my altitude other that wheels everything is awesome. Of course ews team have unlimited bikes so they dont care abkit durability but if they can race those stages on 6" im sure mere mortals like us can too ????with the right tires brakes and suspension it's all good.
  • 1 0
 @ybsurf: nothing touches the fun and comfort of a full DH rig with dual crown fork, good shock and DH casing tires.

Yes, pro racers can go faster on bike park trails on an enduro bike but for average riders a DH is faster, safer and more fun. Also it doesn't have to be fixed as often.
  • 1 0
 @gramboh: totally understand and it's all depends how you ride. For me my kind of riding on flow trail 10 feet drop and tables my 6" is enough and fun I don't race technical steep trails. If I was in whistler often I sure will go for a full rig to be safer and more fun for sure. Just don't see the need of a full dh most people I ride with from really good riders to average go to my bike park of 6 and 7" bikes. Its all depend on how you ride them you gotta go slower a some spot for sure but still fun. A 7000$ nice trail bike or 2 3500$ bikes it's always a toss.
  • 1 0
 He's already got a dh bike, the Fritzz. Keep it and get a wicked trail bike. Decrease rebound on the Fritzz to make it pop more.
  • 53 0
 Bikes these days are just so friggen awesome.
  • 16 3
 Thank you, I'd like people to say it more often
  • 9 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Bikes these days are just so friggen awesome.

You're welcome.
  • 3 1
 These days are friggen awesome so just bike.
  • 22 1
 "Pivot's Firebird has 170 millimeters of wheel travel, DH numbers, and it pedals like a trail bike"

When will this nonsense end? Pedals like a trail bike.....right.

Just call a spade a spade...
  • 12 4
 Idk man, the DW link does its thing pretty well.
  • 21 1
 @therealtylerdurden: it could be a hard tail for all I care, the geometry still sinks it.

Look I'm a huge proponent for sacrificing climbing efficiency for having a capable bike on the downs...I do it myself.

Saying a bike with this geo and build pedals like a trail bike is ludicrous

I celebrate how well these bikes pedal for how capable they are on the downs, but they do not pedal like trail bikes and no amount of enve decals and eagles are going to change that.
  • 9 1
 Right on. Good points.
  • 15 0
 @therealtylerdurden: did we just have a civilized back and forth on PB? This may be a first for me.
  • 3 1
 @nvranka: ha! Well.. It ain't over yet!! Beer
  • 4 1
 @therealtylerdurden: you guys are all dummies
  • 4 1
 I liken it to golf (not that I play). You select the right club for the job. Sure you can putt with a driver and vv but it is never going to be as good. If you do end up going the one bike route it is always going to be a conpromise.
  • 6 4
 I don't see why it can't pedal like a trail bike. The only problem I see with pedalling these things is the lack of travel reduction on the fork. My 11 year old Reign with close to 170 rear travel and a heavy Lyrik U-turn handles the ups and downs fine (I'm no spring chicken and I ain't super fit, but 4-6,000 ft rides aren't a problem). Are you saying that a decade later we've gone backwards? Even with crazy light rims? It should be a piece of cake to make the "one bike" nowadays. Are there no current big forks (apart from the Pike, which isn't the chunkiest) that drop down for steep climbing?
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: Fox quit making Talas forks this year, although I see the Talas air spring available in the parts list, so I think theoreticall you could convert a Float to a talas for extra cost.
Other than that, the Pike and Lyric/yari are the only dropper forks left.
I totally agree, I have a dropper on my E29 and it makes a huge difference in feel, makes the bike feel quick and climb much better in fact I leave it in the lower position most of the time, even on milder downhills because I like the quicker steering old school feel and lower BB, and then I raise it to get rowdy.
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: you aren't young and aren't fit but 4-6000 vert rides aren't a problem - am I missing something here?

Maybe your climbs are gradual, but all of our climbs are quite steep and techy...slack geo burlier bikes just aren't great at steep tech climbs. But as I said, I don't mind suffering a bit on the ups, not trying to break any records there.
  • 1 0
 @BenPea: the thing is, trail bikes have also gotten a lot better the last few years. Comparing a 140mm trail bike like the Mach 5.5 with 66.5 head angle, good pedaling platform, sub-1200mm wheelbase to a Firebird with a 170-180mm 36 up front, 65HTA and long wheelbase... the Mach 5.5 is superior on the climbs.

Sure the Firebird will happily get up fire roads, but if you deal with singletrack/tech climbing, it's not fair to say the Firebird is "just like a trail bike"...
  • 1 0
 @preston67: I've never heard good things about Talas and have always steered clear of air forks for religious reasons (I acknowledge that they kick ass nowadays, having spent time on a Yari), but have Talases got better recently in terms of sensitivity?). Just read that the Lyrik can drop 30mm. Might be sufficient... In 115 mode the old U-turn turns my bike into a goat, so the lower the better really. It's usually all up and then all down in this area...
  • 1 0
 @nvranka: gradual in some places, techy in others, some road too (which is how you get to the big numbers). It's very variable. Compared to the dudes who happily do 8-10,000 in a day I don't consider myself super fit!
A very travel adjustable 170 fork (like down to 110-120) would be a great hack for those burly rigs. I surprise the shit out of myself quite frequently on steep tech climbs when the front is lowered. But as you say, anything techy is going to take a bite out of your endurance over the course of a day. I still think that "one bike" is feasible though. Maybe I wouldn't be saying that if I weighed more than the average 15 year old.
  • 1 0
 @gramboh: it's all a compromise eh, that will be the eternal paradigm.
  • 2 0
 @BenPea: Bro I'm with you...if I couldn't afford to also have a DH rig, I'd want at least something with at least 170mm

Where there's a will there's a way, and I'll always take the grind/struggle on the climbs to smash the down with a bigger more capable bike
  • 13 0
 Something to consider: There are aluminum Nomad 4 builds available whereas there are no alloy Firebirds.
  • 10 1
 For inexpensive mini dh: check the rose soul fire! Will be at rampage with Bizet and there are some pretty positive Reviews about it in german, french and italian magazines. There is also a good test Video at 26inch mag+test.
  • 4 0
 I've got one. It's sick
  • 4 0
 also that fluo yellow... Propain spindrift is also a very good deal
  • 11 1
 YT Capra Mine is always surprising me even after a year and a half of trail time, it climbs really well, jumps really well and descends like a DH bike
  • 18 3
 RC is buddies with Pivot. YT rarely gets the props they deserve. Faxolife. We should all be ashamed that you can spend 10k on an offroad bicycle. There are starving motorcyclists out there.
  • 8 1
 I've got a Capra and love it too as its very capable, but nothing compares to 200mm of big bike and 63 degree head angle when riding park, steeps and gnar! I still have to do a ton of maintenance on the big bike and pretty sure I'd have killed Capra if riding it on those trails. My used DH sled cost slightly more than my Capra but I justify it by riding it 10x more often!
Highly recommend 2 bikes; right tool for each job
  • 3 1
 @Laxplaya51: this guy gets it
  • 1 0
 Lots of people vouch for the Capra, gotta try it soon!
  • 1 0
 Should really be "descends like a DH bike with a 2 degree steeper head angle and flimsy tyres". It's an overused expression. If your trail bike descends like your DH bike... well... your DH bike is crap at descending.
  • 1 0
 @Messy: it's not that- you can go just as fast, and still feel the trail and pop off of everything- maybe it's different in UK- most of the Guys I ride with are on DH bikes...... I used to have four bikes now I only have two, Capra and dirt jumper
  • 1 0
 @fattyreryder: Yeah, on mellow trails (which we have plenty of over here) they are probably faster. They pump, jump, and corner just fine, and I can completely understand why people ride them. BUT... on big tracks, when it gets real deep, fast, and choppy... they DO NOT feel as good as a DH bike. If I claimed my DH bike pedalled like a trail bike you'd think I was mental. Well of course it doesn't, it's for a different thing.
  • 2 1
 What annoys me about this community is everyone bases their opinions strictly on their own riding level...sure there are going to be some riders who do not see the benefit of a DH bike because they simply aren't going fast enough where having a slacker/stiffer/burlier bike with extra travel is taken advantage of or even has perceived benefit.

There are also of course trails that do not warrant a DH bike...

However, anyone trying to claim that on a proper DH track, "you can go just as fast"...well that simply isn't true. And don't start giving me examples where you take a better rider, put them on an AM rig, and say they are just as fast as other inferior riders on DH bikes...the words are meaningless.

Modern trail/AM bikes have come a long way; let's just be happy that if you can only afford one bike, you can at least get away with riding your aggressive trail/AM bike on just about anything and still have fun
  • 1 0
 @nvranka: Exactly. I don't think it helps when bike journalists and reviewers start claiming 'pedals like a trail bike, descends like a Dh bike' when trying to get across how capable new Enduro bikes are. They should know better really. For all round riding, they've come a hell of a long way... but they'll never be as focussed as something that's built specifically for that job.
  • 1 0
 @nvranka: I certainly don't want to sound as though I'm dissing other riders skill levels but I certainly agree that A DH bike IS STILL a different animal and still better suited to big gnarly fast dh courses.

Now while I am a proponent of AM/Enduro machines I have both a '14 Canfield Balance and an '11 Kona Operator. The Operator is visibly longer and lower. The Operator is heavier. The Operator is uglier. The Operator feels like your pedaling a been bag through jello compared to the Balance. BUT, once you get that BUFF (big ugly fat f***er) up to speed you remember real quick that even a 4 year old proper DH bike has a lot more potential than the newest AM/Enduro rigs. Longer, lower, slacker, and more capacity to soak up gnar means you've got a bit in reserve when your AM/Enduro rig has hit's ceiling!

Hats off to EWS riders as some of the trails they race are proper! Wouldn't want do a good number of those on my DH bike due to them being pedaly or just plain tight!.
  • 7 0
 I must vote for one bike.

I do have capable trail bike and an DH bike (Capra and Solid Strike, before TuEs).

The Downside: take care of two bikes, have (different) spare parts for both. Also, bring two bikes along if I go on a trip and have mixed emotions regarding the two :-).

I often find myself having more fun on the Capra in the DH park than on my DH rig. Even here in the Swiss Alps there are only few tracks that really call for a DH Bike.
Lenzerheide? Doesn't need a DH Bike, even Verbier doesn't need one. The Capra is more fun in Finale Ligure and even the rocky downhill track in San Remo can be done on a Capra.

On my local "DH-Track", the Yetis SB5.5 (a 29er) feels more smooth over the roots and braking bumps that the Solid Strike.

So, rather buy one capable Bike.
  • 1 0
 I have made my am and dh bike have similar enough parts
Saint brakes. Shimano drive train. Dtswiss hubs. Straight line pedals. Parts is not an issue. Maintenance, well I love wrenching, what else to do for long can winter?
  • 1 0
 That's a frickin' good point @mtb-journal , that was my logic behind the Fritzz, but damn how I miss climbing and carrying the Stmpjumper/Nerve/Dawg!
Also, I might be delusional but I still think I'll have to do less maintenance on the DH rig.

@Gasket-Jeff: Skiing of course!
  • 1 0
 @Milko3D: I was a long believer in the one bike does all and have ridden a transition patrol for the last two seasons in Donwhill and enduro. There is without a doubt a good 2-3 seconds at a dh race lost by me riding the enduro bike compared to friends on big bikes... And thats in ireland...
  • 9 5
 There is a Nomad 4 build that is 3600. I have a Nomad 3 and if the 4 is anything like that then it can handle everything and is so much fun. Commencal Meta AM V4.2 rig is just as capable. I have heard from friends working in a bike shop that they see tons of cracked pivot carbon.
  • 1 0
 agree to half of that
  • 7 1
 people really need to look at the alloy nomads. 3600 is a fair price (especially for a name brand), and that spec is absolutely bombproof (except guides)
  • 1 0
 I've also heard that there were tons of warranty issues with Pivot this year.
  • 2 1
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: 3600US that is. for the cheap build. We're talking over 5k CAD for a bike you will need to upgrade parts on. Keep calling that a fair price and drinking the kool-aid you numb mofos
  • 1 0
 @mollow: It's cheap, but that's relative.

At least they are offering just frames. 2K for an ally frame is still a lot of money, but it's cheaper than I've seen for other things from other brands.

Personally, I prefer to buy used. Three, four, five (or whatever) thousand dollars is a trip or three to Whistler!
  • 1 0
 @BDKR: damn right you are
  • 7 0
 New nomad feels exactly like me old DH bike, bloody awesome thing
  • 1 1
 It could be argued in that case that Bionicon does it better...
  • 8 1
 More Travel = More Betterer
  • 3 0
 Truth
  • 2 2
 Disagree, some bikes don't feel well when upforked
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: That is true. I was just playing about with some awful grammar. Everyone knows that the battle is won or lost at the chain stay length!
  • 3 0
 I'd be a wary of a longer travel fork on the Anthem. I've got a 16 Anthem SX and I spoke to them when I was considering throwing a 130mm Pike on it. They were twicthy as and said they wouldn't warranty a frame with a longer fork. I've had the frame warrantied once for random carbon crack and it was no questions asked so I wouldn't want mess with that.
  • 1 0
 This is a right tool for the job discussion as well. The Anthem is an XC bike, built they way they built it on purpose. If you are looking for longer travel to make it an AM/Trail rig, you may have purchased the wrong bike.

I suppose the question is, what about your Anthem is making you think you need more travel? I'm running my 08 Kona four. 100mm front to back. It gets the job done on local trails just fine (Although it was a bit overtaxed at Galbraith in Bellingham when I went up a month ago! May have been a wheel size thing)
  • 5 0
 Commencal supreme sx - nuff said
  • 1 0
 I just bought one. It comes tomorrow. I'm stoked
  • 2 0
 Imho, the latest Transition Patrol SBG and Kona 153 G2's geo is as close to a dh's without going overboard. Correct me if I'm wrong, they looks easy to size up/down and accept an angleset.
  • 2 1
 For the money you can't go wrong with a Gaint Reign as far as a mini Downhill/enduro bike that pedals ok. They reign 2 is really well priced if you want something very capable at a good price they are super reliable, ride well and easy to get parts for.
  • 2 1
 Don't believe the hype I had a reign sold to me as a mini dh. Traded it for a norco range. And bought a big bike too
  • 3 0
 i have a giant reign 2016, it's no DH bike!
  • 1 0
 @justincs: yeah I never liked my reign. And thought it a joke that it was marketed as a mini dh, or even the category of mini dh. However at my local dh trail network I would say about half the bixe on hill are reigns. Stupid ppl don't know what they are missing
  • 1 0
 A 1980s road bike pedals well and can be ridden down the hill at a bike park, but is not the best choice. Because something can doesn't mean it should.
  • 1 0
 They only thing super reliable about the Reign is how reliably it blows shocks up.
  • 1 0
 I have a 4x a dh and an am. My dh is my fave and my am gets used most. I think about it but cannot part with having three. I swap bixe in each category but always there are three, always am used the most but dh fave and most fun
  • 1 0
 As stated the right bike for the job is just a better practice. The way my FR / DH Bike handles gives me confidence in the rough stuff when riding FR/DH terrain. If I were to run that same terrain on my 160mm trail bike, for one its not as fun, and secondly I am riding less aggressive / confident. I know; 1, its not designed for that terrain, and 2. I have much less travel. For those that ride CX or XC, you did not get rid of those and are riding CX or XC on your Enduro bike!!! There always is the right bike for the job, and sometimes you can get by and make something work. I know its been said many times, "the correct tool for the job" still probably holds true in all types of riding!
  • 1 0
 I ended up buying a Scott Voltage to replace my stolen Turner DHR as my park / dh bike. Once I realized the seat tube angle was pretty much the same my Kona Tanuki. I started to ride trails with it. It climbs pretty well for having 165mm cranks and a 65 degree ht angle. Ive been building it up as an Enduro bike ever since I saw the potential. I don't mind the weight (37lbs)on the climbs. The downhills are always worth it on a big travel mini dh / park bike in the 180mm range. Planning on going to lighter 6" travel bike next.
  • 1 0
 My Rocky mountain c50 I put a x2 shock and planning on putting a 170 fox 36 but even with the 160 that bike handle everything from bike park to restless climbs and trail rides
  • 2 0
 Already had a trail bike,then we got a lift served park to go along with bus shuttles nearby so it seemed logical to buy a d/h bike.The best,funnest thing I could have done.
  • 3 0
 GT Sanction might fit the bill for mini DH. Pretty affordable, and a bunch of top athletes are still racing them
  • 2 0
 Sweet! Got my question featured! Thanks @richardcunningham
Looking forward to some community input now!
  • 1 0
 You could fit an angleset to slacken out the Anthem, maybe go 130mm on the fork if you want more. It will raise the bottom bracket slightly though.
  • 3 0
 na...go 120 but fox 34 and get a shock bushing. The fork will slightly raise your BB and slacken the head angle. The offset bushing will slaken the head angle a bit more and bring your BB back down.
  • 1 0
 Might b able to get offset bushings to fix that tho, and slacken it further.
  • 4 0
 Please excuse my text speak. Bad habits.
  • 2 1
 A bike thats mini dh but still pedallable. Try the Rose Soulfire 3. I've got one. It's sick! 180mm all round but pedals a treat with a 1x11.
  • 3 0
 Id suggest a newer Banshee Rune for a mini DH bike that can be pedaled
  • 10 1
 but its not metric or carbon! Are they even rideable?
  • 4 0
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: but they can be thrown down a rock garden 6 ways from right-side-up and still come out smiling
  • 3 0
 Add a dual crown fork on the new N4!
  • 4 0
 Scott voltage fr?
  • 1 2
 I so wish they hadn't changed to the newer not so adjustable model. With custom shock plates (that could be made at home with a dremel and a piece of aluminum plate, an angleset and offset bushings it could be setup for anywhere between 80-200mm travel with a 63-69° head angle, plus 3 chainstay options from 415-435mm.. Now it's a whopping 2 travel/geo options. :/
  • 4 2
 Nukeproof Mega. Sam Hill rode one to become EWS world champ and 6th at DH World Champs.
  • 2 0
 Do I look like Sam Hill to you? Razz

Yeah, that's also something I was looking at!
  • 1 0
 Agreed. Planning on getting one myself.
  • 2 0
 You live in the Alps! get a DH bike alobgside tour trail bike. I have a Canyon Spectral and a Sender. Great combo!
  • 1 0
 I see what you're saying man Big Grin
  • 2 0
 @Milko3D: Have you tried turning up your low speed compression?
  • 2 0
 @BDKR It was pretty cool when I changed it to be honest, but I can't tell if was just because it was so much better than the X or if it was because it was new. I'll service it and get back to you.

As for the LSC, I had it dialed, but can't tell you the number of clicks, haven't touched it now.
  • 1 0
 @Milko3D: On my cars and bike (not motor bikes) I love more LSC. On cars, more of it can control body roll, brake dive, and squat during acceleration.

On bicycles, it helps control input from body movements. Pedaling is a big one. More LSC up front helps control brake dive there as well. Personally, it's helped me for things like pulling up for doubling over things. I feel a more immediate response from the bike.

As with all things, there is likely an upper limit. With too much you'll likely loose some compliance in the system.
  • 1 0
 Can I use a 26" Manitou Dorado Expert 2015 fork on a Mondraker Summum 27.5" frame? The legs can be moved up and down.
  • 1 0
 Absolutely
  • 2 4
 Regarding Mini DH Bike: Go with the Canyon Strive. It is two bikes in one - truth. CF 8.0 for $5,000 and you have a great climber that can rip down DH. The Shapeshifter makes it happen.
  • 6 0
 I heart gimmicks
  • 1 0
 So now “mini DH” is a proper title?
  • 3 2
 Mini DH = 4X bike
  • 1 0
 Warden or a Delirium
  • 1 0
 uzzi!
  • 1 1
 Up-fork it!
  • 2 0
 Just don't fork it up.
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