Ask Pinkbike: Mixed Drivetrains & Wheel Sizes, 29ers For Older Riders, G2 vs Code Brakes

Oct 15, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  

Here at Pinkbike, we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul-searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand-picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.




SRAM Shifter and Derailleur With Shimano 12-Speed?

Question: @jeffhernandez asks in the Mechanic's Lounge Forum: I have an SB150 that came with a Shimano XT 12 speed drivetrain. I would like to change to SRAM X01 12 speed. If I change my derailleur and shifter only will it work?


bigquotesYes, a SRAM derailleur and shifter will work with your Shimano 12-speed cassette, although neither manufacturer is going to recommend that setup. I'm curious about what you're trying to gain by making that switch – if anything, you'll be losing features, including the ability to adjust your clutch tension, and to drop down two gears with one push of the shifter. I suppose there's a slight weight difference, but personally, that wouldn't be enough to convince me to make the swap you're proposing.

On the topic of drivetrain compatibility, keep in mind that the XT cassette is designed specifically for use with a Shimano Hyperglide+ chain. Other chains will work, but you won't get the same level of shifting performance, including the ability to shift under load. 

Shimano XT 12-speed
You could run a SRAM derailleur with a Shimano 12-speed cassette, but why?




SRAM G2 vs Code Brakes?

Question: @dnyewoods12 asks in the Bikes, Parts & Gear Forum: SRAM G2 or Codes? I'm racing enduro, racing XC, aggressive riding - appreciate any help on making a decision. Thanks.


bigquotesThere's a pretty big difference between enduro and cross-country racing, but when it comes to trying to choose between the SRAM's G2 or Code brakes for aggressive riding, the Codes are my pick, hands down. The G2 brakes work fine on lighter duty trail bikes, but they don't offer the same level of power as the Codes, especially on long, sustained descents. There's a slight weight advantage in favor of the G2's, but I'd happily take a weight penalty for better performance, which is exactly what the Codes deliver. 

SRAM G2 brake review
The G2 brakes are fine on lighter duty trail bikes, but Codes are the way to go when it comes to power.



Switching to 29 at An Older Age?

Question: @dnyewoods12 asks in the Bikes, Parts & Gear Forum: I may be overthinking this, but is it a bad idea to move to a 29'r at say above 50, asking for a friend...? I tried one about 5 years ago but I was going from a 26" wheel and it felt a bit odd so I went with a RM Thunderbolt 27.5 that I really love, except for the suspension which I can bottom and flex the Fox 32 forks too much these days.

So I'm looking at a RM Instinct with 140/140 travel, but am wondering, will I suffer in the getting rolling area on punchy trails? I'm not sure how much more effort it will need to get rolling. I'm an average rider that's been MTB for 30+ years.



bigquotesI don't think you'll have any trouble at all adapting to the slightly bigger wheels. I agree, switching from 26” to 29” wheels can feel odd, but going from 27.5” to 29” is much less disconcerting. Just like with any new bike, it'll likely take you a handful of rides before you feel at home, but there's really not much of a learning curve, no matter how old you are.

If anything, the bigger wheels will help take the edge off some of those chattery sections of trail, saving those old bones on long rides. The amount of effort it takes to get going isn't unreasonable either, and again, you'll be used to it within a few rides. A test ride is always a great idea to help assuage any lingering fears, but I think you're making the right choice. Enjoy the new bike!



Pinkbike's Richard Cunningham showing the young'uns hows it's done on a 29er.




Yeti SB165 With a 29" Front Wheel?


bigquotesI've received a few questions from readers interested in how the new Yeti SB165 rides when it's set up with a 29” wheel and fork, so I thought I'd address that here. I tried out the 'mullet' configuration for a few rides with a 170mm fork up front (compared to the 180mm 27.5” fork the bike is spec'd with), and the results were in line with what I'd expected.

Even with the slightly shorter travel fork the head angle was still slacker, and the bottom bracket was higher than before due to the larger diameter front wheel. Those changes push the bike even further into the strictly gravity-oriented realm, since its handling is quite lazy on flatter trails and at slower speeds. The pedaling position is still comfortable, but it's not a bike I'd want to take on a long ride with lots of ups and downs. The bigger front wheel does bump up the SB165's plowability even further, although that just got me thinking, "What if this bike had two 29" wheels? There's no denying the fact that mixed wheel bikes can make cornering extra fun, since it's easy to really push that smaller back wheel around.

Realistically, the SB150 is a better all-rounder, with a much more balanced feel than a mulleted SB165. It's a fun experiment, but I'd say the SB150 and SB165 both perform better when equipped with the wheel size they were designed around. We had the SB165 on hand during this year's Pinkbike Field Test - keep an eye out for the videos and articles that go deeper into its handling as a 27.5" wheeled bike.


SB165 Mullet
The SB165 with a 170mm fork and 29" wheel.




Have some unresolved tech questions? Jump in the Pinkbike Forum and we'll look to answer it for next time.


189 Comments

  • 339 44
 Why would anybody go from shimano xt to sram???
  • 222 56
 +1 and why would anybody go for SRAM brakes?
  • 74 11
 clunky shifting, no multi shift, poor ergonomics - what’s not to love?
  • 39 7
 I think perhaps, they just prefer the SRAM shifter ergonomics. Someone who has used SRAM shifters for years might just want to keep them. That's the only reason I can think of.
  • 7 7
 @plume: I think you mean wonderful ergonomics...the rest of what you said is tru tho ????
  • 59 7
 @kyytaM: to be fair the codes are amazing brakes. I’ve had mine over a year now with no issues what so ever. I was sick of shimano wandering bite point and leaking pistons. I tried hope v4 which were just not quite powerful enough for my liking. It’s just so nice to not worry about my brakes reliability or power anymore.
  • 7 2
 Easy, cause thats what comes stock on 99% of pre builts
  • 2 0
 Beat me to it. (Though I do prefer Sram/Avid brakes)
  • 6 2
 @mikelee: And what about soundtrack?
(ex Juicy & Elixir user)
  • 18 2
 @kyytaM: My Codes work better than the last few sets of Shimano brakes I've had with their wandering bite point problem that makes them unusable. Sad to read reviewers still finding the latest generation of Shimano brakes still have that design flaw.

My Codes that been great. One service in two years and just loads of trouble free performance.
  • 32 0
 I have XT on one bike and two with GX Eagle. There is nothing amazing about XT vs. Eagle. They both shift well. No hassles with either. I've also had older XX1 and XO1 drivetrains with nothing, but trouble free shifting. I wouldn't hesitate to buy SRAM drivetrain parts.
  • 4 0
 @mikelee: I really never thought I would say this because I’ve had so many terrible experiences with SRAM brakes but I’ve pretty much had the same experience with the new codes vs the hope and Shimano brakes
  • 11 6
 Latest Codes here, they don’t feel to me as good as Saints or XTs but they don’t have a wandering bite point. I recomment to anyone. Unlike Sram drivetrain...
  • 4 0
 I'm going from XT 10 speed to GX 12 on my new frame, but I'm keeping my XT brakes.
  • 8 7
 No clue. I will never buy anything sram ever again. I may consider the AXS reverb dropper though but once fox releases their wireless dropper. That's it. Goodbye Sram FOREVER.
  • 7 6
 Because the world is full of sheeple who believe the BS that is shoveled
  • 7 1
 What about the other way...can I swap to Shimano RD and shifter with my SRAM cassette/hub?
  • 4 0
 @beast-from-the-east: yes, you can
  • 12 0
 @beast-from-the-east: yes, you can. one of the better setups you can run.

As to why the preference to go with SRAM: I just recently got an eagle drivetrain for a cheap enough price that I was willing to go with it over Shimano, and a few things I noticed that seem like wins over Shimano: The derailleur cage is both shorter, and uses thicker plates than Shimano. Considering how easily I, and some of my friends have found it to bend XT deraileur cages, I'd give the nod to SRAM on that particular design. Also, for a 1x drivetrain, straight paralleogram does make more sense. not sure why Shimano hasn't gone the same direction.

That said, these are considerations I'd only make if I had a destroyed drivetrain I needed to replace, or a bike with no drivetrain that I needed to buy. no way am I taking off a working drivetrain to switch to the other brand just for preference. they both work more than good enough for my needs.
  • 2 0
 @beast-from-the-east: Yes! I have this setup with my 11spd. I have XT Shifter, XTR derailleur on a SRAM XD driver using an X01 11spd cassette. MUCH lighter than the Shimano driver and XT cassette.
  • 1 7
flag konadan (Oct 15, 2019 at 8:23) (Below Threshold)
 Rumor has had it for many years that Sram's shifter pull ratio is closer to 1:1 vs Shimano's at close to 1:2, so less cable adjustment is needed as components stretch and compress over time. Subtle "ghost shifting" and whatnot are less prevalent as well. It's just a less sensitive shifter/derailleur dynamic.
Shimano has long been the king of cassette making, with durability and shifting performance above everyone else's offerings.
  • 7 0
 Why go Shimano to SRAM? I personally don't have an issue, but I have heard numerous people who find the SRAM shifting much lighter and crisper (folks I ride with weekly). Again, not an "issue" for me, but I don't disagree with them that the shift lever is smoother and lighter on SRAM vs. my Shimano. There are several in the group who will not use Shimano drivetrains. To each their own I guess.
  • 3 0
 i´ve been riding gx eagle for a few months and i love it! so i wouldn´t wonder why somebody might change the xt´s for an x01 setup.. also, i´ve been riding my guides for about 3 or 4 years with only 2 oil changes.. still work as well as new!
  • 4 0
 @groghunter: Exactly. SRAM and Shimano both work well. It's simply a matter of preference and feel. I have long preferred SRAM over Shimano at all levels, but if scored a bike with a Shimano drivetrain I wouldn't go out of my way to change it until either I had someone to buy right out the gate, and/or had a deal on comparable SRAM bits. Otherwise run whatcha brung and swap it out when you burn it up.
  • 2 0
 @yupstate: I have both XT, SLX 11sp and shimano 10sp in garage. SRAM GX 11 and x01 eagle. The shifter is SO clunky on the xt 11 even with clutch off. It's bad. The 10sp shimano is like pure butter, but I dont it's one that has a clutch. X01 eagle shifter is waaay better than xt 11. Regardless, I'd take the XT/ XTR 12 anyday over everything else. Shifting under load is useful at times for sure.
  • 1 0
 @mikelee: You must have the upgraded digital water cooling system for your pistons. Everyone around here has the lame stop mid lap and empty a water bottle over em so you don't die analogue version.
  • 4 0
 @yupstate: Im lucky enough to have a bike with XX1/Code and XTR 12s and I prefer the Sram. Way more consistent braking, more modulation and I think the shifting on the new XTR feels "too soft".
  • 2 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Agreed. Recently I bought a new yt capra cf 29 wich came with full sram/rockshox everything. I've had shimano drivetrains on 90% of all my bikes. The GX works pretty good, so far. The code brakes are partially a surprise to me. I can't really find a fault with them so far.
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: tbh I’ve never found shimano or sram/avid to be noisy unless they’re wet but even then it’s only a few seconds. I don’t drag my brakes though and this is why brakes howl especially the rear imo. The hope brakes on the other hand had a constant high pitch squeal which did my head in. I’ve had that on several hopes too. No power and noise meant the hopes had to go.
  • 1 0
 @bbachmei: I know I’m a massive shimano fan and prefer the look and feel of saints but I’m done with shimano brakes until they completely change the master cylinder. Love their other stuff though. Bizarre how they can’t or won’t sort the brakes.
  • 1 0
 @MartyFluxMcFly: i used to have that happen to my guides, took em to the bike shop, and fixed them, that issue is long gone, not sure if it´s the same with the codes
  • 3 0
 @kyytaM: I love my SRAM brakes. I can't get a solid bleed out of Shimano brakes, but SRAM it is money every time- plus awesome modulation. I'm a very happy customer.
  • 2 0
 sram drivetrain is OK if it comes with the bike (I'm on sram transmission atm), once is worn out replace with Shimano.
Buying sram aftermarket makes no sense, 'feel' aside is basically paying more for less.
  • 2 2
 @groghunter: the issue with Eagle is they widen your bike by 2 inches in the bottom half of the cassette. If I had a bonus for number of rock stricken Eagle derailleurs I’ve swapped this summer I could probably retire already. I also met my first batch of SX. It’s astounding what SRAM passes off as engineering...
  • 4 2
 @kyytaM: SRAM codes are extremely good brakes. Code R's are comparable to XT 4 pots.
  • 2 0
 @MartyFluxMcFly: are you talking about the sticky master cylinder? If you are that’s long been sorted. I always wait a year before buying any new product like brakes,shocks even frames. It’s always the masses that find the weakness in the first year imo. Strange shimano can’t fix their bite point issue though!
  • 7 0
 I really like the Sram cage lock button. I don't like the adjustable Shimano clutch because sometimes you forget to engage it and its one more setting to be messing with.
  • 4 0
 @acali: switching from sram to shimano a while back, it is one of the things I did miss. That and the solid shifting feel of SRAM. I don't hate the feel of Shimano, but if I have to rank them, SRAM edges shimano out a little on feel, IMO.
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: Shimano 10sp is the exact feel that I want, so much so that I went backwards from 11sp now that Sunrace started making the 10sp 11-46 with the added bonus of better ratios than Shimano 11sp 11-46. The 10sp XT/XTR shifter feel is so smooth, precise, and light. The 11sp XT/XTR was deliberately made to feel 'more positive', but I found that the shifter felt overly mechanical/clunky despite the actual shift quality itself being as smooth and precise as 11sp.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter: huh ironically ive never seen a shimano cage bend but i have seen 3 of srams “rolla-ma-jigs” bust off the back
  • 2 3
 @pargolf8: I have experience with over 25 clutch style Shimano derailleurs. The only failure I have ever had is because of a chain being too short. When the 8"bike took a big hit the suspension was not accounted for and the derailleur was shredded on a brand new setup. As ScramI have seen multiple ones come in the pits and on my buddies bikes dangling by the cable. I have had a few Shimano clutch failures. This could be contributed to over torquing a clutch and I will not blame this on Shimano. Moreso mechanic experimentation. The coolest thing I can say about Scram is I was in a shop in Asheville and their trash can was labeled Scram warranty bin.
  • 2 2
 I have never had a single problem with Scram because I ride Shimano components;-) Shimano Fanboy for life!
  • 2 1
 m.pinkbike.com/photo/17485152
Shimano has always kept all my family's race bikes shifting perfectly. It also fills my belly with cage-free nutrients. When is the last time your component company-provided substance for your belly?
  • 2 0
 Shifter feel. Can't speak to 12S, but 11S requires a lot of effort and shift travel. SRAM, particularly with upshifts, you can snap off three at a time in a blink of an eye. I'm faster with that short lever than Shimano's double-release, and it doesn't wear my thumb out. It's the same with road flat-bar shifters; I'm swapping a 11S 105 setup to X01 because the 105-level shifter is so agricultural that it discourages shifting. The 10S that preceded it was so much better.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter @acali Interesting that you quote strengths in the SRAM derailleur cage and the clutch when it's those two features that are the reason I'm wishing to move away from my GX to XT.

A month or so ago I was putting some power down towards a jump and the GX derailleur exploded. And it was because the small threaded boss on the inner cage plate snapped off on the upper jockey wheel.
I figured this might just be a unique incident and bought another GX derailleur to replace it.
Within days the clutch has become much looser than it should be and I'm dropping chains everywhere, when I wasn't before. If it were adjustable, I could fix this.
I'll be buying a chain guide to see if this can be fixed before moving to an XT mech.
But a week or so ago I was out riding with some buddies and we lost a guy way back. Eventually he carries his bike to where we were waiting and what had happened to his GX derailleur is what had happened to mine; snapped thread boss.
  • 2 0
 @vikb: I see many people complaining about Shimano's wandering bite point and I'd like to share my experience. I've always had shimano brakes (XT, XTR old and new, SAINT) mainly for maintenance related reasons but also for how the lever feels compared to Sram brakes: I never liked how spongy Sram's levers feel. When I started riding, a few years ago, the wandering bite point issue was undeniably there. In hindsight, my guess is that it was mainly due to my poor riding ability that kept me on the brakes far too much. Nowadays, even though I'm no Richie Rude, I ride much faster than I used to and I don't remember feeling the bite point wander in the last year and a half, not even once. Before anyone asks, I have different bikes all equipped with different brakes, all Shimanos.
The question is: couldn't it be that all these issues are the consequence of limited riding skills?
This is not to say that it is the user's fault. Shimano would still be to blame for not selling a reliable product suitable for all riding levels. Still, I personally can't say their products aren't working for me.
  • 1 0
 @ghirox85: no it's not limited riding skills/ limited mech skill. It's too much smoke for no fire to hear about it everywhere, mainly from pretty much every single bike service. It's like Guide G1 - the levers were messed up, thee can be no doubt about it. I have experienced these issues on both brakes myself on numerous bikes. In case of Shimano, it comes mostyl from XT, because the issue concerns their trail lever that XT/ Saint and XTR share and it so happens that per each 1 piece of Saint/XTR, Shimano sells at least 10 XTs. XTR Race, SLX and Deore have similar issue but due to different lever construction it doesn't manifest itself so much
  • 2 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Right. the way shimano does their lever molds, is that when a mold get too old to produce parts to XTR tolerance, they move it down the line to make XT parts, with internals that are intended to take up the slack for the larger tolerance band. The problems with Shimano started when they moved the sleeker lever redesign down to XT with m8000. Before that, the only complaints people made about shimano brakes were about feel or the bite point screw doing nothing.

It seems like when the molds got moved down to m8000, they weren't able to design the internals robust enough to take up the slack.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter: That is very interesting and believable. Is it a fact?

My XT 8000s were terrible for the wandering bite point on bumpy ground, especially when manualling over big rooty sections.

Right now I have Deore 7000 series brakes and they wander but it's not just that. A couple of times after hard landings I have pulled the lever and felt that wheel that actuates the servo wave part inside the lever has actually moved out of the correct place on the lever - almost popping out of the lever body. When the lever is pulled, it makes a horrendous popping sound as the little roller wheel is pushed back into the right place.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: It's well known in the industry as how they managed to price their lower tier brakes so aggressively. it was true up til m8000 for sure, I don't know if has changed since.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter: I also borrowed a bike from a friend in summer 2015. I used it for a month and had not one issue with the XTR9000 brakes.
Shame on you Shimano!
  • 2 0
 @groghunter: I'm in product design for aerospace etc. Its amazing how often issues just come down to not wanting to pay for tighter tolerances and QC....well, and software.
  • 1 0
 The Shimano Rep told me that you can run Sram eagle shifter on shimano 12speed drivetrain. Is anybody have try it?
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: While that is true, as someone who's worked as a machinist, it's also amazing how often I'd work on a part that was more than doubled in cost because it was using tighter than needed tolerances, or even fully cosmetic features that were toleranced like functional features. An example that comes to mind is a .25 radius on a corner of a window, that will be covered when in use: if you default to +-.010, I have to come in with a smaller tool and cut that as a complex milling op, rather than just use a .500 endmill, because tool pressure will ensure I never hit your tolerance repeatably.

FWIW, their strategy worked for Shimano for a long time, they gained significant marketshare with XT brakes being $100 or under. If they hadn't had problems with m8000, only a few people would know they were doing it, and wouldn't care.
  • 1 0
 @rockthat: I would be surprised if that works, it would be the first time a sram shifter shared the same cable pull ratio as a shimano one since about 1998. Shimano basically created SRAM's derailleur division by changing cable pull ratio in order to block SRAM shifters from working on Shimano derailleurs.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter: both 11 and 12 speed shimano and sram are both compatible with each other. I’ve used 11 speed shimano shifter and sram 11 speed rear mech. No issues obviously! The pull ratio is pretty much identical from 11speed up. This is a well known fact.
  • 1 0
 @groghunter: this may have been true back in the day when SRAM rolled out the 1:1 ratio. And while officially it may not 'work', in real life Shimano 12 speed shifters have been shown to 'work well enough' with SRAM 12 speed derailleurs. Similar to how Shimano 10 speed shifters work well enough with Shimano 11 speed rear derailleurs, and even how SRAM 9 speed shifters work well enough with Shimano 10 speed rear derailleurs
  • 1 0
 @ronufoh: @mikelee News to me! I'd guess that as the speeds increased, there was less space for distinction in cable pull, without making ergonomics suck.

@mikelee the ones where one speed of shifter works with another speed of derailleur proves my point, though: those situations only happened because the pull ratios were different.
  • 2 1
 because shimano clutches are utter garbage
  • 1 0
 @groghunter: so i assume the same can be said for zee brakes? I went from 8000’s to zee’s and found the performance difference negligible. Single piston xtr trails are priced well currently. It appears to me the xtr is also a single piece caliper. Im wondering if this will make a performance difference
  • 1 0
 @pargolf8: zee still uses the old master cylinder design from pre-8000 brakes. I've had a pair, and that wasn't my experience: they were so aggressive that I actually found them uncomfortable to use at non-DH speeds. they were a little similar to XTs, but the feel was so sharply on/off that i felt like they were making me slower.
  • 3 0
 @groghunter: brakes only slow you down. That's their primary purpose.
  • 1 0
 Because SRAM has cooler marketing.
  • 1 0
 Several years ago I had the zee levers with old XT callipers (m770) and they worked spot on for years. The problems definitely started with the slimmed down lever first seen on XTR 9000. It was a shame, because that lever looked a lot cooler than the previous generation, and the ispec2 was cleaner and easier to use than the ispecB.
  • 1 1
 @groghunter: I don’t know. It’s an alternative hypothesis to why it is mainly XTs getting the flack. Bike mechanics I spoke to say all Shimano trail levers after 2013-2014 suffer from this issue. That includes Saint and XTR trail. I spoke to a dude who made a Shifura and used XTR Race levers on purpose and now the only fault is that they are only a bit more sensitive to air than original Magura lever and DOT brakes
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: that’s interesting because the saint lever is the older design with the big thick band. Similar to the zee design which seems to have a reputation of being bombproof.
  • 1 1
 @jaame: erm, not sure ehich band you are talking about. Zee is pretty much same lever as Deore/ SLX and pre 2013 XT. I also suspect XT, XTR trail and Saint are exactly same levers just painted differently.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: by band I mean handlebar clamp. Zee and saint share the same design with XT 780, double band bar clamp and I spec B compatible.

New series 7000/8000/9000 have a single thin bar clamp and are I spec 2 compatible.

From what I’m aware, the problems started with the 000-series levers.

Looking at your pic though, the saint one has the double bar clamp and what looks to be the lower profile master cylinder.
  • 1 1
 @jaame: Good eye! I'll ask my angry bike mechanic buddy.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: fluid displacement is different on most of the models you listed (via s-tec information). Most xtr and saint models years have free stroke adjustment which is a fairly big benefit. modern iterations of xt have free stroke as well making xt and xtr lever nearly identical.

this all without considering weight differences or ergonomics.
  • 3 0
 @JmtbM: you must be the first person that has stated that the free stroke adjustment a)actually does something and a distant b)is a big benefit (because it doesn't do anything aside from maybe catching air bubbles during bleeding)
  • 1 0
 @ronufoh: do you like it when you reach for you levers and they hit you grips or figures because the pads have to move a long distance to contact the rotor. I dont. I set my brakes and other people's brakes up properly so that they can utilize free stroke. If you have any air in the system it work work as air rises to the highest point which is the master cylinder.

Now with that said some people move the lever blade out and call it a day but then they are over reaching and dont have a proper figure position on the brake lever and it takes effort to reach the lever.

Free stroke customizes the contact point of the pads relative to the lever position. Most importantly it gives you the ability to move the pads closer to the rotor. This effects contamination, which decreases friction. And it also effects contact point which can decrease or increase leverage, which is optimal at parallel to the bar. Last benefit is that as pads wear you can adjust the contact point. If you like keep your money and have a bike that works exceptionally than it's a good thing to have.

Small details matter. Just because some people cant get it to work doesn't mean it doesn't. Do it right and you will notice a difference. Or you could take you bike to your local bike shop...
  • 1 0
 @JmtbM: With the utmost respect, I think he knows what the free stroke adjuster theoretically does. I believe the point he is making is that Shimano brakes are notorious for the ineffectual free stroke screw. It's common knowledge that the free stroke adjustment screw on Shimano brakes does not make any discernible difference to the free stroke of the brakes. And by common knowledge I don't mean everyone read a review that said it's ineffectual and jumped on the bandwagon. Probably close to 50% of PB readers have owned or currently own Shimano brakes. I mean we have found from personal experience that the screw does nothing! It really doesn't! If your screws work they're the only ones in the world that do!
  • 2 0
 @ronufoh: @JmtbM: @jaame:
People must be doing something wrong
youtu.be/D0uSTtDWbI8
  • 1 0
 @ismasan: it may work this way a week or two after the bleed. Or rather first few bleeds. In fact I did a similar experiment back in 2009 with first generation of Servo Wave XTs. Theory and lab environment vs practice. I am actually going to bleed my XTs soon, I can do a similar video for you.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: all I know is it works for me all the time, maybe it has to do with my older levers being more reliable.
  • 1 0
 @ismasan: I am amazed by that! I can't believe it actually worked on that lever!

I've had XT m770, Zee, and XT m8000, and the free stroke screw on those brakes did not make any difference that I can recall.

None at all! I can't believe what I'm seeing, but believe it I must.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: is not a subtle adjust tho, a couple turns do nothing. My front one has about 5-6mm out.
  • 1 0
 @ismasan: You’ve really opened my eyes and I appreciate it. Thanks!
  • 1 0
 @JmtbM: I totally get what you're saying, and I'd love to have that adjustment (as I did in my ancient Juicy 7's which worked simply and worked noticeably). My point is most people, whether it be riders or experienced shop techs, have not been able to get the freestroke adjuster to work in any meaningful way. I've seen that video and obviously acknowledge that it can work, but from my large sample size locally as well as online anectotal feedback, you can't say that 'some people can't get it to work' when most can't. I'm well read on how it should work theoretically, bled the brakes bottom up and top down with the adjuster screw all the way out, and don't understand why it doesn't make any difference in the freestroke given how it is 'supposed' to work (basically the screw just displaces master cylinder fluid volume to cause earlier pad contact). Once again I'm not alone in this.

So now I adjust my free stroke manually by using different thickness spacers at the caliper to set the pad spacing. I don't have to rely on more expensive levers that have this 'adjustment', and I do get more consistent bleeds at the lever since the freestroke screw can trap some air bubbles internally. And finally, freestroke adjustment should not need to be used to compensate for pad wear, the system is designed to self adjust.
  • 1 0
 @ronufoh: fair enough to everyone above, there are destined to be problems in anything.

also as a side note to whats listed above: water is a key fluid contaminator. water can penetrate and enter most hydraulic hoses... think condensation entering a car. this, in turn, reduces the volume of dot or mineral oil and reduces the boiling point of the fluid. in the case of Shimano the water buns off into air vapor and causes air pockets. This could happen within a handful of rides.

The biggest point I could ever make to anyone is that dot and mineral oil have each their benefits.

In theory, this is Shimano's problem: the problem with mineral oil is it's nonsoluble with water. mineral oil has less gravity so water goes to the lowest point, caliper, which is the hottest. --- it turns to a vapor--- which creates an air void. I have been referred to this causing the wandering breaking point caused by Shimano brakes. a momentary build-up of pressure. then a subsequent release of pressure due to vapor build-up burning off. now I'm not sure about the validity of the matter as per it affecting, wandering brake point, nor have proof that this is the cause but it would seem to be so. Really, you would need a lab to conduct these tests. Shimano has never from my recollection stated these problems, while Sram, hays, and hope have directly pointed towards this issue in the past.

While I prefer Shimano brakes because they are easy to bleed, in my opinion, feel good, and have a higher boiling point. each their own downside as mentioned previously.

I would like to see Shimano use dot in the future but I don't think that's likely.

www.epicbleedsolutions.com/blog/dot-brake-fluid-vs-mineral-oil good condensed read on the matter if you're interested.
  • 1 0
 @JmtbM: absolutely agree with the theory behind everything you've posted there. Wandering bite point is due to air in the system, but the source of the air I guess is what is debatable. If this were a mineral oil issue, we would expect to see wandering bite point issues with other mineral oil brakes -- maybe we do but this becomes a 'Shimano problem' because of the sheer volume of Shimano brakes out there versus other mineral oil brakes (like the 'Reverb problems'). There is also a theory that Shimano's ceramic pistons are partly to blame. Ceramic as a material is more delicate than stainless steel or phenolic so there is thought that the ceramic pistons develop micro cracks which over time pulls air into the system, and leaks mineral oil at the caliper as it gets worse. In real life, I think the truth is likely a combination of these above issues and maybe other ones we have not discussed.

Despite all this I still love my Shimano brakes because for me they have been consistent and easy to maintain and bleed. But I use the older style 700/800/900 levers, and haven't owned any M7000/8000/9000 series products.
  • 1 0
 @ronufoh: never heard of that before. thanks for bringing that up. I always assumed that the ceramic pistons were full proof. exceptions being when they noticeably have a crack across the surface. definitely opens my mind to potential causes of past issues.

cheers,
  • 1 0
 @JmtbM: Air in the system, could that explain the bite point moving out more often than moving in like mine has always done?
  • 1 0
 @jaame: I’d disagree regarding air in the system. If a brake has any air in the system the brake is mushy when pulled. However all the shimano brakes I had issue with the lever feel was rock solid always. This was saints,xt and xtr. I personally believe as the brake heats up the expanding fluid can’t make its way into the master cylinder until The lever is released. Hence the bite point changes the settles until the next long pull. What would cause this I don’t know but I’m very confident it’s nothing to do with air in the system. Also saying it’s the ceramic pistons is also wrong because a new master cylinder will fix the problem for about 6 months. It’s imo that master cylinder design. I’m sure shimano are aware of the issue as it appears they’re getting rid of all the faulty levers by now putting them on all their brakes from slx7000 upwards. I expect a new master cylinder imminently. Shame they mugged off all their customers in the process just to get rid of the thousands of crap levers they had made.
  • 1 0
 @mikelee: the main reason I never changed mine was that the bite point pretty much always moved out. I’ve never had a lever pull into the bar. Very occasionally the bite point would be closer to the bar, but not enough to make me crash. I’m thinking the same as you. If it was air in the line, the bite point would move in, not out, and the lever feel would not stay the same. Almost like the port connecting the reservoir to the master cylinder lets too much fluid in when it gets shaken, or the master cylinder itself moves too far out for a split second. Very strange.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: I know what you're talking about: I don't however 100% know exacly what it is due to as I have seen many different factors cause it.
Past shop managers have had conflicting thoughts. I think they all to a degree are right.

I hope that sharing one of these might help to problem solve the issues you are having. Otherwise, I'm just shooting darts at a wall.

----Heard people say its due to seals and their design
----Heard people say its due to pressure build-up in Shimano mineral oil. like a tea kettle, the pressure in the caliper magnifies through the hose and gets transferred to the lever. Since running BH-90 brake lines I havent experienced this problem in a while or noticed it, were in the past I did. Due to my experience and past customers, I believe this to be the answer but can't confirm.
----I know some high-flow/pressure brakes come from Shimano with low-flow/pressure insert pins. this can cause pressure to release slower from the lever causeing all sorts of weird issues.
----If the lever has a crash it can be caused by the cam mechanism. If the throw is off by a few degrees it can grab sometimes... remember there is always a little play so if its bent a slight bit it could just be occasionally grabbing.
----Could be that they are too well bleed and are overfilled. While at first, they feel good and solid. After a while of riding the heat causes expansion. that causes a kickback at the lever.
----The return spring in the lever could be damaged or broken causing irregularities. This would be caused to lots of heat warping or damaging the spring, or impact to lever.

keep in mind this is without considering tolerance issues. I havent know Shimano to have problems like the rest of the market, but it could just be that you got a product that was machined or manufactured slightly off the norm.

As per Mikelee's conspiracy, there is no evidence I can see that points to Shimano scrapping all slx7000 levers upward because they have problems. I have worked with plenty of customers and people in industry that would say conflicting comments to your statement.

As a note: the system should always be filled with fluid. what brakes do is transfer pressure from the master to the slave. If you're talking about a differential in pressure that would be caused by having the wrong insert pin or have a blockage in the system and haven't refreshed fluid soon enough. The statement below is impossible as pressure is built in the master cylinder and transferred to the slave pistons. Not vise Versa. The lever pushed fluid through the cylinder and pressure is transferred through the hose to the caliper where the piston seals expand and contract.

"as the brake heats up the expanding fluid can’t make its way into the master cylinder until The lever is released. "
  • 2 0
 @JmtbM:

Since reading this and thinking a bit more, i think it could be caused by the cam. Some poor tolerances allowing some movement of the pin that pushes the master from inside the cam, or perhaps the part of the pin that is touching the end of the master cylinder piston moving a tiny bit - just enough to alter the leverage ratio a bit and hence the bite point. I bled mine quite a few times with the proper Shimano tools. Always used the bh90 hoses, and even bought a litre of Shimano brake fluid because i was doing it a lot. I don’t think there was air in the system most of the time. A mechanical answer would be easier for me to get on board with.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: If you look at videos online of people disassembling the lever you will see the spring is an important unit of Shimano lever as well as the cam itself which positions the piston in the lever and pushes it. If you feel up for it, it might be worth your time to do a rebuild on the lever. They are fairly easy, as long as you don't drop or misplace any parts.
  • 1 0
 @JmtbM: My XT ones were sold on my last bike. All I have now are Deore ones which I'm going to sell on this bike in January. I'm not going to be using Shimano brakes again in a hurry. I want to give Codes a go. They seem like the best option at the moment. I thought about Hope but I've tried a few pairs and they don't seem very powerful in realz. Formula I've had before and thought they were unreliable and the lever feel was shit. Magura, too expensive. Not many good options to be honest!
  • 1 0
 @JmtbM: I have never had issues on my or other bikes with any other Shimano brake than m8000. I haven’t ridden Saint or XTRs for any meaningful period of time. But m8000 inconsistent feel is a fact. Funny you mention: “too well bled”, because the way I pretty much solved it having quite well working brake for over 6 months each time. Shitty bleed does the job. I just attached the funnel at the top, huge syringe at the bottom and flush the system bottom up only. Remove syringe at the bottom close bleed port, then some lever pumping then remove the funnel. 80-90% perfect but not 100% perfect for first two rides then 20-90%
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: I have been witness to some shitty shops that use 2 syringes to bleed shimano brakes. This can over fill the system and cause the seals to expand. While some find this rides great, it really isn't a very good procedure for shimano brakes. People should just follow the manual.
  • 89 12
 We have found a new definition for insanity: having a shimano 12 speed drivetrain and wanting to run sram eagle.
  • 17 1
 If that guy want to make a swap, PM me!
  • 5 1
 and here I am regretting every single minute of having a SRAM cassete on my bike...
  • 48 1
 That pic of Cunningham is inspirational.
  • 8 1
 I love when the line can only really be seen by the rider, while any onlookers are scratching their heads wondering what they just watched.
  • 5 1
 RCs the man! He's been there through it all. Not one of these youngsters pushing pretty parts that keep up with the jonses. Nothing but respect for this guy.
  • 1 0
 Where is RC hiding these days? I haven’t seen any articles posted by him lately.
  • 1 0
 @Kootbiker: out riding his bicycle of course
  • 30 6
 Wheel size has nothing to do with age...its a handling thing. I’ve come from BMX and MTB with 26r’s. I like to ride aggressively and I dont like 29’s at all; after giving them a fair shake. Its a personal thing and should be left at that. I agree 29’s have a racing edge...but that’s it.
  • 2 0
 ...and may I take exception to the expression "those old bones" when the question said "above 50"? Christ maybe I'm fooling myself but if you're active at all I wouldn't consider your (or at least my) bones "old" at 50! Smile Anyway I still think the relationship to wheel size is more about your body size - not your age. (I'm somehow reminded of a Prince song here...)
  • 15 0
 If I just read the comments on pinkbike I would never even consider using SRAM. But I have never had a single issue with a Sram drivetrain or brake. I don’t really care if I have a shimano or sram drivetrain. Both do the job well. I definitely prefer sram brakes because I’m used to the feel of them vs shimano.
  • 36 0
 I you just read the comment section on Pink Bike, you would never consider using anything. Every drivetrain, every brake, every dropper post — any part ever reviewed — will have at least a dozen people in the comments talking about how much that product sucks. Yet out on the trail, everyone seems to be moving, shifting and stopping just fine. You’d think we were all out there out of control, leaving a trail of broken parts behind us.
  • 3 6
 *You prefer pulling the lever more before you start to slow down*
  • 2 0
 @TheR: you said it better than I did.
  • 5 0
 @pistol2ne: when there is modulation built in to it, yes.
  • 5 3
 @PtDiddy: I touch my brakes to brake. I'm not going to touch my handle when I'm not needing to slow down (or turn). The code brakes I've ridden (3 different bikes on demos) have all had me pull noticeably further down for bite than any Shimano product I've used. If that's modulation, I don't want it. Why would I want a handle that requires more distance to work?
  • 1 0
 same here, gx eagle with a set of guides, and everything works just fine!
  • 6 0
 @pistol2ne: You Sir are proving my point. People come on here and say a product is useless and/or terrible that thousands of others are successfully using, including professionals. I prefer the SRAM brakes over Shimano but I get that not everyone is like me and might prefer something different. Even though the comments section is filled with statements about Shimano's bite point is always shifting, I know that thousands of people, including professionals, successfully use them every day. Including you.

You don't like the extra pull on a SRAM lever vs Shimano. That's fine, I get it. The pull distance feels fine to me and many others. My point was, people come on here and write off an entire brand or product line that is successfully being used by many others. Like @TheR mentinoed, if you based your purchasing off the comments section, you wouldn't buy anything. Everything has a deal breaker.
  • 2 0
 @pistol2ne: Sounds like you need to spend some time setting up your Code's properly. I ran them from 2012-2018 and the only thing I ever had to do on any of those sets was replace the internals on 1 master cylinder (I've probably had 4 pair of them. I also HATE pulling all the way to the bar, I like my bite point almost instant. It's all in the bleed and how much fluid is in there. Following SRAM's bleed instructions never yielded me the feel I was going for. I just shaved a couple of bleed blocks down narrower and made sure that the pad contact was set correctly. That allowed a bit more fluid in the system and almost instant bite.

I've since switched to Magura MT series and couldn't be happier. Although, the Codes have had the only "functional" pad contact adjustment on their brakes. Both Magura's and Shimano's pad contact adjust ability is worthless.

I can say I've never had luck with Shimano brakes though. The wandering bite point was a no go for me. That being said, never really had an issue with a Shimano or Sram drivetrain, but I prefer Sram.
  • 1 1
 @PtDiddy: You really think that Sam hill is going to ride his favorite brake? Or is he going to ride the one that pays him the most...I never said that SRAM brakes are useless. You think I'd be alive if they didn't work?

All I stated was my personal experience, which I noted wasn't a one off. Read the article about Cody Kelly's brake set up . That dude loves to pull his brake all the way to the bar. Me, not so much.
  • 2 0
 @pistol2ne: you clearly don’t know what modulation is and how it’s used.
  • 2 0
 @mikelee: you're right in the sense that I use my brakes less than you. Wrong in the sense of modulation.
  • 9 1
 I ran Shimano XT 12sp with the new chain on a GX Eagle cassette due to the limited XT/SLX cassette availability in Europe post launch. I have since upgraded to the matching XT cassette and the shifting quality is just on a different level.

I can't tell the difference between 12sp XT and XTR that I run on my other bike, but the "GXT" hybrid is lightyears away, especially when shifting under load.
  • 1 0
 Hi, I'm considering upgrading from XT 11 to XT 12 speed. It already shifts well under load but is the move the new groupset more noticeable still if you've had experience of this?Worth the upgrade? Thanks
  • 3 0
 @JamieMcL: Guess that depends on what cassette you are running.

The gear ratios on the 11-46 are a joke and I never really got on with it. The shifting quality is as expected for Shimano.
In terms of gear ratios, I much preferred to run a SRAM 10-42 with a smaller chainring upfront. Shifting is quality is quite a bit lower, though, and you have to be a bit more careful under load.

The new 10-51 is much better in terms of gear ratios and the shifting quality is up another level compared to M8k. If the time is up on your 11sp XT, I'd def consider the extra expense of upgrading to the 12sp (possibly SLX).
  • 2 0
 @P3N54: I have Eagle X01 full stack and XT 11 speed with SRAM 10-42 (11-46 xt is a cheap joke...no clue why people enjoy that bad cassette and act like its great).

I hate the XT 11 sp shifter (double down is nice). Its so clunky compared to eagle x01 and the clutch isnt nearly as good. (I know, not apples to apples).

How is the XT12 speed shifter? What's the biggest noticeable differences when moving off of the sram stuff to xt12? It seems like Shimanos new drivetrain is the bees knees
  • 2 0
 @Svinyard: I never really used Sram Eagle long-term as I generally prefer the feel and features of the Shimano shifters. The revised 12sp shifter are definitely an upgrade in terms of ergonomics, with rubberised shifter paddles and what not. However, if you prefer the more "positive" feel of Sram shifters, that won't change.

What is the most impressive with the 12sp Shimano is the buttery shifting action, even under full load. On top, the 10-51 is a very refined casette in my opinion and, overall, it looks the part.
  • 1 0
 @P3N54: Thanks man, running the 11-46 XT cassette currently (I don't mind it!) but I've went for the M8100 groupset. Was eyeing it up yesterday as saw it for a good price but took have taken the plunge today. Thanks.

Edit: Now need to find the correct DT Swiss conversion kit!
  • 16 6
 Has to be clickbait Mike & Mike making up dumbass questions to put on. What else could the reason be???
  • 9 4
 Srams upgraded budgeting market
  • 8 0
 @Chilliwacker, well, it worked, didn’t it? And you even took the time to comment...
Although none of the questions are made up - there are plenty more in the Pinkbike forums.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: It always works Mike Smile
  • 9 0
 Hi, can I have a SRAMANO drive train please? certainly sir, the payment for that will be one brain
  • 18 14
 Re brakes question. The guy is choosing between 2 SRAM brakes but surely the advice should be to buy neither. Never had a problem with avid back in the day, but I've had to warranty new SRAM code r straight out the box due to faulty lever internals. Brand new mega sitting in the house for 3 weeks unridden cos of SRAM quality issues. Looking at forums and talking to the owner of the LBS reveals that sram brakes are just junk these days. Strange, as all mags and websites give them good reviews, which must mean that SRAM knowingly send tested and good sets for review but couldn't give a shit what crap they sell to us. At 41 years of age and been riding since I was a nipper I thought I'd seen it all, but when your LBS tell you they hate selling bikes with SRAM brakes cos they know they will have to warranty them at some point it doesn't inspire confidence.
  • 6 2
 Saw as the vague hints about reverb reliability now they’ve launched a new one, when they were well known to run a 30% warranty/failure rate.

In a couple years reviews will acknowledge GX Eagle was rubbish and then suggest the new GXX Eagle is somehow more trustworthy...
  • 2 1
 @ro-bert I think it goes down to the fact that magazines tend to test aftermarket products.
In my humble experience there's a ton of difference between OEM and aftermarket components, when it comes to the major players, maybe 'cause the two version are made in different plants, or with a different quaity control (that last statement is actually unsupported by further reseach).
  • 1 0
 mmm not sure about that, my guides have been working great with minimum service for the last 3 or 4 years
  • 7 0
 Thats just some mechanic at your shop saying that. I have run Codes for many years. For many years World Cup pros were blacking out Codes if they werent sponsored by SRAM. Remember Gwin's double brake failure on some Saints at Worlds one year? He went blacked out codes the next season.
  • 1 0
 @Rubberelli: i´m sorry, but what do you mean by that blacked out thing about the codes?
  • 1 0
 @jorge269: riders not sponsored by SRAM blacking out the markings. It is done with all kinds of parts, even bike frames if the brands dont sponsor the rider.
  • 2 0
 @Rubberelli: that's some mechanic at the shop saying what exactly? Shop owner said approx 40% of SRAM brakes since the changes in 2017 are getting warrantied. Got my brand new SRAM code R back from SRAM today and they have acknowleged that the lever internals were faulty and have replaced the faulty parts. I'm not one of these guys that just says stuff is shit for no reason, or cos I don't like it, but I have, by SRAMs own admission, recently been sold 2 faulty brakes.
  • 1 0
 @ro-bert The lower end Guides were having a massive failure rate when they were released, and SRAM supplied shops with the rebuild kit, but that was before 2017. I haven't read or experienced anything with the Codes though. I did have a six year old Code caliper get a piston stuck once.
  • 5 0
 Much as I don't fancy a fish cake I am hungry to know what a SB140 with a 140mm 29" front instead of the 160mm 27.5 as designed would taste like? That is a recipe that might allow you to have your mullet cake and eat it
  • 4 1
 As I spent this summer getting to nail all but about three of the jumps on A-Line and as I contemplate Dirt Merchant for 2020, at which time I will be 50, I would offer the following: The key consideration in that type of riding at this point in life is stability and consistency. Tricks are rather not important. With this in mind I can say that I just love 29ers. Everybody seems to agree that 29ers are faster but less good if you want to noodle around with filigree ornamentation like a 16th century harpsichord player. If you dial back the extra speed a bit however, the 29ers give you a bigger confidence margin; letting you focus on being in the right position while the speed just carries. I have direct experience of this, having rented multiple 27.5" and 29" DH bikes at Whistler. I could say more about why we invented the piano hammer, and why harpsichords are now rare, but will leave it for the 27.5 enthusiasts to google the baroque repertoire.
  • 4 2
 I'm running an XTR M9100 shifter and derailleur configured for 11 speed with a SRAM XG-1199 11-speed cassette and a KMC X11SL chain. It's the lightest and most crisp 11-speed setup possible. 12-speed is far too heavy and far too pricey imo.
  • 2 0
 Haha maximum troll.
  • 2 0
 Been riding a 29inch wheeled(xc,road, trail) bike since 2014. This year is a first on a 27.5 wheeled Trek! 27.5 definitely accelerates faster, overall bike chassis is more nimble, less rotational weight, more confident in smashing those berms/corners I've ridden times before. Lol pick a wheel size and be a dick about it, is taken literally on PB
  • 2 0
 Can you match a code caliper with a guide lever? Done the same with an slx set, front caliper replaced with a zee one for extra power while the slx is plenty powerful enough on the rear.
  • 3 0
 That's exactly what the Guide RE is. should work fine.
  • 1 0
 Sure you can. They even sell one already like that called the Guide RE.
  • 1 0
 Xt or zee lever with magura mt5 calipers work wonders
  • 4 0
 I just want a Shimano shifter for the double up shift with the cage lock button on the Sram derailleur.
  • 1 0
 Hey Pinkbike, can you clear up how seat tube angle is now calculated? On the traditional diamond frame, it was straight forward - bottom bracket center to top-center of the seat tube. But now the seat tube often intersects the frame in front of the bottom bracket and is kinked back. I've tried to use protractors on photos, and I see a big variety of angles; some measure the wheel-to-wheel horizontal to the seat tube "straight" intersection, BB to seat tube collar, BB to imaginary line from head tube height intersection with seatpost, etc. None of these represent where the seatpost top clamp would be for a tall rider on the frame. Can we get a realistic seat tube angle range from BB to seat post collar and to about 10-inches above, about where the longest legged rider would be comfortable on a particular frame? Your input could help a lot of riders.
  • 1 0
 After 3 failed sram shifters, I decided to try out a box 2 set up. $130 dollar sram shifter vs a casset, derrailuer, and shifter from box for $210. If its anywhere near as good I will keep buying box at that price.
I run hope brakes on all my bikes, they bleed easy and I prefer the feel over sram and shimano.
  • 1 0
 27.5...29 its a personal thing...riding style...fitness... I really have a hard time with people saying you can't whip them around as well...my trails are tight fast and squirrelly and I find no difference between the two...but for straight up and down...speed and momentum are noticeable with the 29..just saying Smile
  • 4 0
 'Mulleted' is my new least favorite word
  • 2 4
 I thought this fad went away a while ago after people tried the 26/24 combo. Am I the only one that thinks a mullet bike not only sounds dumb but also just looks awkward?
  • 1 0
 Sunrace is the perfect cassette if you want to run Shimano SLX without the Microspline freehub body... I heard Shimano will open its stupid patent in January to all hub manufacturers, but still...
  • 3 3
 Lets just all agree, over all winner is Shimano. We wish that shimano's shifting was a bit smoother but the durability makes up for that for me. Now for the no brainer, sram brakes have no comparison to shimano brakes unless your riding code brakes any other your asking for truble. Just go to your local bike shop and ask them how many sram brakes have you guys had to warranty in the last few yrs. Cant be fun ridding and your brakes fail because of a o-ring...
  • 1 0
 Why do bike manufacturers make bikes with the same chainstay size from small to extra large when they're sizing the bike four riders with a difference in height of a foot and a half? #IrritatedtallerRider lol ????
  • 3 0
 Cost
  • 1 0
 @norcobicycles offers different rc lengths as you go up in size. A few others do it also.
  • 2 0
 @kwapik: yeah only a few. And it should be the standard way of building a frame for all sizes
  • 1 0
 @gotflow: I totally agree.
  • 1 0
 I've been told that the chain rollers on the Shimano chain aren't compatible with the SRAM rear deraileurs by my LBS, I was looking to go AXS but use the Shimano cluster and chain, can anyone confirm of deny this please?
  • 2 0
 This is interesting and I don't see how it couldn't be. Chains are about the most reliable standard...pitch and roller/pin diameter. They have to be or the whole SRAM drivetrain would be proprietary (chainring, chain, cassette & mech). If the chain is standard and you can swap chainrings on any drivetrain (because the pitch diameter of the chainring, and by extension, the cassette, is the same as the chain) then the jockey wheels have to conform to the same standard. I think you LBS person was incorrectly phrasing the "SRAMano doesn't recommend using anything but their own stuff together" schtick.
  • 1 0
 @iammarkstewart: SRAM use NW jockey wheels that might not work with the new shimano chain, can just swap them out for standard jockey wheels no prob.
  • 2 0
 @SonofBovril: From what little I've read I still don't see how that can be the issue, especially if the chain dimensions are standard. Maybe it has to do with side plate shape. I'll keep an open mind but remain dubious.
  • 1 0
 Why mix your drivetrain? A 12 spd SLX derailleur is half the price of a SRAM GX unit. And it shifts beautifully with a SRAM shifter and GX cassette. I can't tell the difference.
  • 2 0
 If you can bottom and "flex" a fox 32 27.5......then I'd say you're over 200 pounds and will be in for a rude awakening on a 29er. Age has nothing to do with it.
  • 4 0
 32 is flimsy as fuck lol
  • 1 0
 @Civicowner: Ok...I want you to explain the "flex" you feel? II guarantee it's your wheelset and not your fork. I've heard this argument on fox32 for atleast 6 years now. If your fork flexed you'd feel it and it would scare the shit out of you. There would also be thousands of broken Fox32 forks out there and that's just not true.
  • 1 1
 @mikekazimer: That's not a flex test.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: www.youtube.com/watch?v=_WlRqcAQr2w

Not hyping Lefty's but this is where I'm coming from.
  • 2 0
 Look at the vital bottom out pics, even the Fox 40 flexes under load.
  • 1 0
 @kymtb0420: when you brake the wheel folds underneath you. Not wheels
  • 1 0
 Been using XT brakes and drivetrain. New bike in two weeks with XO1, XX1 and Code RSC. I’ll have at least one season to decide if I like it all but I’m looking forward to finding out, if I’m being honest.
  • 1 0
 That mullet SB165 would be a blast at the bike park!!! Big front wheel to get you up and over roaches and roots, and the smaller wheel would just follow. It would make jumping and cornering a lot better as well.
  • 1 0
 Xt brakes, the non 4 pot version are now pretty shit- mine are just over a year old and less reliable than a hooker on heat... Hello, here we come to Saints for holier than tho stopping power
  • 1 0
 "Pinkbike's Richard Cunningham showing the young'uns hows it's done on a 29er."

Christ. Thats wildly unpleasant. I like to think i can hold my own on a bike, but i wouldn't know where to start there!
  • 3 1
 you can even match shifter and derailleur from SHIMAN/SRAM .. theres some article with guys trying mix xtr/gx
  • 1 0
 Yeah, you've been able to do that for years (11 sp). Guys have tested mixing eagle and shimano for a long time already as well. You arent getting the full goodness of shimanos new train tho. Kind of silly to mix it unless you are stuck with XD driver.
  • 3 0
 Mr 9er switch after 50; maybe you should just go with a longer sock?
  • 3 1
 So 29ers are for the elderly?
  • 2 4
 Dear PB. My bike came with Sram brakes which I absolutely love, I just hate having to change my pants every lap. Do you think I should I should upgrade to jamming a stick in the spokes when it's hot out or is there another option?
  • 4 1
 #anythingbutsram
  • 1 0
 XTR chain, cassette and front ring with AXS shifter and derailleur... shift under power with wireless robot precision!
  • 1 0
 The original AVID CODES were the best.
  • 1 0
 Trade you GX eagle for XT.
  • 1 0
 Can I have stickers?
  • 3 4
 wAnDeRiNg BiTe PoInT!!!!?!?!!
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