Ask Pinkbike - Nevegal Tire Upgrade, Converting a 26-inch Bike to 27.5-inch Wheels, and Choosing the Correct Spring

Nov 18, 2014
by Pinkbike Staff  
Ask Pinkbike Header

Here at Pinkbike we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.



Replacement Tire for Nevegal?

Question: PB user marcus-the-bike-rider-4 asked this question in the Downhill forum: My front tire is starting to wear down on my downhill bike and I'm not sure what to replace it with. Right now I have the stock Kenda Nevegal on the front and a pretty new Minion on the back. Any suggestions on what I should get for a new front tire?

bigquotesMaxxis' Minion tire, the DHF in particular, is a proven winner, one that works well in nearly all conditions, providing excellent grip no matter how nasty the terrain. You mention that you already have a Minion in the back, but don't mention whether it's the DHF or DHR tread pattern. In either case, I'd recommend purchasing a Minion DHF to accompany it as a front tire. It's perfectly fine to run the DHF in both the front and the rear (a setup I prefer due to the slightly faster rolling speed when compared to the DHR), so when that rear tire gets too worn you can rotate the front tire to the back and replace it with another DHF. I think you'll be pleasantly surprised by the improved performance that the DHF provides over the Nevegal. - Mike Kazimer

Maxxis Minion DHF 27.5x2.3 review

There's a reason the Minion remains a favorite of all-mountain and DH riders - predictable traction no matter the conditions.





Convert My 26-inch Bike to 27.5?

Question: UnboundBoarder asks in the All-Mountain and Cross-Country Forum: I'm looking to buy a Knolly Endorphin 2014 XT model off a buddy, which has 26-inch wheels. My questions are: Is it possible to upgrade the wheels to 27.5 inches? Would I have to replace the forks? I'm new to biking, so I hope this makes sense.

bigquotes Some 27.5-inch wheel and tire combinations will fit inside "select" 26-inch forks, and there is a slim chance that the same combinations can be shoe-horned into the Knolly's swingarm. Doing so, however, would not be a good choice for a number of reasons. First, your only positive gain would be a slight decrease in rolling resistance over choppy terrain. Your tire selection would be limited to smaller versions of the brands you prefer or anemic cross-country models. Also, the stock fork will not have offset corrected for the larger hoops. Even if the Knolly did fit a 27.5-inch rear wheel and you purchased a 27.5-inch fork, switching to larger-diameter wheels will raise the bike's bottom bracket to a less-than-optimal height. The 26-inch-wheel Knolly Endorphin is one of the better-handling trailbikes made, so leave it at 26 and enjoy the ride. I'd suggest converting it to tubeless and spending a small sum on a fast-rolling set of large-volume tires - two improvements that will dramatically improve the Knolly's roll-over performance in addition to boosting its handling in every other trail situation. - RC


Knolly Endorphin 26 wheel 2014

The 26-inch-wheel Knolly Endorphin was one of the first mid-travel trailbikes to adopt modern, low-and-slack frame geometry and it remains a favorite among the sport's most capable bike handlers. Amy McDermid photo





Choose the Correct Coil Spring

Question: Pinkbike user Cherouvim asked this question in the Downhill forum: I have a Specialized Demo 8 with Cane Creek Double Barrel coil shock, with a very high-for-my-weight spring rate. The Cane Creek calculator suggests a 275-pound spring. Assuming that the shop only has a 250- and a 300-pound spring, which one should I go for?


bigquotes As you discovered, the majority of coil springs are only available in increments of 50 pounds. You must weigh very little to require such a light spring, but in your case, the stiffer, 300-pound option would be best because, in an ideal world, no preload on the spring is optimal and will give the best performance. The perfect spring would let your rear suspension sag exactly right, with just enough preload to keep it from rattling between the collars. Our resident Demo Tech says more than two full rotations of spring preload is approaching too much. So, it seems like you have two options for your Demo:

Buy the lighter 300-pound spring from your local shop, and it should produce your desired sag measurement. Or, purchase the lighter, 250-pound spring and hope you can preload it to your proper sag setting without causing it to coil-bind.

Coil-bind means that the spring reaches maximum compression and the coils bottom against each other before the shock reaches full travel. This is a big no-no and could result in damage. Too much preload leads to harshness in the ride and allows the shock to bottom out too easily. If the 300 is too stiff and the 250 won't provide enough support, then you will need to source a 275-pound spring.

Springs in 25-pound increments are available from Ti-Springs.com. They only offer titanium springs, which will save some weight, but at a premium expense. Expect to pay around $159 for their basic Ti spring - colors are additional. Remember, when purchasing a spring, you'll need three numbers: the spring rate in pounds-per-inch, followed by the spring's rated compression length in inches. Both are printed on the coils (ie: 300 x 3), and you must also order the inside diameter of the coils to match the new spring with your Cane Creek shock's collars. That info will be provided by the spring maker. - Paul Aston


2014 For Sale 500 x 2.75 Ti Spring 352 grams

The best spring is the one that allows you to achieve your ideal suspension sag value with the least amount of preload. Sometimes that may mean ponying up for titanium.




Have some unresolved tech questions? Jump in the Pinkbike Forum and we'll look to answer it for next time.


219 Comments

  • + 181
 Im I the only one out there who thinks 27.5 wheels are just for people who are novice and think they can buy speed?… (yes shots fired)
  • + 34
 bulls eye
  • + 55
 Correct. As long as there are 26'' bikes available, i'm gonna buy them!
  • + 2
 Probably not but then you'd simply be one of many who are wrong about them.
  • + 124
 i love 27.5 and 29ers. they make my 26ers more affordable to me
  • + 53
 Yeah, totally. I mean look at Jared Graves! What a novice!
  • + 30
 I rode 26", 27.5" and 29" bikes and i felt most comfortable on the 26'' bikes.
  • + 59
 To which one might reply, if as you say that 27.5 is for the "novice" looking for speed that indeed the 27.5 wheel is by your own admission faster. Why then would an "expert" rider deliberatly choose the slower wheel when a faster option is available?
Further to that, why would one limit themselves to a singular option when numerous variables lend themselves to wheel size. What might be best for North Shore type riding might not be as good for eastern B.C. and Western Alberta riding or not as good for East Coast riding. More options, while maybe not the greatest when looking at it from a strictly budgetary point of view, are better for everybody. Speed alone should not be the only variable one measures.
MTB for Lyfe!!
  • + 9
 "MTB for Lyfe!!" - I think we can agree on that Wink
  • + 1
 Sorry for double post. Not intended.
  • + 17
 when it comes to wheel size u have people that just stick with what they know and u have people that are willing to try different things, if for any reason just to see what they are missing. as far as diehards, well, try telling a mustang lover he should give a camaro a try. to each his own thats all
  • + 5
 I thought 29ers were the way to "buy speed"
  • + 76
 remember kids: its 90% rider, 10% bike
  • + 29
 The differences in wheel size alone are finite. Physics will dictate that a 26" is gonna be ever so slightly "quicker" and snappier than its 27.5 counter part. the 27.5 will have slightly less rolling resistance over the ground, but its rolling mass is farther from the axle, which makes its slightly slower in acceleration, yet slightly better able to maintain the momentum. Now for structural characteristics. Your basic 26" wheel is going to be slightly stiffer torsionally, compared to an equivalently built 27.5" wheel. This plays a small part in the way a wheel will track the ground and deflect off terrain.

Ultimately the differences are negligible for most riders. If your racing world cups and looking for 10th or 100ths of a second, then sure its worth running whats right for the course. However a single bad pedal stroke or wrong line can offset the benefits. Im of opinion the rider and quality of the race run will always play a bigger part than wheel size.

A novice shouldnt make wheel size a deciding factor in a bike purchase. a seasoned rider should choose based on what fits the type of riding they do most, if the choice is available for te bike they want. That being said I personally would still look for several other bike features over wheel size.
  • + 3
 In South Africa The central riding population had bought hook line and sinker inti the whole 29er sales pitch and in particular the more Marathon oriented format. Finding proper 26er trail/AM tyre's becomes difficult. Now 650b steps in and all of a sudden it is like shopping for hens teeth! Used the dhf on the front before and really enjoyed the feel of the tyre, going to move it onto the back following this article and see how it performs on the trail bike.
  • + 10
 "It ain't the arrows...it's the indians."
  • + 8
 as Jared Graves said we developed the 26" bike as far as it could go now the 27.5 is better. then apologized that's just the way it is
  • + 3
 Keystonebikes - after riding several bikes of each MTB wheel size I can second you on that and add the following (I'd just mod it for 80/20% to give some room):

In MTB riding is 80% about the rider and 20% about the bike (as long as it offers fundamental performance that'd be 3k bike). Then that bike is 80% the complete package (geo+components) and 20% wheel size.

Look how long it took for 26ers to dial the geometry of a modern DH bike or AM bike, even when in 2003 we had all suspension systems at hand along with disc brakes. Now 29ers exploded around 2009 - it wasn't until 2012 when we got some decent ones like Kona Honzo or Stumpjumper 29 (it includes decent 29" forks snd wheels). Now it's time for 27.5 to get dialled. Let's face it, just because some old bike had 29" wheels it didn't mean the potential of the larger wheel was utilized. Nowhere clise to a monster like Enduro 29. But some people who call themselves "early adopters" rode junk, geo disasters if you like and now claim that the world caught up with them while modern 27.5 has nothing to do with crap they rode before.
  • + 56
 remember kids, choose your wheel size and be a dick about it.
  • + 9
 i was gonna say 80% rider, 10% bike, 10% luck.
  • + 8
 Ahh the good ol wheel size debat. I'm glad there are choices. Different terrain and riding styles are out there and now everyone is happy. Except is everyone happy ? I've ridden a 29er Spec. Enduro a while back as a tester. Took it on my fav trail and went for it. Now yeah it covered the distance quicker, but f*ck was it boring. All the hits I wanted to play on were gone and even though I'm an average rider I didn't have that " I'm a cool rider " feeling. When I got to the steep loose cornering sections, holy hell was that scary. Yup Matt Hunter has a photo of him laying it right over, but if I could do the things Matt Hunter can do.. I'd be getting paid to be a pro. So I can't ride like Matt Hunter. Second, the video the other day from the Dudes of Hazzard feature Joe Barnes * looked awesome, and by awesome I meant the terrain and the trail. What killed it for me though was yup he's an amazing rider but he really looked like he was having to muscle that big wheel around. He did a really good job at it but then again he's pro and I'm an average rider. Don't get my wrong I want to get better and I do push myself. But I was thinking while I was watching that video was... how much cooler would it have looked if he had been on his smaller wheel bike.
So are we all happy. Not the people who really enjoy every other modern piece of gear but would love to have it all connected to some fun 26 inch wheels. We're just out to have fun and not race or get KOM or any of that other fun racing stuff that I do support.
Anyways, just my thought. Eventually yup I'll end up with a 27.5 wheel bike and I'll have to learn to ride all over again. Maybe it'll be fun. Maybe it won't. Thanks.
  • - 2
 I'd say 50% trail 40% rider 10% bike. Luck is a servant of duality therefore may be excluded. You can't really say that something was a good or bad luck to happen until the dust settles.

A thing I can think of that big wheels really improved for everybody was the development of lighter and stiffer rims both in aluminium and in carbon. If you shown the Ryde Trail aluminium rim, 25mm internal width at 405 grams (fk me!) to almost anyone in 2010, you'd get either misbelief or laughter. In 2001 they'd call you fkn stupid right away.
  • + 13
 I listened to a great story from an industry insider on when BMX was making the switch from American Bottom brackets and mid, spanish, and euro bottom brackets were on the table to take over.



There was legitimately an illuminati style meeting where certain manufacturers and retailers wanted to control the market, and it had nothing to do with which bottom bracket was better, but how these companies could make the most money, forcing people to switch over, making frames/cranks/bottom brackets in compatible and general screwing over of the bikers.
It was an incredible story and I think the same thing is happening with the 27.5” wheel. I don’t believe the marketing BS machine for a second. The 27.5” may have benefits over a 26” wheel, but the benefits are completely coincidental. The birth of the 27.5” wheel was completely a profit driven motive by the bicycle “illuminati” (if you want to use that term).


I
haven’t seen any sales data but if the introduction of the 27.5” saw a big jump in sales and renewed interest in the cycling world, I would expect 27.5” to be dead soon and some new “innovation” to come out shortly.
  • + 12
 in racing, anyone will tell you, luck is an extremely important factor. id rather have luck than 27.5" wheels
  • + 1
 laynehip i remember saying the same thing about 1 1/8" threadless when it came out. some companies were doing 1" threadless and other ones were doing 1 1/8" threaded until the dust settled and went the way it is now. same with the bb deal. we had to use euro style on aluminum bmx because it was risky to press into aluminum like a pro cup. the other two u are correct though. im pretty sure in 5 years or so the dust will settle again and i think at least one wheel size will end up dead.
  • - 6
flag WAKIdesigns (Nov 18, 2014 at 12:54) (Below Threshold)
 You can buy any wheel and You can't buy luck... So factor it out. Aaand I will put my balls on the stomp to be chopped off, to bet that if someone made a research, it would come out, that the better the rider the less he counts on luck.

Laneship - there is no conspiracy here. Conspiracy theory is most often used as a mean of defence against critical thinking. A cheap way to shut someone up. It is perfectly logical: to keep sales going in competitive environment you must keep on introducing "new stuff". Otherwise people stop buying, or buy much less - it is obvious. Now as a bike company owner that actually designs and makes frames, then puts sht on them, in order to change wheel size on your bikes you MUST make a lot of areangements with fork, rim and tyre manufacturers. Whenever I hear "conspiracy" word a red lamp lights up in my brain: "Achtung! moron in denial!"
  • + 11
 I find it funny that people are saying having more choices are better with 26, 27.5, and 29 in wheels. Reality is, all companies just make 27.5 and 29er now, and 26 in wheeled bicycles are not being made. This does not equate to more choices.
  • + 0
 I think you are incorrect in your assumption. I have ridden all three wheel sizes on the same trails. Not a huge fan of 29er. But I like 27.5. It seems to handle just as well as a 26 and is just as fun to ride. But it gets up and over stuff easier. I'll take just as fun to ride and less tiring together any day of the week! But, I must be a novice so perhaps my opinion carries no weight
  • + 4
 26" will never die. they will always make them and 1" threaded steerer tubes. at least at wal mart. waki did u ever race before? id rather be lucky than good any day. you are right, u cant buy luck and that is why it will always be a factor.
  • + 2
 I absolutely love 26ers. But they are hard for me to ride as a trail bike, being 6'2" 29ers feel much better with an XL frame. But I'll never go to anything bigger than a 26 for a downhill bike.
  • - 3
 sdiz - what 29er? What 27.5? I assure you that if you take the masterpiece of mediocrity like Canon Nerve AM 26, then the Enduro29 will feel like a BMX to you. I rode Jekyll 275 with Pike Hans Dampf and it felt like a cow. Few days later I rode Liteville 401 275 with Pike and MMary and it was very nimble. Depends what you like, but also how they make the whole bike. For instance, with introduction of carbon, mixing alu and CF on various components will feel awkward. If you buy super stiff wheels to super stiff frame but run a lightweight flexy fork, it's going to feel weird. the effect of flexy fork will be magnified, you will feel like buying longer stem and wider bars. Ridden staticaly (when you don't accelerate and pump aggressively) a bike with light aluminium wheels will FEEL faster than same setup with carbon wheels (as long as you haven't bought ENVE rims and you have a huge boost of post purchase rationalization driven by mix of guilt and uncertainty anxiety). There's much more to bike than freaking wheel diameter. As soon as most 275ers will get dialed, majority of people won't even look back at 26" wheels. the very fact that Spec is keeping "old" front triangles shows how little difference there is. 26ers will come back though in smaller scale, marketed as "playful" wheels allowing you to squeze every juice from your trail, for those who can't leave a single stone alone without jumping from it. They just need to give it some time, like s bloke who's riding FS super bikes and starts to look at hardtail with melancholia.
  • + 8
 i wonder how much 27.5 is placebo effect and how much is real performance gain. on paper there isnt a big difference. i bet a lot of people would be fooled into riding better and faster if you told them the unmarked 26er they are riding is a 27.5. that being said, confidence boost from "better" equipment is a factor as well, but that goes back to 90% rider, 10% bike. i know i ride better when i have confidence in my equipment and that alone can be a value in and of itself. i know alot of people that jumped on the first crap 29ers and said "its still pretty nimble and can roll over anything" and then when 650b showed up at the party the same people were like " my 29er is too big and cant turn" rose tinted goggles folks
  • - 4
flag dualsuspensiondave (Nov 18, 2014 at 13:49) (Below Threshold)
 @keystonebikes - There is no such thing as luck. Yes, I'm a racer. Sometimes things don't go as planned, however it has nothing to do with luck. There is karma, however luck is a figment of one's imagination.

On 26" vs. 27.5" vs. 29"... I was able to lose 15 seconds on a 2:30 trail going from a 26" to 29". Then was able to lose 13 seconds going from the 29" to 27.5". So 27.5" bike was faster than the other 2. The 29" took the most muscle to ride, the 27.5" bike was the most fun to ride in all situations.

@cthorpe - I agree with your statements for the most part, however a wheel size can make a lot more of a difference than a tenth of a second. I did my own experiment. 29" and 26" were the same bike with different wheel sizes. The 27.5" was a different bike in the same category (maybe even a bit more beefier). The trail was a flow trail with a substantial amount of pedaling.
  • + 3
 im with you on them being faster, i just wonder how much of it is mindset. surely u went to those trails on your new 29er/27.5er with the mindset that they will do certain things better and u probably pushed harder where u expected them to shine. im not saying its all in your head, but i believe confidence alone can be a substantial part of a better performance. and back to luck, i bet in a hundred stages i might be able to beat graves at least once maybe twice. all he has to do is have some bad luck when i have good luck in which case that would definately be the deciding factor. we all call it different things but it is still there.
  • + 1
 What is wrong with me!!?? I ride an OLD 01 enduro (yes I was cool even back then!) And have no desire to switch wheel sizero but also nothing keeping me from it. Face it floks, the sizes are here to stay so fine a " BIKE" you enjoy and slam all the opinions up their arses!
  • + 2
 I still mourn the death of the 24" rear wheel.
I like the idea of a 26" rear and 27.5" front. No popular company has the balls to try it though.
  • + 2
 I actually went in with the mindset that the 26" would be faster than the 29" (as I was once a 26" fanboy), then I was sure that the 29" would be faster than 27.5" (and that wasn't true either). The real truth is, this new crop of trail bikes are more fun and faster than bikes in the past. It doesn't mean that people should sell their old bikes to buy new. It just makes buying a new bike that much more worth it.
  • + 14
 24" is faster, it's proven.
  • + 2
 my experience went the other way with the new wheel sizes . BUT i am only 5'7" and have very deep roots in BMX racing and dirt jumping. i had difficulty "feeling" right on them. and i dont see me having more fun on a new bike. thats kinda bordering on materializm imo.
  • + 12
 Oh good. Another lengthy fucking wheel debate.
  • + 2
 I came from BMX and moto. Definitely not materialism if you are in the market for a new bike. I know people that definitely buy whatever is new just to say they have it though. You have to get used to each bike independently for a while before you will be comfortable on one enough to appreciate the different characteristics and gain that confidence that you spoke of. Until you are confident on each bike, then you'll never have a fair comparison.
  • + 4
 @waki. I have ridden a giant trance in 26, 27.5, and 29. All three had close, but not exact component specs. Same manufacturer and same suspension linkage. I have also ridden a stumpy fsr 29 and 26. I'm not trying to compare aluminum rims to carbon rims or any other jargon. I'm simply stating that my experience was more enjoyable on the 27.5 on the same trails. I also did some riding in Portland Maine on a 27.5 on some very rooty, rocky, slow tech xc riding. I am very happy I had that wheel size. I'm not trying to be a prick or anything, just saying how it went for me
  • + 2
 that is a whole other debate altogether lol. if i went from bmx to 29er because "that was the only option" i would probably have adapted, but i wouldnt jump them or do half the shit i do like on a 26er. 26 is more fun for me and my next new frame will be a 26" someone is gonna make a 28er. i can feel it
  • - 1
 I love 26ers. If i could only have one wheel diameter, that's it. But as a long time critic of them, I've com r o like 29ers for xc racing, as far a d 27.5, simply h wors y of both worlds
  • + 2
 these debates involve exactly two distinct type of riders to make a mockery of the whole thing. the ones that have spent a ton of $ on new shit and feel compelled to justify their purchases, and the ones that cant afford any of the new good stuff so they complain about the direction the sport is going. dont hate it, just some humor. i am of the latter group. haha
  • - 4
flag a2lowvw (Nov 18, 2014 at 14:58) (Below Threshold)
 i am waiting for the shift to 650b on dirt jump bikes, just then might I jump on the bandwagon.
  • + 5
 @a2lowvw On a dirt jumper?? Why the f*ck would you want bigger wheels on one of those, they're meant to be light, small and flickable. 650b would give you literally 0 benefit on a dirt jumper
  • + 1
 Godwins law pleaSS
  • + 2
 maybe the jumps are really bumpy and rough. lol i said the same thing about 26 and 24" dj. i just stay on my bmx. way more durable and flickable. and cheaper to repair.
  • + 5
 There are so many new 650b's out there, ride your 26" while you can folks. Key word, ride. Go ride you f*cks
  • + 3
 This has been debated hundreds of times on here, why do you care so much about what other people ride? Ride your own damn bike, love it, and f*ck what other people ride
  • + 2
 i dont know about everyone elese around here but benchracing is one of my favorite things to do if i cant go racing. thats why i love this comment section!
  • + 1
 If a wheel is less big, it goes fastest. That s why I only ride bmx on MTB trails now
  • + 2
 There's also the much larger REAL world category of those who spent money because they could afford to do so and see no need to justify it to a small percentage of complainers on a 'net forum.
  • + 3
 little wheel-jump good. big wheel-roll good. 27.5 wheel-all good
  • + 0
 I've noticed a big (relatively speaking) difference with mine especially over the techy/rocky sections (a la Moab). For $450 for the barely used wheel set and one new high roller II tire, it was definitely worth the upgrade. I haven't noticed any big issues in handling although it took a little bit of getting used it.
  • + 2
 Oh Deeeight on a high horse again, watch ze Messerschmitts up there Napoleon
  • + 1
 So true.
  • + 1
 Perfect comment. Bang on.
  • + 0
 I would prefer the new 559 wheel size myself, very poppy and fun
  • + 4
 The newer bikes aren't better because they have 27.5 wheels, they're better because frames are lighter & stiffer, suspension technology has improved, and the lower/slacker geometries work better on fast and technical trails. And Jared Graves, as fast as he is, is paid by Yeti, what do you think he's gonna say?
  • + 2
 I'll stick with 26" but I am liking the 27.5 offerings out there. Are 29ers on the way out? It's been ages since I've read a 29er bike review on pink bike.
  • + 2
 I have a 26" dh bike and 650b nomad... im not a novice rider and I love 650B for enduro! not sure about dh...never tried it before
  • + 1
 pick a wheel size, and be a dick about it. sorry, couldnt resist.
  • + 1
 @shredstatus Dirt jump, jump on the bandwagon. poor joke I guess.
  • + 3
 I love my 26 as well as my 27.5 Smile
  • + 0
 Pareto principle?
  • + 1
 ^ How?
  • + 0
 Can we get back to riding bikes please? Who cares what wheel size you run, if you're having a good time and enjoy the bike you ride then who gives a poop what size wheels you ride.

Getting real tired of this "wheelsize, style-of-bike, pricepoint" elitism in cycling real quick.

Shut up and ride.
  • + 2
 why would anyone fit a 27.5 wheel onto a 26 frame? why?? why???
  • + 3
 I would rather fit 26" wheels into 27.5" frame. Add fleshy tires with high knobs and get still a lot of clearance. In addition, bottom bracket gets lower, so you get better stability. For crank-rocks issues use shorter cranks. Voila!
  • + 1
 Curse my metal fingers, their to slow. In reference to WAKI's original rebuttal with the 80/20 ratio.
  • - 2
 @lurch-ECD... because they can? Because it'll make their bike ride better? Because it'll save them money while they try for themselves whether 650B is the way they should go. If not for the hundreds of us early adopters who did conversions, which led to thousands including many professional mtb racers and team managers testing and then winning on them, we wouldn't be where we are today. But there are still hundreds of thousands of 26er bike owners out there who own perfectly usable frame models that have the clearance to be converted, and tens of thousands of them also already own a fork that can be used also. So all it takes at that point to convert is a wheelset and tires. I have three 650B bikes right now, two are 26er XC full suspension conversions and one is an actual production 650B frame (Haro Beasley, the first production brand offering in fact... Haro incidently was one of the first brands after Gary Fisher to offer 29ers as well). I have another five 26er frames and six 26er forks unbuilt that'll fit 650Bs, and a whole extra 650B wheelset with tires mounted for quick clearance-fit checking. Also my next wheelset is going to be 650B (Woven Precision Carbon rims and Woven hubs, I just need to get around to building them as I already have all the parts) so I'll then have two extra 650B wheelsets. I am selling off most all of my 26er stuff now because I just don't get as much enjoyment out of riding that wheelsize anymore.
  • + 2
 @gr8day4ridin

You've hit on a reality that some refuse to consider, I'm six four and yeah when push comes to shove a 29er just feels less like a bmx with a broom in the seattube. Which is obviously handy. Having yo ass in the air is all well and good.. on a timetrial bike. I also get the impression that, whilst it's not the rule, there seems like a tendency for bigger and longer limbed riders to be more likely to get on with the increased gyroscopics of a wagon wheel.
  • + 2
 Trying to convert your 26" bike to 27.5 is pretty silly, sorry. Instead of wasting your time doing that, why don't try to make the geometry match current with angleset's or a longer fork? Get yourself a lighter set of wheels too. The results will likely be way better than putting 27.5 wheels on a 26.
  • + 3
 i don't think anybody is putting 27.5 wheels on their 26 frame cos they want to know what a longer fork feels like. they want to know what 27.5 wheels feel like.
  • + 5
 Yes deeeight, the trouble is you are comparing apples to oranges. You ride some piece of junk which to a modern 26" bike just as 2003 Big Hit is to 2014 V10c. You are raving about how you rode 650Bs, they were so awesome, huh world finaly caught up with you aye? Thank you for mentioning Haro Beasley - fantastic geometry ahead of it's time! Even in 2010 it had 70deg head angle, 23,4" effective top tube for 18" frame at 72.5 seat angle - whoooaa! 130mm stem is a must! To top that this piece of crap had 314mm BB height with rigid fork(!) so it didn't even use the large wheel advantage of BB drop. Or maybe you want to mention their Sonix? Go ahead compare it to 06 Nomad or SX Trail. So apart from shtty geometries, in those good old times ahead of their times there weren't even tyres for 650B so while 26" bikes rode Highrollers, Minions DHF or Nobby Nics or Mountain Kings the best 650B could get was Pacenti Neo Moto which was may be good on dusty trails around Kirks home, but sucks in mixed/wet gloopy conditions like large parts of Europe, Oregon or Vancouver. ah yes there were some Kendas... fantastic tyres, really, each one of their tyres is a gem - Excavator in particular. So your 650Bers have nothign to do with modern ones which take heritage from 26ers and 29ers. Now I don't even want to mention the junk you sell as 26", which is light years apart from a modern bike with 26" wheels. Old 29ers hahaha, I owned 2010 Niner EMD9 - it was crap, it can't compare to Kona Honzo or latest Niners, and that is barely 4 years back.

@SlowdownU - I agree converting 26" to 27.5" is laughable. Go visit some forums or blogs of folks doing it and things get rather clear. My favorite of their arguments is that apparently some bikes are too low and this only helps to stop pedal strikes. Pedal timing is too much to ask (unless you crank a 22t granny...). Fk stability, fk railing corners, I strike pedals and it scratches them.
  • + 1
 Again Waki you're showing your trolling moronic behavior? You just never learn do you? Except for my first good mountain bike which I keep for nostalagia, and one titanium hardtail I've been procrastinating putting back together for 4 years, I have no bikes older than 2009 in my personal fleet. Sure you can recite the stock geometry from the Haro catalog although not the correct size for my own, but whooopy doo. Its perfectly right on the money for an XC trail hardtail, especially having replaced the rigid fork with a 125mm travel suspension fork. As to the tires... the Neo Moto is the same basic tread as the Panaracer Rampage, and they grip well and roll well and I really don't care what they do in Europe, they work great where I am in Canada. My full suspension 650B rolls currently on Schwalbe Racing Ralphs but when those wear out I'll be replacing them with Rocket Rons as are on my GF's 650B Full suspension. But sure, keep whining about what I ride... at least I do ride... not posing and pretending to ride like yourself.
  • + 3
 I love it how you live in denial on your high horse... you accuse me of your own treats, you never learn do you? Check out Shadow archetype, I am doing Shadow work lately... does wonders. Thanks to that I don't despise you anymore, we all do what we do in order to be accepted, ultimately loved. How does that feel when you call me a moron? when you say I ride little or I am a troll? How true is that if you try to feel it in your gut? it doesn't really stick to me isn't it? Because you talk about yourself. Now your girlfriend is obviously not a girl so stop calling her that!
  • + 2
 this is good. real good.
  • + 0
 My 650b roles better. It's more fun to jump because I don't have to pedal. My bike with 650b also happens to have modern geometry which makes it superior to a lot of older 26 inch bikes
  • + 4
 @kleinblake I think the fact that its more fun to jump has all to do with the better geometry and not the wheels…
  • + 2
 ok to everyone out there that thinks it might be stupid to try 27.5 on a 26 frame: maybe for us its like building a clunker or doing some stupid singlespeed DH bike. or put giant 37" tires on a F250. its just good ol' stupid fun. why the hell not? i love tinkering with bikes almost as much as i like riding them. one time, i made new shock mounts for a GT i drive 4 so i could mount an 8.5" coil shock. it had 7" of travel, but it was the sketchiest bike i have ever ridden. so what? it was still fun to build it and try out your own ideas. some of us live by the "built not bought" mantra.
  • + 2
 Keystonebikes - you are a genius!!! Putting 650b wheels on 26" bike is analogical to the trend from 10 years ago when people were putting longer shocks on frames to get more travel! That's an argument! Yea I admit some may do it for fun, you speak words of wisdim here. But then you must admit that a lot of people do it because they think they are going to be faster than people that don't do it, to feel better about themselves. At least this is ghe vibe I get from many forum discussions. You know, when someone does it for the fun of it, he doesn't use words: "it makes perfect sense "and then pretends to be a scientist when talking roll over velocities, angles and sht.

Let the world burn!!!
  • + 3
 thank you waki. all this is for fun right? just do what u love. if it is building bikes or waiting for the shop to fix your flat, make sure u have fun
  • + 1
 @bikerguy222 its definitely the wheels. I have faster, longer jumps and there's a noticeable difference in the rolling speed
  • + 2
 My dashboard is exploding...
  • + 1
 Going biger might be better for those who are taller, but you must choose a bike that fits you, 26 is much better of a choice for my licking, but i would go with a 27.5 or 29er for commuting to work.
  • + 24
 Wheels are for novice riders, so overrated, personally i prefer to levitate and float around
  • + 2
 what levitation do you use? I know the new KS LEVitron has 3 settings Sporty, Meh and Holy Rollers
  • + 9
 Stendec Suspension also offers springs in 25 lb increments. I have had both the Stendec and Ti-Springs offerings...I would buy the Stendec spring again when comparing the two. The Ti-Spring.com spring was really heavy for a Ti Spring in my opinion, not much saved over steel. Just my two cents.
  • + 4
 I got Sendec too Wink x5 bett than any Ti i have (fox,nukeproof ) and the price is far better and the weight Wink
  • + 1
 Do you know how much does the stendec weight?
I'm really interested in their springs, but I don't know if there is a real gain?
  • + 1
 anyone know what happened to k9 industries? I have a ti-spring made by them and can't find their website anymore, which sucks because I wanted to get their angle reducer cups
  • + 2
 thanks for the link, my buddy just installed his -2 works headcups and I forgot about that when I was posting. another thing I forgot is that K9 also had springs in 25lb increments and they were made by eibach. I don't have a steel spring to compare the weight against though so I dunno how much lighter it is.
  • - 1
 I have a 27.5 "Enduro bike" and I love it and I also have 26 inch bikes that I love to so I really think that that each wheel size is good for a different thing.
  • + 1
 Derp.
  • + 9
 I love my nevegals but when I did the swap to minions, I felt so much better on the bike so I personally wont go back to them, sorry kenda
  • + 2
 Nevagal is a crappy front tire in NorCal.. way too drifty.. DHFs hook up! Never looked back. The intermediate knobs on the nevagal prevent the outside knobs from being able to get good purchase..
  • + 1
 i guess it all depends on terrain, here in the northeast ill take a nevagal over a DHF anyday. i run nevagals on my all mtn bike and a DHF on my DH bike, the DHF washes out way too much, i should also mention im about 205 pounds. but to me the nevagal is a way more predictable tire. HOWEVER the high rollers are the clear winner in my book over both offerings.
  • + 3
 I really like the minion (or Specialized's clone the butcher) on my big bike. Has anybody found a tire that feels the same but is intended for less aggressive terrain? Ardent maybe? Nobby Nic? Damn tires are too expensive to try all of them.
  • + 0
 Is there a place where any Kenda works?

Trasher - Butcher in 2.3 is a minime version of Minion DHF. I love both butcher works better for trail riding. Ardent is a trail tyre, too small side knobbs for my likes and skills as for the rear. Nobby Nic is a Euro tyre for slower trail/aggro XC. Can be used on rear for something faster.
  • + 5
 "Continental - Kaiser" they say it's the new Minion never tried it but my friends are obsessed with it Wink
  • + 4
 We always joke that you put the nevegals back on when you're ready to sell the bike.
  • + 4
 second trip I took to Vancouver, Canada I had a brand new bike with stock Nevegal tires.

Canadian buddies took one look at my bike "Slippery death tires?" and gave me some used High Rollers, probably saved my life on the North Shore trails!
  • + 1
 Been on the stock 2.35 nevegal DTCs for a while now. Great all around tires except that they don't play well when cornering on loose over hard trails (kitty litter berms, sand, gravel), which is, in my opinion, where it matters the most. Great durability though.

I find the kaisers insane as a front DH tire, not so much as a rear tire as they desintegrated faster than the speed of light, which is a first for me. Currently waiting to find someone who stocks the foldable version to get one up front on my AM bike. Considering the butchers too, as they are probably half the price and I liked the ones I tried recently.
  • + 3
 I haven't had the best luck with the DHF; without intermediary lugs i always had the front wash out on me. The trails in Utah get dusty in the summer, and unless it was a smooth, flat corner I couldn't usually lean my bike over enough to have the side lugs engage. Also the middle lugs, with that trench down the middle sure wear out quick.
  • + 2
 @hamncheez I've had a similar experience with the DHF. I found the grip really sketchy on slippery trails when you transition from the middle to the side lugs. The kaisers have that gap too and had me worried at first but I didn't have that problem.

With so many people in love with them you feel it has to be you and sometimes I want to give them a go again just for the sake of it but I can't say I liked my experience with the DHF.
  • + 7
 As an alternative to the Minion DHF also have a look at the Specialized Butchers. They are very similar to the DHF except the a bit softer (especially on the side knobs) which might be better if you ride more in wetter conditions compared to hard pack.
  • + 3
 They are less expensive also.
  • + 1
 But the sticky verisons wear faster than the DHF so they end up costing about the same. Consider the Conti Trail King Protection as they grip well, wear well and roll pretty fast.
  • + 1
 They do look like they would wear pretty quickly. But where I ride most of the trails are soft, so I doubt I would wear them out.
  • + 1
 I rode a downhill specific UST Minion in the front, and a 3c MaxxTerra Minion in the back. The downhill-specific Minion was a beast, but felt like I was rolling in sludge. When the rear tire finally wore out, I replaced both (I couldn't take the 1100-gram front tire anymore) with Butcher Controls.

Butchers seem to have the same wear-life as the 3c MaxxTerra Minion, are cheaper -- and dare I say it -- grip better in the conditions I ride. (Colorado -- dry, dusty, rocky). Sidewalls, however, are not as sturdy. I've had burps with the Butchers and finally a little hole that put a kabash on the whole tubeless thing on the rear wheel for the time being. None of those problems with the front tire, though. For the price, I'd go with Butchers again.
  • + 10
 26 aint dead !
  • + 2
 damn straight!
  • + 8
 Any advice converting my new 27.5 bike to 26"?
  • + 4
 LOL already been down at the world enduro, a lot of pros done this for mud clearance when it absolutely pissed down.
The ones running standard 27.5 had to stop and clear out mud as wheel locked up, even had to carry them through stages.
Some pros stuck the 26" wheels in the 27.5 frames and just rode through the mud...
  • - 1
 put a longer eye to eye shock on it and go with a little longer travel fork and that should keep your BB off the ground. of course a cheaper option would be to find a nice 26" frame instead
  • + 2
 or stick on 155mm canfield cranks with 9mm crampon pedals..
  • + 1
 Haha my query wasn't in earnest, I'm just bein a 26 fanboy Wink It is interesting to hear the pros have felt moved to do this at times though!
  • + 0
 I know a guy racing at it was doing good until the mud, when you think about it they have stuck a larger wheel in the same space so of course the mud clearance is going to be reduced quite a bit. 26er for life Smile
The big race teams seam to had this sussed as before the start they all just swapped out wheels...
  • + 0
 stuff like that happens not only just for mud clearance but also for rider preference. u might see him parading around with his 27.5er in the pits, but then switches to 26 so the sponsor is happy and he can ride what he likes. the novice wouldnt notice and that is who they want to sell to anyway. win win. ive even seen "restickered frames' at events before
  • + 0
 totally agree, its all about selling the next big thing...
  • + 0
 thats why pro racing even exists on the level it does today. if there wasnt any money in it, we would all be having fun on rigid 26ers without the circus shit
  • + 1
 Whats your bike six66?
  • + 1
 It's a 26" haro steel reserve haha. She's my do it all bike, even ride down the world cup course at the Telluride bike park on her Big Grin
  • + 1
 That's funny. I asked a guy I know that raced the entire EWS about the 26" wheel in a 27.5" frame and he just laughed. He said, "nope, I've never seen anyone doing that".
  • + 1
 La thuile Italy is where it happened so if he wasn't at the European mudfest that was summer 2014 in the alps then no he wouldn't have seen it.
  • + 1
 Ah I see, when I think world enduro, only the EWS comes to mind.
  • + 2
 not just enduro, there are a lot of "27.5" dh bikes out there too
  • + 3
 The ccdb calculator is pretty wack. It told me to get a 250lb which i did. Was far too soft. Ran then 300 for a while and it was good in stock settings for demo. Could probably go up to 325-350. I would def go stiffer than too soft... Also check the buy sell. That way you can get a local used one of each for cheaper than shop price and do your own testing...
  • + 2
 Do your own calculator, sit on your bike measure the sag. its quite simple
10mm sag on a 350lb spring
sag with 300lb spring will be (10/300)x350 = 11.66mm

Sag isn't the be all and end all. depends on your riding style and how big drops you do too..
  • + 1
 @bat-fastard - Sag isn't the only measurement to consider with spring weight. Suspension design has a lot to do with it. 30% sag will act differently on a FSR bike to a VPP bike.
  • + 1
 its more the suspension curve tbh not the actual linkage design. Some frames are linear and will bottom out easier than a rising rate. Each frame has its own ideal sag, and some will even state a range depending on if your hucking (25%) or racing (30%) for example.
I was only stating an easy method to calculate a spring weight to change the sag of your frame to what you want it.
I never mentioned the % sag for a specific frame or riding style.
Also the damping should be custom tuned to your weigh and style with shim stack/piston changes for someone lighter at only 10 stone.
  • + 0
 Well, I'm not sure about weighing people in stones. How big are these alleged stones? Haha.
  • - 1
 Not much hope for you in the suspension world then.. a stone is 6.35kg most standard shocks are set for a 14 stone rider.
  • + 2
 That's pretty funny as I already worked in the industry. For your education, Americans weigh things in pounds (lbs.). I was making a joke about it, you must have missed it.
  • - 1
 Need to work on your humour a bit then, mine was sarcasm but you obviously didn't get that...
  • + 3
 Remember americans dont get sarcasm
  • + 1
 Oh I got your smartass remark, as I answered it with a smartass remark. I made a clear joke, you took offense to it. What's even better is I'm mostly Irish. Jokes on you.
  • + 0
 lol mr tabletop that was the next joke he didn't get, sure all americans claim to be irish and I used to work for caterpillar as an engineer so am well aware that they use stone pounds inches foot etc as still haven't caught up with the rest of the world there either....
  • + 2
 If everyone in America who claims to be Irish was actually irish the numbers just don't add up at all.
  • + 0
 sarcasm just to explain the joke, telling what a stone is in kg to an American who don't use kg but uses stones, when you know the fact that they already know what a stone is but are being sarcastic by explain it using kg. when they think they are being clever about making a silly joke about stones to cover up their lack of suspension knowledge from previous out of the blue statement.
  • + 0
 If there were more real Irish people in america it'd be a good thing because they could teach them about humour haha
  • + 1
 And how to make bombs and talk bollocks.
  • + 3
 ^whoa that just escalated it a little i think
  • + 1
 Don't slag the Irish Zziplex
  • + 4
 Better check under you car in the morning...
  • + 1
 You never know what could happen if you say things like Zziplex did on your next visit to Ireland!!!
  • + 4
 Anyone know where I can get a set of ignition points for my Subaru Brat? What? Points suck and no one uses them anymore?? How about a carburetor jet? Those suck too?? Oh man. I need a Schlitz...
  • + 3
 when i saw "tire, 27.5, and spring rate" in the title i knew it was gonna be a good comment session. this is way better than the scooter hating last week haha
  • + 1
 I love ineffective and factually incorrect conversion responses... in point of fact regarding the offsets... if the fork was built around large 26er tires already, then the offset is good enough for a 650B of the same diameter. Increased offsets aren't because of wheel diameters specifically though, but to compensate for slacker head angles that are becomming more prevalent on today's trail and all-mountain bikes. As to the tire selection choices being limited to smaller sizes, again that depends on your frame/fork clearances. 26er model Fox forks were all officially rated for 27" maximum diameter in 32 series crowns and 27.3" for the 36/40 crowns, but that didn't include the extra room leftover for mud/debris, which is why so many used Fox forks for conversions, they sacrificed the mud clearance margin. I said crowns because brace clearance they've plenty more still even with a 27.5 installed. Rockshox Psylo forks are also popular for conversions because they were designed around 26 x 2.7s, so they work with just about any 650B model made to date.

MTBR has in their 650B forum two stickied topics, one for forks for conversions, another for frames which can be converted. A quick DIY way to check involves a measuring tape. If you have at least 14" from axle center to whatever frame/fork structure the top of the tire might hit, then you'll be able to fit 650Bs up to about a 2.35 size safely (with forks you need to check the brace and the crown, and remember the fork travel amount in the crown calculation).
  • + 1
 i have also noticed that a lot of mid 2000 era frames with adjustable geometry settings can easily be made to fit 27.5 without being stuck with a 15" high BB. so you can dip your toes in the 650b waters without throwing away a ton of cash
  • + 11
 While what you say is factual, I think the point is why deal with those potential just to clear 27.5? Decreased mud clearance, raised BB, possible tire choice concerns... for what? I have no issue with 27.5 I really don't, but I do not advocate switching to them on a 26 bike as an "upgrade" ... nonsense.
  • - 3
 Because the reason 650B exploded the way it did, is because MANY 26ers were so easily converted, and continue to be for those who already own them. More so in fact now since there are many more wheel, rim, tire, fork options.
  • + 0
 darkstar the only way i will ever have the cash to go 27.5 is to just put them on my old cannondale prophet which i know will fit and has the adjustable geometry so it will ride like todays bikes. deeight is spot on and that is probably 2nd biggest reason for the push. #1 is the fact that all the companies that sat out during the 29er craze dont want to miss out again
  • + 4
 Correct. 27.5 was a way to sell new bikes to guys with perfectly dialed 26. I have no issue with it I just don't have any particular interest in "upgrading" until I actually need a new bike.
  • + 3
 Also let it be known there are obviously a ton of great 650b products and I'll love riding one but what's being discussed here is the notion of removing 26 wheels from your bike and replacing them with new 27.5 and tires. Is this a significant upgrade? Debatable.
  • + 0
 right probably not, but if folks like us never tried to find out, we wouldnt even have mountain biking in the first place. think about it. grassroots baby!
  • + 4
 and for the record, my next new bike will be a 26". again.
  • + 1
 It's all bikes so it's all good
  • + 9
 So if i convert my 26er to 27.5er how much arch material do I file away? already 3/4 of an inch in, so can't stop now, how much is too much?
  • + 4
 justincs, I think it depends on the sort of axle you have. If it is just a 12mm QR, then stop filing now. If it is a 15mm, then you can go a tad further. If, however, you have a 20mm, then you can go all the way through the arch. If you do go all the way, expect the fork to twist a bit under braking. Many people would think this is a bad thing, but you can just compensate by turning the bars a little every time you hit the anchors. Now I have to go back to drilling 'lightening holes' into my frame. Carbon is so much harder to work with than aluminum.
  • + 6
 I have two 26" trailbikes that I ride often - a Pivot Mach 5.7 and a Liteville 301. I can snap a finger and get the kit to switch them, but why mess up two perfectly good handling machines with bigger wheels to be fashionable? My choice for a future bike, however, wouldn't be 26er.
  • + 2
 Well according to certain web stores like chain reaction, there are more 26" forks and tyres available than both of the other wheel sizes put together…

Just putting it out there.
  • + 1
 Currently yes, but that's just simple scales of production. You can still buy NOS parts for bikes made in the 1970s if you look long enough. They'll always be cheap bits made for 26er size mountain bikes, but the premium stuff...that's on the way out quickly. Giant for example has gone completely to 650B/29er models (except for a $500 entry level XC sport hardtail) for 2015 and they're the single largest OEM parts purchaser for component/suspension fork makers, and they've already announced they'll be switching completely to 650B in a year or two.
  • + 1
 As long as consumables like rims, suspension fork spares and tyres are available it's ok by me.
Pretty sure manufacturers (of all products, i.e not mtb related) in Europe have to provide spares for up to 7 years, but I might be wrong. So in 7 years I would have possibly change bike by then.
  • + 1
 @RichardCunningham, im am taking it that it was you who answered the question about the 26 converting to 27,5. And I say, in some cases it may not proceed, but if you indeed change the fork for the offset, fit an agleset to lower your bb height....and several other tweaks, I do beleive you can create a good ride. Maybe some people will do it just to be fashionable, but dont you think it is a good way to try it out, withouth having to get a new frame....
  • + 2
 Every week there seems to be someone who hasn't got a bike yet and wants to change it. I don't understand why these people don't ride the bike and see what needs to be changed before they go switching stuff out.
  • + 1
 Yeah, and if you factor in the price of the bike (even used, it will still be expensive), a new fork, new wheelset, tires, angleset and all, it just means you're buying the wrong bike.
  • + 1
 I used to ride Kenda Nevegal's in the past and they ware not bad at all but don't roll that fast as a Minions and Minions are my favourite winners so far i didn't have any better tires.
Good advert on Ti-Springs i ve heard rumours their advertised weight on their site on the standard Ti-Springs they offer has nothing common with reality and they are pretty heavy for a Ti spring but still less than metal once Frown .... my TR 500 has a option to go 27,5 but im afraid of that will stick to 26 for DH quite hectic is to change rims and find tires and so on ... Wink
  • + 1
 titanium isnt that much lighter than steel. (go ahead look it up) but it does make a fantastic spring. id say give the 300# a try since it should only be about the cost of a cheap tire before spending big $ on a ti coil.
  • + 13
 Pound for pound they weigh the same.
  • + 3
 i see what ya did there
  • + 3
 When it comes to springs I don't think its so much about the actual weight of steel vs the weight of titanium. I'll take your word that the actual weights of the metals themselves are similar. Its the properties of the metals that allow a titanium spring to be lighter, mainly that the Ti is more flexible that steel. This means that to produce a Ti spring of the same spring weight as steel, its takes much less actual material because they can space out the coils and use less coils overall per spring. That's where the weight savings comes from. Its not that the actual material is that much lighter.
  • + 2
 i agree, but what this really comes down to is trying to find a coil that fits a certain size rider. buying steel ones till u get it right, then get a ti when u have it dialed if weight is a concern. and if weight is that big a deal, u could always go air. (i cant believe i just said that)
  • + 2
 Yea for sure. You need to know exactly what you need before you go buying expensive Ti Springs.
  • + 1
 Ti springs are noticably lighter than steel.
I've heard the "no more than two turns of preload" thing a few times and never listened, putting as much preload on the spring as I damn well please has never caused me a problem. Lots of preload to get the right sag gives a nice linear feel to the spring that suits some frames very well. Just measure the gaps between the coils, and add them up to make sure the coil will not bind on full compression. I'm sure if one neglects to set the rebound to suit the extra preload there could be damage to the shock, but hey if your bike is set up like that, it's going to be trying to send you over the bars every time you get air.
  • + 1
 You should set up your suspension however you want it. But that doesn't change the fact that there is a physical limit to how much preload you can put on a spring before you run into trouble, which is all I think the article is trying to point out. You get to a point with preload where simply switching to a stiffer spring is much more beneficial.
  • + 1
 I have a 26" carbon fiber bike with xtr and mavic wheels and rock shox fork. I also have a Niner emd9, XT, american classic wheels, rock shox reba. Both are hardtails. I can ride faster on the 29er, I roll over things easier, it is more stable at speed, it climbs better, it steers better and the ride is more comfortable (wheels absorb shock better). The 26er is more flickable, more maneuverable in tight situations, easier to pick up the front wheel, more playfull,l.
If I wreck, it tends to be on the 26er because the front wheel does not roll over obstacles as well. It's fun to change up and ride both to get a different experience.
  • + 1
 I think the Cane Creek site is way off. For my Scalp i have to recommended 350Lb Ti spring for my 90kg (198Lb) body weight. The Sag is way too high and i get too much pedal bob with less than about 10 turns of preload. Anyone else have experience of this? Also, anyone in the UK want to swap a 350Lb Ti spring for a 450?
  • + 2
 The other benefit of Ti springs is they tend to match thier rating more closely than steel. less than 5% where steel can vary more significantly from the printed spring rate.
  • + 1
 It's not Ti, it's quality. Bos' spring rates are more acurate than Fox's ones.
  • + 1
 Good to know, I rember a report someone did several years ago and it showed significant difference in the manufactures tested, manitou, fox, marzocchi I think.
  • + 3
 im bettin this will get down-propped real quick, but i absolutely love my kenda excavator up front
  • + 1
 Funny you should say that, going to move my dhf to the rear and put my excavator up front......thinking this week's be a nice combo
  • + 1
 Haven't ridden Excavators long at all but from my limited experience with them I like 'em also. It's all personal preference anyway! Ride what feels best to you.
  • + 1
 and they are lighter than a comparable nevagal- if youre into that sorta thing
  • + 1
 A bike is a bike does it really matter what size wheels we have as long as you can do what you love on what ever you feel comfortable...... Is that not what biking is all about????
  • + 3
 Waithing for @whattheheel to arrive screaming vigilante!!!! (those of you who float around in the forums will understand.)
  • + 4
 Man tires? Everybody needs them. Not sure if I would run them for DH tho. Dual ply is best for that. Thanks for the shout out tho!
  • + 3
 what about a 29er with 26 wheels
  • + 2
 what about 29er with a 24 wheels -_- (i'm Groot)
  • + 2
 I will put 24 wheels on a 29er so I will be able to walk with my feets on the pedals. Genius.
  • + 2
 When spring is comming, the gals are never happy with 6 inch. They want to upgrade to 7.5'.
  • - 2
 I'll be converting an M9 into a 275, the G3 dropouts are adjustable in the rear and will give me enough clearance, and I'll change the fork for a 275 Fox 40 ( presently a 26'er Fox 40 ). I've got a Cane Creek Angle set to help me dial in the geo along with the adjustable rear shock mount placements that are standard on the M9 FRO. I've already checked for tire clearance with some of the balloonier tire companies out there so clearance wont be an issue at all. I am also a new owner of a 275'er and since I purchased it, my M9 rarely sees use. 275 Wheels don't give you that much of a feel difference from a 26'er till you really try to throw it around, the most noticeable thing was that the rear felt so smooth I was always stopping to see if I was rolling on a flat tire. Pedaling feels different since the roll-out is longer ( you feel it in your gear selection ) and gave me the impression that I had a smaller cog set than I do, but this is clearly an advantage as I still have torque on the downhills.

People made the same chatter when earlier innovations came out; Suspension, disc brakes, tubeless, latex condoms etc, but now take a look at what people are riding; full suspension fat bikes, UST and DIY tubeless( that's where the latex comes into play) and all while trying to get laid. Even roadies get a taste of the consistence that disc brakes provide.

I noticed everyone was cheering on Rat Boy in the Worlds, but no one was poopooing his bike, a 650b DH rig He would have won if he hadn't broken his ankle.

NOTHING NEVER CHANGES SO ACCEPT CHANGE OR LEARN NOTHING.
  • + 1
 have fun riding your bike and you'll go faster Wink no matter what size wheels you have.
  • + 1
 I like to ride bikes with wheels that spin.
  • + 1
 Yeah, I'm happy as long as they don't wobble.
  • + 1
 You can get NukeProof 275x3 steel spring pretty cheap on chainreaction...
  • + 0
 Put magic mary on the short list too!
  • + 1
 haters gotta hate
  • + 0
 So many typos, your interns aren't doing a very good job!
  • - 1
 did anybody tried to convert orange five 26 to 27.5 wheels ? any luck ?
  • + 0
 Here we go again!
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