Ask Pinkbike: Paint Choices, Cleat Issues, and Predicting the Future of MTB

Dec 26, 2018
by Pinkbike Staff  

Here at Pinkbike, we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul-searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand-picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.




Matte or Glossy Finish?

Question: EliasFritzen asks in the All-Mountain/Cross-Country Forum: I am looking into getting a 2019 Trek Remedy 8! My first full suspension all mountain bike. It comes in two colours, matte black and gloss Miami green. Now, I was thinking about the durability of the paint and from what I have heard, the gloss tends to last much longer, however, I prefer the matte. Also, I work at a bike shop in NZ and the only available colour in NZ is matte black, but I do have the option of ordering the green one.


bigquotes Most production mountain bikes are powder-coated, so there should be little difference in the scratch resistance or durability of matte or glossy finishes between the same brand and models. Glossy paint, however, is much easier to keep looking new, because the smooth surface leaves fewer places for crud to cling to. The moment a matte finish leaves the showroom, micro sized particles of dirt and grime begin to accumulate in the uneven surface that will never wash out. "Lustrous" quickly becomes dull, but a lot of riders prefer that unshaven guerrilla warfare look. If that's you, buy that matte-black Remedy - but keep a can of Maxima SC1 handy. It's the only substance I've used that can make a matte finish look new again.RC

Maxima SC1 Clear Coat
Most mountain bikes that have matte finishes end up looking like homeless pets. Maxima's SC1 can make them look best in show in five minutes.




FiveTen Maltese Falcon - Possible to replace cleat nuts?

Question: @freerider11 asks in the Bikes, Parts, and Gear Forum: So, I've somehow managed to strip out one of the bolt holes on the cleat nut of a pair of FiveTen Maltese Falcon shoes. Anyone know if the cleat nuts are replaceable on FiveTen's? I know most Shimano shoes allow you to replace them, and Shimano cleat nuts are readily available. However, can't seem to find anything specific to FiveTen and nothing that confirms if it's even possible. Hope so, as the shoes are basically brand new...

bigquotesBy 'cleat nuts' I assume you mean the steel plate inside the shoe that is threaded to receive the cleat and bolt? These usually have four mounting holes and are symmetrical, so pull out the insole from the shoe, and you should be able to access the plate. Rotate the plate around 180º and you will have two more holes in the correct place.

If this doesn't work there are a few more options: re-thread or helicoil the plate (depending on your mechanical skill level), head to your local bike shop and see if they can source a spare (I can't find them for sale online, but a good shop should be able to help), or the most expensive option – buy another pair of the same shoes and swap the plate, at least you will have another pair 'in stock' for when you need them.
Paul Aston


2015 Five Ten - Maltese Falcon Race Shoes size 11.5
This pair of Maltese Falcon's shoes from FiveTen has the four mounting bolts as usual. Rotate it 180 degrees and you have fresh threads in the same location as before. (Photo Credit: MyBikesBroken)





Where do bikes go from here?

Question: @Gmoneyog1 asks in the All-Mountain/Cross-Country Forum: Since I was a kid so much has changed...Carbon fiber is becoming a more affordable option and e-mountain bikes are a thing. I am now trying things 5-6 years ago I thought would never really catch on and it's insane how quickly this industry has moved and I am very thankful to grow up in this time period. How much more can they do?


bigquotesI'm right there with you. It's pretty crazy how much stuff has changed in the last few years, and it doesn't look like things are slowing down anytime soon. Components will continually get lighter and stronger, but at the same time more user-friendly in terms of serviceability, and technology that used to be incredibly expensive will be increasingly affordable.

I don't think that we're going to completely re-invent the wheel, but people are going to have ideas for products that previously weren't possible due to technology restraints that are now able to be developed and tested.

I really think we'll see more of an evolution in the sport itself than product technology. Mountain biking has become more mainstream, and for a lot of people, it's their new "golf." This is great for participation numbers and support in creating more opportunities to ride, but all of the growth has to be managed. Those who have been riding and involved for years and have seen the sport change are the ones who can best help promote stewardship and responsibility in new riders and keep mountain biking moving in a positive direction.
Daniel Sapp

Trust The Message trailing linkage fork.
Linkage forks, dropper posts, 29" wheels and it still pedals uphill remarkably well. Bikes have come a long way, and will continue to evolve, but the sport itself and the community of people surrounding it is what will see the most change in years to come.



128 Comments

  • + 123
 Makes sense now as to why my local vmba chapter keeps removing rocks and cutting out roots, makes it easier for the golfers to putt through the woods
  • + 31
 There's no secret cabal that maintains trails. If you want a say, start volunteering.

Often, a trail that has become advanced due to erosion needs remediation just it won't blow out in a rain event. A lot of trails that get "dumbed down" need the work-you'll do a lot of repair and upkeep doing trailwork.

But....given enough man-hours working on mellow trails you might get to build some of the stuff you want to ride. There are few things as satisfying as building a section of singletrack from scratch so it rides just how you want it to.
  • + 6
 @peleton7: There is a political aspect of it that can't be avoided though. As trail networks become more popular there are trails that get dumbed down to better suit ability levels there. This isn't inherently bad because it means potentially more money for the organization lobbying for trails on public land. And there are the trails off the map that satisfy the need for gnar.
  • + 32
 @peleton7: Please tell me how the now-removed rocks on Horsethief Bench trail were impacting erosion and I'll consider supporting IMBA.
  • + 13
 @peleton7: I do volunteer and carry 2 different types of folding saws in my pack at all times to cut blow-downs during rides and regularly head in solo with shovels to maintain berms and damaged sections. I have also helped build every trail we have in my area.
My gripe isn't with building easy trails or having advanced trails dumbed down (I understand that we will never build the super challenging terrain that most folks whine about wanting to ride all the time. For that I go to Killington or Thunder, as I don't enjoy that every single ride), it's more along the lines of having the board not communicate effectively and then not care that people are cutting, hacking and modifying the trail at will. People that didn't help plan, cut, rake and dig. People that don't attend the monthly board meetings, which I'm not a board member. (Too strong a voice for MTB and not enough towards other outdoors recreation activities).

Long story short, I was making a wise-ass remark about some rocks and roots recently removed from a trail by a guy that has ridden this particular trail for years (without a problem, I've ridden with him on group rides) because he had an off day and crashed.

Thanks for the insight into how volunteering and trails work, for anyone here that wasn't aware, please take a peek above, get learned and help the cause
  • + 3
 @taquitos: This plagues my mind every season, all season. Which I why I would make a horrible board member for my chapter. I don't care about trail running, hiking or xc skiing and snowshoeing, but to the board, they bring in money
  • - 3
 @glenward: Unsanctioned trail work.........grrrrrrrrrr!!
  • + 4
 @glenward: Whoever is putting in the work gets to make the choice of how the trail rides. Some IMBA chapters might make trails more technical in order to slow down traffic because of interference with hikers for instance. But my experience is that the vast majority of trails are DIY and whoever works on it decides.
  • + 3
 @dangahoesing: Not like you hit it, ya puss
  • + 1
 @Rubberelli: that's how our trails start out as. My actual issue is that the members of the Board of Directors, that created the chapter turn a blind eye when a trail is modified on a whim. A few of them are even the person doing the modifying. The whole reason my town started a chapter was to eliminate all the rogue building and to prevent unsanctioned trail modifications. Now we create fun trails that utilize the natural terrain without being too technical as to prevent lower skill levels from riding and then someone goes and starts hacking away without as much as a heads-up or a board notice/vote.
It would save a ton of bitching and whining on my end as I'm usually the person that notices first, since I ride the network 3-5 times a week after work. And it definitely would've saved me from destroying a carbon rim
  • + 2
 @glenward: so put up signs saying something like "all trail work must be sanctioned by so and so and heres how to volunteer." The people working on them probably don't know that they are not DIY and probably think they are helping out. But, I'm confused how making a trail mellower, removing rocks and roots destroyed your carbon rim.
  • + 2
 @Rubberelli: a berm that was never on the trail showed up unannounced in the fastest section of trail and I launched off it and wrecked my rim. The berm is built in a gulley, after a rise in the trail, making it almost impossible to see. The builder is a member, and buddies with some of the board of directors. There has been a bunch of other trail mods done by the same guy and other people that are even on the Board of Directors. The people that do know and make the rules. That's my particular problem with my specific chapter.
As for my jab about removing rocks and roots, a Board member recently removed a patch of rocks and a few roots on a section of flat trail just for the sake of removing them.
I'm really just griping about the lack of responsibility and communication from my chapter board of directors. They've all heard my gripes but nothing seems to get better. It's frustrating from my point as to where I want to go rogue and just build my own stuff up in the woods on private property again. Which is why we started the chapter. Apparently, land owners don't appreciate it when you build of their land
  • + 1
 @glenward: it sounds as if the problem to you is sanctioned changes not unsanctioned ones. You can either lead a revolt of other members to kick this board out or leave the group and pick or build some different trails.
  • + 1
 @Rubberelli: I wish it were that simple, but nobody brought up those changes or proposed them during the monthly meetings. I fired off a pretty heated email to all the members about whom added the berm and received a private response from the builder about it. It basically said he's sorry about the rim, thought that it would be a good place for a berm and had the afternoon off from class so he went out to dig. None of the other chapter members or board members knew about it. We also had a rider remove some rocks and fill in a small rock garden with dirt because he had an off day and crashed. He had been riding this trail for years, crashed, went home and grabbed a shovel and drove back. No proposed modification during the monthly meeting where we actually discuss these kinds of things because he just did it.
Most of the time, it seems the BoD is preoccupied with having a good presence with the town to look good and also worrying about the logistics of the yearly CX race because it brings in the most money for the chapter.
I'm sure I'm not the only one with this battle out there, but it's frustrating to say the least. I want to do things right and by the book as to not piss the landowners off but I'm thinking solo building and asking for forgiveness if caught is the most sound option at this point.
  • + 69
 I wanna see that Trust fork in the "huck to flat" slo-mo bike porn video.
  • + 47
 question is whether the inclusion of the Evil with the Message fork is included as a reference to improvements in technology or to symbolize the golfer demographic they reference.....
  • + 93
 Silence on the course I'm going to send it
  • + 14
 Maybe the fork on a single pivot bike is a statement about the paradoxical nature of modern mountain biking?
  • + 24
 Tires! I think that's the real place for improvement. I've got between 2400 and 2700g worth of tire on my bike and would love to reduce that weight while retaining or improving both performance and durability.
  • + 15
 At bare minimum they should have a consistent size rating. Why does one manufacturers 2.5 fit in my frame while another's does not.
  • + 2
 @stinkbikelies: I agree fully there should be more standardization in tire width dimensions. But the same tire could rub in different places or not at all on various bikes depending on a lot of factors, including but not limited to: inner rim width, lateral wheel stiffness, frame stiffness, and the spacing of the rear triangle, both in the lateral and in the radial.
  • + 6
 @stinkbikelies: ignore the imperial sizing, etrto is a real standard.
  • + 20
 Im not convinced bikes are getting lighter. You pointed out yourselves in the field tests that the new ransom weighs the same as the 10 year old version
  • + 0
 Like everything, the pendulum swings on bike weight, and it's waaay over to the heavy end right now. As a person who loves to climb, I need to build frame-up or make a lot of changes to a stock bike to keep it fun for me. Fortunately, the parts are there (and reasonably priced!). But I sort of look forward to the inevitable swing back so I'm not the lone weirdo on the street corner evangelizing the 28-lb enduro bike because if keeps you fresh for that "extra lap".
  • + 15
 @CM999 this is the 29er and pie-plate effect. The transition from 26 to 27.5 to 29 - and the overall upsizing of cassettes - has led to big increases in wheel weights. Of course an XX1 build with flyweight tires and carbon hoops will still have a modern 29er come in at 28lbs, but the average GX-Joe rolling 2100g wheels and Exo/DD tires are going to have a 32lb trail bike. Not saying there’s anything wrong with 32lb, but I suspect if you took the same 2019 frame and put 26” wheels and light tires / 2x drivetrain (ala 2014), you would probably have your 27lb trailbike back.
  • + 11
 Bikes are getting bigger, bigger wheels, bigger frames, bigger forks and bars, so gains in material technology that make the bikes lighter are getting cancelled out. Result is that ten years later we're still riding bike that weigh 30lbs-ish. But hten 30lbs-ish seems to be the sweet spot for an all around bike to weigh anyway.
  • + 9
 NX and maybe even GX Eagle cassettes make up for any "weight savings" of going to a 1x drivetrain. Everyone "needs" that heavy air shock with a reservoir, some of us are even back on coil. DH level tires, brakes and wheels to deal with the speeds and bad line choices modern geo bikes can sustain. 29ers certainly weigh more than 26ers. Bikes are longer (more material). Goes on and on. We aren't at the 50 pound plus huck bike freeride levels again...
  • + 1
 @Fix-the-Spade: Depends; personal preference, how much rider weighs, climbing vs. descending priority
  • + 2
 Gee Atherton's Session from Hardline was 35lbs, but my alloy Transition Patrol weighs in at 36lbs and climbs better.
  • + 4
 @tripleultrasuperboostplusplus: That's why I strip the paint off all my frames.
  • + 2
 @tripleultrasuperboostplusplus: looks like you are just the consumer that Down Country bikes are made for!
  • + 1
 I’ve got a 2011 26er Fuel EX w/120mm travel f/r. It weighs 28.5. My 2018 Remedy with 160mm weighs 28.5. I’d say we are progressing just fine. Riding these two on the same trail is like driving a Ford Raptor and 1989 Ford Taurus on a logging road.
  • + 18
 "Most production mountain bikes are powder-coated" ..............I think you meant "Most alloy production mountain bikes are powder-coated"

DO NOT BAKE YOUR CARBON BIKE IN A POWDERCOAT OVEN.

Gloss finish is always going to wear better than matte finish. While many matte paint finishes on bikes do have a matte clear finish, gloss paint will have a thicker clear coat.
  • + 2
 I think he meant not enough production bikes are powered!? They’re all painted? RC? You sure bro?
  • + 4
 The gloss paint does tend to chip though.
  • + 2
 Trek paint will chip quickly regardless of matte or gloss. They must use thin light paint. The carbon will not chip like the aluminum paint but can be damaged other ways.
  • + 12
 Where do we go next? E-Bikes will kill mountain biking by attracting lazy, morally bankrupt people who don’t care about trail access or coexistence with other trail users. (Including losers on regular bikes)

It will be all about modifying your motors to put out more power and overide any speed cut off.

Mountain biking will be like riding a Harley. You will dress up in a sweet moto costume instead of leathers and roosting people with your pumped up motor will be the equivalent of showing everyone how loud your pipes are.
  • + 11
 Tbh that sounds really fun.
  • + 2
 @TobiasHandcock: I hate you for being so right.
  • + 4
 All the e-bikers I've met so far were cool guys. Plus two of them even took part in building the DH trails in my town a while ago.
  • + 3
 @TobiasHandcock: If I had an unlimited MTB budget, I’d absolutely add an eBike to my garage. I live close to national forest with hundreds of miles of singletrack and fire roads that are open to bikes and motos. Under my own power, I’m limited to biting off 10 or 20 mile chunks at a time on normal rides. I don’t have much desire to invest in a dirt bike, but I’d love to have an eMTB that’d let me do more exploration with the same amount of effort.

I only (personally) know one fit experienced MTB rider that bought an eMTB. His estimate was that a ride on his Levo let him go 3x the distance for the same effort. Aka, the effort of a 10-mile ride took him 30-miles with the pedal assist.

There are lots of reasons to hate on eMTB, but most of those disappear if they’re being used in areas that allow motos.
  • + 6
 Mtb doomsdays prophecy (Do not read if you think you get pissed easily)



Pedal assisted mtb become mainstream when the cost drops further.

Pedalless mtb will branch out to be the new moto. May even be more popular than moto as they are much cheaper to run, easier to throw around, can be run anywhere and less complicated to maintain for privateers.

KTM, Yamaha etc will dominate the mtb industry.

9.82% of PB users who are in the dentistry will buy an ebike in the coming year.

28.9% of today's PB users will needs an e-bike soon due to old age.

No, an ebike will never looks like a Session.
  • + 3
 I agree. E-mopeds are less physically demanding than both motos and mtbs. No need to hoist yourself up the hill, no need to muscle a 250lb bike around. They're slower and safer than a real moto, and the envelope of risk and performance potential is limited by their meager power output. ...But we can still cruise to the top with what's basically a DH bike and crush all those downcountry goobers. It's a compelling sell, and most of us are already looking for equipment that will make our mediocre abilities go further... mopeds 2019.
  • + 4
 It’s going to happen. Places like Kingdom Trails will have to let ebikes on their trails to survive and will turn in to ebike super speed ways. Losers on regular pedal bikes will get pushed to the margins but it won’t matter. Cheap ebikes will attract a whole new crop of fat and lazy americans who want a cool story to tell their friends but aren’t fit enough to complete a 5k run or tough mudder.

Pinkbike will have to evolve and it will be all about new battery packs and motor upgrades.

Specialized and maybe Trek will make it. The mid 2020’s will be the graveyard for the Ibis and Yeti of the world as they make ill fated attempts to go electric and can’t compete with the big players who have access to the motors, batteries and R and D money.
  • + 6
 How much tech does one need to enjoy a great ride these days? The best noteworthy bike attributes have been the seat post dropper, 27.5 wheels and I guess "for some" cassettes the size of a pizza. Oh, and of course puncture proof tech. All things meant to keep us riding longer and faster. Most of us don't need a goofy ass looking fork, Super + Mega Boost++ or left-handed stores. Personally, I've been looking for worthy riding gear like shades that don't fog up the second my body starts producing heat, there is Ryder but that's it, Oakley, Smith, POC where yat on this?! Maybe some lightweight knee pads that can be DH worthy with the feel/weight only an XC racer would approve of perhaps? Maybe night vision mtb googles without the cost of night vision mtb googles lol!
  • + 10
 I’d love a pizza
  • - 1
 Sooner or later we should be seeing dropper posts built into to the frame, maybe with a replaceable cartridge and/or serviceable bushings. There's no need for 3 or more sleeves of metal where only 2 are being used. The frame can play the role of the outer-most piping of the dropper post. Mic-drop inserted here.
  • + 3
 @Warburrito: eight pins inserted here
  • + 2
 @speed10: oh, you know they can create 27 1/2 different standards for it too which they can change every year to make all old equipment outdated. You know it's a perfect idea. Each different size/arrangement will add strength and functionality per reviewers so by 2040 it will be better than ever. Specialized can even have manufacturers make special sizes that only fit their models.
  • + 5
 @pinkbike "Mountain biking has become more mainstream", just a genuine question: what are the evidence this statement is based on? Do you have any metrics you could share?
From where I sit I don't see evidence of it, especially from the trail access perspective.
  • + 3
 You haven’t noticed mountain biking being used as a prop in dozens of ads on TV? I can think of half dozen car ads featuring mountain bikes and I know that was not the case at all 15 or even 10 years ago. Wasn’t there a movie about a dog just a couple years ago and the kid in the movie rode a mountain bike? Just sales numbers alone should bolster that argument, not to mention the amount of schools that have added some form of mtb to their athletics programs.
  • + 2
 Also, trail access in my area, Midwest, has increased exponentially, including many new bike only areas. I can say it’s never been more mainstream than today with certainty, at least in my area.
  • + 4
 My aluminum ‘16 Stumpjumper has a matte black finish, and I certainly appreciate it as a newer rider. I generally keep the bike clean, but also touch up all the scuffs etc with a sharpie once in awhile. Not perfect but keeps it looking decent :-)
  • + 14
 Oh now you’ve done it. You’ve admitted to touching up the paint and wanting your bike to look good. Time for people to tell you it’s a mountain bike and you should be proud of it looking like shit. Means you ride it a lot.
  • + 4
 It's anyone's guess what the future holds as the sport becomes more mainstream, but I really hope we see more pay2ride places arrive. Places with varied designs and dedicated bike trails where you don't have to worry about hikers or accidently skidding a rut into the ground. It's really the only way mountain bikers are going to be able to keep riding everyday as the local populations increase.
  • + 3
 Just go all in and get a Ptoject One Trek custom paint with a matte black with blue gloss flames...you’re welcome.

(FWIW, Inhave seen something like this, black with all blue flames on a carbon Emondia, though all gloss, and it looked spectacular)
  • + 5
 Components may not be lighter, but these days they're way less likely to break and hurt you.
On a more serious note, can I have free stickers?
  • + 3
 The future of my.biking...let’s see, Jan.1, 2019 the 25% Trump tariff takes in affect...that would pretty much end it. When a guy bankrupts a casino, which it nearly impossible...then becomes president and thinks he knows business, history will tell you is not going to end well!
  • + 4
 5 10 cleat plates used to be hard to fix because you had to cut them out of the cardboard innersole with a knife replace the stripped plate with shimanos heaps stronger
  • + 1
 I also cut out the plates from the inside and replaced with new ones. Then sealed with some all weather sealant. A little mtb key hole surgery is fun.
  • + 2
 Still waiting for that magical bike that climbs like a goat with zero pedal bob and descends like a jaguar with Velcro paws.
Or we can have mini DH bikes Enduro DH
And Enduro XC
Enduro DH 180 mm travel front and back 32 to 34 pounds
Enduro XC 130 to 160 mm travel 26 to 30 pounds.
New classes of bikes = more bike sales and more satisfying bikes. Much easier to build a bike that steers towards one discipline.
  • + 1
 That magical bike is every top end build enduro bike PB reviews. just pick one!
  • + 1
 @warmerdamj: I suggest you read the reviews just done on top end Enduro bikes.
  • + 1
 I dont think full suspension bikes are going away. But I do think more and more folks will add a slack hardtail to their quiver (most likely steel frames). Hardtail geomotry is getting dialed and folks are figuring this out and liking the long term reliability of hardtails. 64- 65 HA with 150-160mm fork is what I'm talking about (for directional descending trails). The glory of Strava is fading and folks are taking value in getting rad vs KOM'ing. The hardtail movement is happening and big FS companies dont want it to. Enjoy!
  • + 3
 ...or you'll get older and realize that you'll ride a whole lot longer if you don't rack your skeleton on every feature. Been there, done everything with the Ti hardtail, but it's forever just a sweet commuter bike now.
  • + 3
 @tripleultrasuperboostplusplus: how old is old? I'm 42, been riding 30 years and have had a ton of broken body parts. Still like my hardtail (as well as FS).
  • + 1
 @tripleultrasuperboostplusplus: yep, I love my slack hardtail, but it has been relegated to bikepacking use. Modern FS bikes are just too fun to not use every ride
  • + 1
 @xeren: and what type of hardtail do you use for bike packing? Likely not the type of hardtail I an referring to.
  • + 1
 Built a Transition Throttle for my friend who is 58 and it's now his favorite bike. The modern geo and better forks really make these things awesome!
  • + 3
 @xeren: Naa mate... Depends on the day really. I run an enduro and an old school build hardcore hardtail (Production Privee SHAN frame, Old Mazz bomber 66xr2c fork, 26" wheelset, 1x10 drivetrain)... On days I feel like smashing it and running hot laps. It's the enduro. On days I wanna ride for the giggles with my mates or have a bit more of a challenge on the trails. it's the shan. Best of both worlds...Both bikes are super fun for completely different reasons.
  • + 1
 @JDFF: I hate to break it to you, but old is not too far away from you. Unless you have superior genetics and the discipline to stay healthy, aging hits all of us leading up to 50. I just turned 50 and have been riding for just over 10 years, and I’m not the same person I was 5 years ago. I don’t want an e-bike, just bought a used ‘18 Remedy, but at the rate I’m aging, I know 5 years from now might be a different story. At this moment I hope I can pedal till I’m 60, and maybe just tone it down then, but I know I’ll be pushing it hard this year.
  • + 1
 @deadtime: I hear you 100%. I have normal genetics but am very disciplined on my fitness, flexibility and health in general. So yeah, i work at it. I also do acknowledge slowing down as a fact of aging (reaction times, vision, flexibility, recovery time, etc...). I find riding a hardtail helps avoid the big ER visit worthy crashes. Slower speeds and slightly less hucking, is much more realistic on a hardtail for me. Keep on keeping on!
  • + 5
 Those linkage forks make any bike ‘fugly’ !
  • + 1
 @EliasFritzen Be Careful!! In my experience when it comes to trek you're better off with Matte for durability! I have had a few of their bikes slashs, fuels and sessions with gloss and matte and I found the gloss paint would tend to chip off over time! Frown I highly recommend matte!!
  • + 2
 Ok thanks for the heads up, I was planning on going with the matte black anyways as I think it looks better and will protect the frame with ride wrap/ invisiframe sort of stuff..
  • + 1
 If you are having concerns about your nice new matte finish frame looking dirty and picking up dirt, take a look on ridewrap.ca to get your protection kit that has low surface energy, this helps your bike shed that unwanted dirt and keep it looking fresh.
  • + 1
 Thanks will definitely check that out!
  • + 1
 @EliasFritzen: perfect always happy to help.
  • + 1
 what is the material you guys use to wrap the bike with? is it a 3M product? are there different options?
  • + 5
 The future of mt.biking is sadly enduro motorcycling!
  • + 5
 There was Enduro Moto before the enduro bro
  • + 4
 How about you look at how to repaint, strip, polish frames, replacement decals? Seems that would be more relevant.
  • + 1
 Wow slow news day obviously.

Lea and Perrins on before OR after I've grilled my cheese on toast? I think that's an equally important question comapred to those asked above...
  • + 7
 That's not a question. Before is the ONLY option.
  • + 4
 Should be hendo's.
  • + 10
 What is going on here? This conversation is way to British for us Yanks.
  • - 3
 Lea and Perrins is gross
  • + 4
 Before! My god man.
  • + 5
 @sspiff: My guess is Worcestershire on a grilled cheese? Strange, although not as strange as all the different pronunciations of "worcestershire".
  • + 5
 Yea this must be super British, I've never thought of putting worcestershire on a grilled cheese but it seems like is has to be good.

edit : I just looked this up and you do open face grilled cheese over there ?! , looks good !
  • + 9
 @DARKSTAR63: Why would you dilute the cheese with extra bread?
  • + 1
 @Fix-the-Spade: I agree completely, this blew my mind.
  • + 1
 @DARKSTAR63: same here... And now I'm off to the toaster oven
  • + 2
 @DARKSTAR63: "you do open face grilled cheese over there?" Oh man, if you haven't discovered cheese on toast yet, the geopolitical situation is even more fubar than initially thought. Ignore the Lee and Perrins thing. Tobasco.
  • + 1
 One side gets grilled lightly
Turn over
Cheese, and other shit you wanna (LP)
Grill
Then ketchup quick
Eat.
Repeat
Sleep
  • + 1
 MY GOD THIS IS EYE OPENING! I feel like I have a new lease on life. What have I been missing?

Just to be clear: I grill one side, flip, dowse with whutsherface top with cheese and finish by grilling the other side of just one slice of bread?

Wow, this IS exciting.
  • + 2
 @iqbal-achieve: Lost me at ketchup.
  • + 1
 Holy shit was I wrong about Worcester Sauce. It is indeed a magical time of year. Grilled cheese can bring us all together as the Lord intended.
  • + 2
 regular old Armor-All works well for matte finishes as well. Only thing is to remember to spray it on a rag FAR away from the bike (especially brake rotors!)
  • + 3
 I have some 510 cleat plates I would give away but it doesn't look like they come out without destroying the shoes.
  • + 2
 Good anodising lasts the best.its got almost a Teflon like quality to stop stuff scuffing it
  • + 1
 tell that to my crankarms

edit: oh, you said good

nevermind
  • + 3
 components are getting lighter and stronger? WRONG!
  • + 2
 It would be nice to see steel frames make a comeback!
  • + 2
 whens eagle-tap coming out? prolly before xtr.
  • + 4
 I swear Elon will have a reusable rocket (falcon9 is it maybe?) in the time it has taken Shimano to freaking copy+slightly improve SRAM Eagle.
  • + 1
 I have no issue with E-Mtb, just keep access limited to the same trails as moto and all is good.
  • + 3
 Jibbing.
  • + 1
 The best solution for matte paint, is the matte invisible-frame kits.
  • + 1
 There is always room for improvement:P
  • + 1
 « Affordable » wouldn’t have been my first choice.
  • + 1
 I want to try that evil bike with that crazy fork
  • + 1
 Then, take out your insole and remove the tape over the cleat nut.
  • + 0
 Trust forks rule!
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