Ask Pinkbike: Rotor Size, Convertible Helmets, and XC Shoes for DH

Mar 7, 2017
by Pinkbike Staff  
Ask Pinkbike Header

Here at Pinkbike we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.




Big Guy, Big Rotors?

Question: @Blacker6 asked this question in the all-mountain, enduro, and cross-country forum: I'm a big eighteen stone (252lb) lump and I'm thinking of switching to 203mm rotors. Any thoughts?

bigquotesLarger rotors provide more power and less fading due to the added leverage and material, and while you didn't specify what type of brakes you have, I'm willing to bet that a guy of your stature would only benefit from using 203mm rotors. That's pretty obvious, but you can also use rotor size to tune how your brakes feel. For example, I weigh 160lbs and don't need 203mm rotors when using Shimano's all-powerful four-piston Saint stoppers - the big rotors don't just provide a boat load of power, but also make the brakes a bit too touchy for my liking, especially if the trails are wet or extremely dry and dusty. But if I'm using a two-piston brake with less power, or a cable-operated disc brake, a larger rotor can help a lot. Moral of the story: big rotors are usually great for big guys like yourself, but not necessarily better for everyone.Mike Levy

Eurobike 2016
Four-piston calipers and big rotors can supply a ton of power and initial bite, but that's not always a good thing.




Sweating in a Giro Switchblade?

Question: @Minikeum asks in the All Mountain, Enduro & Cross-Country forum:Any feedback on the new Giro Switchblade helmet? It looks safer than other convertible helmets. Better coverage, and downhill specific certification. I'm concerned about sweat. The pads of my current helmet get filled with sweat, which ends up dripping on my sun glasses. And it is really annoying. So I'm looking for a better new helmet. Note that I don't care about the look: I am a joey, and I'm proud of it. Safety is my biggest concern.Thank you!

bigquotesThe Switchblade is definitely warmer than a traditional half shell, even with the chin bar removed. That's due to the extra material over the ears, and the fact that the vents aren't quite as large as what you'd find on a more XC-oriented helmet. That's one of the tradeoffs that comes with the increased level of protection, although it's one that plenty of riders are willing to accept.

As far as sweat dripping into your eyes, I wouldn't say that the Switchblade is particularly prone to that issue – the padding does a good job of wicking moisture away, even on hot summer days. I've found that it's the area around my ears where I notice the extra warmth – there's not a lot of airflow reaching that area when you're grinding up a long climb. Otherwise, I've found the Switchblade to be very comfortable in both half shell and full face mode, and that extra coverage does help provide a little extra piece of mind when dropping into nasty terrain.
Mike Kazimer

Giro Switchblade
The Giro Switchblade is warmer than a regular half shell helmet, but not nearly as warm as a traditional DH full face would be.




Disco Slippers for Downhill?
Question: Pinkbike user @ridedh10 asked this question in the Downhill Forum: Does anyone use a very stiff XC racing clipless mountain bike shoe for DH riding? I've tried the BMX/DH shoes from Shimano but they just aren't as stiff or as nice fitting as an XC race shoe, just wondering if anyone else likes such a stiff and tight fitting shoe for DH? I wonder why more pro DH riders don't do this (or do they)?

bigquotesI think there are a few reasons why riders don't use XC type shoes for downhill: fashion, function, and sponsorship.

Downhill is a very fashion orientated sport; the proof is in the pudding with the "no lycra or tight fitting clothing rule" from the UCI. Riders wanted to keep the sport looking 'moto' and avoid riders donning the lycra (even though it will be faster down the hill, of course). When it comes to footwear, most downhill riders seem to look for a more skate styled shoe, something that they could wear to an after race party without looking out of place; the general fashion-led consensus towards XC shoes is a glaring, "No way am I wearing those disco slippers!"

Performance wise, the amount of pedaling in downhill is minimal compared to the time spent spinning circles on a cross country bike. I remember reading years ago that Scott Sharples, who was the Australian team coach, calculated that the average World Cup downhill race comprised of eight, five-second sprints. So there is a marginal performance benefit to be gained from the power transfer of a stiff soled shoe. Personally, I prefer a softer shoe for downhill as it absorbs bumps better. I notice a huge difference moving from clipless shoes to flat pedals - put the flats on and suspension performance feels like it has improved instantly. Off the bike, a softer skate style shoe makes clambering up and down gnarly downhill tracks during practice easier, as well as hanging around the pits or the top of the hill for hours on end waiting for start times to arrive.

Sponsorship and the resulting consumer's choices cause riders to choose a downhill specific shoe. If riders see Aaron Gwin shredding with his Giro Chamber shoes, for example, then riders and fans will want the same, regardless of what is best for them. If brands can create shoes for different disciplines, this widens their marketing and sales potential.

At the end of the day, it's a personal choice. Try out as many options as possible and choose what you feel most comfortable in.
Paul Aston

Had to do a double take on this photo of Gwin. Anything catch your eye
Aaron Gwin racing in Fontana last weekend. We assume he rides in these Chamber shoes because he likes their performance for downhill. We also assume Giro pays him to wear them. Giro assume because you like him and he rides like a boss, you want to wear the same as him. Then you buy them and hopefully enjoy the ride characteristics he does.




Have some unresolved tech questions? Jump in the Pinkbike Forum and we'll look to answer it for next time.


150 Comments

  • 135 2
 I like big brakes and I cannot lie
  • 27 2
 reading that like the song makes it so much better
  • 5 5
 Size does matter!
  • 8 1
 Incoming rotor size debate
  • 9 6
 Yeah, I switched to 180's front and rear because now I only have to keep one size spare rotor around. Then I bought an XC bike and once again have to keep 2 rotor sizes around.
  • 16 0
 @ClaytonMarkin: run 203mm dinner plates on the xc and problem solved
  • 4 1
 @ClaytonMarkin: I used to be a contender. I really had the stuff. Then I went to 180s. It wasn't enough. I just needed more diameter they'd say. They still say. Vicious cycle.
  • 12 1
 You better dial 1-900-BRAKEALOT
  • 1 27
flag Wouldhaveletmego (Mar 7, 2017 at 21:22) (Below Threshold)
 Downvoted
  • 4 0
 @cdmbmw big brake rotors don't lie Smile
actually small rotors on DH bike = worn your rotors quickly + waste of 2 sets of pads quickly....+ generate enough heat to light a FKing fire....
  • 2 1
 GO BIG or GO HOME! ;-) As a large not fat but "big boned" human, I agree with the larger the rotors the better. I am going up to 203mm on my next rotor replacement. I'm also a fan of Metallic pads as the organic don't last with a large rider.
  • 2 0
 @cornichons: it's all about the feel when you squeeze it!
  • 5 0
 Brakes only slow you down.
  • 4 0
 @properp: "brakes are for people who lack commitment" is how I've heard it put best. lol
  • 13 0
 @Lurch-ECD: Pick a rotor size and be a disk about it.
  • 1 0
 @conoat: that's why I only run one on my bike
  • 70 2
 "We assume he rides in these Jacket shoes because he likes their performance for downhill. We also assume Giro pays him to wear them. Giro assume because you like him and he rides like a boss, you want to wear the same as him. Then you buy them and hopefully enjoy the ride characteristics he does."

Consumerism in a nutshell.
  • 15 6
 Its how Giro sells their products. Do you think they pay him purely for his benefit? No, its 90% for their profit
  • 44 5
 Its what keeps this whole thing going. All fine by me until someone soul-less pimps some stupid shit, like an eBike
  • 10 7
 Not so sure that's "consumerism", but regardless, it's awesome! The whole thing is voluntary. You're aren't forced to buy the product. You get to watch the races online for free and read articles here on PinkBike for free (hmmm how does PB keep this site going???). Multiple companies compete for your business. We get to watch amazing athletes develop/test/market the products. I'm thankful I do not live in a society where some bureaucrat get's to decide what shoes I can and can't have to use for cycling. If only it was like this for all aspects of the economy.
  • 18 0
 Anyone else old enough to remember DH racers wearing XC shoes?

Main reason against wearing XC shoes for DH is the cleat mounting holes are too far forward compared to a gravity shoe. My calves are much more tired after a DH section when wearing my Giro Codes compared to 510 Impact2 Clips on the same trail and the same bike.
  • 8 3
 @sevensixtwo: You're getting played with your e-bike hate too bro...just from another side of the coin.
  • 4 1
 I dunno. I think Gwin is a master - probably my favorite racer - but it's 5-10s for life. I used to love my old skate shoes back in high school. As soon as I learned they make those comfortable bastards for bikes I was on board.
  • 4 0
 @sevensixtwo: Soul-less. Shoe pun. Love it.
  • 3 0
 @sevensixtwo: Shots fired.
  • 3 2
 I hope they are paying him handsomely to wear them. You just know they are made for $4.20 a pair in some factory in Viet Nam or Indo... where they also make Nike, Adidas, Jump and Traxx. They are certainly at the top end of the price spectrum, and it can't all be down to ""R&D", "shipping", "import duty" and "unicorn fur".
  • 4 0
 @jaame: They charge what they think consumer is willing to pay. Businesses don't get to decide how much you pay for a product, unless they can force you to buy it, which in this case they can not.
  • 1 0
 Guess you picked the Camber just as a random example for marketing voodoo. All true. Actually I really do like the Camber for function and looks. But let's talk about cheaper and better clipless shoes. Your favorite?
  • 1 1
 @westeast: I know. What I mean is, since they are so expensive, the company must be making a lot of profit on them. I would hope that money was going to someone awesome like Gwin, rather than to pay a dividend to someone who invested in the company without even knowing.
  • 28 1
 specialized 2FO cliplite's are great for DH. They're stiff, sleek and offer a fair amount of protection as well for the toe box.
  • 14 0
 2FO are simply the best for for dh in my opinion...had 5ten, shimano and 661 in the past but nothing like 2FO
  • 8 0
 @Pedro019: Second that... they are stiff and cool
  • 4 0
 Best cliplite shoe I've worn and have converted many 510 guys over as well. They just get the job done best.
  • 6 0
 Great shoe but extremely narrow, I prefer Shimano AM9. Yes I have both.
  • 3 0
 2FOs are the only clip-less shoe i will wear now. I just used them for a weekend of riding the nastiest tracks that NZ has to offer and they were awesome. if 2FOs didn't exist id still be riding flats.
  • 4 0
 @Beez177: Do they have toe protection? I also like the Shimano fit but dang!... I didnt enjoy breaking my big toe on a rock-pedal strike.
  • 2 0
 Yep. Completely agree. Had mine for 18 months now and they have been thrashed on all day missions, 2hr plus carrying my bike up mountains, XC spins after work all year round and DH runs. The boa dials are holding up really well too. I ride them 3-4 times a week.
  • 2 0
 @danny611: true, but my pinky toe is crushed in the cliplites and I wouldn't wanted to smash it against a rock in either shoe.
  • 1 0
 Got myself some 2FO cliplite after my shimano AM45s finally died (after 6 years of abuse) and the 2FO are lighter, stiffer and a dam good all rounder (i wanted something i could use for all my riding from XC and Enduro to DH) the only trade off is the added stiffness and less padding make them a little more uncomfortable and harsh but i tend to just wear thick socks and that helps. they make a good compromise between DH fashion and XC performance though.
  • 1 0
 @Beez177: 2fo is way too narrow, could not even get on my feet, even going up a size. Sent them back and got a refund.
  • 2 0
 I fancy the 2FO flats but they don't get good reviews. I used to use Shimano M110s, which I loved. Several years later got the AM45s, which I hate. Too heavy, bulky and thick. I am also looking to go to a more racey shoe. I will probably plump for the ME7. They are meant to be the shit.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: ME7 look good but only trouble is they are well over £130 at least from what i can find, got me 2FO cliplite lace for £80 and AM9s can be had for £70. i agree AM45s are a bit bulky tho especially once soaked up some water, that why i've gone for lighter shoes for all year round use and multi discipline but just use seal skin socks (one of the best £20 I've spent, was reluctant for years to spend £20 on socks but so worth it)
  • 1 0
 +11111 the 2fo cliplites are great all around shoes. I would prefer a little more flex in the sole, but other than that they are money.
  • 1 0
 @maglor: I was looking at the ME5 but then at CRC the price difference is only about £13 to the ME7.

In my experience they last ages so I wouldn't mind stumping up the cash. My original M110s were nine years old when I gave them away!
  • 37 11
 I personally can't take that switchblade seriously. Without the chin bar it looks like a 1960s moped helmet that only stepdads wear.
  • 8 0
 I had a giro ski helmet in 1995 that looked almost identical to that thing without the chin bar
  • 19 1
 I don't know... It reminds me of classic enduro moto lids personally
  • 9 0
 "What's with the pensioner helmets and condom suits?" -some internet genius discovering moto trials on youtube

Also now my instant mental association when I look at this helmet with its chin bar off.
  • 11 0
 Full face and sunglasses, oh yeah
  • 1 1
 haha I thought I was the only one to think that!! Everybody seems to love it... can't understand how someone could find it soooo awesome!! :/ I really doubt I'll see one in real life though! lol
  • 2 1
 @loganskis: ha yeh same. its still in my parents basement. Ima give it a new life as an enduroBro accessory when I get back to NZ! s.stpost.com/eccstorefront/product_images/71150/f_71150_2.1.jpg
  • 13 0
 Aaron Gwin uses the Giro Chamber, their clipless compatible shoe, not the Jacket, their flat pedal shoe. I love the Jackets on flat pedals though, as well as for everyday walking around or working at the bikeshop.
  • 15 0
 Thanks @getschwifty! It should also be mentioned that modern DH shoes (like the Chamber and Jacket) and even some trail ride shoes (like the Terraduro) have more protection built in to the toe, the ankles and the heel.
  • 12 0
 @GiroSportDesign: while we have you here, we want a flat pedal shoe with lace covers (Shimano doesn't count those are hideous)
  • 16 0
 @adrennan: Yes. And free pizza and beers!
  • 4 0
 @GiroSportDesign: I'm on my 2nd pair of Jackets after entirely using up the 1st pair, and will probably order a 3rd pair this summer. Great shoes, even for BMX, cyclocross, and city riding/commuting. (I have flat pedals on every bike) My one gripe is, bring back the Jacket Mid! I want some SO bad, but the Jimbo Phillips edition aren't available in my size.
I also have a Giro Switchblade, and it ROCKS! In addition to being perfect for the kind of trails I like to ride, I use it without the chin bar for BMX and urban freeride around Seattle.
  • 6 0
 @MTB-Colada: I second this request. In fact this should be the priority
  • 4 0
 @GiroSportDesign: please modify the jacket to include a raised ankle cuff on the inside fir ankle bone protection!
  • 7 0
 I have my preferences, then I have my wallet. So When I was looking at DH/endure shoes, I considered tons of brand and every option, weighing my choice carefully... Then bought hellcats because they were on sale. Same thing with helmets, I looked at tons of options, then bought the one on sale. Don't buy 35$ MTB shoes, buy 125$ mtb shoes for 35$. Don't buy a 45$ helmet, buy a 100$ helmet for 45$
  • 3 0
 That's how I got my Poc full facer. On sale for $100.
  • 5 0
 @mikelevy: If I remember well, the UCI rule of "no lycra or tight fitting clothing rule" dates back from the time when downhillers were wearing tight outfits (in the 90's -- I know, I was there) and is meant to avoid an unfair "aerodynamic" advantage. Check John Tomac on this picture: coresites-cdn.factorymedia.com/dirt_new/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/John-Tomac1.jpg
  • 7 0
 Not even the 90s, riders were wearing skin suits up until about 8 or 9 years ago
  • 2 0
 classic. I have poster with tomac in the black suit. stupid rule. loose all the advantage with that numberplate. hahahah
  • 2 0
 Incorrect. 2008 as I remember.
  • 2 1
 Those were also the days of the Kamikaze Downhill etc. when DH races were less technical and more about pure speed. Although a skin suit may still give an advantage, I doubt it would have as much effect on the courses nowadays as it did back then.
  • 1 0
 It was weird. Until at least 2005 (according to the Earthed 3 video) riders were required to ride the UCI DH world championships in a skin suit. Quite some riders actually didn't like that, though for instance MTB Cut team also rode world cup races in skin suits. Then all of a sudden UCI made a 180deg turn and went from an obligation to wear skin suits at the DH worlds to a complete ban. So that pissed off some other riders who actually liked the suit. It is awkward how this UCI works, like a bunch of politicians.

"Ok, no one goes home until we have another new rule. Any suggestions?"
"Let's ban the skin suit for a change."
"Allright, good enough. Weekend!"
  • 3 0
 I remember the reason as industry pressure. After Palmer popularised the moto look for dh, clothing manufacturers like the image. Riders made agreements to run peaks on their helmets even in windy conditions. Rachel Atherton wrote "skinsuits such" on her arm. The UCI brought the broadcut clothing rule in and we joined beach volleyball as a sport with a purely aesthetic rule about clothing. Note that Rachel wears the tightest clothes she can and used to pin her clothes tighter with her number. Aero is faster. She knows it.
  • 12 4
 "Downhill is a very fashion orientated sport" - what's wrong with downhilling in a nutshell for $400 Alex?
  • 5 3
 Is there a mtb discipline that isn't? Wear baggies and 5-10's to a XC ride and see how they react.
  • 6 0
 @WaterBear: They react just fine if you're not riding with a*sholes. Now if you show up to a race, with a full kit clad field, it might be an entirely different story.
  • 3 1
 @WaterBear: I ride like that on XC tracks, no one laughs
  • 2 0
 @hpiguy: Let's change it to 'show up at a race...' then. I have gone downhilling in a non-race setting wearing wal-mart althetic shorts and a wal-mart t-shirt and no one said a thing.
  • 2 0
 @WaterBear: I did this. No problem mate, except 'bout my aero. Probie need to shave my legs next time
  • 1 1
 @Tier1Voodoo: My point was supposed to be: "Is there a mtb discipline that isn't?"

If there is no situation in which wearing one kind of mtb kit in the wrong situation will get you mocked, then in what sense is this a fashion oriented sport?
  • 2 1
 @WaterBear: I agree with you. fashion clicks in any aspect of the sport is dumb. And for what its worth, Pinkbike seems to be the biggest collection of those types on the internet, even more than - gasp - mtbr. Read the comments on any review - helmet, bike, etc on Pinkbike and you'll see them bitching about fashion with no regard to function. "The logos on the sidewalls of those tires are so lame!" Maybe get your bike dirty and don't worry about it.
  • 1 0
 @WaterBear: Our group generally doesn't care about what you're wearing. We have a guy that shows up regularly in a cotton T shirt to group rides, nobody says a word. What we're riding the majority of the time is definitely XC type terrain. We're just out there to have fun, and hang out with our friends, we don't judge each other or new riders to the group.
  • 1 1
 ""Downhill is a very fashion orientated sport" - what's wrong with downhilling in a nutshell for $400 Alex?"

It's like watching Charlie Brown trying to kick a football.
  • 6 0
 Downhill shoes are safer. More padding. Wrecked at Plattekill last summer and managed to scrape/bruise my foot through my Shimano SH-AM45s, and the bruise lasted weeks. Glad I wasn't wearing something less beefy.
  • 1 0
 my 5-10s have saved my toes numerous times catching a rock or root - not sure about the clipless shoes, but the DH/AM shoes reinforced in the toes and ankles are for sure worth their weight.
  • 2 0
 Safer too when you step off. A skate style shoe with rubber sole will grip on rocks. A carbon soled XC shoe will slip.
  • 9 1
 Simple - 203/180....Full Face....AM9
  • 3 0
 I have Mavic xc shoes that I love when it comes to comfort, the issue is when riding dh and you need to unclip, they don't provide any grip unless you're clipped in, I found them to be almost dangerous. The new wave of enduro shoes are a good compromise of xc shoe comfort and dh shoe grip/practicality.
  • 3 0
 I've spent years on ultra stiff XC clipless shoes and you're not missing much @ridedh10. If you are ever off the bike, they are the worst shoes imaginable. Not much comfort level either, but your foot will be nice and snug.
  • 9 3
 XC shoes = broken toes if you hit a rock.
  • 6 1
 I've hit a few rocks with several pairs of XC shoes. Not one broken toe. They're called 'disco slippers', but are not actual slippers.
  • 6 0
 Exactly. I broke a big toe from a large rock kicking up off of my front wheel while downhilling at Northstar. I was wearing XC shoes, because it was ten years ago and shoe selection was a lot more limited then. --Dain Zaffke from Giro
  • 1 0
 You might not break a toe, but it's like turf toe. It fucking sucks.
  • 3 0
 For people that run into the problem of sweat going into their eyes i have had really good luck solving that problem with this product:
store.haloheadband.com/elastic-sport-headband-p/hp.htm
  • 1 0
 My buddy won't ride without his. He got really bummed out when we got to the trail and he realized he didn't have it with.
  • 1 0
 Does it really help?!?! It drives me absolutely nuts! I sweat more than most, and when riding here in San Diego it can get a bit toasty. All hell breaks loose and my sunglasses become worthless. For a while I was carrying one or two of the glasses clothes to clean them over the rides.

I may have to try this, because it will change everything if it keeps the sweat out of my eyes and off my sunglasses!
  • 1 0
 totally agree - I wear mine on about every ride now. I also have a underarmour head band with the rubber channels, but the halo is the best.
  • 1 0
 @cgdibble: Not perfect, but definitely helps. After a while it does become saturated and sweat might drip, but it does a decent job of channeling it away from your eyes. I won't ride without it. I also have shaved head, so I use the skullcap version to keep the sun off my dome, actually keeps me cooler.
  • 1 0
 Sweats not as bad as sun screen is!!

Lost my halo band, used to need it with my Fox Flux but find I don't need it with my TLD A1.

@cgdibble: yeah little sweat spots on the glasses sucks.
  • 3 0
 I wonder how leanient the UCI is about the no "tight clothing rule". I'm not advocating for the return of Lycra in DH racing, but it seems to me that some guys could benefit from not wearing parachutes for shirts.
  • 5 1
 Why the hell is the UCI concerned about 'image'. MTB is a SPORT FFS. Even though I wear baggies and would laugh if I seen a Lycra clad DHer, It not up to the UCI to be a fashion police.
  • 1 0
 it's measured with how much you can grab. most pros are running as slim a shirt as possible, see the athertons, gwin, hart, etc. all very slim fitting with the minimum amount of give.
  • 1 0
 @atrokz: Oh I just figured Gee Atherton wore tighter shirts to show off how shredded he is.
  • 2 0
 it seems as though there has been a crucial point missed... XC shoes have the clip setup to work much closer to the ball of your foot and can often lack the lack aft (as oppossed to fore) adjustability to have a slightly more centered footing on the pedal (now that pedal efficiency is no longer the main driver in the process).
  • 3 0
 BINGO. that entire diatribe was off the point entirely.
  • 2 0
 @mikelevy: I thought the point of 4 pistons is to improve modulation rather than power? I found this link a while back which compares power of brakes and the power doesn't seem to relate to pistons at all.(www.bikeradar.com/mtb/gear/article/how-we-test-hydraulic-disc-brakes-24345)
  • 4 0
 As far as full face helmets go the new fox proframe looks sweet! DH rated and should have pretty good airflow
  • 2 0
 @mikekazimer: "...a little extra piece of mind...". It's 'peace of mind', because your mind is at peace.

As opposed to 'a piece of mind', which is what my wife is always giving me.
  • 4 3
 Check the new fox fullface. Most ventilation ever light. I dont like the new switchblade taking the chin bar off maxe negligable difference to airflow and weight. Looks dorky as a half shell and is hot.
  • 11 0
 Halo headband is very good too.
  • 2 0
 @diego-b: They are the best.
  • 3 0
 What's better for a light rider?
Small rotors, 4 piston brakes or large rotors 2 piston brakes?
  • 1 1
 for a big(er) rider like myself (210lbs) i like the 4 piston with 203s. I just swapped my xtr 2 piston caliper to a saint (leaving the levers as-is) and the power increase is very noticeable. the weight gain was pretty small, about 45 grams. (the weight diff. between the xtr caliper/pads and the saint caliper/pads)

and the difference between the 203 vs 180 rotor is about 30g (magura storm sl) so it seems like weight wise, 2piston with 203 vs 4 piston with 180, the weight would be almost the same. within 15g or so. But I havent yet tried how the second option (4piston w. 180 rotor) actually feels as far as the braking performance... but it might be worth a shot.
  • 1 0
 As a big guy at 275lb I have settled on Formula T1 sintered pads and 203mm disks front and rear.
It does not take much to bake a small disk/caliper setup for me.

Now my daughter is a feather weight at 85lb I took the 203's on her bike off and put on 160's front and rear with two piston Elixer's and its great for her. Good feel (could be better), light enough and they don't glow red at the bottom of the mountain like that set up would for me Smile

You may have to go thru some experimenting to find the balance between budget, feel, heat and how long they last for yourself. That said, I would guess your more the 140lb range and if your DH oriented 4 piston 180/160 would be a good starting point. It will also depend on how you brake, your mix of rideing etc etc
  • 8 1
 cantilevers
  • 1 0
 I weigh 165 and use M8000 Shimano XT brakes with 203 / 180 and, frankly, I would like more power for extended downhills. I have Zees and 203/180 on my DH bike, and same story. I'd like Saint + 203/180.

I've never noticed the initial bite being a problem - at least not yet. From where I'm sitting, the more brake power the better, since your hands will be less worn out after a few runs in the park.
  • 1 0
 @WaterBear: I doubt going to Saint would do much for you over the Zee setup. The Saint are better because they have some nice features like the reach knob, not really for better braking feel or grab. I could be wrong there do some research. Are you using the resin or metal pads in the Zee? Try the metal if your on the resin pads.

M8000, ya that could be upgraded and I am sure you would be much happier if you do.
May I suggest Avid Guide brakes Smile
Just from my research anyhow....
If you do change from Shimano to Avid make sure you get new caliper adaptors (post to IS or whatever your bike needs) Shimano have a different angle they hold the caliper than Avid, they look right but you can get some bad brake squeal if you don't do that.
  • 7 4
 got no brake control skills fit 180s .
got brake control skills fit 203s
pick a rota size and be a dick ????
  • 1 0
 The IXS Trail RS is the best sweat-handling helmet I've used—lots of ventilation to decrease sweat, but when it inevitably comes, it does an amazing job wicking it around to the sides so it doesn't get in your eyes
  • 1 0
 I bought a convertible helmet, and i have never even put the chin-bar on. I can see the application for racers, but for most people, i think it would be better to just have a good half shell.
  • 4 1
 der... der... der der.... der.
  • 1 0
 i bought a rockshox kage rc 2015 recently and it wont fit but its the correct size the front black tube is too big and wont fit i have a santa cruz vp free any tips
  • 3 0
 Pull the mounting hardware out of your old shock and install it in your new Kage!
  • 2 0
 Like the piggy back is contacting the frame? Not all shocks fit on all frames (especially older ones)
  • 2 1
 I use the old 5.10 Minnaar shoes, the white and orange model... Because sometimes on a XC race I had to climb walking. Good grip and no sinking on sand!!
  • 1 0
 I have those, they are amazing. Especially because you can flip and flop between flats and clips so easily
  • 1 0
 I got those, too, and love 'em. The 5.10 logo is starting to come off and they're beat to hell but man they've been good shoes.
  • 2 0
 Can we please address the question of how to keep a Boxxer team from bottoming out (even with stiffest coil)? Thx
  • 8 0
 Is that you Can Zink?
  • 3 0
 you tried the black extra firm spring ? im 230lbs and find for dh racing the blue firm spring is fine. if you aint much bigger and you are bottoming out the black one then i dont know if there's a solution for you other than to stop huckin 60ft drops to flat
  • 1 0
 I'm a fat, slow piece of shit and the big rotors are too touchy. If I had sustained fast portions bigger rotors nice to have.
  • 2 0
 Fuck Fashion wear whatever works for you I'm pretty sure gyro make enough shoe styles for Arron to take his pick from!
  • 2 0
 Oh ,and Gwin wears Chambers btw...
  • 1 0
 How do I submit a question to be answered? I'm wondering about running a metric shock on a non metric bike
  • 5 0
 You can't buy metric shocks aftermarket yet. You could pull it off but be aware of all the usual issues of short/long shocking and the potential interference. Almost certainly not worth it unless you got the shock for free.
  • 3 0
 You post it in the forums and hope it gets picked before too many armchair experts get involved
  • 1 1
 I want to see moar infos re: the Leatt Enduro convertible helmet. It looks like it would be better for teh climbz. Make with teh reviewz @leattphil
  • 3 0
 Was that a YT ad?
  • 1 0
 No, Giro ad.
  • 1 0
 Interesting... I just wear skate shoes when I ride. Never thought much about soft vs. stiff for pedal performance.
  • 1 0
 Sofft shoes on a long ride equals sore feet.
  • 1 0
 I'm 6'2 and 230lbs,,the only thing that slows me down is 203's front and back and 2.5 tire on the rear
  • 1 0
 what about stiff flat shoes for dh/enduro riding?
  • 5 0
 It's important to find a balance between pedaling efficiency and having the sole flexible enough to conform to the pedal. Even with grippy rubber, if the sole is too stiff, it won't grip the pedal as well.
  • 2 0
 @GiroSportDesign: actually, I really don't like it when my shoe conforms to the pedal, as having my foot arched around the pedal creates pain in the bottom of my foot almost immediately. I wish there were better shoe options for flats that were stiff enough that they didn't arc around the pedal! If the sole of the shoe is flat and stiff and the pedal is relatively flat, why wouldn't it grip? I'm constantly looking for longer pedals to compensate for flexy MTB shoes
  • 1 0
 @GiroSportDesign: Precisely. Once they break in, the Jackets give just enough pedal feel without sacrificing stiffness. No pedal feel=no good for me.
  • 2 0
 I used to ride BMX with the stiffest flat shoes I could find. Which were Simple. Now I ride downhill on midtop Vans, certain Vans have stiffer soles.
  • 1 0
 @Squeakybb: Maybe try bigger pedals? DMR Vaults are pretty big (I am size 12 and really like them on my dh bike).
  • 1 0
 @Squeakybb: @Squeakybb: Try a thinly padded Sole footbed. Will provide support even in squishier shoe, such as Freerider. Newer model Freerider Contact (& probably Pro) have a stiffer midsole. Don't know about Giro. If that's not enough, there's Pedaling Innovations.
  • 1 0
 @MTB-Colada: I have the vaults. I'm also a size 12. Vaults with the older 5-10 impacts are a decent combo. If I run a 5-10 freerider my feet hurt on any pedal. I need a pedal just a little longer than a vault and a shoe that's at least as stiff as the impact. I'm surprised so many people don't mind their feet arching around the pedals... I literally cannot see the benefit of that.
  • 1 0
 Shimano XT ice tech. I'm 105kg 1.88m. 203mm rotors are awesome.
  • 1 0
 Brake are for wusses
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.037163
Mobile Version of Website