Ask Pinkbike: Knee Pad Suggestions, Tires for the Southwest & Do I Want a Singlespeed?

Jan 29, 2019
by Mike Kazimer  

Here at Pinkbike, we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul-searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand-picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.




Which Tires for Riding and Racing in the Southwest?

Question: @flaggnar asks in the Bikes, Parts, and Gear Forum: I was thinking about running a Maxxis Assegai front and Aggressor rear for enduro racing and general aggressive riding in the southwest US. I have Cushcore installed in the rear so I was thinking a lighter tire (over DHR II) might be nicer, and sometimes with the rear tires that have big knobs and big traction even when I want to break loose sometimes it feels like I can’t, so that’s another reason. The Assegai seems like great traction... not great rolling resistance but that’s why it’s on the front. Any thoughts / suggestions?


bigquotesThat's a reasonable setup, but if I was racing and riding in the Southwest I'd go with a Maxxis Minion DHF up front and a Griffin in the rear. I'd say the Assegai is overkill for the typical conditions in your part of the world – the DHF will be faster rolling, while still offering plenty of traction for those loose and sandy corners.

Speaking of sand, the Griffin is one of my favorite tires when things are extra-dry and blown out; I prefer it over the Aggressor. It's only available in a 2.3” width, but pair it with a 2.5” DHF and you'll have a great combo for drier conditions. You may also want to consider a semi-slick, something along the lines of a Minion SS if you're looking for help getting that rear wheel to break free.

Maxxis Griffin
The Griffin seems to fly under the radar, but it's a great choice for dry and dusty trails.




Should I Get a Singlespeed?


Question: @bestseller2019 asks in the All-Mountain/Cross-Country Forum: I need to buy a second, inexpensive mountain bike. I was reading about the Gravity G29 FS. Can you climb mountains (Seattle area) in a bike without gears? I like the idea of simplicity, but not sure how practical that bike is when riding trails.


bigquotesSinglespeeds were all the rage for a time in the early 2000s, and I spent my fair share of time riding on the one-speed train. I even did a 24 hour race (remember those?) solo on a singlespeed – my reasoning was that when my brain started to melt in the middle of the night I wouldn't need to remember how to shift. These days, my only singlespeeds are a dirt jumper and a town bike – my knees are much happier with my decicion to stop ditching the derailleur.

But back to your question – should you get a singlespeed? Yes. Why? Well, you say you already have a mountain bike, so I'm assuming you're looking for something a little different, a new challenge. A singlespeed will change your typical riding experience – you'll find yourself standing up and pedaling way, way more than you ever have, and you'll also start trying to figure out methods to maintain your speed when you're spun out. You might even need to walk once in a while, which is humbling, and something I try to avoid at all costs, but there are some steep hills outside of Seattle, and not everyone has legs like Robert Forstemann.

Singlespeeds may not be as popular as they once were, but in a time of 12-speed drivetrains, there's a certain appeal to the simplicity that comes with eliminating the cassette and derailleur altogether. I'd say go for it, although I'd be tempted to save up a little more cash to get a bike with a suspension fork - your wrists will thank you. You'll also probably need to spend some time experimenting with different gear ratios depending on just how steep your local trails are. 


Singlespeeds aren't for everyone, but they can make for a fun N+1 bike.





Comfortable Knee Pads?


Question: @congnargnar asks in the Bikes, Parts, and Gear Forum: Looking for a new set of kneepads now that my G-Forms are shot. Looking for something that's good and breathable for trail riding/uphill but burly enough for downhill. I like the look of the 7iDPs, but are there other pads that are more versatile?


bigquotesPOC's Joint VPD knee pads are the most comfortable knee pads that I've found when it comes to pedaling performance. At $150 USD they're not cheap, but they stay in place extremely well, don't cause any annoying chafing, and help keep hard slams from totally toasting your knees.

Those POC pads are a good pick for general trail riding, but if you're looking for something a little burlier, iXS' new Trigger knee pads might be the ticket. They offer extended coverage, including protection on the side of the knee. A set just arrived in for testing, and I've been able to get in a few rides with them so far. My only nitpick is that the upper cuff could be a little taller, but otherwise they're extremely comfortable, and provide a good deal of protection without being overly bulky.

POC Joint VPD Knee
POC Joint VPD knee pads.
iXS Trigger knee/shin guards. Photo: iXS.




Have some unresolved tech questions? Jump in the Pinkbike Forum and we'll look to answer it for next time.


105 Comments

  • + 98
 If you're asking if you should get a single speed...You shouldn't...If it becomes impossible to resist getting a single speed...You should...
  • + 20
 Great way to look at it! I was like this with a steel HT.. I always asked if I wanted one... And this year, I finally determined that my life wasn't complete without one. And now I have a steel hardtail!
  • + 12
 Been running my downhill bike single speed for over a year now and I can honestly say I'm never having a DH with a full cassette again. It's way too much fun.
  • + 8
 @ItsOnlyJayke: Seen that Starling DH bike with single speed, bmx cranks and Ohlins suspension? Oh my word!!!
  • + 5
 I like gears.
  • + 1
 @ItsOnlyJayke: I'm looking into the single speed dh thing and seems very practical. Do you use a tensioner or a derailleur ?
Also don't need 11 speed on my enduro bike, i think i would be ok with seven
  • - 1
 @Code98:

"Also don't need 11 speed on my enduro bike, i think i would be ok with seven"

I have bought the 10 speed cassette and reduced it to 8 speed with spacers on my hardtail enduro bike. Never felt better. All those extra ratios are ridiculous. My current set up is 36t on front and 11-32 on rear and it is more then enough for any climbs. Also by reducing 10s to 8s chain banging on border speeds is less and that actually also feels good.
So go for it. Throw away couple chainrinngs from cassette put spacers and you'll feel totally another level of simplicity and convenience.
Of course this must be done with understanding what you are doing.

I can provide you with some photos of drivetrain if you need Smile
  • + 2
 @swan3609: and now make it a single speed hard tail and your life will be perfect
  • + 2
 @Code98: Alfine tensioner worked perfectly for me & a few others I know
  • + 1
 @ivankvkharkiv: woah, you should be really strong if you can use those gears.

Anyway, i ll be grateful if you can send me some photos.
Last year i ditched the front derailleur and it's been good, less things to worry about, but i've never tought of removing gear from a cassette, i bought a 10 speed 11-42 instead
  • + 1
 @lubes17319: definitely gonna try that when i buy my dh bike
  • + 1
 Haha that's exactly how I ended up with an el mariachi ss!
  • + 1
 @swan3609: I've wanted to do this with my Honzo. I'm gonna hate it, but I want it.
  • + 23
 Singlespeeds are a blast, and (properly geared) they're a great option for someone getting into, or getting back into the sport. They're cheap. They eliminate the most complex parts of bike maintenance. They teach you the value of gaining and maintaining momentum.

They make you a better rider.

When I bought my first mountain bike as an adult, it was a used, $600 Origin 8 Scout. With a single speed drivetrain and mechanical discs, it was super-simple to maintain. I went from not having ridden a mountain bike since I was a teenager, to more than 1K singletrack miles on it the first year I owned it.

When I upgraded after about a year, I kept it in my garage as my backup bike, and would still take it out whenever my main bike was in the shop, when I had a friend in town without a bike or just needed to be reminded of how fun it was to ride a single speed hardtail.

I sold it a couple years ago in a moment of temporary insanity, and I'll pick up another as soon as my bike budget allows.

The only downside (apart from not understanding how other riders can happily meander up sustained gradual climbs) is that people tend to see you on a singlespeed, and assume you're some kind of pain-loving badass god-of-the-climbs. Despite all other evidence to the contrary.
  • + 8
 I bought one while living in the UK for a year.
Made me a WAY better rider, plus way less chance of a mechanical in the mud and slop that is British winter (or all year really).
Plus there is no feeling better than kicking the butt of some guy on a Yeti sb5 than passing him on a descent, while on a singlespeed hard tail.
  • + 2
 My only bike is a single speed hardtail these days as it's quite flat where I live. I absolutely love it. There are long lists of benefits of single speed out there on the web but one of the best reasons for me is that, because it forces you to stand up more, you get a better upper body workout rather than just sitting and spinning. Fitness is one of the main reasons I ride.
  • + 3
 @tremeer023: That's completely true.

When I'd take out my single speed after a few months of riding geared bikes, I'd absolutely feel it in my arms, shoulders and back (healthy muscle-soreness, not unhealthy back pain).

Riding a single speed forces you to climb with your whole body.
  • + 3
 Circa 2005ish I was told that every real mountain biker had ridden the local epic ride on a singlespeed.

For us it was downieville classic with no shuttling: start in downieville, warm up with 49 to Sierra City, then the whole baby head strewn Jeep road climb, then the descent. It was brutal; we did it a couple of times per year. One especially masochistic buddy would ride it on a 2:1 gear (26").
  • + 5
 Another reason to ride a singlespeed is if you have kids. It'll put you on a more-level playing field on the climbs and can make for a better experience than having to always be on the brakes, or taking breaks for them to catch-up. I put together a SS hard-tail from an old Aluminum Nashbar frame and Manitou fork, plus some old parts from the garage, and I get compliments every time I'm out riding it.
  • + 3
 My knee and back pain went away after a few months of ss (Seattle area). I think it really helped my core and glutes.

What I didn't expect is how much more fun I had, you're forced to look ahead to plan how you'll keep your speed. Now I get to a flat spot I sprint to up my cadence.

No more hamster in a cage spinning up hills.
  • + 3
 @tremeer023: ditto. Single speed rigid steel 29er as my N=1 and it's a blast. You just ride and don't have to think, just pedal.
  • + 2
 @Mazdamia: I am not sure I follow on this one. Singlespeeding makes you faster up a lot of climbs because it forces you to put in more effort to sustain whatever gear you have. It also makes riding with slow climber difficult because you need to attack and preserve momentum or else you are walking. Riding behind a gear rider on a section with punchy climbs in particularly frustrating because they are letting off the gas to gear down right when you are trying to hammer. This typically ends with you stalling out and walking on something you can easily clean on your own.
  • + 1
 @MTBSPEC: Or a situation where everyone thinks you're some kind of super competitive a*shole who wants to beat them on the climbs.

No, it's just that this is literally the slowest speed I can climb without walking.
  • + 2
 @MTBSPEC: Might have said that backwards. It's more of an overall leveling of the field. Thinking about it, yes I'll climb faster (but exert more), and be slower on the descents and flats due to gearing.

I get a good workout while staying close to the family, where with a geared bike I'm going to tend to have to take it easy to keep from ditching them the whole time.
  • + 12
 In the midwest where we lack big/steep climbs, singlespeeds can be an awesome second alternative. They'll give you a different perspective on your local trails, often times forcing you to pick different lines. You never worry about being in the right gear because you're never in the right gear.
  • + 14
 ...well...when you have a single speed it's ok to skip leg day at the gym.
  • + 9
 @congnargnar got it right when looking at 7protection pads. The Sam Hill pads and if you need a hint more protection the Projects. Both sit nice and high on thigh so they never fall down or bunch up. The Sam is a little more breathable than the Projects, but the Projects give a little better knee support if you also like your pads to give some knee support as well. These are pads you can put on at the house and not take off till your back home. Superb comfort excellent protection, and they stay in place in a crash.
  • + 1
 If you want protection while riding in the heat, I'd recommend Dainese Trail Skins 2 Lite. No question other pads offer more protection, but those are manageable in even the hottest conditions.
  • + 2
 I have the og trail skin 2's going on 2 years. The velcro on the top lost some of its stickieness however they have protected my knees from some pretty bad falls. Pretty good value for a knee pad that you can wear all summer.
  • + 1
 I've got a set of the Sweet Protection Bearsuit Lights. They go on for a full days riding and are really comfortable. Also, it gets hot and humid here (35c and 90% humidity) and they're fine.
  • + 10
 Take your geared bike, choose a combination of gears you think you can live with and go for a ride. Resist the temptation of shifting and then ask yourself if the experience was enjoyable.
  • + 6
 Having a true singlespeed drivetrain makes the bike lighter and the power transfer feel snappier.
  • + 1
 That settles it, I definitely don't want a singlespeed. That was a great thought experiment
  • + 5
 yeah that's not even close to what a singlespeed feels like. you still have a heavy rear end, poor chain wrap, and the derailleur. this idea's been yapped about pretty much only by people who don't have an SS. Next!
  • + 5
 Crap summation of what it's like to ride a SS, without factoring in how much more efficient it is, and how much lighter your bike will be. That said, I still did not find it all that enjoyable unless I'm comparing it to not riding because my main bike is down with a mechanical issue.
  • + 6
 The good: SS makes every old trail new... you are hard AF just rolling up to the trailhead/groupride/Race...you’ll become a better rider...Under $50 if you want a new drivetrain (which you might never need)... 8% less drivetrain drag with perfect chain line and no boogie wheels/ freewheels....Proper off-road chain, not 10-11-12 speed noodle to thrash...stronger wheel without gear dish.. purest riding experience The bad: knees, Achilles, back, wrists will suffer as 99% hard tail/ rigid (Spec Epic Works I hear SS because no chain growth)...you will become obsessed with gearbox Bikes that the ss gives a low tech glimpse of (strong, quiet, no rear shitnest, etc.) ... rode ss for 4 years, no regrets.
  • + 5
 Ditto on the POC Joint VPD. They say put and are supremely comfy, so good I’ll forget I’m wearing them when running around after a ride whether the pub or errands before I get home. I got a great deal on them but they’re worth even MSRP.
  • + 1
 For me the higher expense of the POC is justified by the fact that I'll automatically wear them all the time (on the bike!). If I'd spent half the amount and then not worn them as they were less comfortable is not a worthwhile saving in my opinion...

Fit is the most important aspect - I'd recommend trying a few and see what works best, whether that be POC or another brand... Get yourself to a well stocked bike shop or make good use of some free returns!
  • + 8
 Borrow/hire a singlespeed for a day. After that you will be sold or running for your life. Either way, you will know...
  • + 4
 I don’t normally ever comment.

But please DONT get the POC knee pads. I have two sets that were measured appropriately for my size. Went from POC air to the VPD thinking I had just purchased the wrong knee pads for the application.

Every time I have needed them they slide out of the way. Not sure if this is a design flaw or just poor engineering. But for how much they cost I can’t think of a more worthless knee pad.
  • + 3
 You can't expect every product to fit YOU. They fit my ginglymus joints great.
  • + 4
 The Griffin is one of my favorite rear tires from Maxxis, especially for blown out summer conditions in CO. It brakes better than Aggressor yet seemed to be faster. But it only being available in MaxxTerra meant it was absolutely shot in about 3-4 weeks.
  • + 4
 Buddy of mine has an older Spot belt driven singlespeed 29er hardtail. I love it!!! It's such a fun bike to ride at some of the less challenging rides and the suffering is just awesome. I'll hope to pick that up when he's ready to move it...
  • + 4
 For the kneepads I'll throw in my 2c. I'm currently on the Race Face Flank (adds shin protection) but they also make the Ambush which is just a knee guard. I'm going on 3 seasons of DH on mine and they're still holding up great. I don't even know I'm riding in them when I have them on, have never felt I needed to take them off for anything except at the end of the day. They stay in place really well, and it's a bonus that you can take them on and off without removing a shoe!

I tried the VPD and I just didn't dig the overall fit of them
  • + 3
 Second this

The RaceFace Ambush knee pads are great. Super comfortable, but big enough to take to Whistler, and taking them off w/o taking your shoes off is awesome! Wish more companies went this route.

Also I had the older version of the POC VPDs and took a solid crash racing the downhill bike and they got bumped out of the way and I ended up with a gash right to the knee cap. Could have been a bad fit or the fact that they were a couple of years old. Either way not something I continued to use after that...

RN the RaceFace Ambush are on Amazon for $77 for a S/L/XL or $88 for a M. Either way a good deal IMO
  • + 6
 answers:
1. gatorskins 700x25 front and back
2. do you wanna get laid?
3. i heard tampax pearls are comfy

happy shabbat shalom, everybody!
  • + 10
 Happy what?
  • + 6
 @chillrider199: oh it's french for "i'm gonna get so drunk tonight that my voice will eventually end up sounding like gilbert gottfried"
  • + 1
 @rocky-mtn-gman: Just what I have been looking for. What kind of alcohol is required?
  • + 5
 @chillrider199: Walter Sobchak
  • + 4
 @DuelingBanjos: If that is a real drink then Im going to be f*cked
  • + 9
 @chillrider199: it's a mixture of colorado kool-aid and that clear shit dad keeps in a plastic clear gallon jug in the garage fridge. that fridge that's got stickers that says things like "tree huggers anonymous" & "Earth First: We'll log the other planets later"
  • + 3
 Chalk it up to my BMX/Dirt jumper roots. But everytime I get a bike I manage to go about a year or so with gears. But then ultimately switch out to a SS bike. The sacrifice of gears is worth the no fuss, no muss, durability of SS. I'm a bit of a masochistic fella sometimes haha.
  • + 4
 SS rocks. Don't forget to take a packet of jelly babies with you so you can nonchalantly offer them round at the top of climbs while trying not to cough up a lung-

"You ok?"

"Yeah *wheeze* Jelly baby?"
  • + 2
 I don’t know — I’d take knee pad recommendations with a grain of salt. A lot of it comes down to fit. What fits one guy won’t fit another. That said, I ride with POC VPD 2.0, and they are great. Great fit, quality construction. Way better than the 661s they replaced. Looks like the VPD 2 has been discontinued, though.
  • + 5
 I did a single speed kit on my DH bike and will never go back. It quiet and simple.
  • + 1
 see a few chainless on the mountain ....thinking I should try
  • + 6
 ixs carve evo+, very comfortable
  • + 2
 These are nice, for the most part but the material is a bit rough and the padding is hard for the get-go and not just "hard on impact" like others. Don't get me wrong I like them a lot and my 7yro lives in them (the material rubs him raw on certain days tho).
  • + 5
 Why stop with a single speed get a kerosene lamp hand pump your water and crap in a outhouse
  • + 1
 you're joking, but some people pay good money for that kind of experience. Actually, I'm one of those idiots. Shout out to 10th mountain hut association.
  • + 2
 In the SW, I ride a 2.5" Maxxis DHf on the front, and an Ardent 2.4" on the rear. Good traction and breaks loose in the rear just when I want it to.

I got a 05 Jamis Dakar fs frame on closeout on Jenson.com, had a Manitou Air 3-way Swinger rear shock all for $399.00.
Built it into a 32X16 SS, put a Fox Talas 130 on it. I rode that ss EXCLUSIVELY for almost 2 years solid before I got my Ellsworth fs 29er. I loved it. Got to where I was cleaning a switchbacked climb in SD's Sycamore at a time when most riders were using gears and STILL had to take a break on the way up. Had a spare set of Spinergy Cyclone noodle-wheels that have yet to fail me 25 years into the game. It was an awesome ride, and at the time it made me feel like an absolutely fukkin' God of a rider.
It still lives in my garage, patiently waiting for a carbon riser and a 70mm stem. This might be the year I do it.
I'm 65 now, got my Medicare, using the bennies, life is good now!
  • + 3
 Tire recommendation for all conditions, pretty much anywhere in the world; Maxxis Dhf EXO 3C TR 2.3.
Downhill or heavyset/clumsy rider? Get a doubledown casing of the same
  • + 1
 For my SW desert riding, Specialized Butcher Grid 2.6 up front, and the 2.3 Aggressor have worked really well. (But I'd be happy with that same exact setup in the NE where I also ride.) I'd take the Aggressor over the Ardent bc it feels a little more aggressive to me without much loss in rolling resistance. Ardents are nice and fast though for long pedally rides. Not familiar with the Griffin.
  • + 1
 Got a Swobo Mutineer when they liquidated but I was also considering the State Pulsar: www.statebicycle.com/collections/mountain-bikes/products/pulsar-29er-mountain-bike
At the time they sold a geared conversion, I only see small rigid and no conversion kit (was $150).
  • + 4
 What about Dakine Slayer pads? Above average protection, very comfortable, fairly priced and awesome name Wink
  • + 1
 These are great all around (I live in the Dakine town) but damn if they aren't made out of Sandpaper compared to others. They sure do stay in place but the material is a bizarre choice.
  • + 2
 Riding in the southwest (Arizona primarily), I have come to love the Minion DHF 2.5 front/Highroller II 2.4 out back. It's a setup that grips up-front and lets rear break loose when desired + low rolling resistance!
  • + 1
 I have a fixie on the road that I ride frequently in the Spring to gain fitness. I ride steep ups, steep downs, flats, everything. So I naturally assumed I'd love a single-speed on the trail. I was wrong. I hated it. I wouldn't have guessed it, but cadence is far more important on a mountain bike than on a road bike. For moderate trails it was fun in the same way that a hardtail is fun. But for anything with variable terrain, it was really a nightmare.
  • + 1
 Maybe it’s down to my bmx roots but I’ve always ridden singlespeed. I’ve tried riding with gears, they haven’t made a gear ratio low enough for me to stay in the saddle and climb slowly like normal people yet. My legs simply refuse. But on my singlespeed climbing requires my whole body in an out of saddle all or nothing effort involving a lot of momentum before the climb and that’s what I’m used to. Plus I’ve always ridden dirt jump mtb’s but I’ve used them for everything from pump tracks and dh runs to laps of xc trails. I could buy the right bike for the job but when I can keep up with my mates on their full sus trail/enduro/dh bikes on the descents on my dirt jumper with only a rear brake do I need to hand over a 4 figure sum for a 160mm full sus bike? Not really. Being faster than your mates on the fun bit (downhill) is better than being faster on the crap bit (uphill) anyway haha!
  • + 1
 The POC VPD pads are indeed super comfy while pedalling, but don't do their job when you crash because nothing is holding them in place (part of why they're so comfortable), found out the hard way.

Pretty much everyone in this comment section who has crashed in them so far confirms that, as opposed to recommendations from folks who have ridden in them but have not binned it just yet.

I love wearing them but the pad slid right out of the way last time I took a spill. I'm definitely replacing them with something that stays put (i.e. has straps).
  • + 1
 In January 2003, I purchased a Raleigh XXIX - their 'new' 29'er SS. Wanted it so I wouldn't trash my new Scott Ransom LTD in the winter muddy conditions... Rode some of my regular routes that I would nonchalantly spin up in my middle ring - and it KICKED MY ASS. Like a previous comment said; "Every trail is a new trail". 'Easy' sections became challenges. I walked places I never thought I would. But then one day, I made an entire climb without stopping. I started doing that on more and more climbs. Took the Ransom and the SS on a week long trip to AZ to ride with friends. Ended up riding the rigid SS more than the Full-sus bike. 4 months later, sold my 'dream bike' and went solely SS (Except when I converted it to 1x9 to do the Hut-to-hut trip) but it went back to SS upon my return. I rode SS until Fall of 2016, when I blew out my knee hike-a-biking across a creek. FINALLY my close-to-60-yr-old knee is back again, and I have just started riding a little SS. It took a geared bike to get back going though... I will continue to ride SS as a +1 bike, to keep in a bit better shape and for certain trails - probably won't go full time SS, but those were some of the best days riding in my almost 40 years on MTB. If you think you want to do it - the suggestion to try a few rides without shifting is a good one. If you can suffer through a few rides on trails you know in a 32x20 or something like that - then get an SS and give it a shot. At worst, you sell it, and you may also have the option of building it into a 1x## hardtail...
  • + 1
 7iDP Covert is a great option for heavy sweaters. The back is extremely well ventilated and doesn't impede my pedal stroke on longer pedals. The ability to choose from 3 levels of protection is great and the light-weight hardshell punches above its weight. Solid buy.
  • + 1
 I am hopefully laying my grubby paws on a new Steel SS frame this week and really can't wait. Been a year or so without MTB SS one and been missing the ride......fortunately I have had a {spit} roadie SS commuter to keep the legs spinning.

I say get a SS, if it does not work for you then sell it on again to another that will appreciate the bike.
  • + 3
 Kona Honzo ST single speed - Of course you want a SS, they are simple - (like me) Mine is pretty durable in the NW winter slime and mud.
  • + 1
 I personally think I could get away with a six speed cassette on my trail bike. Same range as Eagle but take six cogs off the cassette I always end up double or triple taping shifts any way. I’m not a roadie I can handle 20-30% jumps in my gearing. Less is more.
Love my steel single speed. 26” wheels crappy fork and one brake. It’s terrifying at times but of so much fun.
  • + 4
 I agree the Griffin is a great tire for hardpack but it looks like Maxxis dropped it from there product line up. ????
  • + 2
 Such a bummer, I loved that tire for summer conditions but I destroyed it in 3 hard weeks with the triple compound. Bring it back in 2.4-2.5 and a dual compound!
  • + 1
 Yeah look like it. Pretty bummed as that was my favorite rear tire from Maxxis. @Maxxis Bring back the Griffin!!
  • + 1
 I don't need a stray femur or humerus getting caught up in a derailleur while I'm narrowly escaping death during the zombie apocalypse. The average zombie shambles along at 1-3 up to possibly 9 mph so gear accordingly.
  • + 1
 Lots of forums talk about that G29 being a good spot to start. I disagree , get a steel framed bike. Kona Unit 29er if they still make one. I bought the 2014 and it's now my main ride. Simple, quiet and super fun.
  • + 0
 In the SW U.S. I ride a Maxxis DHF@.5" up front and a axis 2.4 Ardent in the rear. Fast combo. Front wheel GRIPS.
I made my own FS SS from a Jamis Dakar 05 frame on sale from Jenson's w/ a 3-way Air Swinger and A Fox Talas 32 up front for a 130mm F/R ride. Had a Wolf Tooth chainring and a /Y.E.S.S. Research tensioner which was bitchin'. I rode that bike for better part of two solid years. Exclusively. By then I was cleaning switchbacked climbs on it that many guys on geared bikes could not clean w/out a break. I felt awesome on account of that bike. Still got it in the Garage.
  • + 2
 I actually really like the Aggressor as a rear tire. In the 2.5" WT it's a solid choice for rear end duty.
  • + 1
 if you think you might want a Singlespeed- get one. that is all I have to say. who ever said they don't want a fast, light bike?
  • + 2
 Why are the tire selections limited to Maxxis? Why not a Rock Razor SG or Slaughter in the rear?
  • + 3
 ION all the time dude, wthh...
  • + 1
 Those iXS pads are fugly Eek my personal favourites are TLD or RaceFace. Both can be bought for fairly cheap on CRC. Super comfy and no chafing
  • + 2
 But hardtail, add cheap ss conversion kit to try it out. Install cassette later
  • + 3
 Just for the record, a SS has three gears Standing, Sitting and Walking!
  • + 1
 Tires for the southwest? Desert kitty litter? Continental Trail King 2.4" setup tubeless, hands down. Ive tried so many combos its ridiculous.
  • + 3
 Are those Trumps orange legs in the bottom right?
  • + 1
 Yes. They are the best and can ride the biggest mountains with all of the pedals. Very big bike kind of legs.
  • - 2
 I have no idea why in this day of amazing technology for bikes, that you would want to burden yourself with a single speed. Also, they can be quite debilitating. I know several riders who have ruined their bodies by trying to be "core" and riding a SS. Not at all worth it in my mind. Riding is enough of a strain on your body as it is, why make it worse?
  • + 6
 I have to say, I don't personally know anyone that rides a singlespeed that has ruined their body because of it. Not to say it can't happen, but I know quite a few folks who ride singlespeed exclusively and have knees in great health. I have a knee issue and I have found that riding a singlespeed actually makes my knees feel better. I'm not saying that people don't wreck their bodies on singlespeeds, I'm just saying I've never met anyone who rides singlespeed that has ruined their body I have only heard people saying that they have heard of it happening to people. That being said, single speed mountain biking is like a local delicacy, if you're into it you are probably really into it. And if you aren't, those who are into it will call you crazy for not being into it haha
  • + 2
 Done wrong maybe but done right there are plenty of upsides to single speed most people seem to choose too high of a gear and run through more parts and knees/hips. The same person riding a geared bike will probably still beat their body up and run through lots of chains and bbs. Also I’m not sure that the Tech has gotten so good that it is without issues people still seem to complain about it a lot when I hear large amounts of people complain about SRAMs cheaper 12s issues I think it’s clearly not perfect unless you can afford the top notch. Smart single speeders have setups that allow for quick gear change even mid ride which can minimize a lot of issues. I ride both and enjoy both and both can be done wrong.
  • + 1
 Gear to spin. Spinning no hurt your knees. Coasting is all nice. I rode with some eastern European guys who guaged how tough of a rider you were by how many teeth your front 1x chainring was. Apparently anything under 34 made you a wussy. They don't ride much anymore
  • + 1
 I only live my life with one speed. Biking , sex , work , eating , sleeping , threaded bottom brackets , one speed blenders!
  • + 2
 One speed's all ya need! F*ck gears.
  • + 1
 So, are all you single speed guys pushing up long 20%+ grades? What gearing?
  • + 2
 I ride my Enduro Singlespeed . Its all the way fun
  • + 1
 Maxxis DHF 29 x 2.5 and Maxxis DHR 29 x 2.4 excellent wet or dry in coastal BC
  • + 1
 Yes, get some, especially if you plan on wrecking Get some Minions. and no, just.....no.
  • + 1
 I hope it was just a typo, but I really liked seeing who at Pinkbike left the comment
  • + 2
 single speed all they way from the bmx days !

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