Ask Pinkbike: Going Tubeless, Stripped Nipples, and Riding in Germany

Dec 29, 2015
by Pinkbike Staff  
Ask Pinkbike Header

Here at Pinkbike we get inundated with all kinds of questions, ranging from the basic "Can I have stickers" to more in-depth, soul searching types of queries like if you should pop the question or what to name your first child. Ask Pinkbike is an occasional column where we'll be hand picking and answering questions that have been keeping readers up at night, although we'll likely steer clear of those last two and keep it more tech oriented.






Hookless, Tubeless, and Airless

Question: Pinkbike user famous-nobody asked this question in the 29ers forum: I want to switch over to running tubeless, but I don't want the tires to go flat just because the carbon rims have hookless beads. What rim strips and valve stems do I need? I want 2.5'' to 2.9" tires that are light and roll easily (with a low tread) but not so thin that they tear and go flat on minor rocks. The bike shop that I went to said that they tried mounting Geax tires on my hookless rims with Stan's tape but they would not air up. Any advice?

bigquotesThe fact that your carbon rims are hookless will have zero effect on whether they hold air or not, so don't worry about that. You could use pricey tubeless rim tape, but I'd suggest just picking up a roll of Gorilla Tape from your hardware store. It does the exact same thing, but you can tear it to whatever width you need and it's much less expensive. Many companies sell valve stems, but e*thirteen has some neat aluminum stems that use differently shaped grommets to create a better seal up against your rim, or you can just use some generic tubeless valve stems from your local shop. And as for tires, you're not going to find any 29" tires in the widths you're looking for that are going to be "light" so you should look for something that works well on your terrain.

There's a pretty good chance that the bike shop that tried to set your wheels up tubeless only failed because the fit between your tires and rims is a bit loose. Stan's rim tape is very thin, but two (or in rare cases, three) wraps around the rim with Gorilla Tape will artificially build up the rim bed height and create a tighter fit that will make it easier to air the tires up when they're installed. Too much tape and the tires become very difficult to get on and off, though.
- Mike Levy

What you ll need One roll of Gorilla Tape don t substitute any other brand all you potential cheapskates a pen a box knife with a brand new blade tubeless valve stems we used American Classics your favorite wheels and a measuring device.
  Everything you need for a tubeless conversion.





Stripped Nipples

Question: Pinkbike user Ninjasstolemytv asked this question in the Mechanic's Lounge Forum: Gist is, half my spoke nipples are stripped and my wheel is out of true. This would be no problem, but the previous owner did a tubeless conversion and the sealant must've oxidized the nipples. So when I take the rim tape off and stick a flat-head in there, the top of the nipple just breaks apart. Any way to fix? Would obviously prefer not to cut apart the spoke or get a new wheel - only as a last resort.


bigquotesI'd start by focusing on the nipples that need to be turned in order to true the wheel. First, put a few drops of a penetrating lubricant (TriFlow works well) where the spoke enters the nipple. Next, if the nipple truly is too stripped out to accept a spoke wrench, and a flathead screwdriver won't work either, I'd say it's time to resort to a set of vice grip pliers, the type that can be squeezed and locked in the closed position. It's not an elegant solution, and it's guaranteed to destroy the nipple, but this should give you enough grip to force it to turn. In most cases, the threads on the spoke will emerge unscathed, even if the nipple is broken and mangled beyond recognition, at which point you can put a new one on (I'd recommend going with brass over aluminum).

With any luck, you'll only need to repeat this procedure a few times get your wheel rolling straight and true again, but if you do end up needing to replace a dozen or so nipples, I'd suggest putting on some soothing music and maybe trying a little meditation before diving into that tedious and potentially frustrating task. Or you could bring it into your local bike shop, but be sure to tip your mechanic well if you choose to go that route.
- Mike Kazimer

Patience is key when dealing with stripped spoke nipples.
Patience is key when dealing with stripped spoke nipples.





Destination Germany

Question: Pinkbike user AshGough asked this question in the Downhill Forum: Hi Guys. I'm heading to Loßburg in Germany for 3 months in February 2016 with work. It's located in the "Black Forest" area, I was wandering if any of you have ridden here or around the area? If so, is it worth me taking my bike along with me? As it's going to kill me not riding for that long! Especially with Fort William BDS a few weeks after I get back. Thanks in advance, Ash.


bigquotesThe Black Forest seems to have a bunch of riding and a strong local scene. For example, Solid Bikes are based in Freudenstadt and use the bike park at Bad Wildbad for testing their downhill rigs, your best bet if you want to get race-ready for Fort William, it's a pretty short track but a brutal rock-fest that even the strongest riders seem to struggle against. A funicular railway out of the town centre gets you to the top, or you can shuttle yourself on the public road. Bad Wildbad used to have a small bike park using a ski drag lift accessing a fun 4x track, but I can't comment on its current condition.

Driving a couple of hours north to Heidleberg could yield some good results, I have never been there myself but have heard many positives from German riders. Two and a half hours to the west and over the French border is Lac Blanc, a well renowned bike park which is scheduled to open on the 5th May for the summer season. The surrounding Vosges countryside is well known for the Cannondale Enduro Tour and is the area where Remy Absalon and Jerome Clementz cut their teeth.

From my experience, local bike shops are key when visiting a new area. Find a quality shop and they will be sure to help you out with trail advice, invite you on regular shop rides and introduce you to local riders who will know where to find the local gold.

Another essential is the Trailforks mobile app, if you don't have it yet, why not? The app has been huge help for me over the last few months. It's free, you can download the map for specific regions to use offline, it connects with your Strava or similar GPS mapping system and if you're riding on your own there is an 'Emergency Call' feature that will help emergency services locate you if something untoward happens. You can photograph and report trail issues such as fallen trees to whoever runs the local trail club and if you find some trails you really like, you can donate to the affiliated trail builders to say thanks. - Paul Aston


Bad Wildbad mountain biking trails





Have some unresolved tech questions? Jump in the Pinkbike Forum and we'll look to answer it for next time.


99 Comments

  • 94 1
 If your bike shop can't air up your tubeless setup, doesn't suggest a bit of Gorilla tape or at the very least come up with a ghetto alternative....You NEED a new bike Mechanic!!
  • 13 2
 Agreed, I had a similar problem setting up tubeless and my wonderful bike shop mechanics, all 3 of them, plus the owner of the shop got together to try to get the bead to seal. They ended up using a cargo strap thing to squish the bead down and then when it sealed they ripped off the cargo strap, voila it worked! It was so cool having a bunch of mechanics trying their hardest to complete a tough task.
  • 8 0
 I aired up all my tires, first time is hard then you learn soap and water make everithing easy, gorilla tape is a no brainer too.
  • 8 0
 Those are the true mechanics. Ones that revel in the challenge of such a task. Aside from the verbal thanks a little local food goes a long ways.
  • 8 0
 My first time doing tubeless I was ready for all out war, fresh roll of gorilla tape, air compressor, and even the straps. But I put the tire on the rim with my hands, and was able to do it with a floor pump. Just goes to show how hit or miss tubeless setups are.
  • 1 0
 @sopro13 I have done the same thing many times at my shop. I got the idea from a friends dad that would do the same thing for car tires. It's a great idea.
  • 2 0
 I've run tubeless on all 7 of my bikes, Geax/Vittoria tires air up easily, and you don't even need the TNT (tubeless) version of their tires.
  • 5 0
 If I can't get a tubeless tire to seat I'll remove the valve core and use and air gun to blow into the valve stem. You can get more air in the tire at a faster rate that way. It's usually the boost you need to get a tricky tire/rim combo to work.
  • 2 1
 Yeah my bontrager tires and DT Swiss rim go up with a floor pump no worries...
  • 7 0
 Something about working smarter not harder...
  • 4 0
 A couple of times I've had problems getting new tires to seat, put an inner tube in them and pumped it up, let it sit for a while and get some of the creases out. Doesn't work all the time but worth a shot before taking it down to the LBS
  • 4 0
 Recently I had problems getting a tyre to seat. Used a tube to seat the tire, then broke the seal on 1 side, removed said tube and with a bit of soap the tire popped straight in.
  • 4 0
 Gorilla tape all the way. Used Stans for years and got sick of paying so much. Bought a giganto roll of gorilla and have been very happy. It's more flexible so it can wrap around rim contours better. I don't give one lousy fuc% if it's harder to get off.
  • 1 1
 I used Stans for years too. I met him at Interbike in 2003, he was ice picking the S&#T out of this tire and it sealed right up.

I bought the DH kit and never looked back, ran that tire set for 4 months before I decided to look inside to find all the sealant evaporated. After looking at the kit in my Amazon cart I went Ghetto and I doubt I'll use any other method unless Stan starts kicking me down rim strips. Still use his sealant though!
  • 1 0
 Use a compressor and make sure it's set high (120psi), that and a bunch of sealant and you are good to go.
  • 2 1
 Went to a shop was like I want some rim strips to go tubleless they were like $35 each wheel. I just about fell over then was like I'll just use tape. They said you really need to strips and I just left. Turns out toy really don't need the proper stuff tape is perfect. Needless to say I'm not going back
  • 6 0
 tubeless is a sort of art, perhaps even black magic....
  • 2 0
 Split tube ghetto works a treat every time. Plus it gives you a bit of added security over Gorilla tape.

PM me for details of my tried and tested fail proof method (I reckon I can get any tyre / rim combo to work).
  • 1 0
 Gorilla tape is good - but is a NIGHTMARE to remove. Leaves sticky goop everywhere, and it absorbs sealant too.

I used red Tuck Tape ( for example 3M 8088 ) on my last tubeless conversion and it was great. Thin, and because it's waterproof - doesn't absorb sealant so you can use less.
  • 1 0
 @jaydubmah Interesting. Where'd you get that tape? I only put on one layer of Gorilla and have been good to go. I've heard it sucks to remove, but is the goop a real issue?
  • 1 0
 Gorilla in Home Depot no brainer decission.
  • 1 0
 @JesseE: I got the red Tuck Tape at Canadian Tire, but you can pretty much get it at any hardware store. Gorilla tape works great, but if you ever need to redo your tubeless set up, it's a pain getting the rim clean enough to put newtape on again. Then again, I've never had to remove the red tuck tape either!

One trick I've used in getting Gorilla Tape reside off is dabbing a fresh piece of Gorilla onto it, and yanking it off.

For folks who find Gorilla tape too thick and makes their tires hard to get onto the rims, I'd definitely try the red stuff. Cheers!
  • 2 0
 @jaydubmah thanks for the info. I knew there had to be ways around that stupid Stans tape. 20bucks for like 5mm of tape!
  • 68 0
 For stripped nipples I recommend soothing cream and fabric softener for your jersey...
  • 13 0
 Perhaps a sports bra ?
  • 20 1
 Bandaids over the nips brah
  • 12 0
 Don't forget pasties. They come in all sorts of fun shapes
  • 5 1
 Ha, I get it... but really fabric softener is a bad idea for any wicking tech fabrics. Dont do it.
  • 10 0
 The only solution for pepperoni nips is to ride shirtless
  • 2 0
 Nipple glide or nip slips is the only way to go..
  • 2 0
 I use my shammy cream up there also.. don't judge me.
  • 6 3
 I woulda just cut the spoke in half on the stripped ones and replaced the whole thing for 1.50 a spoke... to HELL with patience
  • 3 0
 Haha. I just noticed we were referring to different nipples here
  • 1 0
 If wearing a jersey is required I be sure to lube up 1st thing. You can't be to slippery
  • 3 0
 @wolf-amongst-lambs what, you don't put cream all over your wheelset?
  • 3 0
 Gorilla tape for your rims and nipples.
  • 2 0
 @thook sometimes I WANNA cream all over my wheelset. ...
  • 8 0
 I feel like this is a boobytrap
  • 21 0
 For riding in Germany -

I was stationed there for 5 years in Heidelberg.
In Heidelberg, they had been working on the trails on the Königstuhl (the hill above the castle) and they were getting pretty good around 2012 when I left. I believe there are shuttle vans that go up there.
Also, down the river is Beerfelden Bike Park. They’ve got a lift and some good features.
If you’ve got the ability to get there, you have to go to Winterberg Bike Park.
If you’ve got even more time, get out to Morzine and Les Getz.

If you’re in Heidelberg and looking for a mechanic, go to Fender in Schwetzingen and ask for Adam Kus. Tell him Jeremiah sent you. Bring him American beers if you can find any.

Beyond all that, you would be doing yourself a great disservice to not check out the local trails on a trail bike. (Rent maybe?) There is nothing quite like riding through the German forests amongst castles and ruins of churches only to stumble upon a Waldhütte that serves bratwürst, pommes, tomatencremsuppe or goulash all to be washed down with local Pils or Radler, then bombing back down the hill. One of these can be found atop the Weßerstein, the hill north of the river in Heidelberg, opposite the Köigstuhl, for example. Rodalben will be a little closer to you and has excellent trails as well.

I would love to be back there. There’s so much to see and ride. Tschüß und viel spaß!

P.M. me if you’ve have any more questions.
  • 2 0
 that amphiteather in the middle of the mountain is pretty scary too, i found it once riding by myself, i heard there is some type of festival around september
  • 4 0
 I second the Koenigstuhl trails in Heidelberg. When I was there in 2012 you could take the bus from the city center up to the top of the hill. It ran every hour on the hour, and dropped you off right at the trailhead. The timing of the bus is pretty great. It takes about 30 min up and 15 min back to the bus stop. You can run laps all day without having to bother with your own transport. As I student I loved it cause I could study on the ride up and then ride down. HOWEVER! If you do take the bus be sure to be courteous to your fellow passengers. That same bus stops at a nursing home and often has elderly passengers.
  • 2 0
 Heidelberg is one of the best cities I've ever visited.
  • 3 0
 You can take your bike on the bus in Germany?
  • 2 0
 @Narro2 I used to ride up there all the time. It’s called the Thingstatte - HItler had them built in various places and were rallying places for the Germans/Nazis and I believe placed there because of ancient occult significance.
  • 7 0
 @MTB-Colada When I was there you could. It was kind of a touchy subject as the bus could easily get overloaded with DH-Riders and their bikes. Not to mention the mud that got tracked along the floor. If they still allow bikes on the bus just keep a couple of things in mind:
1) Let other passengers load first.
2) Give your seat up if its needed.
3) Try and get as much mud off your bike, shoes, etc as possible before loading.
4) Keep the seats as clean as possible.
5) If the bus is full don't force it.

Germans can be a little touchy (compared to other western nations) about proper public etiquette and if enough of them get annoyed they will use the civic process to address the issue (ie.. they'll get bikes banned from the bus). I've found that if you're patient, polite, and willing to help out other passengers there isn't a problem.
  • 8 0
 Trailforks may be great elsewhere, but for Germany I recommend gpsies.com.
Freudenstadt/Loßburg is some 150km away from Heidelberg, there sure are some great trails in the Black Forest nearby.
Remember, in Baden-Württemberg cycling is restricted to tracks wider than 2 meters - everyone ignores it, but you can end up in fierce arguing with hikers.

www.mtb-news.de/forum/f/freiburg-karlsruhe-und-schwarzwald.38
  • 4 0
 Yah the two meter thing had to be completely ignored if you wanted to ride anything non-fireroad, which everyone did. There was the occasional hiker that threw a fit; we just politely rode around them. It was never an issue and you can pretty much ride wherever. Just don’t be a toolbag. If you are, you’ll be on the wrong side of the law and will lose.

Also, I would seriously make sure your medical insurance is in order if you’re gonna’ ride in Europe. Many of my friends had fantastic crashes that resulted in concussions to snapped collar bones needing surgery. We were military so it wasn’t an issue but it does happen so make sure you’re covered.
  • 3 0
 depending on your mobility you should also visit the freiburg area. in black forest, hills are a bit taller in southern black forest, and freiburg has a very big biking community which managed to legalise two beautiful natural trails despite the 2 meter rule.

in general, getting a trailbike would be the best idea. most trails are semi-illegal, forbidden to ride but nobody cares as long as you dont bring your car in the forest to shuttle your dh.
also: lac blanc best bike park in this area. if you want to keep it classic you can visit todtnau, the oldest bikepark in germany.
when you have a lot of free time, you should try to get to portes du soleil (chatel, morzine, les gets just to name a few) and ride in the beautiful alps close to montblanc.
  • 2 0
 I currently live in Germany, and can attest to the amount of trails available. Definitely bring your bike, you'll find places to ride. I lived in Heidelberg through 2013, and the trails up by the Koenigstuhl are definitely worth the trip if you have a free weekend. You can still use the bus to shuttle you back to the top, but as was mentioned already, be respectful and mindful of others as you do. There are lots of good shops around, but I would recommend a closer shop run by an ex-Pat named John Crouse. He speaks English, and is more than happy to help out fellow Americans. His prices are decent (for Germany) and can usually do most repairs on the spot. www.johns-radhaus.de and on FB at www.facebook.com/Johns-Radhaus-174615469245484/?pnref=lhc. No beer required, but he'll have one with you. Lastly, there is a local military MTB club in Germany, based out of Wiesbaden if you end up a little further north. Contact them and they can set up a ride to some great trails - all depending on what part of Germany you want to visit. They'll even set up a ride with a group for you to showcase some of the area. Wiesbaden Trail Riders at www.facebook.com/WBDNTR.
  • 2 0
 Winterberg bike park is definitely worth visiting for a good weekend of chair lift assisted riding
  • 6 0
 Yo guys, Heidelberg is my Hometown and riding here is really fun. Smile
You can still take your bike into the bus, but the max. number of bikes is 3. And if there's a wheelchair you have to wait for the next bus or pedal up the mountain.. Wink
I would say, if you are here for a couple of months taking your bike with you is worth it.
I build a couple of new trails since 2013 by the way Razz

I also got a video of some of my favourite trails here... if you wanna take a look whats going on here: www.pinkbike.com/video/429023 Only the last 2-3 clips aren't in Heidelberg, but not that far away from here Wink

If you are here and wanna know how to find the trails, just inbox me and i can show you around
  • 2 0
 You should definately bring your Trailbike/Enduro an check out the trails that are going down the valley of the river Murg, which ist quite close by Loßburg. And check out Flowtrail Sasbachwalden, they have a shuttleservice.
  • 2 0
 Heidelberg area is amazing, wanted to move there but ended up in Düsseldorf instead, closer to Winterberg but really weak for "everyday" riding.
  • 2 0
 if you want to ride bikepark beerfelden ,or get to know some other trails in a nearby region called odenwald ,hit me up on pb or on fb www.facebook.com/Loose-Riders-Odenwald-642865259163132 . i can show you around and show you the goods
  • 3 0
 www.bikepark-albstadt.info is the next bike park from Loßburg,
www.bikepark-todtnau.de is also in the area (more south)
  • 2 0
 Massively humbled by the amount of you willing to help out! Thank you very much!!
By the sounds of it I'd be stupid not to take my trail bike?!
Unfortunately I'm going to be a little stumped on transport as I will be flying in and my only method of transport will be my bike, bus or taxi.
Is there anyone on here that is situated close to LoSberg that would be willing to show me around?
I'm definitely going to check out the LBS as I know there is a Cube dealership in the village and from some research I can see that there's some riding to be had I'm just concerned it's going to be more XC based stuff :/ .
Thank you once again for all of you replys!
  • 16 1
 If your nipples are that oxidized and break so easily do you really want to ride a wheel that is that fragile? re-build it and be safe
  • 2 0
 That's what I was saying
  • 13 3
 BREAKING NEWS: GWIN STOPS DH racing and begins an NBA career www.instagram.com/p/_zXJxdFStw

about here, tubeless is the bomb you shouldn't be hesitating if you currently are !!
  • 1 2
 Yeah, but everyone saw that coming, d'uh.
  • 1 0
 Word is he'll be completely decked out in Nike gear next season
  • 1 0
 No he is joining the Harlem globetrotters. All about the trick shots. That and the always win.
  • 13 2
 The whole title sounds like a trip to Eurobike that went wrong... very wrong...
  • 2 1
 Just checked again and i agree ;D
  • 5 0
 As for riding in Germany - just be wary of the fact that in Baden-Württemberg (the state in which the black forest lies) Mountain bikes are a touchy subject at the moment. Technically, unless a trail is designated as a bike trail, it is illegal to use it if it is narrower than 2m / 6ft. Which means pretty much all the single trail is illegal by state law - you're not going to find signs. So please do the people there a favor and ride responsibly - they have plenty of great trails, and they are lobbying to legalize them again. Don't behave like a **** and if you get into a conflict, don't argue, be polite. Germans can be oddly stubborn with laws - disobedience is not one of their strengths. Also - please don't "dig" unless you're being told to - most of the land is private property and thusly rogue building isn't welcome in most Areas.

That being said - enjoy your riding there, you'll enjoy the trails, they are great. Since they aren't legal, it may take some seeking to find the good ones, but from my time there I can tell you that you'll find plenty of them by talking to some locals - just don't expect a trail sign at the trail head. It helps if you know that Germany is _the_ beer nation.
  • 1 0
 Thank you for your advise, It will mostly be me riding on my own so I'll be sure to take it easy and be curteous to anyone that I may come across on the trail. Even if it means having to turn around and head back. I respect that a lot of people use the forests for many things and sometimes as a mtb comunity we can come across a little selfish in regards to where we can and can't ride. I'm afraid thats why I need my bike! I love beer just as much as I love riding! haha
  • 5 0
 My to do list for riding in central germany.

1. Parc Naturel Vosges: Lac Blanc is located there and heaps of pure awesomeness for your trialbike.
2. Boppard: Jumptrack, search for Amir Kabani videos, you will see the tracks are worth it if you like to Jump.
3. Großer Feldberg, Hessen, a lot of nice Enduro Trails.
4. Malmedy Belgium + Hürtgenwald Germany small Bikeparks but my favorites when it comes to Euro Bikepars except for Hafjell!
5. Spicak CZ. Great for your Downhill training! Spend a weekend there, food and beer is ridiculously cheep!
  • 4 0
 Freiburg is about 1.5 hrs away and has a good scene. Borderline is a good trail and the Canada trail is really good. It was built by some canadian freeride guys that the Freiburg mtn bike club paid to come over and build. Also, Todtnau held the German DH championship last year and has a good dh track. And Lac Blanc is amazing for its size. Really good dirt and lots of different tracks. In short, yes, you should bring your bike!
  • 2 0
 ^This guy said it all!
  • 3 0
 An app for reporting downed trees??? My god get off your bike and get your partners to help clear the tree. I understand the large diameter (>1ft) ones can be stubborn but it pisses me off when people dismount and continue their ride without lifting a finger... I've spent early season rides with riding partners clearing blow down every 200ft of trail. May not be the most "flowing" ride but its what you should do to contribute whether they are your local trails or not.
  • 3 0
 I agree that riders should fix small issues themselves and try to do so myself, I often carry a small folding saw in my bag. With Trailforks you can report any kind of issues like fallen trees, bad drainage, broken bridges etc.
  • 7 2
 Really PB? You couldnt answer my enduro specific shift cable housing question?
  • 5 0
 If you got stripper nipples simply look down, you probably got a bunch of money in your Gstring to fix your bike.
  • 2 0
 No. Gorilla tape is not the best way to go. Difficult to clean, heavy and you always need to top it off because it eats the sealant.
Every rim requires the right size tape. Meaning 1mm can make the difference. If you want to do it right. $5 more. Or 3m vinyl tape is much better. Best valves are stans. Work on every rim. No leaks.
Do it once, do it right.
  • 2 0
 You can use a tube on the outside of the tire to hold the tire shape to seat a bead. I work at a ranch and we use similar things for equipment tires. They air up to sqeeZe the tire into shape. But honestly the best trick is really soapy water. Even on stubborn tractor tires.
  • 1 0
 I been doing this my first tubeless, but its not worth it It keeps the air coming out and its hard to to fit the Tyre on the rim. Now I realize that I need to have a real tubeless rim and I got mavic rim, hassle free worry free and works perfect.
  • 1 0
 Yep. Use the proper stuff and be done with it.
  • 1 0
 The only good answer to stripped alloy nipples is to not use them in the first place. Friends don't build friends wheels with alloy nipples. All you can do is rebuild your wheel with brass ones and spoke prep when it comes time to do so. And why the bike industry keeps ramming them down our throats at ridiculously minimal weight savings while majorly screwing us for maintenance in the long run is crazy. And why pink bike doesn't even mention the negative aspects of them while reviewing wheels is questionable as well. It's worth noting that Easton has a bigger tool fitting and their nipples never strip.
  • 1 0
 I fixed troublesome tubeless by putting tube in and pump up till tyre pops into place, you can then undo just one side and remove tube, you can also use of the tube sealants such as slime, put that around tyre where it's leaking, leave a few hours to semi harden then try and inflate again, it should go up, just wash off the remaining slime.
  • 1 0
 Tip: I just cut out the valve of an inner tube (Schwalbe and Continental have removable valve cores). Never had a leakage, plus it's much cheaper than a dedicated tubeless valve stem.
  • 1 0
 I had similar problems setting a bead on a geax, take the valve core out and put wheel on top of trash can, as you're adding air with a compresser have someone move the tire up in down, same thing guys do in tire shops
  • 3 0
 brass nipples.... them funky nipples.... brass nipples.... don't oxidize!
  • 2 0
 Stripping nipples, going tubeless and riding what, in Germany, exactly? The eight year old in me is giggling!
  • 2 0
 Going tubeless with stripped nipples is very fashionable within certain circles in Germany I hear.
  • 1 0
 unless you have really fancy spokes just cut the problem ones and replace, they are really cheap and the LBS should sell them to you individually with nipples
  • 1 0
 One layer of gorilla tape , Stan's, & soapy water. Works every time. I even can leave the original gorilla tape for the life of two tires.
  • 1 0
 Buy the Gorilla tape in a narrower 1" width, soooooooo much easier than cutting.
  • 1 0
 Yep, fits 23-25mm rims perfectly
  • 2 0
 I just tweaked my nipple. What do I do?
  • 1 0
 Do it again!
  • 2 0
 Hehehehe Stripped Nipples...
  • 1 0
 Reading all that makes me feel like I've been to Germany. Black Forest occult ruins sausage and beer on bikes sounds rad.
  • 2 0
 Stripped nipples... Wink
  • 2 1
 Nipped stripplez
  • 1 0
 Stripped Nipples is my new band name.
  • 1 0
 Came for the nipples, left disappointed
  • 1 0
 I didn't even read the article but I love strippers and nipples
  • 1 0
 llllloolll..n ,m
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