Now Finished: Ask Us Anything with We Are One on Their Future Bike Project

Dec 9, 2020
by Pinkbike Staff  


Now Finished, 12:20pm PST: Thanks for having us today and for all of your questions. We will do our best to reply to anything that we've missed. Your support means a lot to us and we hope to see you all out on the trails soon.

We Are One has been building carbon rims and wheels in Kamloops, BC since 2017 in a facility we were lucky enough to go Inside in 2019. Now, they've told us that they have a future bike project in the works. Yes, a carbon bike designed and manufactured in British Columbia.

We wanted to know more about the team at We Are One and how they plan to expand their carbon manufacturing into bicycle frames, so we thought it would be a perfect opportunity for you to ask Dustin Adams, Gilles Corbeil, Adam Marchand, and Dave McInnes your questions.


Dustin Adams - Founder and CEO
Sometimes you simply need to step back and learn how to do things on your own. Dustin founded We Are One with a dream to make high-end products, domestically.
Gilles Corbeil - Head of Machining
Gilles runs the CNC machines like his KTM - wide open! He’s the reigning Wednesday Night World Cup ride champion and you can challenge the title with a case of Coors Banquets.


Adam Marchand - Mechanical Engineer
Adam comes from the East, but has adapted to the style of riding in Kamloops and his attention to detail make him the right choice for many of our current and future projects.
Dave McInnes - Production Manager
A decade ago you’d have found Dave touring around with Dangerous Dan’s Flow Show. From there he built up a very successful service based shop in North Vancouver and now brings that organizational skillset to the production floor of We Are One.





How ‘Ask Us Anything' Works:

Starting at 10:00 AM PDT/7:00 PM CET today, December 9th, you can type your questions for We Are One into the comment box below this article and the guys will have a crack at answering them. Sometimes your answer will pop up in a few seconds; others may take a few minutes while Dustin, Gilles, Adam, and Dave work their way through questions that are popping up. Everyone who posts a question, large or small, will be taken seriously.

To make this go as smoothly as possible, try to follow these guidelines:

• Keep your questions relevant
• Stay focused and to keep your questions on one topic if possible. You can always ask about another item later
• Try to keep your questions to about 100 words
• Ask Us Anything is a service to PB readers who are seeking helpful information, not a forum to broadcast opinions or grievances. If you do have an issue that you want to ask about, no worries, just keep your complaints relevant and in the context of a question so that it can be addressed in a productive manner
• Use propping to acknowledge good (or not so good) questions and bump them up or down to where they belong
• Please don't "Reply" to other people's questions and try to answer other people's comments. This makes it confusing to follow the thread.


Other time zones:
• 1:00 PM EST (New York)
• 6:00 PM BST (London)
• 7:00 PM CET (Paris)
• 7:00 PM SAST (Cape Town)
• 3:00 AM AEST (Sydney, Australia)


Dustin Adams closing out the pack.



385 Comments

  • 186 4
 How long until You Are Two?
  • 54 3
 You'll know when the tantrums start.... oh, you'll know...
  • 3 0
 @kinematix: nailed it
  • 4 0
 @kinematix: Well played, both of you!
  • 3 0
 Did you not see the pics, they are "Four", just OneUp on the others!
  • 3 0
 Beat me Two it !

Answer:
When the company becomes to big and cant keep up with the overhead, etc., etc...
  • 23 1
 We are 2 is the first loser. You know the golden rule! Dustin
  • 4 0
 @WeAreOne: if you’re not first, you’re last!
  • 6 1
 @WeAreOne: So what you're saying is, If you ain't first, you're last?
  • 79 2
 When they do a story on We Are One and realize they accidentally walked into the Arc’teryx building.
  • 13 0
 Ironically Enve really did used to be under same umbrella as Arc’teryx haha
  • 3 1
 @Tacocat13: It still is, both owned by Amer Sports who also own other brands like Wilson and Salomon among many others.
  • 38 0
 Hahaha ya we have some guys in our staff that are good buds with the crew at Arc and we bought nice company jackets for the staff last winter as a thank you at Christmas. Great company with a great local manufacturing facility like us. We share a lot in common and love supporting them all we can.
  • 14 0
 @WeAreOne: dang Arc'teryx company jackets? Better than WAO frisbees and notepads. Nice work.
  • 1 1
 Graff writer's favorite jacket to rack.
  • 1 0
 @rickybobby18: What if they were CF frisbees?
  • 77 4
 Do you see a time ever in the future when you make a 600 dollar carbon wheel set that could compete with the typical Stans/Hope hub wheelset? That everyday riders on a budget could afford, without going to an offshore carbon rim of unknown dubious quality?
  • 21 3
 Cost, Strength, China, Pick two.
  • 2 0
 @CamNeelyCantWheelie: I'll take cost and strengh thank you, cheap and solid is the best
  • 1 0
 @fracasnoxteam: I am pretty fine with lightbicycle.com wheels
  • 1 0
 @bok-CZ: Not the first time I check their website, pretty interesting but I don't find enough informations/ffedback about them
  • 3 0
 Sounds like Hunt carbon rims are exactly what you want. Under $800 and have a lifetime warranty.
  • 1 0
 @conman1395: thank you sir!
  • 34 2
 Are you considering making a single wall rim?

Are you considering using any alternate resins like guerilla gravity or revel?
  • 7 0
 +1, the Zipp rims really look like the most compelling rim option available right now. Pricey though!
  • 2 1
 @davec113: reports are they are too compliant and race times show them slower. Probably more comfortable though.
  • 2 0
 @jaydawg69: Gotcha, thanks! I know one pro who loves his, but he is very light. I'm fat so prolly not for me, lol.
  • 17 0
 While we haven't explored the single wall design, it's always something we can consider as we look to the future. @jaydawg69 does make a valid point, that most current offerings are overly compliant, which results in the wheel feeling muted - great for quieting down the trail but a huge drawback on precision and "poppy-ness" while riding.

The alternate resins you're referring to with Gureilla and Revel are actually a very different process using a thermoformed plastic, as opposed to the thermoset resins we use. Thermoforms definitely have their advantages and drawbacks compared to thermosets, but are much more difficult to manufacture due to the specific tooling and increased heat needed. As we only process thermosets currently, this would be a pretty big equipment investment on our end. Nothing to say it's not an avenue we may explore in the future!

Cheers,
-Adam
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: Is it true that single wall is cheaper to manufacture? Might make a good budget option to have a 29" single wall rim in the lineup especially for hardtail riders.
  • 3 0
 @dlxah: single wall definitely is cheaper to manufacture as you have less overall carbon in the wheel, so it costs less in both material and time required to layup the wheel itself. Cheaper options (like a single wall) are always something we like to explore, but we also have to balance price with producing a product that gives a ride feel our customers would love.

-Adam
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: I hear you about new processes and technology but nobody is doing it to combine the impact strength of thermoforming with carbon wheels.

You would have a legit answer to those that say carbon breaks too easily.
  • 2 0
 @zeedre: Each of our rims has been through the wringer when it comes to impact testing to hold up to the abuse of everyday riding. While thermoforming does give you better impact strength compared to a thermoset, handlaid process, current technology can't quite deliver the amount of fiber elongation (how much fibers are stretched & aligned when placed under pressure) that gives you all the other benefits of carbon wheels. Our current process lets us produce wheels that stand up to impact testing as well, if not better, than competitors both using thermoform and thermoset processes, while letting us fine tune the stiffness to give you the best ride feel possible!

-Adam
  • 3 0
 @WeAreOne: I owned a pair of Zipp 3Zero and I would call them "floppy" and unpredictable. They feel fantastic on lighter terrain, and there is definitely something to the idea, but I sold them after two months and plan to buy some we are ones for next season if I can get my hands on em.
  • 1 0
 @encorp: Totally agree. I have a pair too. They feel more like having really well tuned suspension than anything else I can think of: the bike just tracks straighter through rough terrain. They feel different on berms, but I wouldn't say they feel bad.
  • 2 1
 @jaydawg69: A certain Nico Vouilloz would disagree with you there.
  • 1 0
 @zeedre: revel make thermoformed wheels don't they?
  • 1 0
 @russthedog: they do but they make them with a nylon type resin to prioritize recyclability. I brought up the gg peeps because they prioritized toughness for their frames which is what I think wheels should also be prioritized to. At least thats my understanding - slight possibility someone will tell me I'm wrong here. Having said that,, I'm sure revel wheels are tough too.
  • 1 0
 @jaydawg69: yep. everyone forgets that "compliant" in racing always equals slower! a toyota camry is compliant, a porsche GT4 is not....
  • 1 1
 @jaydawg69: wow,that's a lot of scientific proof...said no one. I'm not rich,so I don't care that much,but I like compliance,as a not so young hardtail rider. We are not all racers..
  • 1 0
 @lenniDK: it's more proof than what you are showing.... faster is always better.
  • 29 1
 What happened to your budget $999 wheelset?
  • 13 5
 As we developed the Revolution line of wheels we felt the jump in quality was too great to continue offering the Movement line. It was a good product for our first foray and did many riders and still continues to do many riders well. It will be missed but we need to keep moving forward. But hey, our Revolution line starts at $1399 and is a very competitive price point if you dig around.
  • 60 8
 @WeAreOne: Jumping from $999 to $1399 took it from a "no brainer, get WAO wheels" to "lets see what other brands offer.".
  • 11 0
 @MrLynch: This is truth. Quite literally was going to buy those, they got bumped up to $1400, went another route later that week.
  • 10 2
 @MrLynch: We recognize that any increase in price causes questions. The Agent wheel set was actually brought way down in price as we were fazing it out of production, to bring about that 999.00 price. As it currently stands we feel our value proposition is still incredibly competitive at the 1399 price point, for the Revolution line up.
  • 14 16
 @WeAreOne:
$1400 CAD for a carbon wheelset is incredible value. As a shop mechanic I don't think I could even lace a decent alloy wheelset for that if I'm charging everything out at MSRP.
  • 3 0
 @Klainmeister: @MrLynch that is about $999 Freedom dollars for you still!
  • 3 0
 @notthatfast: Pretty sure that’s USD. The website says $1599 CAD so a bit more.
  • 6 4
 @notthatfast: you must be using gold spokes then
Hope wheelset 400 GBP or 600 ish cad
  • 5 2
 @hhaaiirryy:
Yeah, off the shelf.
I also said decent. hope hubs yes, hope rims no thanks.
  • 2 2
 @hhaaiirryy: but it will be super heavy with hope hubs
  • 1 0
 @covekid: Yeah, I have heard there is a promo code floating around right now too, so they could get close depending on the exchange rate that day Smile
  • 4 0
 @notthatfast: i’ll make a note to never have you build wheels then. Yikes!
  • 1 1
 @MrLynch: yep you can get American made enves for $1400.
  • 1 3
 @whitebirdfeathers:
Find me any bike shop that can do a quality custom built wheelset for that at MSRP.
  • 4 0
 @notthatfast: Who pays MSRP for anything?
  • 1 0
 What the hell are you guys building?? Or how much do you charge for wheel building?

Over here, in retail (not sure about MSRPs), a set of boost DT 350 hubs is 230 EUR, a pair of EX511s (including nipples and washers) is under 200 € and then throw in another 50 € and some change for the spokes. 400 € for the materials easily (probably including rim tape and valves). 1400 CAD is just under 900 EUR, so please tell me where I can sell a custom wheelset with the cost of lacing it of 500 €. I'll happily do it for half the price, all day, every day. And laugh all the way to the bank.

If the EX511s aren't decent, I don't know what else to put on alloy wise, but if for some reason the workhorse that is the 350 is a problem, a set of 240 hubs raises the parts price by ~200 €.
  • 2 0
 @Primoz:
350 hubs $500
Ex511 rims $400
Spokes $140
Nipples $25
Labour $200

Okay $1300 so I mis-estimated. But my point remains that $1600 for a hand laced wheelset with carbon rims is great value
  • 1 0
 @notthatfast: There's a guy here on PB classified selling new EX511's built with 350 hubs for $670 U.S.
  • 1 0
 @Xlr8n:
He's probably losing money unless he works in the industry...
  • 1 0
 @notthatfast: Yeah, he's probably getting bulk discounts, So? A buddy of mine got a set from him. It's legit. Bottom line is he's selling top shelf alloy wheel builds for half your quote.
  • 25 2
 Any plans of doing front and rear optimized setups such as Zipp and Nobl? Thoughts on this? Perhaps recommend different combinations of your rims to do similar.
  • 20 1
 What are your thoughts on cushcore and other inserts?
  • 9 2
 Great question. We have tried to develop wheels that are strong enough to handle all the abuse you throw their way and don't necessarily think inserts are needed. They reduce air volume and aren't always ideal for avoiding impacts. The largest contributor to avoiding impacts is air volume and and PSI. That being said any insert that doesn't add pressure to the top sheet i.e. Cush Core can be run. -Dave
  • 16 0
 @WeAreOne:

On your 2020 PB Holiday giveaway day what do you hope sewer-rat will say about your product in his song.
  • 4 0
 In my own experience using insert this past season... well first season I can remember not destroying multiple rims. Also allowed me to run my suspension lighter and faster, overall I think the benefits outweighs the detriments. Also nice not having to carry a tube
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: please clarify, what inserts add pressure to the rim top sheet? what do you mean rim top sheet?

Cushcore is good or bad for for WR1 rims?

thanks!
  • 1 0
 @rendaddy: Ones that are inflatable like Pro Core. Cushcore is GTG.
  • 2 0
 @rendaddy: i'm not with WAO, but they are referring to procore type systems that use a secondary inflated inner chamber that add pressure to the rim top sheet. Cushcore is good to go with WAO rims
  • 3 0
 @rendaddy: Cush Core is ok, Systems like Pro Core Are not Smile
  • 3 0
 @WeAreOne:

On this 9th day of Christmas WeAreOne disapointed me by not answering my question ASAP.....

Maybe you guys will take up the call to get sewer-rat some swag for his PB troll version of the 12 days of christmas...

Great that you have built the brand and a 40+ employee shop behind it. Fun to see the folks and get some inside info on what makes your company tick. Happy holidays and all the best to WeAreOne in 2021.
  • 1 0
 @pink505: skip bayless, is that you?
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: Don Cherry, is that you?
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: wait hopefully this will get answered, what tire pressures do you folks recommend? I’m 175lbs running 27-29psi in the rear and 22-25 in the front. 2.4 DH casing in the rear and 2.5 exo+ in the front.
  • 17 0
 Could you make a BMX in a common project with Wethepeople and OneUp components and call it the WeAreTheOnePeopleUp ?
  • 12 0
 How do you intend to scale your production while keeping it local? I have been impressed by your ability to manufacture in North America, but it seems so much more challenging to grow a brand here than in Taiwan, for example.
  • 17 0
 Scaling for any business is tough and we are no exception. That being said we are lucky enough to have an amazing crew of employees that are constantly helping us nail down efficiencies and increasing output. Being nimble allows us to grow and change process relatively quickly and being vertically integrated allows us good control of our supply chain. It also allows us to scale locally and still keep the business healthy. This has allowed us to grow over the last three years and will continue to help us moving forward. That being said we are in an almost continuous state of hiring to make sure we can keep up with demand. We currently employ 43 people and that has given us the resources we need to keep pushing. We believe in what we do, and with the right vision local manufacturing is possible and beneficial to everyone involved. -Dave
  • 4 0
 @WeAreOne: I've enjoyed reading this whole ama, but this is the bit that made my head pop...43 people! That's massive!
  • 16 2
 Why choose you over all the other brands?
  • 21 5
 While the others are many, they are One.
  • 45 3
 Made in Canada... unbeatable warranty... by riders for riders... what's not to love? Big Grin
  • 12 0
 I just bought a set from them a few months back and their customer service is damn good. Plus like @Pilsner-power said they have an unbeatable warranty and are made in Canada. I'd highly recommend these wheels to anyone. The amount of silly precise inside lines you can take with them is an absolute blast
  • 11 7
 @upside: Exactly.

Made In Canada - the carbon is coming from Portland(as far as i know) - If your want your stem in a color: The work is getting done in Vancouver. Made in BC to proof they are suitable for everything else. Warranty and Customer Support is top notch. They even have a phone number and help you out - not a Cell like some others that never answer their phone. Had even Buddies who got help, stranded with two broken spokes in SunPeaks, drove down to WeAreOne, got a new one installed and was shredding the whole weekend.
#SUPPORTYOURLOCAL

No Need for NOBL Wheels - or rebranded overseas Carbon Wheels what i would call them!
  • 33 0
 Great question. All brands have a unique story and market products to people in ways that work for them. Our story is we are a Canadian manufacturer that is 100% vertically integrated and offers the best support and quality in the market today. All of the products we manufacture are sourced within 500km of our factory. Every day we are making our products and continuously improving on all aspects of our business. There are only a few other operations that can say the same and we applaud those companies as well.

Cheers, Dustin
  • 2 0
 I also ride a set of their wheels and agree with all the other comments on here! Awesome customer service takes it ALL THE TIME!!! Then they add an amazing product at a great price to boot!
  • 2 0
 Customer service is amazing. Ride quality is just as good.
  • 3 0
 I've been very impressed with the CS provided by WAO. Great rims, timely and friendly communication, and a great warranty (although, I should note that I haven't had to use it).
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: Cheers Dustin. I have a beater wheelset that I have yet not been able to break, from that other noble brand. When it's time I'll replace with WAO. You stand for your products and provide great CS. ! stay safe!
  • 11 1
 That's rad! Really looking forward to see a bike from you guys, as your carbon wheels are fantastic.

1) Can you tell us anything about the bike (type, travel, linkage design, etc)? 2) will you be doing anything new/different in terms of automated carbon layup to improve your quality/efficiency and ultimately cost than your typical asian carbon manufacturer?
  • 16 0
 1) While we can't share any specifics, we think we've built an all-around trail slayer that will get you up fast, and down even faster with a big smile on your face.

2) We've explored some automation possibilities, but we've found hand layup to still be king for something with such a complex shape. Layups for things like bikes are highly skilled labour, and requires a degree of artistic freedom to ensure high quality parts that a robot just can't produce (yet!). That being said, we do have a unique layup and molding process that eliminates a large degree of variability in the final product and ensures super strong and light parts, with relatively quick speed.

Cheers,
Adam
  • 2 0
 @WeAreOne: As a Guerrilla Gravity owner, I am totally pumped to see someone finally give them a run for their money in the NA-made trail/enduro category. I support GG because they are amazing bikes, and they are an innovative company. I know they are expanding currently and frame production is on hold as they move into a larger facility. I was an early adopter of WR1 for similar reasons. Seeing the innovation small companies have to bring to domestic manufacturing to be competitive with much larger facilities overseas is fascinating, and I do think it helps pave the way for healthy competition, and even better ideas in the future. Cant wait to see it!
  • 21 8
 Are you sponsored by arc'teryx? You know they moved their production out of canada, right?!
  • 13 1
 What's your opinion on spoke count balance for Enduro/DH Wheels, does it make sense to have different rim layups front and rear and different spoke counts on each wheel?
  • 14 3
 If 4 is in fact 1 does it mean that I'm only 1/4? Or maybe we are more talking 0100 then I would be 0001? Then you could only grow right to 8 (1000) in order to stay 1, am I right?
  • 9 0
 I am here for the binary humor. Bravo
  • 4 1
 @peterdavidhaile: I was tempted to add some data type (INT, BOOL, FLOAT, etc) into it but since everyone is going Python right now you don't really need to specify it anymore since that lazy scripting language will do the work for you. Anyone who think I should stop can just call the garbage collector...if they ever know how to it!
  • 3 1
 @lRaphl: What's this Python crap? You know C# is way better at garbage collection if you Dispose of it properly Wink
  • 2 0
 @CSharp: Yep! And this is why that version of C is sharp!
  • 6 0
 BAHAHA! Even though the engineering team spends most of our day nerding out over bikes, we can always appreciate a good binary joke! Cheers, Adam
  • 12 1
 What is your opinion on using alloy nipples with carbon rims (running tubeless). Been seeing/hearing about galvanic corrosion
  • 1 0
 +1, Was going to ask this as well.
  • 4 1
 Sapim alloy nips are coated and treated. there are no better.
  • 1 0
 i've lived this and a few of my nips are disintegrating - I couldn't believe it. gonna rebuild it with brass, but curious is sealant might also play a role.
  • 5 0
 Galvanic corrosion stinks. Not all alloy nipples are created equal - the better the grade of alloy and the better the ano job, the more corrosion resistant they end up being. Making sure nipples are properly prepped pre-build, and building with stainless steel washers that are also properly prepped goes a long way to helping prevent galvanic corrosion also. Sealant often does play a role in the degradation of alloy nipples, in both alloy and carbon hoops. Best to make sure you use a good tape, and that your valve hole is neat and tidy, to make sure you are sealant proof.
  • 9 0
 The quality of the nipple and the quality of the anodization is key. Sapim has done a great job and this is why we stress to use a specific nipple of theirs. Longevity is great, wheels out there that are 4 years old now, and rolling strong! Dustin
  • 10 1
 Why are carbon rims so expensive. I mean, how much of the price difference to Al is due to increased production cost and how much is due to budgeting warranty replacements?
  • 5 1
 i got this guys: the raw material is very expensive, the design and engineering is very expensive and more time consuming than for alloy, and the manual nature of production is much more time consuming and expensive than with alloy. the last part of your question is not a factor.
  • 4 0
 @jamesbrant: Yeah, I'm an engineer, used to work in aerospace so I have some understanding of cfrp production but for much larger parts. I was hoping for something a bit more in depth, more engineering based: things like bake times, how QC is performed, non destructive testing? QC rejection rates?
  • 8 0
 @kcy4130: Great question! @jamesbrant did hit the nail on the head from a high level standpoint, but I can comment more on the engineering side of things:

Dave does put a lot of effort into optimizing our oven cycles so we can get as many wheels as possible in and out throughout the workday, but there is always going to be heating and cooling times so our layup team can handle molds safely. This adds time to the process on every wheel we make. While I can't comment on our exact QC reject rate, we do thorough visual checks, as well as weighing of 100% of our rims. Our unique layup process means even a few grams of difference in weight points to a missing ply somewhere in the wheel, and we reject the few wheels that aren't visually stunning and within that small weight tolerance. We do also sample wheels from time to time to check that stiffness is on target with our spec!

Cheers,
Adam
  • 3 0
 @WeAreOne: you ever need a place to send the cosmetic rejects I'll give you my address and pay for shipping!

Also I'm still on a set of your early production Agent rims and I'm amazed at the quality and durability of your product. They are art compared to the other carbon rims I have tried.
  • 10 0
 When the work day is over and it's time to go home, do you become "We Are Done"?
  • 13 0
 We sometimes even get to We Are Home
  • 7 0
 What long term negative impacts do you feel offering lifetime free replacements has on the expectations of consumers?

Do you feel that replacing an item for life with such low recyclability is at odds with the industry’s largely greenwashed stance on sustainability?

Do you feel that customers have latched on to your product only due to the free-replacement policy and don’t have an actual connection with the brand beyond that?
  • 19 0
 This is such a great question. Best one on here yet I feel and there is a lot to unpack here.

Our decision to offer a lifetime warranty was not to garner attention and run numbers that work out in the end. The goal was to develop products that if used in an intended manner will last a lifetime. Looking over the warranty information each month we see that the product is being pushed to extremes. Most riders applying for a warranty fully acknowledge their role in the resulting failure. Meaning they were doing something that had consequences and surely messed up. Be it a bad line choice, a mega case on a gap jump, flat a tire and continuing to ride to the bottom of the bike park anyway. These are just a few examples, but they all fall under the common theme of “I messed up.” And we have stood behind all of these cases, literally.

While we are doing all we can to address this by improving our products day after day, there will always be a level of personal responsibility on the rider that will impact the outcome of a product's lifecycle. The main goal is somewhat self-defeating. Our outlook is for all of our customers to need to buy fewer wheelsets over their riding seasons, thus reducing the overall need for RAW materials consumed in our manufacturing process.

Internally we have long conversations about recycling and we usually come back to scale. Firstly carbon recyclers will not even look at you unless you are producing metric tons of waste for them to consume. If we had more options to send our waste to this would be a no brainer.

It is my vision that people are not buying our product for our warranty alone. I hope they see the values of our company, the quality of our products and what we are aiming to do with We Are One in the long term.

Dustin
  • 2 0
 @WeAreOne: on the topic of warranty / failures, do you incorporate any sort of failure mode analysis from these rims and incorporate it into the design/testing process? i get that you can't account for every possible failure mode, but if you saw a trend would you address it?
  • 5 0
 @captainderp: Absolutely. Failures are handled case by case, most of them are very similar in nature. For the ones that stand out or are new, we will do an in-depth failure analysis on them and determine the reasoning and if we can engineer a better result.
  • 3 1
 @WeAreOne: Little anecdote re: 'flatting and riding to the bottom anyway' . I ride the Strife rims. I slashed my rear tire wide open at kicking horse, I was too tired after a long day to walk down, and figured with lifetime warranty why not just ride down and call it a day, assuming that by the bottom I'll have nothing but carbon splinters vaguely resembling a wheel . Made it to the bottom (almost 4000ft descent) with no tire left on the wheel, and the rim still looked like a rim. I re-taped and mounted up a new tire tubeless with only a hand pump, rim was straight and true, bead was smooth with only cosmetic scratches. Still running that rim 4 months later and abusing it as hard as I can.

Strong as hell, and a ride quality you have to feel to understand. WR1 has discredited all my former carbon prejudices many times over.
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: it’s an interesting place to be in. Leading with a lifetime wheel warranty and then offering a bike will come with heavy customer expectations.

I just wonder if companies have to offer such crazy warranties due to the rapid loss of value bike components have and high price tags.

I can’t think of any other industry that has so much depreciation and crazy warranty to make customers comfortable with spending the money. *Also zero desirability for older product. Retro stuff in high-end audio or cars is pretty insulated. Things that are proportionally as high of a spend based off of purchaser income level.
  • 12 2
 Does Arcteryx sponsor We Are One? Haha
  • 3 1
 I noticed that everyone pictured was wearing an arcteryx jacket and wondered if somehow they had some affiliation???
  • 1 0
 +1
  • 30 0
 In BC, wearing Arcteryx is law if you’re even remotely outdoorsy, along with owning a Tacoma.
  • 1 1
 @mungbean: what about MEC ???
  • 5 0
 @unrooted: Honestly MEC is not good. One of the reasons they have failed as a Co-Op.
  • 1 0
 @jaycubzz: I can always spot the Canadian climbers that visit my area because they almost always have at least one MEC item on their body....along with the Arcteryx puffy, and shoes, and pants...
  • 4 0
 @jaycubzz: It's unfortunate the turn that MEC has taken in recent years. Miss the days of the peak logo and the true cooperative. I guess this new direction is more marketable/profitable... It's owned by a multinational conglomerate now right?
  • 7 0
 Hi had some carbon wheels once (sixth element) but they made the ride way too stiff. They took were tough for sure. How do the new layup on carbon wheels help prevent this....? cheers
  • 6 0
 Orientation of the fibers and the shallower profile allow us to fine tune ride characteristics. Keeping the strength but offering better ride feel -Dave
  • 2 0
 I've got WeAreOne's Outlier rims, which were their earlier DH rims - @WeAreOne would you say they're stiffer than most of the rims you produce now?
I came from alloy wheels and currently have an alloy front wheel (because the bike is now mulleted) and at my weight I never noticed the stiffness of WAO's rims being too much.
My rear is about 2 years old and has never even had the spokes touched and it's still perfectly straight and true, that's not through lack of trying either, it's had some hard abuse.
  • 6 0
 Have you like looked into making front and rear wheel specific rim designs?

I’ve seen a few of your competitors doing this, and on the surface, it seems to make sense. With rear wheels usually needing to be stiffer, stronger, and usually using a slightly narrower, it seems like an opportunity to save some weight, increase compliance for the front rim.

Also, give some props to Josh in sales! I’ve been in correspondence with him for a long time while I’ve been trying to decide on a rear wheel specific build. He’s been great to work with. And even better, I should be ordering this week Smile .
  • 7 1
 What kind of carbon recycling programs do you have, if any, for old/damaged rims? Or do you utilize any recycled carbon fiber for manufacturing your components? Given the significant negative impact that carbon has on the environment, recycling and reusing materials is really what makes or breaks my decision to buy.
Thanks!
  • 11 2
 "Today, July 9th"... Is Covid finally over?
  • 7 4
 I’d like to know why it’s so cold outside in July??? Is global warming also over?
  • 7 0
 When you test your rims, how much do you vary the different types, brands of tires, and inserts? Do you feel certain hubs affect rim performance?
  • 3 0
 We test with an entire spectrum of tires/inserts/ pressures etc. We want to try and identify and isolate as many variables as we can during testing to ensure we are creating what we feel is the best product.
In terms of hubs there can definitely be some increase/decrease in performance depending on things like flange width and spoke angles. Most of this can be controlled during our building process but can affect wheels if not looked at. Furthermore the quality of the hubs will affect the overall performance of the bike so high quality hubs are usually money well spent.
-Dave
  • 7 0
 Can you talk about the work you do for i9? Are the rims you make for them in some way different than the one sold as We Are One?
  • 6 0
 Thanks for the question. They are actually a little different. We have worked with I9 to create some slightly different layups to optimize their System Wheelsets. -Dave
  • 4 0
 Where do you see your future wheel/rim designs headed, that is to say, what ride aspects or design features do you feel have the most room for development in future models? I’ve been riding a set of your DH wheels for two years and I love them.
  • 4 0
 Are you still testing out the idea of building a frame?

Does the build of a wheel change at all with the hub, specifically in regard to engagement? So would the tension of the spokes need to change or really anything else for that matter between a higher and lower engagement hub?

Straight vs J-bend, preference?

Hub standards. Is 157 needed for 29er or anything else? Preferences?
  • 5 0
 In terms of environmental impact do you guys recycle worried carbon rims or do you have a process in place that can keep them away from a landfill or the dreaded seafloat? if not yet is this something you are working on?
  • 5 0
 I know Dustin spoke to this earlier but it it is important to try and tackle. Our first line of defence is to simply cut down on the number of wheel sets that need to go to a landfill. In production we have great process' in place to ensure that only a marginal percentage ends up having to be turfed. We also believe that by building the best wheel set we can we can ensure that overall less wheel sets end up in the trash. By sourcing our manufacturing pieces as local as we can we also cut down on our overall production footprint. We are constantly looking for partners for recycling though most companies won't deal with the small scale of what we would need recycled. We recognize this is far from perfect and we are always looking to improve and find better solutions moving forward. -Dave
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: does BC offer any kind of green business incentive for small(ish) businesses?
  • 4 0
 I know the AMA has ended, but damn are people salty about the cost of carbon wheels. Nobody is making you buy them, and the benefits of them are relatively small. There are tons of budget aluminum wheels out there that are absolutely awesome, and to demand a set of carbon wheels for 600$ is absurd.

These guys make a great product, and are competitive with much bigger companies offering a performance component with a great warranty. If that's out of your price range, then get some spanks or nukeproof wheels that ROCK.
  • 1 0
 At the same time, carbon is far stronger. Your aluminum rim will slowly pick up dents, flat spots, etc until it cracks and fails. Throughout this process, the wheel will go out of true and you’ll need to spend either time or money to fix it.

With carbon, you can just keep riding and riding until the wheel cracks, then pick up a warranty replacement and go riding again. Most aluminum rims I’m aware of don’t have warranties like the ones carbon rims do.
  • 8 1
 Where do I find that nipple holding device that attaches to a drill?
  • 118 1
 Sir this is a family establishment
  • 4 1
 Spencer’s
  • 5 1
 Depends on what nipples you use. For slotted nipples, Unior makes a good drill bit nipple driver for slotted nipples that you can get from any bike shop. Double square 3.2mm drivers are harder to come by. Arkane wheels is where I got mine. They are a massive time saver.
  • 4 0
 Problem Solvers Holy Driver
  • 1 0
 @infamous: The Holy Driver, I almost forgot that one! Also a great tool for slotted nipples and can be thrown in a drill as well.

Arkane's DSN driver is most similar to the Holy Driver with the adjustable prong down the center.
  • 12 0
 Simple, you take a grinder to a nice tool and turn it into an even better tool.
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: Now that's engineering
  • 6 1
 Hi,

I just graduated from the Machining program at Bellingham Technical College this spring and was wondering what machines you use in your shop? Thanks, Rosewheel
  • 6 0
 We have a Haas VM3 that we use to make all of our molds as well as stems and hard parts for the bike. We recently added a Haas ST15y for all of our round small parts. - Gilles
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: Thanks for the reply!
  • 5 1
 Will there ever be a better way to run Tubeless than using tire sealant? Anything, you are looking at?

Also having cased the living shit out of your Union wheel-set many times, I can attest to how durable they are.
  • 3 0
 I agree warranty is a huge selling point as is customer service/support. I'm from North Van so I get the local business as well. From PURELY a product performance perspective, what's the top 2-3 differentiators between We Are One rims vs the other big brands (RaceFace, NOBL, ENVE)?
  • 7 1
 Great question. There are a plethora of choices out there today for carbon rims. We do our best to separate ourselves as being a manufacturer of our products and not marketing. We understand what mountain bikes and riders are capable of and test and ride our products to that level all the time. And being able to produce a product locally, supporting over 44 employees and growing a Canadian-based manufacturing business that is not offshoring anything is the other major factor I feel separates us. Dustin
  • 2 0
 I bought a second hand 2019 WAO Unions wheelset and have them checked by my mechanic, it has correct spoke tension but noticed it has straight gauge. Why do I still hear creaking on the spoke or around the nipples under load?
  • 3 0
 There are many different things that could cause this. Without inspecting the specific wheel it would be tough to diagnose with certainty. Is the creaking for sure coming from spokes or could it be free hub/cassette interface? has there been any spokes replaced? Feel free to reach out directly to info@weareone.bike to try and trouble shoot.
-Dave
  • 3 0
 What are your plans going forward for your handlebar line. Will you continue to collaborate with 77Designz? Specifically interested in whether you will offer a more XC oriented flat bar.
  • 2 0
 Doug go to bed you dont need a flat bar
  • 1 0
 Are you saying that I should put bar ends on riser bars? After I get out of bed @SomeBlindKid:
  • 3 0
 What are your production timelines for new orders of rims? Can you guys deliver in 3 weeks, or in 3 months like some other companies? Also, your Christmas downtime podcast promo code doesn't work.
  • 3 0
 As of this moment we are delivering on a 4 week turnaround. We are always trying to ensure that we can bring lead times down and we strive to never be more than 4-6 weeks out at a maximum. As for the promo code we just tested internally and it seems to be working just fine. Maybe try it again and see if there was just a mistake on entry. If still not working let us know. -Dave
  • 3 0
 Do think you'd be able to scale up production to compete with some of the bigger OEM brands while keeping production in Kamloops, or does something of that scale inherently mean manufacturing overseas?
  • 12 0
 Love all the questions about scaling and keeping production Canadian. We firmly believe in keeping production local. It's the cornerstone of what we do. It allows us to ensure quality, stay nimble and flexible, develop new product and stay connected with our consumers. All while supporting our local economy and providing jobs. We are constantly looking at different methodologies and process improvements to continue to increase our output and we feel confident we can manage that growth and stay proudly Canadian made. We have expanded our facilities and staffing, currently employing 43 folks and are excited to continue to grow with the market. -Dave
  • 7 0
 @WeAreOne: we need more companies like you! When I am ready to buy my first set of Carbon rims I know who I will be coming to... Beer
  • 2 0
 If the new frame rumours are true will you be making a 27.5 option (assuming if you go the way of Forbidden and only launch with a 29” frame)? With in house machining does that afford you the flexibility to adjust linkages etc. for other options?
  • 3 0
 I noticed customwheelbuilder.com is offering the same wheel set as is on the WAO website for around $150 less. Is there something that I’m not getting from them that I would get by ordering direct?
  • 2 0
 Obviously you are invested in the thermoset resin process... can you share why you believe this process is superior to the thermoplastic systems that are being offered by competitors?

BTW... I built up my Unions a couple weeks ago... smoothest wheelbuild I've done in a while. The finish and craftsmanship of the rims is excellent, I'd recommend them to anyone.

Thanks!
  • 3 0
 We are always playing with new and innovative products. Thermoplastic has challenges that make it a very hard product to use for rim production if you bladder mold your product. We are making some headway with it, but the process materials need to improve before we could ever scale that up.
  • 2 0
 Q1: I know it's getting a bit ahead of things, but what's the reasoning behind complete bikes only? Many of us have very particular tastes on things like brakes, suspension, and drivetrain, and would like to carry those over from a current bike. Coughing up extra dough for a complete build just to immediately strip it is a fairly large turn-off.
Q2: I saw a comment above about some inserts (i.e. CushCore) increasing pressure on the rim, thus being bad. Any truth to that?

I'm on my second set of WAO wheels, and my experiences with your sales and warranty support are fantastic. When I cracked a rim being a dumbass on a Sunday, you had a new one on my doorstep on a Friday. Customer for life!
  • 2 0
 As avid riders we all know the feeling of customizing your rig with the parts you want. and we batted around frame only vs complete bikes a ton of times in the office. We landed on the complete bike as we felt we could spec it with what we would want on it, to preform the way we, as riders, would like it to. This lets customers that don't want to part things out to get their ride and get going asap which we felt was important. As for the Insert question, any insert that uses air pressure or a bladder to create a bumper does so by putting downward pressure on the top sheet of the rim, below the rim lips. This isn't something we suggest as that upper internal layer isn't meant to take those forces. Passive inserts, ie Cush core can be run as they don't actively compress that top sheet.
  • 3 0
 Do you have plans on making your carbon rims more recyclable? Revel's Fusion Fiber is one example, and it would be great to see more manufacturers utilize this layup method.
  • 5 1
 No question just mad props for being Grizzly Cycles favorite carbon wheel company!
  • 1 0
 Is there ever a chance that you'll outsource rim / wheel production? I know it's easy to say 'NOT A CHANCE' right now, but if business continues to grow, and expenses mount, what are your long term plans for keeping costs down and meeting demand while still remaining Canadian made?
  • 4 0
 There is no need to outsource our production, nor will we ever look to do so. It is in our fabric and the basis of what our company is built upon.
  • 1 0
 (1) It seems most are putting 30mm internal rims on everything. Where do you draw the line between the Faction (27mm internal) vs the Union (30mm internal)?

(2) What is your take on Cushcore? Obviously WAO has nice ride characteristics, but do you guys recommend Cushcore (pro/xc)?
  • 2 1
 Im looking to buy a set of 29' carbon rims with an internal of a minimum of 30mm to 35mm max but were i live is pretty rocky and gnarly. No bike parks whatsoever and im on a need of a lightweight carbon rims thats not stiff. Most options out there are stiffer than an alu rim. I need something lightweight that at the same time absorbs. Cheers from Greece.
  • 1 0
 Lightweight + wide + handles rocky terrain = Error does not compute.
  • 1 0
 Either get zipps and deal with spoke tension issues...or: get whatever carbon wheel that has a decent hub, solid rim design, GREAT warranty in your local market and throw some inserts in there - tannus or cushcore XC are both light and allow you to soften up the ride a bit while maintaining a bit of sidewalk stiffness.

Lightweight...that part just isn’t going to happen. A bonus of the zipps is that the rim height is so low that you’ll avoid smashing the sides with rocks.
  • 1 0
 I have two sets of WR1 rims,and have had zero issues with either set. The first set I built, the second I bought as a wheelset. I was surprised to learn you use 2X lacing on the Union rim, but I has worked very well, and feels great. what led to that decision? I can guess, but I'm curious what led you there.
  • 2 0
 To save weight is the biggest reason. Not overly complicated.
  • 1 0
 I like to run 27mm internal, 2.5 front, 2.4 rear, and cushcore for all mountain and enduro. Like the slightly rounder profile and cushcore supports the sidewall. Weigh 210 lbs and get after it fairly aggressively. Yeah or nay with your rims? Thx for doing this. Super cool.
  • 1 0
 I'm exactly the same, at 195, but I've never felt faster or had more traction.
  • 1 0
 i would say yes. i have their 27mm rim (the Faction) on my 29er Slayer and i weigh 220, ride 2.5 tires (prefer Rimpact) and they are phenomenal. IMO, larger travel bikes are easier, not harder on the wheels but of course it comes down to you the rider and terrain. i have no concerns or fears of damage on these rims and have had a few rim strikes (double down casings) and no issues, cracks, dings, nothing. not even pinch flats due to the rim design.
  • 1 0
 @jamesbrant: thx for response. I am doing this on trips with 27mm Reserve wheels that normally have tannus and slimmer tires, but was curious what they would say. Was expecting they wouldn’t answer. Feel slightly more confident with Reserve’s, but nice to know you are having a good experience with their rims.
  • 2 0
 Bit late here but I say go for it as well. I'm about your size and have been running a set of Factions on my Firebird 29er all season this year with zero issues. I originally had planned to use them as my "light duty" wheel set for the pedally days and keep the stock DT rims with DH rubber on them for park days etc... but I ended up just riding the WAO's all season and not swapping them out. Nice to have a backup set just in case, but the Factions have been rock solid.

Best carbon wheels I've ridden hands down as far as feel goes too. I've had a couple sets of ENVEs, NOBLs, some random Chinese carbon rims (and have demoed many more) and these have been the least problematic and best feeling of the bunch.
  • 1 0
 Hi, thanks for doing this Live Now. Are there rider weight limits to your rims? If so, is that in my bday suit, fully kitted (helmet, pack, pads, shoes, etc), or with bike included? Different for front or rear? Different if using a WeAreOne wheelset?
  • 1 0
 Good question. While we don't have any weight restrictions on our rims there are some best practices to follow. For heavier or very aggressive riders there does need to be higher PSI run generally to ensure impacts are limited and the tire doesn't peel off the rim. We have different layups based on application as well so ensuring you are picking the right rim for the riding you want to do is imperative. We do also offer some layups built around heavy duty bike packing, for example, that may have to be carrying weight loads far in excess of "standard" ride weight.
-Dave
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: thanks for the reply/answer. All in (me, kit, bike) I am about 120kg, I ride trail with 130f/100r travel. Max tire size I can run is 2.3 - would the Faction be a good choice?
  • 1 0
 @dzmtnrider: Based on size I would suggest jumping up to the Union, simply because the added air volume will allow for a much better ride quality.
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: thanks for the feedback. ‘Based on size’ are you referring to tire size or my size?
  • 1 0
 @dzmtnrider: For this I would consider riding weight to be the main determining factor. The larger air volume will give your tires a much better feel at that 2.3 width
  • 2 0
 @WeAreOne: thank you
  • 1 0
 is it feasible to offer diffrent wheel builds using the same rims and hubs with regards to compliance based on rider weight and preference?
ie I'm fat and reasonably fast on a good day so I like them stiff for accuracy and control . But the lighter or slower riders tend to prefer a softer wheel in my experience due to the reduced stress they put through them.
  • 3 0
 Great question! The majority of the ride feel you're describing is developed at a rim level - specifically how the carbon fiber layup is designed for that specific product. Spoke tension will definitely have an impact on ride feel, but not enough that you would be able to tailor a wheel build perfectly to what a rider is looking for. Our recommendation would be to pick a wheelset based on your riding style, as that will get you to that ballpark ride feel the easiest. From there, you can play around with pressures and tire widths to really dial it in! -Adam
  • 1 0
 I've been running the Insider rims from the Movement series for 3 years+
(I hand-laced them to King hubs with Sapim Race Spokes)...

I've spent about 10 minutes w/ a spoke wrench in those 3 years.

If I update to the Faction or Union Rims in the future, what benefits will I notice?

(I'm on a Tallboy V4 now, but the wheels have lasted through a TB3, and a Ripmo)
  • 2 0
 The first big difference is that we have added strength while cutting weight. While it doesn't sound like you've had any strength issues, its always nice to know you have some extra in your back pocket if things get rough. The lateral stiffness has been maintained while further improving ride feel. -Dave
  • 1 0
 I'm curious about vibrational feedback for dapackage and your rims. I've ridden on a surly moonlander (chromoly frame) and was extremely impressed on how little I felt small vibrations and impacts on the trail. I think in general aluminum and alloys do a better job of reducing vibrations, but I could be totally wrong. Would pairing a carbon bar/ stem and carbon rims to a carbon frame translate to feeling every small bump in your hands? How much would suspension setup fix this?
  • 2 0
 Funny seeing a familiar face around here! Carbon fiber is stiffer than both chromoly and aluminum, which means it will actually do a better job of damping small vibrations - think small exposed rock, chewed up trails at the end of the year, etc. The other advantage of carbon fiber is that the stiffness can be biased in a specific direction. This allows frame and component designers to make products stiff in one direction, and softer in another direction to eat up some of the trail chunder. Our carbon rims are stiffer laterally so your cornering is snappy and precise, but softer vertically so the trail gets smoothed out to an extent. Da Package achieves a similar thing, but with a more noticeable impact as your hands are directly on the bar all day. As always, good suspension setup will give you a great ride feel. Carbon takes that high quality ride feel to the next level. Cheers, -Adam
  • 1 0
 I broke two of their wheels on the rear, and both times they had me up and running by the end of the week. The breakage isn’t surprising considering how I ride at all and it was just a spoke/nipple pulled through the rim. Would buy them again any day and they are the best feeling rim, made a way bigger improvement than I thought they would in ride quality
  • 1 0
 How long does it take to laminate front and rear triangle ?
From your learnings , are EPS mandrels best to scale up the process ?
Why did you chose splitting the swingarm into two separate parts rather than molding it one piece ? Just curious which were the difficulties in the development that pushes you to go for a more conventional way of manufacturing.
  • 6 0
 I can't give away too many secrets, but I can tell you our process will not be using EPS mandrels. This was the goal from the start, as we believe having tooling that needs to be melted out using harsh chemicals that strain both the health of our workers and environment was something we simply would not accept. -Adam
  • 1 0
 I've never owned a wr1 wheel myself but had many come through my hands in a shop.
I did however notice some bubbles in the layup at the bead/sidewall "corner" . Comparing it to some other rims including offshore parts that Nobl puts their name on for instance they seem more consistent, so my question is if it could be some early production rims, or it's seen as a non issue? I don't have any pics of what I mean but was wondering if it affects the quality?
I love seeing a local brand manufacturing carbon wheels here but this particular issue puts a worry in my head that I've never had with the overseas rims I've built.
  • 5 0
 Thanks for the question. First thing to note is that no We Are One product is sanded and/or painted. Something that virtually every other manufacturer does in order to allow for greater numbers of rims to make it to sale, while hiding imperfections. There are costs to this both in terms of time and price, and environmental concerns. Occasionally non structural spotting may make it through QC but even that is incredible rare. Every rim that leaves the shop is checked and structurally sound and ready to keep you riding rubber side down!
-Dave
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: Thanks for the reply, that actually makes sense. Guess I'll have to give them a shot when I have a chance, though I also hope I won't need wheels anytime soon! Smile
Also, do you still have that blue RB Dragster frame you had in North Van? Would love to see that beauty again now that I ride an RB Big Grin
  • 4 0
 When are you releasing your frame!?
  • 20 0
 Alright, let's address the "Frame" We have is on the dock for Q2 in 2021. It will be complete bikes only in 2 spec levels. The builds were based on what we would want to ride out of a bike. The geo is modern enough to be very current, but not way out there pushing a new envelope. We have been riding the prototype for over 4 months now and have made some iterative changes to the design, but are keeping with the Geo we set in place and the kinematics. The bike is 100% built here in Kamloops, linkages, triangles, small parts, all of it.
  • 1 0
 have you ever done any performance testing to compare in-molded spoke holes vs drilled? from a manufacturing standpoint, how much of an increase in time is the extra lay up process in comparison to the drilling process?
  • 6 0
 Great question! When you drill a hole, you are essentially punching through a wall of existing fibers that have been "stretched" under pressure to give the best strength possible. When you mold a hole, the fibers at the edge of the hole typically will drift under pressure, and end up carrying significantly less load than the stretched fibers that have been cut by the drill. This ends up creating a weaker nipple bed, and puts the rim at higher risk of spoke pull-out. You also run the risk of having your molded holes forming "out of shape", which might require drilling afterwards to clean them up to accept a nipple.

Manufacturing wise, our drilling process is semi-automated and is quick compared to the rest of the process that goes into a rim. Molding holes would add more time in layup then would be saved at drilling, and produce a weaker overall rim for our customers.

Cheers,
-Adam
  • 4 0
 Is Adam Marchand the kind lost brother of Jo from “Pinkbike Academy?”
  • 2 0
 BAHAH! Amazing
  • 2 0
 Can neither confirm nor deny... although the resemblance is uncanny! -Adam
  • 1 0
 Huge WA0 fan here. I run the faction rims whit their Da Package handlebar/stem.
Will be looking at a their frame for sure. Raw carbon options would be nice as you can paint them the way you want, if needed
  • 2 0
 Are there any concerns when using a stiffer, maybe steel core tire lever? And what kind of force can the rim wall withstand before damage?
  • 3 0
 If you are using tire levers for tires, you might not be installing the tires in an optimal fashion. Remember to keep the bead of the tire in the deepest part of the rim while you slip on the bead. There is always some wiggle room or slack in the bead if you keep chasing the slack to where you are trying to slip the tire over the rim wall. If you do require a lever, steel is not optimal as it might mar the surface, we recommend using a composite of sorts for this in a perfect world.
  • 1 0
 Do you know roughly when your upcoming frame(s) will be available for purchase? Can you give us any details yet regarding wheel size, amount of travel, suspension design, price range, etc.?
  • 3 0
 I will throw a few details out here for you. It will not be available in a frame only and it will be a 29er. After that... the clock is ticking! Cheers
  • 1 1
 Hey crew, hope all is well!

With the rising costs of raw materials as well as inbound/outbound freight costs, how do you plan to remain competitively priced in the market while remaining profitable, maintaining a low carbon footprint and keeping your production 100% in Canada?
  • 1 0
 We've been discussing my potentially buying your Title branded DJ rims on the DJ thread. What benefit would I get from going carbon for DJ/Skatepark/pump track to say EX471s which are only 50g heavier?
  • 2 0
 People finally understanding that carbon wheels are not primarily about weight savings. Do you take the over or under on the year 2030?
  • 1 0
 Will the new frame be called “The Hemi”?
Are you currently closet training in a bid for 40+ category world domination?
Who is your spirit animal...
Boba Fett? Or
Shane Jenson?
  • 5 0
 The Semi is more betterer Shane Jensen every time hands down
  • 2 0
 Dave McInnes ! That's where you ended up after closing the shop in north van. You mentioned you were doing something exciting. Super glad to see you involved with WeAreOne.
  • 3 0
 It has been an awesome move for me for sure. I will always miss the shore but love this company and am super proud to be involved here.
  • 1 0
 You guys are a great brand but I feel you do some false advertising... I mean call something by it’s really name.... it’s John David Peter Mcinnes the fourth. Not dave Mcinnes.... aka stunny D!
  • 2 0
 HAHAHAHA- Some truth to that. -Dave
  • 1 0
 “Being a good musician doesn’t do it. If you don’t sing and play, you’re not a complete mariachi. When we sing mariachi, we become part of the group, ‘we’ become ‘one.’” -Nati Cano
  • 6 6
 Can you answer the age old question -
Are all the carbon rims made in the same factory/region somewhere in the asia?
Of your major competitiors, who makes their carbon rims in asia?
  • 3 0
 Any plans to make a rim design that actually plays with tire inserts?
  • 3 1
 How do you protect against glavanic corrosion with aluminum nipples and carbon rims?
  • 3 0
 Heard some contribution with forbidden is that true? What could it be?
  • 4 0
 We all love what Owen and his crew are doing at Forbidden. Last season there were 4 of the Druids under asses here in the factory and we all enjoyed the time we spent on it. While this would be amazing, there is currently nothing in the hopper for us working together. But the discussion has been had around how that would look.... let's see where it goes.
  • 3 1
 Have you concidered offering decal graphics that match hub colours for wheelset builds?
  • 3 0
 Good question, for any of our North American customer you can contact stikrd.com for any custom decals you would like. Invisiframe.co.uk for UK and Europe will do the same thing over the pond. -Dave
  • 3 0
 What are your personal rides/frames?
  • 1 0
 Gilles is on a Trek Slash, Dave rides a YT Capra, and I'm on a Devinci Troy! Dustin is currently in recovery mode from a crash and sticking to gravel riding on his Norco Search. -Adam
  • 1 0
 Will there be any level of customizability to your upcoming frame? Will you be optimizing layup and geometry by size rather than just for those on the peak of the bell curve?
  • 4 0
 We can't share too many of the specifics just yet, but we have spent many hours going over geometry at each size point to make sure our choices make sense for the riders that would fall in that size bracket as opposed to just scaling everything up. Same goes for layup - each size is treated as an independent layup design and all are optimized for that size only! Cheers, -Adam
  • 2 1
 While I appreciate the partnership with I9, will you ever offer factory wheels again that don't sound like a swarm of bees? Onyx?
  • 2 0
 While we truly love the I9 product, we do offer a few other options for hubs. Feel free to contact us directly for any custom build .-Dave
  • 2 1
 @WeAreOne: Maybe add the hub option to your pull down or at insert a statement suggesting other hubs are available.
  • 1 0
 As a growing business in a highly competitive market, what are your most pressing business challenges across the various functions within the organization.
  • 1 0
 I think like any business today; it is always people. This year we have hired over 27 people, and we are always looking for more. Right now, we are looking for 12 more staff to join our team, and it is getting tougher each time we post a hiring blitz to obtain people that fit well with our company ethos and commitment to making great products.
  • 3 0
 Are Arc'teryx jackets a required dress code at We Are One? Smile
  • 1 0
 What’s in the product pipeline for 2021? Keen to get my end on a some of your wheel but don’t want to drop big $$ on something that will get an update shortly.
  • 3 0
 You are safe to pull the trigger, nothing in the rim hopper until later in 2021.
  • 1 0
 What category of bike are you targeting first, and what will you be doing to differentiate the bike from others already on the market?
  • 1 0
 Company culture seems to be awesome at We Are One.
What is your favourite part about working there?
Do you think that your collective energy drives innovation?
  • 3 0
 Thats a tough one. There are so many things to love here. For me it is the passion and dedication our staff invest into each product we make. 90% of the staff are avid riders and we get to use that love to create something to make riding better for other people.
Sitting in a room with a diverse group of riders, different styles, different opinions definitely helps inform us when looking at product development. I do feel it helps foster our innovation and drive to keep improving!
-Dave
  • 1 0
 You make the rims for Industry Nine wheels - can we find somewhere such rims for sale, even if branded “We are One” and not I9? Smile
  • 1 0
 Are you guys partnering with PinkBike in the Advent Calendar Giveaway to give us the chance to win some sweeet WAO carbon wheels?
  • 1 0
 What makes the We Are One wheels different from all the other carbon rims and competitors out there, like bontrager, DT Swiss, NOBL, race face, e13...
  • 1 0
 Could you guys "in theory" do a rim that has colored 12k carbon fiber? I think Bugatti does something like that on one of their cars.

That would be the absolute coolest.
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne I know when you first released your rims a few reviews mentioned that continental tires would not work with the hookless rim design. Is that still the case?
  • 2 0
 Is there any truth in the rumours that Dustin once hurt an otter?
  • 1 0
 I can tell for sure he stomped on a street rat... Or as a street rat... Or was a street rat.! Ya ya that’s it !.....I can’t remember the rest. ????
  • 1 0
 @Intense4life:
I have no idea how that name came to stick, but from my faintest memory I was a bit of a fuzzy kid and we were at the water slides in Bromont between Canada Cups and my buddy Sean said I looked like a drowned sewer rat..... and another guy yells out Streetrat......and that stuck with all my close friends ever since.
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: hahaha. Love you brother! Been a long time.
  • 3 1
 What's the status of the frame you teased a while ago?
  • 1 0
 We are still working out the bugs and plan to launch in Q2 of 2021.
  • 11 13
 Should we expect the same durability from carbon rims as from alloy rims?

If so, how far away are we from the point where we can ride with the same confidence that we won’t destroy the bead beyond usability on a tiny sharp rock?

If not, what should the expectations be for a carbon-wheeled rider vs an alloy-wheeled rider?
  • 8 3
 Melodramatic much?
  • 2 0
 @twonsarelli: broke multiples alloy rims, but I have yet broke a carbon rims so there's that.
  • 2 0
 @ybsurf: thats awesome you haven't broken a carbon wheel. i ride carbon wheels only and haven't broken one in 4+ years but i would be lying if i said i don't occasionally back off the gas a little because i am afraid i might have an expensive meeting with a pointy rock.

it seems people here think i am attacking carbon rim manufacturers with this question. i am just genuinely curious to know what the manufacturers' perspectives are. it seems everyone is obsessed with the carbon wheel warranty situation and seem to now expect a no-questions-asked replacement for damage so i want to know their opinion on the whole situation.
  • 2 0
 @twonsarelli: that's why I will NEVER buy a carbon rims without a lifetime warranty it might ruin your ride but wont cost you much to replace. When I travel away from home I have an old beat up set of alloy rim just in case so i can still be riding until it get replaced.
  • 1 0
 @ybsurf: yeah i have a set of alloys in the garage just in case but haven't ridden them. what wheels do you ride? i have some 942s that have been ridden hard for 3 years and they've been amazing. also have some nox wheels that i love as well. they have a different feel but are good as well, just a bit $$
  • 1 0
 @twonsarelli: I have a set of union on my druid mullet and a union front and stife rear on my dh bike
  • 8 5
 This one is a great question. To look at this in a fair manner, you have to make assertions equal across the board. If we are just talking rims, carbon vs alloy, then carbon wins all day long. They are stronger in compression, lateral strength and take more impact damage without denaturing the product.
When you build these 2 different rims into a wheel, you need to look at the system. Alloy wheels are far more reliant on the spokes and tension to keep them together and strong. Alloy also does not deform and hold its shape as well under high loads. This is where truing is more common with alloy wheels vs carbon wheels.
Now to impact the one thing that, in my opinion, is where the term "fails" needs to be hammered out. For me, I see a fail when the product is no longer in the state it was when you first put it on your bike. I look at it as if an ally rim dents, that is a fail as much as if a carbon rim cracks. These, to me, should be equal. The alloy rim, not always but for the most part, will not hold tubeless tires and pressures, needs to be trued and adjusted, and is no longer the same rim it once was. So if this is the case, yes I firmly believe that our carbon rims win this all day long. This is not to say they will not fail if struck hard enough, but it will take a hell of a lot more force than the alloy ever will.

Cheers

Dustin
  • 7 1
 @WeAreOne: So, a small dent on an alloy rim is equal to a cracked carbon rim? Not sure I agree with you there.
  • 1 0
 @noplacelikeloam:

Seems like that would depend on the size of the dent.

Some little dents on alloy really aren't a problem. I've got a handful of those like that on my current rim. The tire still seals, doesn't weep/etc, and that tire has been on there for like 8 months now.

But I can see how a larger dent could be considered a failure. Especially if the tire doesn't seal anymore, or the rim is flat spotted/has a hop in it,etc.
  • 1 0
 @ocnlogan: Exactly, so a smallish dent is still usable, a tiny crack in carbon is not usable. Seems like there are more small dents than big ones occurring so my thought would be alloy would seem to fair better for what we typical do. My 2c anyhow. ;-)
  • 3 4
 How do you combat knock-off or grey market products? Have you considered RFID chips for product registration or incorporating blockchain ledgers to prevent fraud and improve traceability?
  • 1 0
 Valid and good questions. Being their production is controlled, it should be easy to enforce. MAP companies could assist with fake listings. Fake product should be easy.
  • 3 0
 Can I name the bike
  • 3 0
 Hit me. I would love to hear what you have stored up! Dustin
  • 5 0
 @WeAreOne: Give it a YZF-R1 inspired paint job and call it the "Wee R1".
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: The Scythe? For when you're ready to shred that shit.
  • 1 0
 @bishopsmike: if we're focusing on the shred it should be named the Grater, or whatever the name is of the machine that eats up tree stumps
  • 1 0
 edit* just saw that machine is called the excavator mulcher, which is a terrible name. I suggest the Wowza, similar to how the company name sounds phonetically with the first letter of each word
  • 1 1
 @WeAreOne:
The Monarch
The Tyrant
The SassySquatch
The Longneck
The WAP (worship and prayer)
The JeffreyEpsteinDidntKillHimself
  • 1 0
 @Jimmy0: I prefer the other meaning for WAP
  • 1 0
 Hi

Your 26 inch rim (dirt jump). Is this a good option for a child who ride mostly bike park/Downhill?

Thanks
  • 1 0
 I know full grown adults that ride We Are One 26" wheels on their DH bikes. They can take a f*cking beating thats for sure
  • 2 0
 Yup this is a solid option for the hold-out DH crew! It is tough as nails! Dustin
  • 2 0
 What’s up with the bike that y’all are developing?
  • 12 11
 Are you taking outside investors? I’m an entrepreneur always looking for investments plus a fanatic MTB rider.
  • 3 0
 26” DJ wheels?
  • 2 1
 Having by chance seen a possible bike in person, how soon did you design it after watching the Grim Donut video?
  • 1 0
 Do you plan to use a distributer in the future for shops to have access to We Are One products?
  • 2 0
 Great question. We love supporting shop access to our products!! In Canada we are our own distributor and your shop can contact sales@weareone.bike to set up shop access. We also work with distributors in other countries to make sure shops have access to the product they want.
-Dave
  • 2 0
 Is Billy still grumpy old man
  • 3 0
 Who is Juan?
  • 1 0
 Any plans for making different sweep options on the Da Package bars? Would love to get a 10° option!
  • 1 0
 you already collaborate with 77 (i have da package, two thumbs up)...maybe a carbon Kavenz?
  • 1 0
 If you were to hire, which branch of engineering would you be in need of the most?
  • 1 0
 I like Industry 9 but their hubs are obnoxiously loud (I know, unpopular opinion). Do you offer any other hubs?
  • 2 0
 You can always tame the bees with some Dumond Tech grease. This works like a charm and lasts a decent time as well. With all of the POE that the Hydra has, it is hard not to love it!
  • 1 0
 @WeAreOne: Awesome. Thanks!
  • 1 0
 Do you guys Plan on sticking with 29 inch bikes or will you guys eventually introduce a mullet
  • 2 0
 Will you offer mullet wheelset?
  • 1 0
 For sure. We have done a ton of reverse mullets this year. Send your requests to our handsome sales guy Josh at sales@weareone.bike and he will take good care of you.
  • 1 0
 In the last picture thats me in front of you Dustin, OLDER STRONGER FASTER. FOAMED
  • 1 0
 I ride where its really rocky all my aluminum rims get deep scratches will your carbon rims hold up to this
  • 1 0
 The local riding in our backyard here in Kamloops is either really fast and steep, or really loose and rocky (and more often than not, both at the same time!). Our rims stand up to the abuse they get put through here from the trails to the bike park, and I'm confident they'd do the same for your riding zone.

-Adam
  • 1 0
 I heard some talk about a frame on the downtime podcast. Any new developments you can share on that front?
  • 3 0
 Its going to be great! -Dave
  • 1 0
 Is there plans to make wheels like Santa Cruz with layed up spoke holes without drilling the rims?
  • 1 0
 Absolutely amazing looking rims ! Well done. Saw the product on a shop owner's personal bike. Pics don't do them justice.
  • 1 0
 I've heard rumours that the use of Cushcore voids your the WAO warranty. Truth?
  • 1 0
 Not true. While we do feel you are not needing this and it can affect the overall performance, it is not a warranty void situation.
  • 1 0
 Any chance you'll make some fat bike rims? I'll buy a set in 26" if you do.
  • 1 1
 I have a love hate relationship with tubeless set ups. Is there any thoughts about a specific to your wheels tubeless system?
  • 1 0
 whats your thoughts on SRAMS zipp moto wheels, and is there going to be anything you make like that in the future?
  • 1 0
 My new factions with onyx hubs just showed up...so so nice can’t wait for some dirt.
  • 1 1
 More seriously do you have any other collaborative projects in the works similar to "da package"?
  • 1 0
 We are always open to this opportunity in a case by case manner. We are a manufacturer and love making CFRP bike products.
  • 3 2
 When will you be able to get DT Swiss hubs again?
  • 2 1
 Will we see aluminum rims from you guys?
  • 1 0
 It’s only July 9th?!?!? Will 2020 ever end?!?!?!?
  • 1 0
 What is the secret to Jordan Hodder's effortless style?
  • 3 0
 Pixie dust and donairs
  • 1 0
 Any plans for a warehouse in Europe?
  • 1 0
 Any plans to produce an 80mm fat bike rim?
  • 1 0
 Tire inserts and low psi or proper air pressure without?
  • 1 0
 Proper PSI with no insert wins
  • 1 0
 I feel that proper air pressure and no insert is the way to go. Proper air volume is the best protection, -Dave
  • 2 0
 @WeAreOne: Thanks. I feel the same way but sometimes I’ll use something in the rear (yes, I just said that) for races as insurance.
  • 4 0
 @WeAreOne: what about the noticeable gains in damping/traction when running an insert at a lower pressure. I held out for a very long time but now run the tannus tubeless and cuchcore and can feel a huge difference in chatter reduction with no loss in cornering support (If anything the cornering support is better and there is more traction) Just curious what the performance benefits of running no inserts and high pressure are in a downhill/enduro race application. Can see it making sense for regular trail riding though.
  • 1 0
 When is the bike coming out?
  • 1 0
 Any coming updates to the rim lineup you can hint at?
  • 2 0
 I like your beard Dave
  • 1 0
 Do you have to wear a hat to work at WAO?
  • 2 0
 Have you ever seen me without my hat Fred? haha.... We spend too much time focusing on rims to worry about our hair Wink
-Dave
  • 3 0
 @WeAreOne: what hair?
  • 1 0
 Any relation to Canadian native Brad Marchand by chance?
  • 1 0
 Thankfully, no. My dad has some strong opinions on the Bruins, so luckily there's not relation there! -Adam
  • 1 0
 What is the max psi you can run 26" ?
  • 2 0
 Sponsored by Arc'teryx ?
  • 1 2
 Only hub choice on their website is I9, is that correct?

Yeah, so that's lame. At least offer a few decent hubs like DT Swiss, Onyx, Stealth
  • 1 0
 I have a set of Unions on Onyx Vesper hubs, the wheels are awesome. Send them an email if you want something specific.
  • 1 0
 How do it do, and more importantly why do it do?
  • 2 0
 BEST RIMS
  • 1 0
 Not a question just a statement: Made in Canada! Luv it!
  • 1 0
 This is the one!
  • 2 2
 Why no super light aluminum rims for those guys who aren't millionaires?
  • 1 0
 Do you love me?
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