New 7 Speed Hub from Atomlab

Mar 18, 2015
by Atomlab Components  
New 7 Speed Hub from Atomlab

Dedicated 7 Speed
Atomlab is stoked to announce the addition of the DHR 7spd hub. The shorter freehub body allows the drive side flange to be wider spaced from the non-drive flange; as a result, a stronger wheel with more symmetrical spoke angles can be built. This increased triangulation of the spokes increases stiffness, especially important when using a larger wheel than 26".

New 7 Speed Hub from Atomlab

The flange spacing is highly visible between a standard 150mm hub and the DHR hub.


Short Shift
The 7 speeds of the DHR hub can typically be covered with a two tooth jump between each sprocket. The DHR hub offers an even shift between gears when using a 10 speed 11-34t cassette for a 11 - 13 - 15 - 17 - 19 - 21 - 23 spread. 11-24 and 11-25 spreads are also possible. Installation is a breeze. Simply remove the three largest cogs (fixed to a spider) from a 10 speed cassette, slide the remaining seven cogs on the freehub, torque the lock ring, limit your 10 speed derailleur, and go shred!

New 7 Speed Hub from Atomlab

No spacers, a true 7 speed hub.


DHR Hub Details
• CNC Machined 6061 Aluminum
• 102 Points of Engagement
• (5) Sealed Cartridge Bearings
• 32 Hole
• Black
• 12x150mm = 333g
• 150mm or 157mm spacing
• MSRP $289.95 USD

Atomlab has a limited first release of the DHR hub, contact your Atomlab distributor to order. Riders in the USA and Canada may contact Atomlab through atomlab@singletrack-minds.com

Riders
Garrett Robertson, Raymond George and Jared Smith will be putting the DHR hub through it's paces in 2015. Jared's first ride on Atomlab wheels was documented below:

Views: 28,336    Faves: 332    Comments: 54



MENTIONS @Atomlab-Components / @grobertson90 / @raymond-george / @BraydonBphotography




129 Comments

  • + 152
 It's kind of cool to see a new "standard " that is actually answering rider's needs and helping to make things smarter and easier ...
  • + 102
 much nicer to see than "SRAM announces new hub standard"...
  • + 57
 Now this makes sense.
  • + 15
 Agreed. Other companies could take a lesson on working WITH old technology, rather than forcing proprietary upgrades. Doesn't mean I'll be buying one though....especially at $289! Yikes.

I'll stick with old school 8 speed cassettes on my DH rig for now. Sure would be nice if there was a company that could man up and build me a clutch derailleur for it!
  • + 56
 its not a new standard, just a smart design
  • + 6
 @rory most nice hubs are $300+

Never heard of these guys but if they're solid, that's just what it costs for a decent hub.
  • + 3
 You are totally right @game , thats why I preferred to put it in quotes but a smart design is what it is for sure .
  • + 3
 I must have been speed reading lol, not sure how i didnt catch that
  • + 15
 Although SOME hubs are over $300, I don't agree that's a required price for quality. I've owned hubs running the gambit from $85 - $300+ and even as a pretty good rider and mechanic I struggle to tell the difference (beyond mere weight savings, of course). In fact, I've often had more expensive hubs be some of the most problematic. At some point you're paying for a bling factor....or for a hub that wasn't built somewhere in Asia for bottom dollar wages (which I do find more justifiable).

On a somewhat related topic, I would confidently state that a "fancy" FRONT HUB ia probably one of the most overpriced items out there. For what is essentially a cylinder with bearings pressed into it I buy pretty much the cheapest one I can get my hands on and have yet to encounter a problem : )
  • + 7
 Yes! this is the kind of progression we need. SRAM is really starting to lose cool points.
  • + 11
 sram was never cool....
  • - 10
flag mountainbiker929 (Mar 18, 2015 at 18:53) (Below Threshold)
 @rory Chris king hubs are a great example their cost is only justifiable if you only care about looks. They are horribly unreliable and have loads of drag.
  • + 7
 @rory Maybe what you need is not a new 8-speed compatible clutch derailer. Just an 8-sp shifter with the correct indexing/cable pull ratio for clutch derailer already available on the market will do. Wink
  • + 6
 This is a standard that makes sense.
  • + 1
 Where's McGazza?
  • + 5
 yeah ya have to wonder if companies actually care what consumers think, its like, the news u can find a channel that fits with your insular view of the world as you were taught or lead to believe, same with products if the choice is the same all the time but in a different box, then thats what you end up with, garabge.

Example I heard this qoute the other day so Im using it here, if the industry feeds u hamburgers you will eat hamburgers! reality here is many consumers hate what the industry feeds us, and Atomlab u hit the nail on the head, cheers, if I was building up a new Dh wheelset right now this hub would be high on my list, I support those who listen to our needs, thats how you grow business, not by forcing new standards that are different than what we have now for no real tangible benefit to the average consumer, I doubt most people could benefit from Specialised 142+ plus std or Treks std or Srams new std over the normal we have 20mm, 110, 135, I have bought into 142 for example because the DT axle system especially has made wheel removal and installation a cinch.

In srams defense, XX1 or 11 spd std as another example has been a new standard that is entirely new if people would take time to use it and understand it, its a no brainer, but not something that wasnt asked for over many years and ignored, so good on them for that, same with fork Pike a reliable and high performing fork (Fox how many years and if not for the Pike we would still be feed the same hamburger mentalitly garbage) stiff legs, shite dampers!

So long way round but this is something real world for real riders to me that makes good sense, thank you atom lab.
  • + 9
 Consider the fact Sram's new 7-speed cassette costs as much as this hub. When you think of it in terms of full-wheel build, this is cheaper and offers a stronger wheel design.
  • + 1
 Will this work with srams DH 7 speed though as i thought it was an 11 speed spacing on their cassette like the rest of the new XO
  • + 1
 Yeah I would like to know this as well. And can anyone tell me what cassette models have individual cogs at least up to 7 speed?
  • + 2
 @mountainbiker929 What the hell are you talking about king hubs are great! very reliable and not sure that the f you are talking about on the drag my kings have no drag and will coast forever! not to mention the great engagement of them!
  • + 1
 @stuiewarrior No it won't work. The X01 DH 7 speed cassette is just as wide as a 11 speed cassette since it has that integrated, wavy spoke protector.
  • + 1
 @theminsta Yeah I know,I mean instead of using the xo dh 7 speed cassette using this set up with the 7 speed shifter and mech
  • + 3
 So odd reading NEW RELEASED 7 speed... I remember when 7 speed was top notch and NEW first time round!
  • + 82
 Man I really hope this gets released in a 148mm version!!!! --no one
  • + 10
 Amazing timing eh? +1
  • + 61
 Atomlab = Win
Sram = Fail
  • + 29
 Atomlab.....now that's a name I haven't heard in a long time
  • + 7
 We have the force.
  • + 27
 Seriously Atomlab. This hub has needed to exist for a long time now. So glad someone finally did it. Good work!
  • + 2
 maybe update your website.. has it been touched since 2012?
  • + 3
 @Atomlab-Components now I believe I've read before on some other site, that you've got a 135/142 version in the pipeline somewhere, is there any information out there about that? With the new Demo and now Aurum, there's bikes apearing that could make a good use of just what you've made right here in 135mm! I'm aware some singlespeed hubs can do it, but I find it painfully hard to find which hub could I use for 7sp 135mm.. Thanks for getting things done!
  • + 1
 @MrDuck I believe Industry9, Project 321, American Classic, and Hope all make 142 or 135x12 single speed (or 7 speed) hubs. You can add Profile, and DT Swiss and Hadley to that list for 135x12 as well. Would be cool if Atomlab made one too!
  • + 1
 Ummm... that is a singlespeed hub, nothing more.
  • + 3
 You could say that. But it is 150x12. Ever seen one of them before?
And Atomlab have kindly made sure it fits a shortened 7spd block, without any funny spacers or whatever. I assume...
  • + 3
 @MrDuck Yes, it was made mention during Interbike that we are looking at a 135/142mm option.
  • + 1
 I have the Industry Nine Torch rear hub in the singlespeed shell. It only fits 6 speeds and you have to add a few milimeters of spacers first because the chain will rub on the spokes and hub flange. I've also had to put spacers in my derailleur hanger so I could limit the low limit screw properly. I've also had the Hope Pro2 singlespeed hub and it only fit 6 speeds as well. It might fit 7, I can't remember. Onyx Racing Products also makes singlespeed hubs, but that only fits 6 speeds. Will not fit 7. Truth be told, I don't think anyone has made a shortened freehub model for 150mm hubs though.... until nao
  • + 22
 Man they should have made the hub 151.5mm wide because.... F@ck consumers!!! Haha, oh no wait.... That's Trek!
  • + 16
 Hub standard craziness today.
  • + 10
 Today? Craziness FOREVER!!!!
  • + 35
 Well at least this is something many riders want and have requested and not just some marketing bullsh*t from sram.
  • + 7
 this isn't a new hub standard.
  • + 6
 For all you 135mm riders out there - pickup a hadley or hope single speed and just run 6 speed on it like many ppl have been doing for years and years:

fcdn.mtbr.com/attachments/29er-bikes/518738d1265523185-6-speeds-ss-cassette-explained-hadley-b.jpg

fcdn.mtbr.com/attachments/29er-bikes/383886d1218504306-6speed-jones-cassettes-pg990-6spd-pro-ss_md.jpg

if you can argue for 7 speed, surely nobody will NEED that extra 1 gear down to a 6 cog setup...
  • + 1
 Can you run a clutch derailer with the limit screw set up?
  • + 1
 i couldnt see why not. youd would likely need a longer limit screw. i used to run this type of setup on my trials bike. just use 6 10speed cogs, space them out, set up your derailleur...
  • + 1
 @ccolagio Thanks for pointing it out! I've been looking into it for a while now. I got used to the road cassette spacing on a DH bike, do going back to 7sp doesn't feel that grat to me (especially considering the Saint shifters allow you to shift across a 10sp cassette ridiculously fast with multi-release, which is the only benefit to 7sp), but I was looking for a SS hub that could actually do 7 speeds - not because I care about the one gear too much, but it's just simple to set up with a XT cassette, any clue if there's such a hub out there?
  • + 1
 I don't know about Hadley, but Hope doesn't sell any through-axle compatible axles for their SS hub. It's limited to 10x135 open dropouts.
  • + 1
 I have the Industry Nine Torch rear hub in the singlespeed shell. It only fits 6 speeds and you have to add a few milimeters of spacers first because the chain will rub on the spokes and hub flange. I've also had to put spacers in my derailleur hanger so I could limit the low limit screw properly. I've also had the Hope Pro2 singlespeed hub and it only fit 6 speeds as well. It might fit 7, I can't remember. Onyx Racing Products also makes singlespeed hubs, but that only fits 6 speeds. Will not fit 7.
  • + 5
 Alex Morgan of BCD composites had WTB build him a 150 hub with a singlespeed freehub body back in 2006. In 2007, i9 built him a singlespeed hub with a 12mm axle. Huge props to @Atomlab-Components for making this hub a reality... now take my $. for reference= www.littermag.com/techno/bcd29er/3.htm
  • + 4
 Nice, hadn't seen that. Thanks for the props!
  • + 9
 hey finally something that is useful!
  • + 7
 Serious question: What's the benefit of a 7-speed cassette for DH?
  • + 7
 "Atomlab is stoked to announce the addition of the DHR 7spd hub. The shorter freehub body allows the drive side flange to be wider spaced from the non-drive flange; as a result, a stronger wheel with more symmetrical spoke angles can be built. This increased triangulation of the spokes increases stiffness"
  • + 10
 For dedicated downhill bikes that never get pointed uphill when you never really use the 3 largest gears. It's a pretty common mod in the world cup pits.
  • + 5
 why does udayorama get downvoted for an honest question?
  • + 8
 why do i get downvoted for cutting and pasting the answer from the article?
  • + 2
 @gabriel-mission9 because he asked about the cassette, not the hub.
  • - 3
 Weight...and trendiness.
  • + 3
 serious question, what is the benefit of reading the article?
  • + 4
 Wrong @rory, The main benefit of a seven speed cassette is that it eliminates the need for double shifting when racing. The reduced weight and 'kool faktor' are side benefits of ditching the unnecessary gears.
  • + 1
 The benefit is the drive-side flange is farther from the center-line, so you can use higher tension on the drive-side spokes which give you a stiffer and stronger wheel. Looks like a pretty awesome product to me. Not really worth upgrading a working wheel, but this will definitely be near the top of my list when I need to spec a wheel for a new build or replace a bashed wheel.
  • + 1
 @dthomp325 the question was about using a 7 speed cassette for DH, not this particular hub.
  • + 3
 @MmmBones haha thats what i was trying to say above but i guess general reading skills aren't high on the list of qualifications for "internet bike blog keyboard warrior"

edit i am agreeing with you
  • + 2
 You can get stoked!
  • + 1
 Yep, and what I was saying was that the main advantage of a short cassette block as I see it, is that you can use a hub like this. The advantage this will give you is far greater than the tiny weight savings and supposed reduction in double shifts
  • + 2
 It's more about putting the materials and strength in the optimum places for downhill riding, including eliminating an unnecessary number of cogs.
  • + 2
 No, not wrong, mmmbones. What you mentioned is ALSO a potential advantage, but that doesn't make you right and me wrong so don't be too quick to pounce. The ideas aren't mutually exclusive. Furthermore, you can come pretty darn close to achieving these exact same tooth spacings (minus the 10 tooth cog that requires the XD driver) by removing the largest cogs from a close ratio 8 or 9 speed cassette. Personally, I don't really care about the extra weight and I'll just leave the cog in there for the rare occasion when you've got to pedal a few ups to get to a DH trailhead.
  • + 2
 So its for extra stiffness and because you don't use that many gears in DH?
  • + 1
 pretty much. keep te ratios you need, throw the rest away = some weight savings, maybe more reliability (just guessing), and therefore shorter freehub body needed = wider flange spacing = stiffer spokes = stronger wheel
  • + 4
 Seriously guys! This is such a smooth Hub and Wheel setup. I have owned my fair share up hubs and wheelsets and I am soo stoked on what Atomlab is bringing to the market! Good work @Atomlab-Components
  • + 5
 Do I get a royalty from this since I have been saying it was a good idea for years?
  • + 3
 been thinking the same thing, why did this take so long to catch on, i swear someone else was doing this like 7 years ago. And what happened to compact drive, that was a great idea for dh too.
  • - 2
 It's called 1990's 7speed was the only option.
  • + 5
 Haha, true but in the 90's I wanted the 7 speed Shimano Airlines.
  • - 1
 It's full circle! When it went to 9spd that was too much for dh lol! Do you make complete dh 27.5 wheelsets around this hub? Wink race light? @atomlab-components
  • + 3
 Yes, you can run the SL Trail 650 and DHR hub as a complete for race. We will also have it laced to the DHR rim soon.
  • + 1
 just checked the website @Atomlab-Components i can't find the new rims!
  • + 2
 Problem was in the 90's the hub were to narrow.
  • + 4
 Working on the new site...will be ready soon.
  • + 6
 thank jesus. three years later, a new site!!
  • + 2
 I was all getting ready to be all snarky about why we need a 7-speed now. AAAAAND then they answered my question in the first two sentences. So yeah. Take that. I'm going to go sit in the corner and complain about 27.5 wheels now.
  • + 1
 I made a custom 6 sp cassette from a 9sp XT cassette, because I wanted the "standard" 11-24 DH range cassette but without all the useless cogs you have on a road cassette, to avoid annoying double shiftings. As all my others bikes are single speed, I don't remember how to shift gears.
  • + 1
 @fatenduro, I get what you are saying about the 36h wheels instead of wider-than-standard hubs I.E. BOOST, but this hub isn't wider than standard. I think you should save your breathe for that SRAM article, down below. And Bikeradars testing was flawed, but 26 will always reign supreme.
  • + 5
 Another slap in Srams face. Silly Sram with your $1000 plus drivetrains.
  • + 3
 It's really just a matter of time until we can realize all the advantages of 26 inch wheels using the shiny new standard....what with science and all.
  • + 2
 I like the triangulation part makes sense. Big wup if i need longer spokes.. Unlike srams new 148 hub... I need a new frame!!!
  • + 0
 Is this required or fashion over function.
My wheels are fine. My hubs are nearly fine. They just need steel free hub bodies for dh. My wheel diameter is fine. My hub width is fine.
now invent a perfect hub/cassette for trail riding. Has the lower 7 of a dh cassette. The next 3 are obviously larger for climbing and and the outer has a planetary gear for an overdrive for steep climbs.
  • + 1
 By using existing 10 speed parts (so costs are reasonable) but yielding a stronger wheel, this is all function.

The value you put on it probably depends on how hard you are on rear wheels. As you apparently never have an issue, it's probably not for you.
  • + 1
 The elegant solution to the old asymetrical/offset rear triangle found on Demo bikes. Will still go for 5 out of 9 speeds on my dh rig.
  • + 1
 36 spokes. Why not just use 36 spokes? BTW bikeradar proved 26's are fastest on descents, so enough of this new hub standards crap to please the wagonwheel crowd.
  • + 6
 Hardly anyone makes 36h rims. Also, this is not a new hub 'standard'. It is 150 or 157. This hub will make most 32h wheels stronger than 36h due to even spoke tension. Nowhere do they state that it's meant to benefit bigger wheels.
  • + 0
 Bikeradar's testing was flawed.
  • - 1
 Perhaps people should start making 36h rims again, and keeping your lbs in business by getting them to build it seems way more sensible than making a wider hub standard just so you can use cheap labor and machine make low spoke count wheels. And d8, what exactly was flawed about bikeradar's testing. They've done a more thorough job than anyone on the topic.
  • + 0
 One group of riders carrying around a bunch of gear on an XC course does not make a thorough job of testing, not when every race team was already testing it years before and found all their actual PRO racers people knew the names of, got faster. I put as much faith in Bikeradar's test as I do in the make-believe research into vaccines and autism written by people without medical degrees.
  • + 2
 I think the Brits at bike radar did a better job than most pro manufacturers. The controlled for energy and effort that the rider put in by measuring Everything. They included muscle tension and VO2, not just the lap times. No pro manufacturer has done that. And once the wildcard variable of the rider was adjusted for, the 29 came out the quickest by far, followed by the 26, and dead last the 650b. So keep drinking the industry koolaid D8. All you 26'ers for life, the Brits proved you half right!
  • + 1
 I'm not drinking the koolaid...i've been living the reality of 650B riding for 7 years now.
  • + 1
 Gave you a thumbs up cause I believe in you!
  • + 6
 deeeight - I agree with you, test was flawed, but at least it was a big time, open attempt at a test, no one else does anything else than PR brochures, the thing that Giant did was pathetic from a point of view of an intelligent man. Pseudo-science is the name of 99% of claims in the industry. How hard is it to setup an experiment according to all scientific standards, whether clipless pedals are more efficient at pedalling than flats? Yet no one provides results of such research - why? Because difference is so little that in some cases flats win, so it would damage the clipless industry. I asked a few companies, including Marzocchi: given same tyre pressure and geometry: what plays bigger role in roll over - suspension setup or wheel size? They all say: rider by a large margin.

BTW wider flanges add only lateral stiffness, 36 spokes add both lateral and vertical, making them too stiff vertically... whiiiiiich is a bullcrap because everyone wants carbon rims and those are stiff as FK!!! Asymmetric rims like Ryde or Bontragers, solve flange problem to a certain degree.
  • + 1
 If it was provable by this test that bigger wheels were faster then the 29 would have been fastest, the 27.5 second and the 26 last. All this test proved was that XC riders are better at riding the bikes they are more familiar with. They all ride 29ers now so they were fastest on the 29ers, they used to ride 26ers so they were familiar with those and they were second. they have never ridden 27.5's so those were last.
  • + 1
 @Patrick9-32 No, it prove that the bike they took has a better geometry than the 26 and the 27.5 geometry of this particular bike is the worst.
  • + 1
 Didn't the guy say in the beginning of the conclusions bit that differences are too small to find them relevant and the only significant difference was uphilling on a 29er? But if we are into interpretations and seeing/hearing things that were not there, how many women slaves does the wheelsize God allow to have?
  • + 3
 Ahhhh colorful bike riding bleak terrain in super slo mo. I will buy!
  • + 1
 Wish they would have tried this setup with X01 DH 7sd shifter and rear derailleur - will this work?
  • + 1
 Nope- X01 Dh cassettes are made for a 10-speed freehub spacing. Unless you want to try butcher the end off a $200 cassette...
  • + 1
 He's asking if you can use it with the shifter and derailleur, not the cassette.
  • + 1
 doh. haha
  • + 1
 @atomlabcomponents could you please update your web site your stuff has never let me down and I need parts like that
  • + 2
 Smart design on existing standard - kudos.
  • + 1
 No hate looks nice but what exactly does this achieve?
  • + 5
 Most folks are already ditching the low gears on their DH bikes to run 5-7 speeds to avoid double shifting and making a noticeable gear change, see SRAMs X01 DH cassette for reference. This makes use of the now free space by using a shorter freehub body and moving the hub flange out to create even spoke tension, i.e. a stronger wheel. Trials riders have been doing this for years using Hope's single speed hub. This is the first production 150x12mm hub with a singlespeed freehub body. BOOM!
  • - 2
 Well a single speed LENGTH freehub body anyway. Some folks used to mod shimano hubs with the 6 and 7 speed freehub bodies from their older hubs (nice thing about shimano is the freehubs pretty much all mount the same way) but that only served to lighten the hub a bit. It didn't do anything for the wheel lacing/tension.
  • + 1
 I dig it @Shiny-side-up. Didn't know those existed until today!
  • + 1
 Anyone know the song used in the edit?
  • + 1
 Five Hours by Deorro.
  • + 1
 Sun ringle' still make 36's Can't wait for the 135 version!
  • + 1
 Really nice to have another option than spacers or a SRAM cassette
  • - 3
 Cute. Another paper weight.
Disappointed by their rims. First and last product I ever bought from them.
This is getting filed in the "White Crayon" bin.
  • + 1
 Useless for you. But many others will benefit the wider hub especially if you wan't extra stiffness in the rear wheel.
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