Backcountry.com Suspends All Legal Actions & Publishes Apology Letter From CEO

Nov 12, 2019
by Sarah Moore  


Last week, we reported that consumers were expressing frustration with online outdoor retailer Backcountry.com on social media after The Colorado Sun broke the news that the e-commerce retailer has been taking legal action against small business owners who use the word “backcountry" as part of their name.

In a follow-up interview with The Colorado Sun, Backcountry.com CEO Jonathan Neilsen said that they have fired all the attorneys from trademark-only law firm IPLA, and, while not immediately dropping the lawsuits, they are suspending all legal actions. They are also partnering with small business owner David Ollila to help grow his Marquette Backcountry Ski brand and hiring Ollila as a consultant to help turn the PR nightmare into a way to help grow small businesses in the outdoor industry.

Neilsen told The Colorado Sun, “What we found when we sat down with David is that we can sit down and talk about this and work something out that works for everyone, and I’m hopeful that we can do that with all the parties that we have spoken to.”


Backcountry.com has published this letter apologizing:


bigquotesDear Backcountry Community,

We have heard your feedback and concerns, and understand we fumbled in how we pursued trademark claims recently. We made a mistake.

In an attempt to protect the brand we have been building for nearly 25 years, we took certain actions that we now recognize were not consistent with our values, and we truly apologize.

It’s important to note that we tried to resolve these trademark situations amicably and respectfully, and we only took legal action as a last resort. That said, we know we mishandled this, and we are withdrawing the Marquette Backcountry action. We will also reexamine our broader approach to trademarks to ensure we are treating others in a way that is consistent with the culture and values envisioned by our founders and embraced by our community.

We only want what’s best for the whole community and we want every person and business in it to thrive. Backcountry has never been interested in owning the word “backcountry” or completely preventing anyone else from using it. But we clearly misjudged the impact of our actions.

We understand that this step we’ve taken may not be enough for some of you. The hope is that we can ultimately win back your trust, even if it takes time. We are grateful to be a part of your lives, providing you with great gear for your outdoor adventures, and all we want is to go back to doing what we do best. We intend to learn from this and become a better company.

Sincerely,
Jonathan Nielsen, CEO



166 Comments

  • 464 3
 Backpedalcountry.com
  • 16 0
 Only click if you have a 72 poe hub, or it’s a waste of time. #ratchet
  • 9 0
 ...or #goatunworthy
  • 13 0
 @Mtnoak: uh oh, craftsmen is trying to trademark the word ‘ratchet’. They got a lot of millennials to talk to.
  • 3 0
 should have studied Nike
  • 25 2
 personally, imho the only good reason for social media to exist. to act as a voice of everyone and reason.
  • 12 0
 I just bought gloves and tires and purposefully avoided backcountry.com.
  • 2 0
 @cuban-b: or trademark the word: "craftsmen".
  • 19 0
 Backcountry.com sued a local used outdoor gear company years ago called Backcountry Pursuit in Idaho. They are now called Boise Gear Collective. Its great they are finally being called out.
  • 24 0
 Read any of the letters their lawyers sent to the small businesses and non-profits they were trying to intimidate. They contradict everything said in the CEO's apology. Sorry backcountry, you're trash and have been for quite a while and now we all know it. They're just trying to save face for their upcoming biggest sale of the year. God forbid their numbers drop and their IPO loses value! Don't be fooled by their bullshit. There are plenty of other online retailers with just as good and better prices.
  • 1 0
 @scott-townes: Not condoning their actions, but lawyers letters are not letters from the CEO. The CEO will defer to the lawyer in legal matters based on the lawyers recommendations.
  • 13 6
 You can dump on the CEO all you want, but I like the fact that he appears to be owning it and taking positive action. What more do you want?
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: CEO is being disingenuous and being called him out. that's all.
  • 4 0
 @rrolly: He's the CEO... you know what that is, right? He knew what they were saying on behalf of the company. He's a scumbag, plain and simple. He's not sorry about what the lawyers did under his direction, he's sorry for getting caught just before the biggest sale of the year.
  • 4 0
 @scott-townes: plenty of LOCAL BUSINESSES who would love to have your business and feed tax dollars back into your community.....
  • 1 0
 @scott-townes: I don't know the CEO (but, yes, am well aware what one does), and I don't know how he functioned with his lawyers, as I doubt you do. But, if someone recognizes their poor choices, and then looks to rectify them, is that not a good thing?

(I've got no skin in the game here. I've never purchased anything from backcountry.com, and likely won't, regardless of this case.)
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: When it comes to screwing over dozens of smaller companies, non-profits and organizations, it doesn't matter if you apologize or not, you're still a POS. Sorry brah, I aint Jesus Christmas.
  • 140 3
 "It’s important to note that we tried to resolve these trademark situations amicably and respectfully, and we only took legal action as a last resort." This is the most important line here. In other words "We apologize for suing..but bullying anybody using a generic name by sending them threatening legal letters is perfectly cool." That CEO needs to go. He failed the outdoor community and made the PR issue even worse.
  • 32 2
 @Grunk. 110% agree.

Backcountry.com: "Hey Marquette. You better change your name because we want to own the word Backcountry"

Marquette Backcountry: "You're a corporate bully. Why don't you guys kindly F**K off?"

Backcountry.com: "What? You're not gonna bend over and give us what we want?!?! That's not very "amicable". Get ready to hear from our high dollar legal team!! "
  • 23 0
 It's also not true. The letter Marquette got explicitly said they would refuse to be amicable. Blister did a great line by line take down of this rather shitty apology. They've got a long way to go before they'll win back many of the customers who followed this sorry case.
  • 20 0
 Why would anybody bother to be their customer again?

Oh wait...squirrel.
  • 29 0
 @kingtut87: For anyone who might be interested in Blister's dissection but hasn't passed Google-Fu 101, the direct link is here: blisterreview.com/industry-news/boycott-backcountry-com

My favourite passage:
"And second, screw you for using the language of “last resort” — you were not forced to resort to anything here. You were not being harmed, you were not the target of malicious activity, and we are smart enough to know this. You have convinced none of us, and you insult all of us with your “last resort” language. We call bullshit."
  • 6 0
 They withdrew just one case, so may resume the remaining ones when the dust settles and the community forgets about the issue.
  • 103 7
 The dog contingent comes here to deliver a message, an emphatic Fuck-You bark from dogs everywhere to everyone at Backcountry involved in orchestrating the law suits in the first place. Winger predatory behavior by corporate juggernauts is unforgivable. I'm off to lick where my balls used to be to calm down.
  • 44 0
 barkcountry.com
  • 36 0
 @IamTheDogEzra I've also heard the CEO of backcountry.com fakes the ball throw
  • 74 2
 now replay all the companies legal fee's you sued. No, your values do reflect intimidating other companies by suing them. this time you just got caught!
  • 15 0
 I agree. What did it cost that coffee company to change its name? Proof of reparations needed or my family's $$ stay away.
  • 13 0
 I work for a shop that they came after. Wasn’t cheap, even with giving them everything they asked for.
  • 5 0
 Yep. No mention of what they are doing with companies they already bullied into settlement. I find it a bit egregious that they have merely "suspended" litigation.
  • 2 0
 @BigAlfonz: so far, jack shit for us despite having cost us many tens of thousands of dollars.
  • 15 0
 Love the terminology used - "fired all the lawyers", as if the attorneys were not doing exactly what they were instructed to do.
  • 6 0
 You can smell the shit a mile off when companies talk about their *values*.

Selling shit to make money, that's your values. Plus all that toxic legal shit you tried to pull, went well didn't it?
  • 3 0
 @headshot: Right! Trying to sound like they had rogue lawyers on their payroll running amok suing small businesses.
  • 50 1
 Yea, not really interested. This is such a "shit we got caught, sorry for getting caught" bullsh*t apology. I can't imagine anyone is seeing this as legitimate in anyway. It would be one thing if they went after a few big company's for infringement, but going after a small local non profit group just screams "let's kill the little guy"
  • 1 8
flag RADVANBIKES (Nov 12, 2019 at 21:47) (Below Threshold)
 Well, I mean... if you add up all the “little guys” it does seem they’re potentially hurting backcountry sales.
  • 46 6
 I know I'll be downvoted for asking this, but why aren't we as outraged when The North Face, Apple, Amazon, etc. do this exact same thing? Trademark and patent protection is part of my dissertation, so maybe I just think about the phenomenon more, but defending/litigating trademarks is a pretty standard practice that virtually every firm does. So genuine question here, what is the difference when it's done in our industry? Do we just have higher expectations? Do we expect higher levels of stewardship?
  • 12 6
 Exactly what I've been ask all along, good question.
  • 6 4
 Your questions are precisely addressed on the FB page. Go read it. It's all about the particular word used in this case.
  • 7 2
 I have a company called Bedford, and Ford motor company sues me for using ford in my name is basically what these Backcountry's suits were about. On top of that, alienating your core market through those actions is biz 101 level stuff.
  • 44 0
 Isn't it the fact that the word backcountry is a widely used term that can easily be used in the outdoor industry without any connection to backcountry.com? It seems to me like an equivalent would be if Apple tried to sue people selling actual apples?
  • 24 2
 The difference is that Apple and Amazon have names that don't get used very often in their own industries which makes the trademark make sense. Apple in the computer industry isn't something you'd get this kind of response to, but if some company called ByteWare somehow trademarked the word "byte" and sued everyone who had the word as part of their name (like "Bits'n'Bytes" or "Byte Me!") there would be an uproar.

Frankly Backcountry.com totally should have a trademark on the word Backcountry when used as a URL ending in .com, but not for any usage in a company name. Overstock.com shouldn't be able to sue Granny's Overstock and Liquidation Center over trademark infringement.

For TNF,
  • 8 0
 @tripleultrasuperboostplusplus: sorry, I don't Facehook.

@Pedro404: A bit of history in review, Cannondale trademarked the term "Freeride" back in 1997-1998, forcing the small group of Freeride pioneers to change their names to "Frorider's" in a silly response to the silly trademark.
Specialized Bikes trademarked the terms "Epic" & "Roubaix" (to name a few) forcing small businesses to change their brand names. Big Roubaix story hit around 2013 and is very similar to this Backcountry outrage.
  • 14 2
 This is all a lot more complex than "Get the pitchforks and stake" mob mentality wants it to be.

www.theoutbound.com/kylefrost/the-backcountry-com-debacle-isn-t-really-about-trademarks?
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: great article that provides context. Thanks for sharing.
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: perfect article!
  • 11 0
 @hamncheez: It’s really not all that complex. Just because something might be legal, or because other outdoor industry companies do it, does not make it honorable, ethical, or just.
  • 4 3
 There is no difference. I think it’s less about the actual trademarks and more just about the general dislike for big online retailers. These feelings are particularly prevalent in the outdoor sports industries. You see it constantly talked about in comments here on Pinkbike. Every time PB puts up a post with online deals the complaints roll in like clockwork. It’s much the same in other outdoor sports like skiing and snowboarding.

When it comes to something like Apple no one gives a shit because no one has their own local cell phone or computer manufacturer they feel like they need to protect.
  • 3 0
 @Eatsdirt: ok start protesting Patagonia then.
  • 6 1
 I'm thinking about going after North Face because I've got a face so then they become The North, apart from in the North where they will become The.
  • 2 0
 Because North Face/Amazon/Apple are all more specific vs. Mountain/Fruit/River. Theoutbound.com article mentioned cites REI, Patagonia, and Yeti (coolers) as actual examples of patent litagants but I don't see them as being comparable to "Backcountry". It's like comparing trademarking Santa Cruz vs. "Mountain Cycles".

The real mystery is how are two Yetis ok?
  • 3 0
 @matttauszik: trademarks don’t provide blanket coverage. They are specific. Yeti cycles likely hold a trademark relating to bikes and parts, so yeti coolers is fine because it’s a completely different industry.
  • 2 0
 @Hayek This reminds me of a David vs. Goliath battle I’ve browsed on occasion the past 20+ years watching Nissan.com get harassed by Nissan-global.com for having a domain for his business the car manufacturer falsely accuses of squatting. I would say I’d stop shopping at Backcountry but I’ve never bought anything from them. Now I doubt I ever will.
  • 2 0
 @browner: The Ohio State University (a state university in our fair country) was recently denied a trademark for “The”. TNF would be left with nothing.
  • 2 2
 @matttauszik: right, I understand the murkiness around the USPTO decision to issue the patent on the word “Backcountry”. My question isn’t about the trademark itself, but about why we punish Backcountry more so than Amazon, Apple, TNF, Patagonia, or any other firm that engages in standard trademark defense.
  • 4 0
 @hamncheez: thanks for posting this. Interesting read, but f*ck them anyway.
  • 3 0
 @hamncheez: Damn voice of reason ruining my getting worked up. Guess I’ll go put my pitchfork away...for now!!
  • 1 1
 @matttauszik: Yeah, two Yetis... More than a few times I've been wearing my Yeti T-shirt (the older one with the ice ax) and I've had strangers come up to me and say "Wow, did Yeti coolers start making bikes too?" ... uh, no... this Yeti has been around since 1985... Smile
  • 2 0
 if you have more targets for my sawed off rage shotgun, don’t hold back! Which other specific cases should we redirect the anger that backcountry probably deserves to witness?
  • 2 1
 @Myfianceemademedoit: Is there a point you're making?
I wouldn't say the Roubaix one is comparable, since it's a small region and associated with biking, while backcountry is literally everywhere and not limited to biking. Epic and freeride I definitely consider to be on the same dumb scale as the backcountry one.
Specialized however blamed the lawsuits on an overzealous law firm that was handling the trademarks for them (which may or may not be bullshit, I'll give them the benefit of doubt).

How did the Cannondale situation pan out?
  • 3 0
 Apparently Edgar Purnell Hooley's great grandson is suing specialized for using the name Tarmac, which is a road surface invented by Hooley in 1908.
  • 25 0
 So what actually happened here? It almost looks like they wrote a blank cheque to a legal firm to sue anyone who uses "the word" (I'm too scared to type it out), and then either provided too little oversight or more likely didn't really care who they went after until it blew up in their face. I blame the CEO.
  • 27 2
 Kind of reminds me of the time my gold plated buttplug business got sued by Apple. Apparently they have a patent on overpriced stuff for assholes.
  • 2 0
 I like some Apple products, but this was a good ass rippin. XXL BP for Apple and upvote for you!
  • 23 0
 This isnt Backcountry doing the right thing, this is Backcountry trying to prevent losses from terrible PR. Regardless of their 180, I am done doing business with this company. Their true colors have been shown.
  • 18 0
 This message is super weird. They should have a pr person phrase something like that. It seems very obvious that he's not sorry for the harm he caused. He's sorry for the consequences of the legal suits, i.e. the pr backlash. So he's basically sorry for himself. And he then he blames the people he sued. And the ending reads like a desperate letter to his gf he cheated on. I'll win back your trust honey, just give it some time damnit.
  • 3 0
 in other words we are sorry we got caught so we are going to make some small steps and hope you'll forget about it....

"We only want what’s best for the whole community and we want every person and business in it to thrive. Backcountry has never been interested in owning the word “backcountry” or completely preventing anyone else from using it"

Cause suing small businesses is good for them, and they to show people that you want them to use the word backcountry and that you dont want to own it is to try and bully them into changing their name and then suing them for no caving ....
  • 19 0
 “Your actions speak so loudly, I can not hear what you are saying.”

― Ralph Waldo Emerson
  • 11 0
 There's two groups at fault here:

1. USPTO - for issuing the trademark in the first place.

2. The law firm representing backcountry. Holding a trademark entails an obligation to police that mark (stopping others from using that mark). A failure to do so could result in losing the mark. Law firms are usually given broad leeway to police marks but tend to go overboard and in a tight-knit community such an approach creates consumer backlash. In scenarios where the likelihood of TM confusion is weak the legal team should factor negative consumer perception into the decision to undertake policing action.

Not the first time this has gone bad for a policing brand in the action sports industry. Scott Sports (Great Scott! skis, also a Back to the Future line), Specialized etc. have all done similar things in the past and been bit.
  • 4 2
 So backcountry.com leadership has clean hands?
  • 1 0
 I have no idea what Backcountry is doing... there are 138 records using the term. Here are a few. I wonder if they went after all of them? imgur.com/a/ZuwYHnC
  • 8 0
 Too late. Actions, even if they're corrected, have consequences. There's a lot of competition out there so crossing one off is not a big deal for the consumer.
  • 11 1
 20% off any full priced items over at Jensonusa.com
  • 3 1
 Just bought a new dropper. Very happy with customer service. And impressed they haven’t sued every Jennifer on American soil.
  • 1 0
 This is how you change things.
  • 8 0
 This is exactly what specialized did with the frivolous legal action against cafe Roubaix a few years back
  • 5 1
 As much as anything these guys just gave us a glimpse into the corporate world of the rich d!cks. No real reason to believe that any other large company managed by business people rather than people from said industry is any different. I’m really bummed that the C-students (CEOs, CFOs etc) took over the world.
  • 6 0
 - Grab someone else's plate of food

- Smash it in the floor

- Say you're sorry

Does it make it all better !? Is it fixed now !?
  • 2 0
 Yeah and they are only apologizing because Mom made them. Once this blows over they will go back to do the same damn thing, but just more descetely with better NDA's or whatever their lawyers can bargin into. That's why they arent dropping the suits but simply "suspending them". Yeah, suspending them until the Holiday purchasing season is over. This is garbage.
  • 4 0
 So, why did Backcountry not go after Backcountry Access? Could it be that Backcoutry is the largest BCA distributor? Or BCA would be able to put up a good fight?

F off Backcountry.
  • 2 0
 Pretty much. BCA is a division of K2 Sports. K2 Sports is owned by Kohlberg Private Equity. Backcounty.com is owned by TSG Private Equity. Cripple Creek Backcountry, Weston Backcountry, Backcountry Nitro, etc. are owned by actual people you can talk to at events, ride and have a drink with. Backcountry.com wanted some quick money, not some drawn out litigation with another deep pocketed peer, there was no threat, no "last resort", and they got called out.
  • 5 2
 Dear Backcountry.com,

It has come to our attention that your attempt at an apology was an "Epic" failure. Unfortunately we own all rights to the word "Epic" and intend to vigorously defend that trademark. See you in court.

Sincerely,
Big S Legal Department
  • 1 0
 i want to see specialized vs epic games....
  • 6 1
 Remember to tell everyone you know to avoid backcountry.com this holiday season. Make it hurt them where it counts, the bottom line!
  • 2 0
 @daddydonuts: yes. Same company
  • 4 1
 it's okay to cheat, steal, kill, lie, deceive, manipulate, intimidate, conspire, be treacherous but just as long as you don't get caught/exposed. From politics to sports, to police, banking systems and corporate life, if power and money are involved these things I listed above will always thrive in human beings willing to live out the "American dream". Albeit it's not so elegantly put, but you get the picture. This greed affects us all at least once in our life experience. Wait, what am I saying... Whatever, I'm glad people still care about the "little guy". The story of David vs. go light is as old as dirt. We keep repeating the same story. (I haven't been high in months)
  • 4 1
 bul·ly
/ˈbo͝olē/
Learn to pronounce
verb
gerund or present participle: bullying
seek to harm, intimidate, or coerce (someone perceived as vulnerable).

Backcountry's actions are the definition of being a bully. They targeted smaller vulnerable stores/organizations and left larger companies unharmed. They knew what they were getting into when they hired IPLA to represent them.
  • 10 3
 Fuck that guy.
  • 8 1
 backcunty behaviour.
  • 2 0
 Interestingly, Gibson Guitars has been making a series of similar corporate missteps. Not exclusively using legal action to attempt to strong arm their position in the market, but also actually trying to spin the message to consumers as a “play authentic” message, meaning non-Gibson is not authentic. The legal action was basically entirely derided by the guitar community and they have not recovered, pr wise. Nice of these scummy corporate trademark lawyers to clog up the courts with frivolous money grab cases. Yuck.
  • 3 0
 Honestly.. not good enough. It should never of happened in the first place. The whole apology and attempt to rectify it is just about money and their current loss. Nothing more nothing less.
  • 2 0
 The problem and I find is people say they do things that aren't consistent with their values. But the problem is that it really is consistent with their values. I would never think of suing a whole bunch of small companies if I had a big company because that is my value. My dad always said don't go by what people say go by what they do. This is who they are
  • 2 0
 It's too bad Backcountry settled on that name in the first place. From a brand perspective, it's incredibly weak and was bound to cause legal issues from the get-go. I'm surprised it's taken this long to cause a stir. Recovering from this is going to be a struggle. An apology letter, whether it's half-hearted or not, is not enough to retract the original intent. Actions speak louder than words, and in this era of transparency, it's more crucial than ever to make wise business choices. I just don't understand why they would have gone down this route—everyone knows small businesses in the outdoor industry don't make a killing and a lawsuit like this would have put thousands of people out of work and potentially bankrupt. I'll be giving my local shop, The Backcountry, some extra love this holiday season (they've been around since 1993 before the shitty online consumer culture was even conceived).
  • 3 2
 reminds me of this: SLAPP Suits: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO).

www.youtube.com/watch?v=UN8bJb8biZU

Unsubscribe to Backcountry and Competitive Cyclist is the best way to keep the big guy suing the little guys.
  • 1 0
 Y'all remember in Alien's when Ripley's trying to tell the zoned out little girl that the Marines will keep her safe... 'it won't make any difference...' This is kind of just like that, 'cept it's bikes and douchy CEOs and stuff... Still, it's the same.
  • 1 0
 when are we going to take responsibility for consuming the products that feed this "beast" and encourage/empower this kind of activity? we can all agree that this is wrong but as participants in outdoor activities, we're inherently required to consume goods that are retailed by massive corporations. whether you buy your stuff at the local shop or not, we're a part of a massive revenue stream and the buck stops with us as it always has.

the interesting part of this article being on pinkbike is that skiing vs. MTB...I'd say skiing could require less overall consumption, just due to the lesser mechanical nature of the equipment and replacement factor of disposable products.

seems silly for mountain bikers to get fired up about a massive retailer behaving like a massive retailer, and then "protest" by going over to jenson the same day to use their 20% coupon to buy a set of new tires "just in case."
  • 5 1
 .....Reminds me too much of Specialized.....Corporate Fucks!! I'm out
  • 4 0
 F*cker... Just buy local.
  • 11 0
 just buy what local? Your chinese made backpacks and bike parts?
  • 4 5
 Howlie. Just look and you will find. Don’t be such a kook!
  • 2 0
 @Wqvk: @whak stop posting drunk.
  • 3 0
 Minion Dhf......ah I see the word ’Minion’ here.....will Universal Studios take any action? So despicable.......
  • 1 0
 Deary me
  • 4 0
 Backstabby.com. Suck it you corporate kooks.
  • 2 0
 Under Armour is pulling the same stuff against Cascade Armory in Bend Oregon. Trying to own a word....if they want to own a word it should be DILDO'S
  • 3 0
 Just read a few articles on this. Def a douche move on UA’s part. TY for the heads up.
  • 2 0
 “CEO Jonathan Neilsen said that they have fired all the attorneys from trademark-only law firm IPLA”

I wonder how many cancelled Yeti orders that caused...
  • 2 1
 You can send your discontentment, constructive feedback, love, support and or intent to boycott until the CEO resigns and they turn this completely around to customerexperience@backcountry.com
  • 3 0
 definitely will avoid shopping with them now.
  • 3 0
 Yawn, lame apology letter. I shop local anyway.
  • 3 0
 Still not gonna shop there...
  • 3 0
 Tool Late. We saw your colors.
  • 2 0
 Who cares? The damage is done. Shop local. Build relationships. Be a human.
  • 1 0
 It is our responsibility as consumers to put them and their owners out of business. This is the only way to force businesses not to be cunts.
  • 1 0
 @Jonathan Neilsen, @backcountry.com
Your greed has gotten the better of you. Get thef@ck out of our Backcountry you are no longer part of this community.
  • 1 0
 FU Jonathan Nielsen, CEO. You have lost another customer for life with your actions and I have purchased a lot of sh*t over the years. Good bye!
  • 1 0
 Hey guys so what do I do when there's a tent vestibule I need for my tent and backcountry is the only place that has it in stock? I mean they said they were sorry.
  • 4 1
 Unforgivable
  • 1 0
 CRG International, production company of Unforgivable 2011 (French: Impardonnables) starring André Dussolier would like you to retract your comment
  • 1 0
 Did backcountry just get cancel cultured? ironic.
And to top if off google put a red line under "backcountry"
  • 1 0
 Hmm......so will Cadbury now sue the whole mtb industry over the usage of the term ‘boost’?
  • 2 0
 Dibs on downcountry.com Pinkbike is going to owe me a mint.
  • 3 0
 Cancel culture sucks!
  • 3 0
 Ass Hat!
  • 2 0
 Get-rich-quick scheme gone bad
  • 1 0
 When you're a star they let you do it. You can do anything you want...Grab 'em by the backcountry...You can do anything!
  • 1 0
 Backcountry : "We made a mistake."
Everyone reads : "We made a [f***ing] stupid decision."
  • 1 1
 I just ordered flannels from Backcountry. very quick delivery, and very easy to return and replace when one didn't fit correctly. 10/10 would buy from again
  • 1 0
 damage already done... and they don't offer any special products that I can't buy elsewhere
  • 1 0
 that was a half-assed apology. "we only sued if couldn't get them to change their names amicably'". FU.
  • 1 0
 Used to like Backcountry. Was optimistic before reading the apology letter. It was pathetic, I'm done.
  • 1 0
 Take it with a grain of salt, but hopefully more brands follow suit.
  • 3 1
 Deeks.
  • 2 0
 So the people won
  • 2 0
 SHOP LOCAL
  • 1 0
 every second hand shop is now full up
  • 3 6
 Very weak. They listened to a bunch of jealous losers on the internet who have never been involved with a successful business other than spending their parents money and some loud and easily offended socialists who will move on to whining about another imagined grievance. Gotta protect that trademark!
  • 1 0
 wow, it's like far-right bingo there, you have all the buzzwords!
  • 1 0
 See you in the backcountry............not
  • 1 0
 This is a nice ending to a real dumb move by Backcountry.
  • 1 0
 The people’s voice has been heard !
  • 1 4
 SUCKS they should stand their ground and not listen to 'keyboard cowboys'! They have 25 years of business building which in return means they have TONS of employees that they need to PROTECT!!!! Business is Business and the 'Peoples Voices' are only strong hidden behind a screen.
  • 4 0
 Protecting their employees? The CEO just posted an open letter firing his employees due to bad decisions made by organization leadership. Backcountry is a dumpster fire.
  • 1 2
 @DertBug: Just in 'general' as a CEO I have to look at the whole picture including Susan in accounting a single mom with two kids.
  • 1 0
 @brookesbruno: As a CEO, if you were responsible for making choices that lead to PR debacles like this one, your employees would be better of elsewhere, even in the case that losing their employment may cause short term inconvenience and discomfort. At the end of the day, no job is permanent, and no job is worth enduring if the fish is rotting from the head back.
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 @Hyakian: Thats why I don't have PR mistakes and all my employees are fully invested in our overall success!
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 @brookesbruno: It's good that you are apparently considering that and the ramifications of poorly thought-through actions that could derail brand affinity, extending to unintended consequences that affect employees downstream.

However, reading your original post above, it appears that you were attempting to make an argument in support of BDDC and their investor overlords. I'm not a fan, but like it or not, "Keyboard warriors" are a part of the landscape. Relative to public sentiment, what used to take months/years, now takes days/hours to coalesce and solidify. The current and developing landscape requires a far more thoughtful and nuanced approach from business leaders and PR professionals. Now more than ever the notion that "everything is brand" is critical, from top-level edicts down to the smallest ideas backed by actions.

You can complain about people being vocal behind a keyboard, but this is part of our reality now. Proactive leaders will be considering this when making choices that have any potential to be public-facing.
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 BrokeBackCountry.com
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 This response makes it even worse. CEO he must go, CEO he must go!
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 Good to know 'downcountry' is safe
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 I wonder if its too little too late...
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 That’s right!
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 Money hungry cut throat non riding snakes.
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 Business is hard. damned if you do damned if you don't. i don't envy them.
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 Good enough for me
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