Behind the Bike: The Merida One-Sixty

Feb 3, 2018
by Matt Wragg  




When you think of aggressive, race-bred mid-travel bikes, Merida probably isn't a name on the tip of your tongue. In fact, if you live in North America, you might not know the name Merida at all. Despite this, you have almost certainly seen Merida-produced bikes on your local trails. They are the second largest Taiwanese bicycle manufacturer, after Giant, and one of the top aluminium specialists in the world, yet thanks to the byzantine web of production deals, their bikes have never been sold in North America and they remain a brand many people may have never heard of.

Here in Europe, they had a big presence on the XCO scene with the Merida-Multivan team. When they finished the programme in 2016 after 16 years, the team had more than 30 World Cup wins, 15 World Championship titles and Olympic gold and silver medals to its name. Yet despite this straight-laced, lycra-clad appearance, there was always a dark, kinky streak running through the company. After all, it was aboard a Merida that a certain Thomas Genon burst onto the world scene in 2012. So when it came time to look at their 160mm bike, as product manager Rey Ilagan says, "people weren't really expecting anything from us, so we were free to do what we liked with this bike."

The result? A mid-travel monster that pushes right to the forefront of current geometry that would not look out of place on any EWS race course, the One-Sixty. Yes, the One-Sixty has been out for over a year now, but we thought it was still worth diving deeper into the story behind the its creation. We travelled to their engineering centre in the German motor industry hub of Stuttgart to meet the team behind this surprising bike.



Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
Having their European base here in Stuttgart is a huge deal for Merida, with the global HQ for Mercedes literally just down the road and Porsche a few minutes away, it is one of the acknowledged centres of mechanical engineering excellence and Merida are proud to draw from this for their bicycle development.



The starting point for this new bike was to take almost everything about the old bike and throw it away. Engineer Roman Braig is not nostalgic for the old bike, "This bike was quite old-fashioned. From the kinematics, we had good downhill performance, but I have to say that uphill performance was pretty poor because of pedal kickback and anti-squat. We wanted to go for a real race-ready enduro bike, so we had to improve our uphill performance a lot." While this may seem counter-intuitive for a bike that is meant to come alive when you aim it downhill, you need to be able to get the power down to stand any chance of being competitive when racing. This meant ditching the heart of the old bike, their Virtual Pivot Kinematic (VPK) system and using the floating shock technology they had recently introduced with their 120mm travel bike.

Roman explains that with the fully-floating design they could "fine-tune the anti-squat with the main pivot location... and we have the advantage that we can then use the upper linkage to fine-tune the kinematics independent of the anti-squat ratio." The intentions of this bike become more clear when you look at how it behaves under braking. The VPK system on the previous bike was a virtual pivot system, not so different from a Maestro or DW Link bike, which means that the suspension performance could be separated from the braking influence. By switching to the full-floater design, they are essentially switching to a single-pivot, which means the braking will have a much greater influence on the suspension performance. Roman clarifies this, acknowledging that "there is a little bit of locking under braking. From a racing point of view, it is possible to deal with this issue, but to have a bike that doesn't pedal well is much more of a disadvantage. You have to find a compromise between pedalling and downhill performance."



Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
The initial drawings of the One-Sixty taking shape.



By moving from a horizontal to a vertically-mounted shock came new possibilities for frame design, too, and brought about a number of really significant benefits. Firstly, it helped them create the kinematic they were looking for, they felt that with the old design they were going to have to make compromises they didn't want to make. With this new layout, Roman explains, "You lower the centre of gravity because you can move the shock to a lower position in the frame. You get a really low centre of gravity, which is very good for cornering and stability. From the structural side, with the full-floater design the forces are concentrated the rocker pivot and the main pivot. Therefore, the toptube doesn't have to withstand the forces from the shock through a compression. This means that the toptube can be lighter, because if the shock were mounted to it you would have to add some reinforcement so it could withstand those forces."

Having the toptube separated from the suspension forces also meant they could be more creative with the design, adding a huge bend just ahead of the seattube to significantly lower the standover of the bike. It is thanks to the new generation of metric shocks and the trunion mount that this is possible. "The current shock is 205mm eye-to-eye with 62.5mm stroke, in comparison a standard mount shock would, which would be the comparable model with 225mm eye-to-eye for the same stroke," says Roman. "Also, the trunion mount was very important to us because this design has the benefit of being able to use bearings at the top shock mount. They're integrated into the rocker link, and therefore the friction is reduced compared to a standard bushing." Another benefit of this design is that it leaves most of the front triangle free, which means there is plenty of space to fit a full-sized water bottle in there, regardless of what shock you run.

Like many longer travel bikes released in the last year or so, Merida opted to remove front derailleur compatibility from the frame. Without the need to accommodate one they could widen the main pivot significantly to make the frame stiffer. This choice also helped them achieve their desired climbing performance, as Roman sets out, "with one-by, you can really fine-tune your main pivot location and your anti-squat ratio with it. If you have the two-by option you always have to compromise, which chainring is the most important? The bigger or the smaller one?" As such, the One-Sixty is designed around a 34 tooth ring, which they feel is a perfect companion for the SRAM Eagle group that their high-end version of this bike comes with.


Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
From the initial drawings the design becomes a 3D model, a rapid prototype then finally an alloy prototype for testing.



One question that jumps out when you're talking to Merida about this bike is; why are world-renowned aluminium specialists launching their flagship bike in carbon? "Freedom of design" is the simple answer from Roman. "With carbon, you can achieve the frame design you want. Also, you have to keep in mind that with the big tubing we're using on this enduro bike you have to keep an eye on weight. Carbon was, therefore, the natural choice because we wanted to have a really competitive bike on the weight side of things."

When it comes to weight saving, it is clear that working with carbon has been a learning process for Merida. Their One-Twenty was their first high-end carbon mountain bike and if you look closely at the dropout and rear pivots you can clearly see the evolution. The dropout itself it smaller, because as a forged metal piece it is relatively heavy, so for this bike they worked to reduce the size of that piece as much as possible. There are subtle details that make a big difference, like the location of the pivot. Roman explains that "by reducing the distance between the rear axle and the pivot between the chainstay and the seatstay you reduce the force in this area, so we no longer needed a brace as we did on the One-Twenty." There are other details too – on this bike the brake has moved from the seat stay to the chainstay, which again reduces the size of the forged parts needed, which again brings the weight down.



Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
Merida have an extensive in-house testing facility in Stuttgart where they can put their new designs through all kinds of pain to make sure that they are tough enough for the job.



However, there is one area where weight considerations were set to one side and that is in the hardware for the linkage. Aside from the standard bushing at the base of the shock, everything on the One Sixty runs on bearings, not bushings, which should be a pleasing note for anyone who rides a lot in muddy conditions. "On the bearing side we use standard bearings everywhere and the main pivot uses two rows of bearings to make this area stiffer. It also reduces play, because every single bearing has a little bit of play, but by using two rows we can reduce this."



Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
The prototypes are put through their paces by Merida staff, who are a keen group of decent riders and make sure the bikes are thoroughly abused before the designs are sent to production.




Throughout the bike, there are little touches. One that Roman is especially proud of are the ports for the cable routing – the smart entry system. "We introduced this in 2016 and now we use it in all our carbon mountain bikes, it means we have a big entry which helps with cable routing during assembly, but they then clamp at the exit to reduce rattling when you are riding."

Altogether this adds up to a bike we described as a "worthy contender for any enduro rider's shortlist" when we reviewed the bike at the start of last year. Sure, Merida may not be a name on many gravity riders lips right now (and there are no plans to launch this bike in the US, unfortunately), but if they keep making bikes like the One Sixty, it looks like Merida is a name worth paying attention to.



Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg

Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
Magstadt Germany January 2017. Photo by Matt Wragg
The finished product...



114 Comments

  • + 82
 One should mention that Merida owns the majority share of Specialized... that's probably why they won't sell in the US
  • - 59
flag chillrider199 (Feb 3, 2018 at 8:15) (Below Threshold)
 Do you have proof of this?
  • + 44
 @chillrider199: It's common knowledge that Merida bought 49% of Specialized in 2001.

It was in all the trade publications at the time. It's no secret.
  • + 5
 @MisterChow: I thought it was 51... good to know.
  • + 4
 Odd then they opt NOT to use the Horst-link. They probably could have before the patent expired, but not that everyone is switching to it, it makes it even more peculiar.
  • + 20
 According to Merida they divested and no longer have that kind of shareholding.
  • - 61
flag chillrider199 (Feb 3, 2018 at 11:15) (Below Threshold)
 @MisterChow: Well, in 2001 I was 3 years old...
  • + 17
 That’s not a Trek...?
  • + 8
 @ReformedRoadie: I always wondered if Specialized felt bound to using the Horst-link over the years because they so aggressively defended and prosecuted the patent (that they purchased from Amp-Research.)
  • + 13
 @MisterChow: It's simply because they feel they have the best suspension design. Just like Santa Cruz feels they have the best in VPP, and Pivot feels they have the best in DWL, and Evil feels they have the best in Delta...and so on. In riding there is so little difference between them that a solid argument can be made for every single one.
  • + 1
 After this shocking news I cannot buy specialized anymore.. well Transition will do Smile
  • + 5
 @TheRaven: you hit the nail on the head. Implementation makes a far greater difference than the design.
  • + 2
 @mattwragg: Interesting, any link?
  • - 3
 @splsce: Looks like a Giant to me.
  • + 1
 @TheRaven: I would bet that the design engineers know what is the 'best' design but marketing normally have the biggest influence on what medium and large companies produce. That's where working for a small company can be very rewarding if they have the budget.
  • + 3
 @shaborider: hahaha, that went over a few heads lol
  • + 2
 @mattwragg: If that's the case, someone at Specialized should update their own Wikipedia's page
  • + 1
 @TheRaven: Actually, I think there is quite a bit of difference between the suspension designs despite
how much homogeneity one believes there is.
  • + 2
 49% is not the majority share... Mike Sinyard still owns the majority of the company.
  • + 3
 It was 49%... 17 years ago. And it was only becasue Sinyard needed "fresh money"... now this % is less then 10% if Im right? Anyone?
  • + 0
 Pinkbike Community needs to smoke a wholw pot farm. I got my ass pounded with downvotes. Damn. I dont know why too? Haha
  • + 2
 @hellbelly: To clarify - yes there is a TON of different between the DESIGNS. But in terms of what they actually do on the trail, the differences that reviewers and even some PB members make into huge life-changing attributes are really very very minute.

Anti-squat suspensions like VPP/DWL/Delta climb a better than four-bar, but it's a very small difference, and gets smaller with each new refinement of four-bar. I never touched the climb position on the shock on my '14 Enduro, and only used the trail position on really long packed dirt/gravel road climbs. Otherwise it was perfectly fine climbing. Conversely, the harshness of VPP and DWL on descents under braking can be a nuisance in a select few situations but even coming from the ultra-plush Enduro, my Carbine still feels fantastic on descents. The differences in suspension are just not enough to make or break a bike choice.
  • + 1
 @TheRaven: VPP harsh under braking... lol. My V10 is the smoothest braking bike I have ever ridden. You obviously never rode or raced a 224. My Nomad mk2 with push link is also very smooth. The V10 in 8.5" mode is better under braking than the Turner dhr was. Both fantastic bikes but the v10 is considerably faster down a hill. (I have raced both).
  • + 1
 @betsie: Opinions dude. Different terrain, different weather, different setup on bike. Maybe his was harsh. But yeah, every bike performs differently under every rider.
  • + 1
 @betsie: That may be, as you and I have certainly ridden different bikes. I'm not trying to argue subjective feel. I'm trying to stick with objective suspension traits. Every suspension is a trade off - good four-bar designs have the ability to be "fully open" with absolutely no pedal/braking influence while good VPP designs trade away that ability for unhindered climbing (i.e. no need for overdamping to maintain pedaling platform). This is why the suspension debate rages so aggressively - different riders prioritize suspension traits differently.

My original point is that the whole thing is overblown. The differences are very minor, i've ridden so many different designs and the only one I actually didn't like is ABP (Trek). It doesn't climb as well as VPP and it doesn't descend as well as FSR...and it doesn't party like DWL. It's just blah.
  • + 2
 @TheRaven: defo not an argument. It's great to get other riders perspectives.

The mk2 nomad stock was horrible for climbing due to the excessive kick back on square edges. Then push industries made the push link which transformed the bike into a climbing weapon for technical trails. Never going to be a rocket up a climb compared to the DW link (I had a 6 point and still have an Azure).
You are right in that suspension is a compromise of different traits.
For Dh as a results based sport and for me (with a little history, time,conditions and slight track changes).
Fort William
Santacruz VP free 4.59
224 4.50
Sunday 5.31
V10.3 5.19
Scalp 5.27
Dhr 5.20
Nevery raced my pulse there
V10.5 5.05
The Dhr fastest time of the day was 2 seconds faster than the 10.5 time.

Perceived performance and actual track performance can be 2 different things. I have found some bikes that feel really fast (224) only felt fast because they were all over the place. Last year's 5.05 felt like I was holding the bike back still. More to come. Even at 43 Smile
  • + 1
 @betsie: There are also a lot more variables in your times. Not only are those bikes differing in suspension designs and revisions but also in geometry. More aggressive geometry may give you more confidence to attack sections that made you nervous before. So your better times may have nothing to do with the suspension, or they may have everything to do with the suspension.

But yeah, even though I feel my Enduro descended a tiny bit better than my Carbine, I can't guarantee that I was faster on it.
  • + 1
 @splsce: it does seem similar to treks full floater, but there are some differences there too
  • + 1
 @TheRaven: I will be honest... the V10.5 is significantly better than the rest of the bikes. Main variable with the V10.5 is performance. It just works. No pinkibike BS. I have been riding and racing for long enough at a good enough level to know what truly work's. The V10.5 isn't without its flaws but it's a fast and consistent bike. Anyone who knows me on here know I know what I am talking about, I am not a keyboard warrior.
  • + 1
 @chillrider199: yes they do perform different under every rider. Yes it's opinion with the backup of race results and performances. I love Pink bike. You can be have many regional medals and medal nationals when you race them but it means nothing over the power of the keyboard. Smile
  • + 19
 I love these kinds kinds of articles! I'm studying manufacturing engineering, so seeing the process behind bike brands is super interesting.

I always try and get a peek at what engineering software is being used to design bikes. Couldn't quite tell here, looks like some Key Shot, Rhino, and Autodesk something?? Curious what parts of the process Rhino is used for if any? The flowy linkages?
  • + 4
 Looks like they also use Creo for the solid modelling
  • + 6
 Check out Linkage - www.bikechecker.com
  • + 13
 @davemays Rhino can be better for conceptual design, but making production model in it would be like making contruction drawings for a building in SketchUp or asking Stephen Hawking to sing Adele’s Hello.
  • + 3
 Im in school for mechanical/aero engineering as well as physics, and i too very much enjoy these types of articles. Getting a peak at the testing SRAM does in the recent DUB article made me envious of the engineers that also get to ride their products.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: Hey! Don't knock Hawkings pipes man... The dude can whale in auto tune!
  • + 4
 Solidworks and Creo are widely used. Both packages are much more affordable compared to more premium automotive grade softwares like NX and Catia.
  • + 11
 @blodadtand: i hate creo
  • + 3
 Here you can see what Yeti is looking for in a design engineer: lukescircle.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Yeti-Design-Engineer.pdf
  • + 1
 Creo is a very mysterious and powerful device and it's mystery is exceeded only by it's power.
  • + 1
 I wonder if mechanical engineers brag about which software is bestest and they can’t believe how can someone use something else, just like architects do Big Grin
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Yes they do. All of the Chief Mech Designers who have come into the company I work for have so much to say about what package they've been using for the past 15 years and it can do "this, this and this" and it's so much easier. Now they're here, using Autodesk Inventor and tell me how it's shit and it doesn't do things right and blah blah blah.

Reality is; each package is a slightly different tool used to do the same job. It all boils down to what you prefer rather than what's actually better. Like a spanner vs a socket/ratchet. Different tool; same outcome.

I personally have no preference. I learnt CATIA at first, but now I'm using Inventor. I have used Solidworks briefly. They're all okay. Can't speak for CREO/Pro E or NX though.
  • + 4
 Who doesn't love a good nerd-out on the tools used.

@haroman666: Having used Creo, Catia and dabbled with Inventor I'd agree they're ultimately a much-of-a-muchness for producing models, the differences come with the power of the bolt-on functionalities.
The important thing for anyone looking to improve / get into the industry, I'd say is understanding how to build stable and time efficient models (construction geometry is your friend)
  • + 17
 If they changed the "D" in their name to "C", they could sell a boatload in the US. Just sayin'
  • + 13
 You could have recieved an even greater response if you had mentioned that in NZ, you can get one of these fully built for essentially half of the price of a Santacruz frame...
  • + 3
 This is true. Are you gonna ring Ferrari and tell them their cars are overpriced because Mercedes Benz make a car too and it's lots cheaper??
  • + 1
 @MitchThompson89: yeah, but Ferrari is italian. If something italian is well made, some mistake happen there... Smile Smile
  • + 11
 Poople used to mock about Merdia, picturing them as supermarket bikes .... look at this... its as serious as trek giant or devinci .. ! props
  • + 4
 I had a one-forty and the aluminium frame build was top quality. Glad to see they an internal cable rattle fix, used to drive me nuts.
  • + 3
 @tremeer023: 140mm built up light, the new one is vv good apparently
  • + 4
 @tremeer023: those cable minges sure look good!
  • + 2
 Also, Merida have made bikes for many other brands for donkeys years. Really good reliable factory and skill set. They just never pushed their own range, so as not to tread on their customers feet I think. But yeah, great looking sled, probably at decent coin too.
  • + 8
 Merdia... Freudian slip?
  • + 1
 @cunning-linguist: they use a hydroforming process for their alu frames. You could tell the quality was in line with their road frames. I'd definitely buy another Merida frame (the Big Trail bike looks interesting).
  • + 1
 @BenPea: put1 le lapsus Big Grin et **poople au début abusé ... lol
  • + 2
 @cunning-linguist: Aye, and the housing quims look good anaw.
  • + 2
 @RedBurn: ha! j'avais même pas vu, énorme !!
  • + 1
 I love how you're using a nobody brand like devinci to compare to one of the longest standing industry powerhouses that there is! Merida is probably second only to Giant and maybe Shimano in the bicycle industry. Is cool that they are putting some effort into their house brand though.
  • + 7
 Am I the only one that wants to play with that 3d printed model really, really bad? Big Grin

Nice looking bike though too ????????
  • + 5
 I was able to play with a 3D printed version of a Bold Linkin Trail before. Feels very light and like you could break it any second.
  • + 5
 Nice pictures Wow it's an aggressive design A monster of a bike The old version was so old This one is so much better Blah blah blah No marketing hype here The pictures are very cool mind you
  • + 4
 Trek just moved away from the full float system. Would think their (Trek) R&D would have extracted all they could out of that design. Wonder what Meridia think they can do with it?
  • + 9
 You have to change your design every product cycle or two in order to catch the attention of the masses
  • + 2
 “The current shock is 205mm eye-to-eye with 62.5mm stroke, in comparison a standard mount shock would, which would be the comparable model with 225mm eye-to-eye for the same stroke," says Roman

What happened to the good old 216x64???
  • + 14
 They changed it to 215.99x63.99
  • + 1
 @JackStephen: good one!
  • + 3
 There was never a 216*64.

The stock sizes were 216*63 and 222*70
  • + 1
 Same difference ???? that’s what I meant @jaame:
  • + 1
 I'm on number 2 of this bike. Living in Canada up untill 4 years ago, I had never heard of these. I've been very pleased with the value on this sled. If anyone in North America would like to own a barely used frame(6 months riding) check out my profile pics and send me a message. Going cheap cheap.
  • + 1
 Looks like a steal. Will it take 26" non-boost wheels, a non tapered steerer, a BB from circa WWII, a front mech... and will it swim to Europe if you give a good push at the port?
  • + 1
 I bought a Merida One-Twenty in 2012. I had never heard of Merida before that but was impressed by the good looks and solid specs at a very reasonalble price. While other 6 years old bikes meanwhile look old fashioned, my Merida still looks good.I did never regret buying it. In fact, I'm using it again after cracking the frame of my 2016 carbon rig. Just upgraded it with a dropper post.
  • + 3
 It's probably of zero consequence to anybody, by I'm picking up a one forty next weekend and I'm soooooooo excited eeeeeeks
  • + 3
 Please stop with pressfit and make 160 mm 29er ????
  • + 2
 People critisizing should know that most of known bike brands have their frames made by Merida or Giant
  • + 2
 UMF was a line from Merida too which was more about gravity riding. So it is not that they are completely new to this.
  • + 1
 Good article with discussion on one by, shock length, cable routing, carbon, etc but would have liked a little something on why 27.5 vs 29.
  • + 2
 i try one-sixty this summer in a bike convention in Ruhpolding in Germany, trust me this bike is a simple enduro weapon!!
  • + 1
 @davemays Rhino is used for the surfacing of the product - connecting the spots between the linkage points with a beautiful form. The Autodesk software is autocad.
  • + 1
 Given the layout of the production drawing I would probably go with Autodesk Inventor rather than just AutoCAD. At least I would in my office.
  • + 1
 @OnkleJoachim: That's the AutoCad icon, Inventor is an I, I use it daily.
  • + 3
 Merida, you had my curiosity. But now you have my attention.
  • + 1
 The problem with a bent seat tube is that you can't fully slam a long travel dropper post.
  • + 1
 all looks dandy fellas but I'm not buying a carbon enduro bike, where's the real one?
  • + 1
 They thought, calculated, thought more, and when it was ready a scoott spark came out
  • + 2
 Can you just make it look like a Remedy?
Okey dokey.
  • + 1
 I still have my old one fifty as backup bike, super trustworthy frame
  • + 1
 The only full suspension Merida I was ever aware or is the stormbringer
  • + 1
 am i the only one who is thinking this looks like treks suspension tech?
  • + 1
 That's a good looking bike. Probably the only one I'd ride.
  • + 1
 Always neet to see the behind the scenes stuff, thanks PB
  • + 1
 That is a pre - Atherton Trek bicycle , tell me I am wrong
  • + 3
 Except the rearmost pivot isn't at the wheel axle.
  • + 2
 Looks like a Session lol
  • + 1
 Do they also make mongoose? Sure looks like it
  • + 1
 I'm not sure about that. One thing the article doesn't make clear is that Merida does not make bikes, per se. Merida is the brand of the parent company.
  • + 1
 saw one in israel a month ago. nice looking bike
  • + 2
 TREK Lingkage
  • - 1
 If by "tons of testing" you mean take a Scott Genius front end and slap a Remedy rear end on there, then yeah.
  • + 0
 Headtube looks like something familiar ... YT One-Sixty ?
  • + 1
 Sharp looking bike
  • + 1
 looks great.
  • + 1
 Merida in the 2018 ews
  • + 3
 Spaniard Toni Ferreiro raced the One-Sixty last season at most of the EWS stops, and he'll race for Merida again in 2018, full EWS calendar.
  • + 1
 Good looking' rig...
  • - 3
 why build new bike have face Transition, Trek and many brands?????
  • - 1
 But is it a 29+?
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2018. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.108228
Mobile Version of Website